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Search results for: Rainforest

CLIMATE-CHANGE/FORESTS C
RTXA79ZZ
March 08, 2021
Logging and land conversion, mainly for agriculture, have wiped out 34% of the world's original old-growth...
Brazil
Rainforests are disappearing globally C
Logging and land conversion, mainly for agriculture, have wiped out 34% of the world's original old-growth tropical rainforests and degraded another 30%.
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAV
January 11, 2021
Brazilian forestry student Mateus Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon to check how much...
Curitiba, Brazil
Brazilian rforestry student Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon at the Center of Excellence...
Brazilian forestry student Mateus Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon to check how much climate-warming greenhouse gas a small plot of the rainforest can contain, at the Center of Excellence in Research on Carbon Fixation in Biomass at the Federal University of Parana in Curitiba, Brazil, December 1, 2020. Picture taken Decemer 1, 2020 REUTERS/Rodolfo Buhrer
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAU
January 11, 2021
Brazilian researcher Emmanoella Guarana analyzes material collected in the Amazon to check how much climate-warming...
Curitiba, Brazil
Brazilian researcher Guarana analyzes material collected in the Amazon at the Center of Excellence in...
Brazilian researcher Emmanoella Guarana analyzes material collected in the Amazon to check how much climate-warming greenhouse gas a small plot of the rainforest can contain, at the Center of Excellence in Research on Carbon Fixation in Biomass at the Federal University of Parana in Curitiba, Brazil, December 1, 2020. Picture taken Decemer 1, 2020 REUTERS/Rodolfo Buhrer
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAT
January 11, 2021
Brazilian forestry student Mateus Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon to check how much...
Curitiba, Brazil
Brazilian rforestry student Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon at the Center of Excellence...
Brazilian forestry student Mateus Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon to check how much climate-warming greenhouse gas a small plot of the rainforest can contain, at the Center of Excellence in Research on Carbon Fixation in Biomass at the Federal University of Parana in Curitiba, Brazil, December 1, 2020. Picture taken Decemer 1, 2020 REUTERS/Rodolfo Buhrer
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAS
January 11, 2021
Brazilian forestry student Mateus Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon to check how much...
Curitiba, Brazil
Brazilian forestry student Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon at the Center of Excellence...
Brazilian forestry student Mateus Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon to check how much climate-warming greenhouse gas a small plot of the rainforest can contain, at the Center of Excellence in Research on Carbon Fixation in Biomass at the Federal University of Parana in Curitiba, Brazil, December 1, 2020. Picture taken Decemer 1, 2020 REUTERS/Rodolfo Buhrer
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAQ
January 11, 2021
Brazilian researcher Emmanoella Guarana analyzes material collected in the Amazon to check how much climate-warming...
Curitiba, Brazil
Brazilian researcher Guarana analyzes material collected in the Amazon at the Center of Excellence in...
Brazilian researcher Emmanoella Guarana analyzes material collected in the Amazon to check how much climate-warming greenhouse gas a small plot of the rainforest can contain, at the Center of Excellence in Research on Carbon Fixation in Biomass at the Federal University of Parana in Curitiba, Brazil, December 1, 2020. Picture taken Decemer 1, 2020 REUTERS/Rodolfo Buhrer
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAO
January 11, 2021
Brazilian forestry student Mateus Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon to check how much...
Curitiba, Brazil
Brazilian forestry student Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon at the Center of Excellence...
Brazilian forestry student Mateus Sanquetta separates material collected in the Amazon to check how much climate-warming greenhouse gas a small plot of the rainforest can contain, at the Center of Excellence in Research on Carbon Fixation in Biomass at the Federal University of Parana in Curitiba, Brazil, December 1, 2020. Picture taken Decemer 1, 2020 REUTERS/Rodolfo Buhrer
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAL
January 11, 2021
Antonio Laffayete Silveira, a forestry engineering professor at the Federal University of Rondonia, and...
ITAPUA DO OESTE, Brazil
Silveira, a forestry engineering professor at the Federal University of Rondonia, and botanist Oliveira...
