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Search results for: Raft

USA-IMMIGRATION/BORDER
RTXA44BH
March 05, 2021
Smugglers use a raft to transport migrant families and children across the Rio Grande River into the...
Penitas, UNITED STATES
Smugglers use raft to transport migrant families and children into the United States from Mexico in Penitas,...
Smugglers use a raft to transport migrant families and children across the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in Penitas, Texas, U.S., March 5, 2021. Picture taken with a drone. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-IMMIGRATION/BORDER
RTXA448Z
March 05, 2021
Families with children walk along a migrant trail after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United...
Penitas, UNITED STATES
Families walk along migrant trail after crossing Rio Grande River into U.S. from Mexico on raft in Penitas,...
Families with children walk along a migrant trail after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico on a raft in Penitas, Texas, U.S., March 5, 2021. Picture taken with a drone. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
USA-IMMIGRATION/BORDER
RTXA448Y
March 05, 2021
Families and children walk along a trail as a smuggler on a raft transports more migrants across the...
Penitas, UNITED STATES
Migrants walk along a trail as a smuggler transports more migrants across the Rio Grande River into the...
Families and children walk along a trail as a smuggler on a raft transports more migrants across the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in Penitas, Texas, U.S., March 5, 2021. Picture taken with a drone. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
USA-IMMIGRATION/BORDER
RTXA4441
March 05, 2021
Smugglers use rafts to transport migrant families and children across the Rio Grande River into the United...
Penitas, UNITED STATES
Smugglers use rafts to transport migrant families and children into the United States from Mexico in...
Smugglers use rafts to transport migrant families and children across the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in Penitas, Texas, U.S., March 5, 2021. Picture taken with a drone. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
USA-IMMIGRATION/BORDER
RTXA4440
March 05, 2021
Migrant families and children climb the banks of the Rio Grande River into the United States as smugglers...
Penitas, UNITED STATES
Migrants climb the banks of the Rio Grande River into the United States as smugglers on rafts prepare...
Migrant families and children climb the banks of the Rio Grande River into the United States as smugglers on rafts prepare to return to Mexico in Penitas, Texas, U.S., March 5, 2021. Picture taken with a drone. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-IMMIGRATION/BORDER
RTXA443T
March 05, 2021
Migrant families and children climb the banks of the Rio Grande River into the United States as smugglers...
Penitas, UNITED STATES
Migrants climb the banks of the Rio Grande River into the United States as smugglers on rafts prepare...
Migrant families and children climb the banks of the Rio Grande River into the United States as smugglers on rafts prepare to return to Mexico in Penitas, Texas, U.S., March 5, 2021. Image taken with a drone. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
INDONESIA-FLOODS/
RTX9HONK
February 18, 2021
Youths transport an elderly woman using a makeshift raft in an area affected by floods following heavy...
Jakarta, Indonesia
Youths transport an elderly woman using a makeshift raft in an area affected by floods following heavy...
Youths transport an elderly woman using a makeshift raft in an area affected by floods following heavy rains in Jakarta, Indonesia, February 18, 2021. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana
USA-IMMIGRATION/CARAVAN
RTX8NBSA
January 19, 2021
People cross the Suchiate river on a raft, the natural border between Mexico and Guatemala, as Mexican...
CIUDAD HIDALGO, Mexico
Mexican authorities set up an operation at the Suchiate river to prevent a migrant caravan of Central...
People cross the Suchiate river on a raft, the natural border between Mexico and Guatemala, as Mexican authorities guard the border to prevent a migrant caravan of Central Americans from entering, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico January 18, 2021. REUTERS/Isabel Mateos
USA-IMMIGRATION/CARAVAN
RTX8NBS2
January 19, 2021
People cross the Suchiate river on a raft, the natural border between Mexico and Guatemala, as Mexican...
CIUDAD HIDALGO, Mexico
Mexican authorities set up an operation at the Suchiate river to prevent a migrant caravan of Central...
People cross the Suchiate river on a raft, the natural border between Mexico and Guatemala, as Mexican authorities guard the border to prevent a migrant caravan of Central Americans from entering, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico January 18, 2021. REUTERS/Isabel Mateos
GLOBAL-POY/2020
RTX8AAUW
November 18, 2020
A group of migrants climb up the banks of the Rio Grande river after crossing into the United States...