Antonio Laffayete Silveira, a forestry engineering professor at the Federal University of Rondonia, and botanist count smaller plants in a 1-by-1 meter frame on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Jake Spring
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAJ
January 11, 2021
Agronomy engineer Ueliton Pinheiro Januario and Rioterra plant nursery worker Juciney Pinheiro dos Santos...
ITAPUA DO OESTE, Brazil
Agronomy engineer Ueliton Pinheiro Januario and Rioterra plant nursery worker Juciney Pinheiro dos Santos...
Agronomy engineer Ueliton Pinheiro Januario and Rioterra plant nursery worker Juciney Pinheiro dos Santos dig for soil samples while measuring carbon content on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil November 4, 2020. Picture taken November 4, 2020. REUTERS/Jake Spring
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAG
January 11, 2021
Rioterra biologist Alexandre Lima Queiroz marks a tree on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do...
ITAPUA DO OESTE, Brazil
Rioterra biologist Alexandre Lima Queiroz marks a tree on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do...
Rioterra biologist Alexandre Lima Queiroz marks a tree on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil November 4, 2020. Picture taken November 4, 2020. REUTERS/Jake Spring
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAF
January 11, 2021
Rioterra project analyst Iara Barberena, a forestry engineer, measures dead plant matter on a parcel...
ITAPUA DO OESTE, Brazil
Rioterra project analyst Iara Barberena, a forestry engineer, measures dead plant matter on a parcel...
Rioterra project analyst Iara Barberena, a forestry engineer, measures dead plant matter on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil, November 4, 2020. Picture taken November 4, 2020 REUTERS/Jake Spring
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAE
January 11, 2021
Day laborer Ivan Batista Queiroz helps take soil samples while measuring carbon content on a parcel of...
ITAPUA DO OESTE, Brazil
Day laborer Ivan Batista Queiroz helps take soil samples while measuring carbon content on a parcel of...
Day laborer Ivan Batista Queiroz helps take soil samples while measuring carbon content on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil, November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Jake Spring
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOAD
January 11, 2021
Botanist Edilson Consuelo de Oliveira marks a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia...
ITAPUA DO OESTE, Brazil
Botanist Edilson Consuelo de Oliveira marks a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste
Botanist Edilson Consuelo de Oliveira marks a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil November 4, 2020. Picture taken November 4, 2020. REUTERS/Jake Spring
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOA2
January 11, 2021
Carlos Roberto Sanquetta, a forestry engineering professor at the Federal University of Parana, botanist...
ITAPUA DO OESTE, Brazil
Brazilian researchers inspect a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste
Carlos Roberto Sanquetta, a forestry engineering professor at the Federal University of Parana, botanist Edilson Consuelo de Oliveira and Rioterra plant nursery worker Juciney Pinheiro dos Santos inspect a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil, November 4, 2020. Picture taken November 4, 2020. REUTERS/Jake Spring
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOA0
January 11, 2021
Researchers break down a tree to measure its carbon levels on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua...
ITAPUA DO OESTE, Brazil
Researchers break down a tree to measure its carbon levels on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua...
Researchers break down a tree to measure its carbon levels on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Jake Spring
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LOA3
January 11, 2021
Day laborer Ivan Batista Queiroz and forestry student Mateus Sanquetta weigh tree branches on a parcel...
ITAPUA DO OESTE, Brazil
Day laborer Ivan Batista Queiroz and forestry student Mateus Sanquetta weigh tree branches on a parcel...
Day laborer Ivan Batista Queiroz and forestry student Mateus Sanquetta weigh tree branches on a parcel of Amazon rainforest in Itapua do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil November 3, 2020. Picture taken November 3, 2020. REUTERS/Jake Spring
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON
RTX8LNFD
January 11, 2021
Brazilian researchers are measuring how much carbon can be stored in the Amazon rainforest, vital data...
Interactive Content
Amazon jungle lab
Brazilian researchers are measuring how much carbon can be stored in the Amazon rainforest, vital data for controlling global warming and for companies seeking to offset their carbon footprints.
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON C
RTX8LNF4
January 11, 2021
The graphic shows how a group of Brazilian researchers compared the carbon content of native primary...
Brazil
The ABC of carbon measurement in the rainforest C
The graphic shows how a group of Brazilian researchers compared the carbon content of native primary rainforest and naturally regrown replanted-forest to measure the amount greenhouse gas in the rainforest.
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-CARBON C
RTX8LNEY
January 11, 2021
Graphic shows estimates of carbon storage in different fields according to data collected by the University...
Peru
How much carbon do the Amazon rainforests stores? C
Graphic shows estimates of carbon storage in different fields according to data collected by the University of Parana (UFPR) in Brazil
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-PANTANAL
RTX7VGLD
September 14, 2020
A fire has been burning since mid-July in the remote wetlands of west-central Brazil, leaving in its...
POCONE, Brazil
The Wider Image: In Brazil, it's not just the Amazon that's burning. The world's largest wetland is on...
A fire has been burning since mid-July in the remote wetlands of west-central Brazil, leaving in its wake a vast charred desolation bigger than New York City. A team of veterinarians, biologists and local guides arrived in late August to prowl the bumpy dirt road known as the Trans-Pantanal Highway in pickup trucks, looking to save what injured animals they could. Jaguars were wandering the blackened wasteland, they said, starving or going thirsty, with paws burnt to the bone, lungs blackened by smoke. They saw bodies of alligator-like caiman, jaws frozen in silent screams, the last act of creatures desperate to cool off before being consumed by flames. This massive fire is one of thousands of blazes sweeping the Brazilian Pantanal - the world's largest wetland - this year in what climate scientists fear could become a new normal, echoing the rise in climate-driven fires from California to Australia. The Pantanal is smaller and less-known than its famous cousin, the Amazon jungle. But the region's normally abundant waters and strategic location - sandwiched between the rainforest, Brazil's vast grasslands and Paraguay's dry forests - make it a magnet for animals. The fires are now threatening one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on the planet, biologists say. The Pantanal is home to roughly 1,200 vertebrate animal species, including 36 that are threatened with extinction. Across this usually lush landscape of 150,000 square kilometers (57,915 square miles) in Brazil, rare birds flutter and the world's densest population of jaguars roam. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "PANTANAL PEROBELLI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES Matching text: CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-PANTANAL
Wider Image
Wider Image
The mission to save the Amazon's animals
31 PICTURES
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-ANIMALS
RTX7TXOW
September 07, 2020
A road runs through a tract of burnt Amazon jungle near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 14,...
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: The mission to save the Amazon's animals
A road runs through a tract of burnt Amazon jungle near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil, August 14, 2020. Creatures of the Amazon, one of the earth's most biodiverse habitats, face an ever-growing threat as loggers and farms advance further and further into the rainforest. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "BRAZIL ANIMALS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-ANIMALS
RTX7TXOS
September 07, 2020
Smoke billows in a burning area of the Amazon jungle near Apui, Amazonas State, Brazil, August 9, 2020....
APUI, Brazil
The Wider Image: The mission to save the Amazon's animals
Smoke billows in a burning area of the Amazon jungle near Apui, Amazonas State, Brazil, August 9, 2020. Creatures of the Amazon, one of the earth's most biodiverse habitats, face an ever-growing threat as loggers and farms advance further and further into the rainforest. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "BRAZIL ANIMALS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-ANIMALS
RTX7TXNN
September 07, 2020
Xita, a tiny monkey with sad brown eyes, clutches her newborn tight. Both are fighting for their lives....