LOS EBANOS, UNITED STATES
Pictures of the Year
A group of migrants climb up the banks of the Rio Grande river after crossing into the United States from Mexico on a raft, in Los Ebanos, Texas, U.S., May 8, 2019. REUTERS/Adrees Latif/File Photo TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "GLOBAL POY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2020 PACKAGES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9A
October 15, 2020
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E99
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E98
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E96
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E95
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E94
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E92
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E91
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E90
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Z
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Y
October 15, 2020
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8X
October 15, 2020
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8W
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8P
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8M
October 15, 2020
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8L
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-CASES
RTX7SX19
September 01, 2020
Volunteers wearing protective face masks stand on a makeshift raft with idols of the Hindu god Ganesh,...
Mumbai, India
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mumbai
Volunteers wearing protective face masks stand on a makeshift raft with idols of the Hindu god Ganesh, the deity of prosperity, before they are immersed in a pond during the last day of the Ganesh Chaturthi festival, amidst the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mumbai, India, September 1, 2020. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas
CHINA-WEATHER/FLOODS-DAMS
RTX7L31Q
July 22, 2020
Tourists ride on rafts along the Yulong river in Yangshuo county, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China...
Yangshuo, China
Tourists ride on rafts along the Yulong river in Yangshuo
Tourists ride on rafts along the Yulong river in Yangshuo county, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China July 17, 2020. Picture taken July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Thomas Suen
CHINA-WEATHER/FLOODS-DAMS
RTX7L31I
July 22, 2020
A man fixes a raft for tourists near the Yulong river in Yangshuo county, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region,...
Yangshuo, China
Man fixes a raft for tourists near the Yulong river in Yangshuo
A man fixes a raft for tourists near the Yulong river in Yangshuo county, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China July 17, 2020. Picture taken July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Thomas Suen
INDIA-FLOODS/
RTX7KRVD
July 20, 2020
A woman carries a bag of fodder for her cattle after transporting it on a makeshift raft through a flooded...
Morigaon, India
A woman carries a bag of fodder for her cattle after transporting it on a makeshift raft through a flooded...
A woman carries a bag of fodder for her cattle after transporting it on a makeshift raft through a flooded area in Morigaon district, in the northeastern state of Assam, India, July 20, 2020. REUTERS/David Talukdar
INDIA-FLOODS/
RTX7KRTF
July 20, 2020
A boy transports a pot on a makeshift raft through a flooded area in Morigaon district, in the northeastern...
Morigaon, India
A boy transports a pot on a makeshift raft through a flooded area in Morigaon district
A boy transports a pot on a makeshift raft through a flooded area in Morigaon district, in the northeastern state of Assam, India, July 20, 2020. REUTERS/David Talukdar
BANGLADESH-FLOODS/
RTX7KGRJ
July 18, 2020
Children are seen on an improvised makeshift raft on a flooded area in Jamalpur, Bangladesh, July 18,...
Jamalpur, Bangladesh
Children are seen on an improvised makeshift raft on a flooded area in Jamalpur
Children are seen on an improvised makeshift raft on a flooded area in Jamalpur, Bangladesh, July 18, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
BANGLADESH-FLOODS/
RTS3KDDD
July 17, 2020
A flood-affected man rides on a makeshift raft after his house got flooded, in Bogura, Bangladesh, July...
BOGURA, Bangladesh
A flood-affected man rides on a makeshift raft after his house got flooded, in Bogura
A flood-affected man rides on a makeshift raft after his house got flooded, in Bogura, Bangladesh, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
BANGLADESH-FLOODS/
RTS3KDDC
July 17, 2020
A flood-affected man rides on a makeshift raft after his house got flooded, in Bogura, Bangladesh, July...
BOGURA, Bangladesh
A flood-affected man rides on a makeshift raft after his house got flooded, in Bogura
A flood-affected man rides on a makeshift raft after his house got flooded, in Bogura, Bangladesh, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
BANGLADESH-FLOODS/
RTS3KDB6
July 17, 2020
Flood-affected people are seen on a makeshift raft and a boat after their houses got flooded, in Bogura,...
BOGURA, Bangladesh
Flood-affected people are seen on a makeshift raft and a boat after their houses got flooded, in Bogura...
Flood-affected people are seen on a makeshift raft and a boat after their houses got flooded, in Bogura, Bangladesh, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
BANGLADESH-FLOODS/
RTS3KD99
July 17, 2020
A flood-affected woman sits on an improvised makeshift raft as she poses for a picture, in Bogura, Bangladesh,...