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: The mission to save the Amazon's animals
Xita, a tiny monkey with sad brown eyes, clutches her newborn tight. Both are fighting for their lives. Vets working at the Clinidog clinic in the Amazon city of Porto Velho believe the mother and baby were run over by a car as they fled fires raging across the world's largest rainforest. "She arrived stressed, screaming and smeared with blood," said Carlos Henrique Tiburcio, the owner of the clinic, as he wrapped the pair in a small, white cloth. Creatures of the Amazon, one of the earth's most biodiverse habitats, face an ever-growing threat as loggers and farms advance further and further into the rainforest. In the dry season ranchers and land speculators set fires to clear deforested woodland for pasture. Blazes can rage out of control, fueled by the swirling wind and dry foliage. Wildlife flee from the smoke and flames. Weak and dying animals arrive at Tiburcio's clinic where four volunteers work tirelessly to save them. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "BRAZIL ANIMALS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-ANIMALS
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES
RTX7Q0GS
August 17, 2020
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches their house in an area of the Amazon rainforest, near...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches their house in an area of the Amazon rainforest, near...
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches their house in an area of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES
RTX7Q0GM
August 17, 2020
Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in an area of Amazon...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in an area of Amazon...
Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in an area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES
RTX7Q0GG
August 17, 2020
Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in area of Amazon...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in area of Amazon...
Rosalino de Oliveira throws water trying protect their house as the fire approaches in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES
RTX7Q0GH
August 17, 2020
Siblings Rosalino de Oliveira and Miraceli de Oliveira try to protect themselves from the smoke as the...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Siblings Rosalino de Oliveira and Miraceli de Oliveira try to protect themselves from the smoke as the...
Siblings Rosalino de Oliveira and Miraceli de Oliveira try to protect themselves from the smoke as the fire approaches their house in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES
RTX7Q0F6
August 17, 2020
A firefighter monitors a spot fire in an area of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State,...
Porto Velho, Brazil
A firefighter monitors a spot fire in an area of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho
A firefighter monitors a spot fire in an area of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES
RTX7Q0EV
August 17, 2020
Miraceli de Oliveira protects herself from the smoke as the fire approaches her house in area of Amazon...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Miraceli de Oliveira protects herself from the smoke as the fire approaches her house in area of Amazon...
Miraceli de Oliveira protects herself from the smoke as the fire approaches her house in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES
RTX7Q0DG
August 17, 2020
A firefighter monitors a spot fire in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil...
Porto Velho, Brazil
A firefighter monitors a spot fire in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho
A firefighter monitors a spot fire in area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES
RTX7Q0D8
August 17, 2020
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches her house in an area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches her house in an area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto...
Miraceli de Oliveira reacts as the fire approaches her house in an area of Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/FIRES
RTX7PNRB
August 14, 2020
An aerial view shows logs cut from the Amazon rainforest near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August...
Porto Velho, Brazil
An aerial view shows logs cut from the Amazon rainforest near Porto Velho, Rondonia State
An aerial view shows logs cut from the Amazon rainforest near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 14, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
Isolated Amazon tribe fears coronavirus infection
27 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
RTX7HV10
May 08, 2020
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused...
Manaus, Brazil
The Wider Image: In the Amazon, an indigenous nurse volunteers in coronavirus fight
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused to leave his home on the outskirts of the Amazon rainforest's biggest city. It took a stern word from a trained nurse in his community to convince him he would die if he refused a ride with her to the emergency room. Vanderlecia Ortega dos Santos, or Vanda to her neighbors, has volunteered to provide the only frontline care protecting her indigenous community of 700 families from the COVID-19 outbreak ravaging the Brazilian city of Manaus. It is an uphill battle. The ramshackle settlement of descendants from 35 different tribes, called Parque das Tribos, lacks plumbing and electricity in most homes. Ambulances regularly refuse to pick up the seriously ill because there is no public health clinic nearby. As the coronavirus pandemic has begun spreading across Brazil, indigenous people who live in and around cities have been caught in a dangerous limbo. The country's indigenous health service, Sesai, focuses its resources on those living on tribal reservations. Sesai has reported 10 indigenous deaths from the pandemic on native lands, but indigenous umbrella organization APIB estimated this week it has taken the life of at least 18 indigenous Brazilians if fatalities in urban areas are counted. The real number of cases in often remote villages across Brazil's vast hinterland is difficult to ascertain. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS INDIGENOUS NURSE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
RTX7HRRY
May 07, 2020
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused...
Manaus, Brazil
The Wider Image: In the Amazon, an indigenous nurse volunteers in coronavirus fight
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused to leave his home on the outskirts of the Amazon rainforest's biggest city. It took a stern word from a trained nurse in his community to convince him he would die if he refused a ride with her to the emergency room. Vanderlecia Ortega dos Santos, or Vanda to her neighbors, has volunteered to provide the only frontline care protecting her indigenous community of 700 families from the COVID-19 outbreak ravaging the Brazilian city of Manaus. It is an uphill battle. The ramshackle settlement of descendants from 35 different tribes, called Parque das Tribos, lacks plumbing and electricity in most homes. Ambulances regularly refuse to pick up the seriously ill because there is no public health clinic nearby. As the coronavirus pandemic has begun spreading across Brazil, indigenous people who live in and around cities have been caught in a dangerous limbo. The country's indigenous health service, Sesai, focuses its resources on those living on tribal reservations. Sesai has reported 10 indigenous deaths from the pandemic on native lands, but indigenous umbrella organization APIB estimated this week it has taken the life of at least 18 indigenous Brazilians if fatalities in urban areas are counted. The real number of cases in often remote villages across Brazil's vast hinterland is difficult to ascertain. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS INDIGENOUS NURSE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT
RTS37E01
March 27, 2020
A sawmill worker processes trees extracted from the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil...
HUMAITA, Brazil
A sawmill worker processes trees extracted from the Amazon rainforest near Humaita
A sawmill worker processes trees extracted from the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 19, 2019. Picture taken August 19, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT
RTS37DZU
March 27, 2020
A sawmill worker processes trees extracted from the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil...
HUMAITA, Brazil
A sawmill worker processes trees extracted from the Amazon rainforest near Humaita
A sawmill worker processes trees extracted from the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 19, 2019. Picture taken August 19, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT
RTS37DZM
March 27, 2020
An aerial view shows a deforested plot of the Amazon near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August...
Porto Velho, Brazil
An aerial view shows a deforested plot of the Amazon near Porto Velho
An aerial view shows a deforested plot of the Amazon near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 21, 2019. Picture taken August 21, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT
RTS37DZH
March 27, 2020
Charred trunks are seen on a tract of Amazon jungle, that was recently burned by loggers and farmers,...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Charred trunks are seen on a tract of Amazon jungle, that was recently burned by loggers and farmers,...
Charred trunks are seen on a tract of Amazon jungle, that was recently burned by loggers and farmers, in Porto Velho, Brazil August 23, 2019. Picture taken August 23, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT
RTS37DZ2
March 27, 2020
A sawmill worker processes trees extracted from the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil...
HUMAITA, Brazil
A sawmill worker processes trees extracted from the Amazon rainforest near Humaita
A sawmill worker processes trees extracted from the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 19, 2019. Picture taken August 19, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT
RTS37DYZ
March 27, 2020
A charred trunk is seen on a tract of the Amazon jungle, that was recently burned by loggers and farmers,...
Porto Velho, Brazil
A charred trunk is seen on a tract of the Amazon jungle, that was recently burned by loggers and farmers,...
A charred trunk is seen on a tract of the Amazon jungle, that was recently burned by loggers and farmers, in Porto Velho, Brazil August 23, 2019. Picture taken August 23, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT
RTS37DYQ
March 27, 2020
An aerial view shows a deforested plot of the Amazon near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August...
Porto Velho, Brazil
An aerial view shows a deforested plot of the Amazon near Porto Velho
An aerial view shows a deforested plot of the Amazon near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 21, 2019. Picture taken August 21, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT
RTS37DYP
March 27, 2020
An aerial view shows a deforested plot of the Amazon near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August...
Porto Velho, Brazil
An aerial view shows a deforested plot of the Amazon near Porto Velho
An aerial view shows a deforested plot of the Amazon near Porto Velho, Rondonia State, Brazil August 21, 2019. Picture taken August 21, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-DEFORESTATION/
RTS34K3F
March 03, 2020
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands, inside the...