BOGURA, Bangladesh
A flood-affected woman sits on an improvised makeshift raft as she poses for a picture, in Bogura
A flood-affected woman sits on an improvised makeshift raft as she poses for a picture, in Bogura, Bangladesh, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
BANGLADESH-FLOODS/
RTS3KD75
July 17, 2020
Flood-affected people are seen on a makeshift raft and a boat after their houses got flooded, in Bogura,...
BOGURA, Bangladesh
Flood-affected people are seen on a makeshift raft and a boat after their houses got flooded, in Bogura...
Flood-affected people are seen on a makeshift raft and a boat after their houses got flooded, in Bogura, Bangladesh, July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
BANGLADESH-FLOODS/
RTS3KBN2
July 17, 2020
Flood-affected people are seen on a makeshift raft and a boat after their houses got flooded, in Bogura,...
BOGURA, Bangladesh
Flood-affected people are seen on a makeshift raft and a boat after their houses got flooded, in Bogura...
Flood-affected people are seen on a makeshift raft and a boat after their houses got flooded, in Bogura, Bangladesh July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
BANGLADESH-FLOODS/
RTS3KBMJ
July 17, 2020
Children sail on a makeshift raft after the land was flooded in Bogura, Bangladesh July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad...
BOGURA, Bangladesh
Children sail on a makeshift raft after the land was flooded in Bogura
Children sail on a makeshift raft after the land was flooded in Bogura, Bangladesh July 17, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain
INDIA-FLOODS/
RTS3GJXB
June 29, 2020
Villagers row a makeshift raft through a flooded field to reach a safer place at the flood-affected Mayong...
MAYONG, India
Villagers row a makeshift raft through a flooded field to reach a safer place at the flood-affected Mayong...
Villagers row a makeshift raft through a flooded field to reach a safer place at the flood-affected Mayong village in Morigaon district, in the northeastern state of Assam, India, June 29, 2020. REUTERS/Anuwar Hazarika TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-REOPENS
RTX7J5NC
May 15, 2020
Visitors climb the ramp with a raft to ride a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the...
Mesa, UNITED STATES
Golfland Sunsplash water park after COVID-19 restrictions eased in Mesa
Visitors climb the ramp with a raft to ride a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions were eased in Mesa, Arizona, U.S. May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin O'Hara
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-REOPENS
RTX7J5NB
May 15, 2020
Visitors climb the ramp with a raft to ride a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the...
Mesa, UNITED STATES
Golfland Sunsplash water park after COVID-19 restrictions eased in Mesa
Visitors climb the ramp with a raft to ride a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions were eased in Mesa, Arizona, U.S. May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin O'Hara
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-REOPENS
RTX7J5M7
May 15, 2020
A guest carries rafts up the ramp to ride a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus...
Mesa, UNITED STATES
Golfland Sunsplash water park after COVID-19 restrictions eased in Mesa
A guest carries rafts up the ramp to ride a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions were eased in Mesa, Arizona, U.S. May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin O'Hara
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-REOPENS
RTX7J5M0
May 15, 2020
Guests smile as their raft hits the pool after riding a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park...
Mesa, UNITED STATES
Golfland Sunsplash water park after COVID-19 restrictions eased in Mesa
Guests smile as their raft hits the pool after riding a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions were eased in Mesa, Arizona, U.S. May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin O'Hara
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-REOPENS
RTX7J5LZ
May 15, 2020
A lifeguard wears a face mask and disinfects rafts at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus...
Mesa, UNITED STATES
Golfland Sunsplash water park after COVID-19 restrictions eased in Mesa
A lifeguard wears a face mask and disinfects rafts at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions were eased in Mesa, Arizona, U.S. May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin O'Hara
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-REOPENS
RTX7J5KM
May 15, 2020
Guests carry rafts to ride a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus disease...
Mesa, UNITED STATES
Golfland Sunsplash water park after COVID-19 restrictions eased in Mesa
Guests carry rafts to ride a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions were eased in Mesa, Arizona, U.S. May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin O'Hara
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-REOPENS
RTX7J5KK
May 15, 2020
Guests carry a raft up the stairs to a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus...
Mesa, UNITED STATES
Golfland Sunsplash water park after COVID-19 restrictions eased in Mesa
Guests carry a raft up the stairs to a water slide at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions were eased in Mesa, Arizona, U.S. May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin O'Hara
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-REOPENS
RTX7J5JW
May 15, 2020
A lifeguard disinfects a raft before passing it to guests at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the...