HUMAITA, Brazil
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands, inside the...
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands, inside the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. Picture taken August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-DEFORESTATION/
RTS34K3D
March 03, 2020
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands, inside the...
HUMAITA, Brazil
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands, inside the...
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands, inside the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. Picture taken August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-DEFORESTATION/
RTS34K3C
March 03, 2020
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands, inside the...
HUMAITA, Brazil
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands, inside the...
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands, inside the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. Picture taken August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
POPE-AMAZON/REACTION
RTS31T79
February 12, 2020
A Catholic church is pictured as a fire burns a tract of Amazon jungle being cleared by loggers and farmers...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Catholic church is pictured as fire burns tract of Amazon jungle being cleared by loggers and farmers...
A Catholic church is pictured as a fire burns a tract of Amazon jungle being cleared by loggers and farmers near Porto Velho, Brazil August 27, 2019. Picture taken August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
POPE-AMAZON/REACTION
RTS31T6T
February 12, 2020
A Catholic church is pictured as a fire burns a tract of Amazon jungle being cleared by loggers and farmers...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Catholic church is pictured as fire burns tract of Amazon jungle being cleared by loggers and farmers...
A Catholic church is pictured as a fire burns a tract of Amazon jungle being cleared by loggers and farmers near Porto Velho, Brazil August 27, 2019. Picture taken August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
POPE-AMAZON/REACTION
RTS31T6F
February 12, 2020
A Catholic church is pictured as a fire burns a tract of Amazon jungle being cleared by loggers and farmers...
Porto Velho, Brazil
Catholic church is pictured as fire burns tract of Amazon jungle being cleared by loggers and farmers...
A Catholic church is pictured as a fire burns a tract of Amazon jungle being cleared by loggers and farmers near Porto Velho, Brazil August 27, 2019. Picture taken August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-AMAZON/DOLPHINS
RTS311RQ
February 06, 2020
A Tucuxi dolphin is pictured at the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve in Uarini, Amazonas state,...
UARINI, Brazil
A Tucuxi dolphin is pictured at the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve in Uarini
A Tucuxi dolphin is pictured at the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve in Uarini, Amazonas state, Brazil January 19, 2020. Picture taken January 19, 2020. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
BRAZIL-AMAZON/DOLPHINS
RTS311RO
February 06, 2020
An Amazon River Dolphin also known as Pink Dolphin is pictured at the Mamiraua Sustainable Development...
UARINI, Brazil
Amazon River Dolphin also known as Pink Dolphin is pictured at the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve...
An Amazon River Dolphin also known as Pink Dolphin is pictured at the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve in Uarini, Amazonas state, Brazil January 18, 2020. Picture taken January 18, 2020. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
BRAZIL-INDIGENOUS/MINING
RTS311P6
February 06, 2020
Yanomami indians follow agents of Brazil's environmental agency in a gold mine during an operation against...
AMAZON, Brazil
Yanomami indians follow agents of Brazil's environmental agency in a gold mine during an operation against...
Yanomami indians follow agents of Brazil's environmental agency in a gold mine during an operation against illegal gold mining on indigenous land, in the heart of the Amazon rainforest, in Roraima state, Brazil April 17, 2016. Picture taken April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
BRAZIL-INDIGENOUS/MINING
RTS311P1
February 06, 2020
A gold dredge is seen at the banks of Uraricoera River during Brazil's environmental agency operation...
AMAZON, Brazil
A gold dredge is seen at the banks of Uraricoera River during Brazil's environmental agency operation...
A gold dredge is seen at the banks of Uraricoera River during Brazil's environmental agency operation against illegal gold mining on indigenous land, in the heart of the Amazon rainforest, in Roraima state, Brazil April 15, 2016. Picture taken April 15, 2016. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
BRAZIL-INDIGENOUS/MINING
RTS311OK
February 06, 2020
A Yanomami indian follows agents of Brazil's environmental agency in a gold mine during an operation...
AMAZON, Brazil
A Yanomami indian follows agents of Brazil's environmental agency in a gold mine during an operation...
A Yanomami indian follows agents of Brazil's environmental agency in a gold mine during an operation against illegal gold mining on indigenous land, in the heart of the Amazon rainforest, in Roraima state, Brazil April 17, 2016. Picture taken April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
BRAZIL-AMAZON/DOLPHINS
RTS311O6
February 06, 2020
An Amazon River Dolphin, or Pink Dolphin, is pictured at the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve...
UARINI, Brazil
An Amazon River Dolphin is pictured at the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve in Uarini
An Amazon River Dolphin, or Pink Dolphin, is pictured at the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve in Uarini, Amazonas state, Brazil January 20, 2020. Picture taken January 20, 2020. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
BRAZIL-CORRUPTION/GREENWALD
RTS2ZA2N
January 21, 2020
U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald is seen during the demonstration to demand more protection for the Amazon...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Greenwald is seen during the demonstration to demand more protection for the Amazon rainforest, in Rio...
U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald is seen during the demonstration to demand more protection for the Amazon rainforest, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil August 25, 2019. Picture taken August 25, 2019. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes
BRAZIL-CORRUPTION/GREENWALD
RTS2ZA2J
January 21, 2020
U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald is seen during the demonstration to demand more protection for the Amazon...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Greenwald is seen during the demonstration to demand more protection for the Amazon rainforest, in Rio...
U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald is seen during the demonstration to demand more protection for the Amazon rainforest, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil August 25, 2019. Picture taken August 25, 2019. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTS2UIRQ
December 11, 2019
A dead red-tailed monkey hangs by its tail above the ground, in order to keep it away from ants, in the...
Mbandaka, Congo, the Democratic Republic of the
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
A dead red-tailed monkey hangs by its tail above the ground, in order to keep it away from ants, in the forest near the city of Mbandaka, Democratic Republic of the Congo, April 5, 2019. Reuters Photographer Thomas Nicolon: "I slept overnight with the poachers in the forest. The sun had risen above the canopy, there was still fog over the river and the hunters packing their dugout canoes ready to leave. That day we would go back to the city of Mbandaka after spending four days in the rainforest hunting bushmeat. The monkey that had been killed the day before was hanging from a tree above the water, in order to prevent ants from eating it. Its baby had been crying all night. They would eat it a few hours later. I grabbed my camera and got closer to the dead monkey. I wanted to show the crude reality of hunting. Hours earlier the monkey was swinging from branch to branch, high up in the trees, a symbol of CongoÕs rich biodiversity. But by morning it was just flesh. It had been disemboweled, and it was now a symbol of Congo's empty forests." REUTERS/Thomas Nicolon/File Photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2019" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTS2UIQX
December 11, 2019
Guajajara Indians "forest guardians" detain a logger during a search for illegal loggers on Arariboia...
AMARANTE, Brazil
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
Guajajara Indians "forest guardians" detain a logger during a search for illegal loggers on Arariboia indigenous land near the city of Amarante, Maranhao state, Brazil, September 17, 2019. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "The photo shows the actions of the indigenous Guajajaras against illegal logging in the Amazon Rainforest. I followed these ÒGuardians of the ForestÓ for seven days on their mission to expel invaders. We walked many miles with no potable water, food, tents or adequate weapons. Spiritually the Guajajaras believe they are defending their land as predestined by their ancestors. "I go to sleep, and I can never forget my grandfather before he died saying that one day, I would defend our land with my own life," one man known as Wolf, said. This logger was tied up and interrogated. After attempting to remove the trucks loaded with the logs they were burned. Then the man was released and the Guajajaras returned to their villages. Some celebrated the fact that logging was paralysed for a few days at least. This was not an easy assignment. The loggers fired at the indigenous people. Physically the pace of the Guajajaras can be compared to high-performance athletes Ð the distance was immense, and they faced jungle heat and dehydration. For me, it was seven days of expectation, for a few minutes of confrontation in the darkness of the forest." REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino/File Photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2019" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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