Mesa, UNITED STATES
Golfland Sunsplash water park after some COVID-19 restrictions eased in Mesa
A lifeguard disinfects a raft before passing it to guests at Golfland Sunsplash water park after the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions were eased in Mesa, Arizona, U.S. May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin O'Hara
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/OCEAN PARK
RTX7IUU2
May 14, 2020
An empty raft is seen at the Ocean Park theme park, which is currently closed due to the coronavirus...
Hong Kong, China
An empty raft is seen at the Ocean Park theme park, which is currently closed due to the coronavirus...
An empty raft is seen at the Ocean Park theme park, which is currently closed due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Hong Kong, China May 14, 2020. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/IRELAND
RTX7I0TU
May 08, 2020
People build a raft outside their homes following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19),...
Dublin, Ireland
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Dublin
People build a raft outside their homes following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Dublin, Ireland, May 8, 2020. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/IRELAND
RTX7I0TT
May 08, 2020
People build a raft outside their homes following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19),...
Dublin, Ireland
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Dublin
People build a raft outside their homes following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Dublin, Ireland, May 8, 2020. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne
EARTH-DAY/INDIA-POLLUTION
RTX7EWFX
April 22, 2020
A man rows a makeshift raft in the Yamuna river on the Earth Day, during a lockdown to slow spread of...
New Delhi, India
Spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New Delhi
A man rows a makeshift raft in the Yamuna river on the Earth Day, during a lockdown to slow spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in New Delhi, India, April 22, 2020. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-ELEPHANTS
RTS386V0
April 06, 2020
Bamboo rafts for tourists are seen at an elephant camp closed to tourists due to the nationwide lockdown...
Kanchanaburi, Thailand
No work for Thailand's tourist elephants due nationwide lockdown
Bamboo rafts for tourists are seen at an elephant camp closed to tourists due to the nationwide lockdown to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, in Kanchanaburi, Thailand April 3, 2020. Picture taken April 3, 2020. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND
RTS36LBV
March 19, 2020
A combination picture shows a general view of the go-go bars street Soi Cowboy before and after Thai...
Bangkok, Thailand
A combination picture shows a general view of Soi Cowboy before and after closure of cinemas, bars and...
A combination picture shows a general view of the go-go bars street Soi Cowboy before and after Thai government ordered the closure of cinemas, bars and other entertainment facilities as part of a raft of measures intended to control the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, in Bangkok, Thailand March 17, 2020 (Top) and March 18, 2020 (Bottom). REUTERS/Chalinee Thirasupa
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND
RTS36LB3
March 19, 2020
People sit outside a closed go-go bar at street Soi Cowboy, after Thai government ordered the closure...
Bangkok, Thailand
People sit outside a closed go-go bar at street Soi Cowboy in Bangkok
People sit outside a closed go-go bar at street Soi Cowboy, after Thai government ordered the closure of cinemas, bars and other entertainment facilities as part of a raft of measures intended to control the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, in Bangkok, Thailand March 18, 2020. Picture taken March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND
RTS36LAN
March 19, 2020
A general view of the go-go bars street Soi Cowboy, before Thai government ordered the closure of cinemas,...
Bangkok, Thailand
A general view of the go-go bars street Soi Cowboy in Bangkok
A general view of the go-go bars street Soi Cowboy, before Thai government ordered the closure of cinemas, bars and other entertainment facilities as part of a raft of measures intended to control the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, in Bangkok, Thailand March 17, 2020. Picture taken March 17, 2020. REUTERS/Chalinee Thirasupa
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND
RTS36LAL
March 19, 2020
A general view of the go-go bars street Soi Cowboy, after Thai government ordered the closure of cinemas,...
Bangkok, Thailand
A general view of the go-go bars street Soi Cowboy after in Bangkok
A general view of the go-go bars street Soi Cowboy, after Thai government ordered the closure of cinemas, bars and other entertainment facilities as part of a raft of measures intended to control the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, in Bangkok, Thailand March 18, 2020. Picture taken March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Chalinee Thirasupa
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND
RTS36J5O
March 18, 2020
A go-go bar at street Soi Cowboy is closed after Thai government ordered the closure of cinemas, bars...
Bangkok, Thailand
A go-go bar at street Soi Cowboy is closed after Thai government ordered the closure of cinemas, bars...
A go-go bar at street Soi Cowboy is closed after Thai government ordered the closure of cinemas, bars and other entertainment facilities as part of a raft of measures intended to control the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bangkok, Thailand March 18, 2020. REUTERS/Jorge Silva
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