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Search results for: Religious-convert

RUGBY-UNION-WORLDCUP/SIDELINES
RTX748V4
September 23, 2019
A man leaves a subway station in Sapporo, Japan September 22, 2019 . Picture taken September 22, 2019....
Sapporo, Japan
A man leaves a subway station in Sapporo
A man leaves a subway station in Sapporo, Japan September 22, 2019 . Picture taken September 22, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su
MIDEAST-CRISIS/YAZIDI
RTR4M22M
January 19, 2015
An elderly member of the the minority Yazidi sect takes refuge in a building in Shikhan January 19, 2015....
SHIKHAN, Iraq
An elderly member of the the minority Yazidi sect takes refuge in a building in Shikhan
An elderly member of the the minority Yazidi sect takes refuge in a building in Shikhan January 19, 2015. Islamic State has hounded ethnic and religious minorities in northern Iraq since seizing the city of Mosul in June, killing and displacing thousands of Christians, Shi'ite Shabaks and Turkmen who lived for centuries in one of the most diverse parts of the Middle East. Hundreds of Yazidi women and girls have been captured, raped and tortured, and forced to convert to Islam and marry Islamic State followers, according to rights groups. The Yazidi are a religious sect whose beliefs combine elements of several ancient Middle Eastern religions. Tens of thousands have fled Islamic State fighters, who say the Yazidi must embrace their radical version of Islam or die. REUTERS/Ari Jalal (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT RELIGION)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/YAZIDI
RTR4M21G
January 19, 2015
People from the minority Yazidi sect take refuge in a building in Shikhan January 19, 2015. Islamic...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
People from the minority Yazidi sect take refuge in a building in Shikhan
People from the minority Yazidi sect take refuge in a building in Shikhan January 19, 2015. Islamic State has hounded ethnic and religious minorities in northern Iraq since seizing the city of Mosul in June, killing and displacing thousands of Christians, Shi'ite Shabaks and Turkmen who lived for centuries in one of the most diverse parts of the Middle East. Hundreds of Yazidi women and girls have been captured, raped and tortured, and forced to convert to Islam and marry Islamic State followers, according to rights groups. The Yazidi are a religious sect whose beliefs combine elements of several ancient Middle Eastern religions. Tens of thousands have fled Islamic State fighters, who say the Yazidi must embrace their radical version of Islam or die. REUTERS/Ari Jalal (IRAQ - Tags - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT RELIGION SOCIETY)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/YAZIDI
RTR4M21D
January 19, 2015
People from the minority Yazidi sect take refuge in a building in Shikhan January 19, 2015. Islamic...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
People from the minority Yazidi sect take refuge in a building in Shikhan
People from the minority Yazidi sect take refuge in a building in Shikhan January 19, 2015. Islamic State has hounded ethnic and religious minorities in northern Iraq since seizing the city of Mosul in June, killing and displacing thousands of Christians, Shi'ite Shabaks and Turkmen who lived for centuries in one of the most diverse parts of the Middle East. Hundreds of Yazidi women and girls have been captured, raped and tortured, and forced to convert to Islam and marry Islamic State followers, according to rights groups. The Yazidi are a religious sect whose beliefs combine elements of several ancient Middle Eastern religions. Tens of thousands have fled Islamic State fighters, who say the Yazidi must embrace their radical version of Islam or die. REUTERS/Ari Jalal (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT RELIGION SOCIETY)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/YAZIDI
RTR4M219
January 19, 2015
A displaced boy from the minority Yazidi sect walks in a refugee camp in Shikhan January 19, 2015. Islamic...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced boy from the minority Yazidi sect walks in a refugee camp in Shikhan
A displaced boy from the minority Yazidi sect walks in a refugee camp in Shikhan January 19, 2015. Islamic State has hounded ethnic and religious minorities in northern Iraq since seizing the city of Mosul in June, killing and displacing thousands of Christians, Shi'ite Shabaks and Turkmen who lived for centuries in one of the most diverse parts of the Middle East. Hundreds of Yazidi women and girls have been captured, raped and tortured, and forced to convert to Islam and marry Islamic State followers, according to rights groups. The Yazidi are a religious sect whose beliefs combine elements of several ancient Middle Eastern religions. Tens of thousands have fled Islamic State fighters, who say the Yazidi must embrace their radical version of Islam or die. REUTERS/Ari Jalal (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT RELIGION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LFBK
January 14, 2015
A displaced girl from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced girl from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced girl from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LFBJ
January 14, 2015
A displaced girl from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced girl from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced girl from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LFBF
January 14, 2015
A displaced woman from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced woman from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced woman from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LFBE
January 14, 2015
Displaced boys from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
Displaced boys from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
Displaced boys from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LFB3
January 14, 2015
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LFAX
January 14, 2015
A displaced woman from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced woman from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced woman from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LFAV
January 14, 2015
A displaced boy from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced boy from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced boy from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LFAA
January 14, 2015
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LFA8
January 14, 2015
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LF9Z
January 14, 2015
A displaced woman from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced woman from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced woman from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LF9Y
January 14, 2015
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LF9X
January 14, 2015
A displaced boy from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced boy from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced boy from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LF9O
January 14, 2015
A displaced girl from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced girl from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced girl from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LF92
January 14, 2015
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi...
A displaced man from the Yazidi minority, who fled violence from Islamic State militants in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, poses for a portrait at the holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Iman Simonovic, United Nations assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LES5
January 14, 2015
A combination photo shows people from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the Iraqi town of Sinjar due...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
Combination photo shows people from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the Iraqi town of Sinjar due to...
A combination photo shows people from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the Iraqi town of Sinjar due to violence by Islamic State militants, as they pose at their holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Simonovic said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
IRAQ-CRISIS/
RTR4LES1
January 14, 2015
A combination photo shows children from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the Iraqi town of Sinjar due...
SHIKHAN, Iraq
Combination photo shows children from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the Iraqi town of Sinjar due...
A combination photo shows children from the minority Yazidi sect, who fled the Iraqi town of Sinjar due to violence by Islamic State militants, as they pose at their holy Lilash temple in northern Iraq September 20, 2014. Thousands of Yazidis have been shot, buried alive or sold into slavery by Islamic State militants, who regard them as devil-worshippers. U.S. President Barack Obama authorized air strikes in Iraq in August, citing the duty to prevent an impending genocide of Yazidis at the hands of Islamic State militants after they overran a vast swathe of northern Iraq. Simonovic said that Islamic State was forcing Yazidis to either convert to Islam or be killed with the intent of destroying the religious group. Islamic State originally attacked the area around Sinjar, in northwestern Iraq, in August. They advanced on Iraq's Sinjar mountain, tightening a siege of thousands of stranded Yazidis, who called on the United States and its allies to act to avert more bloodshed. Pictures taken September 20, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
Religion
Religion
Hezbollah Fighter Now a Rabbi - 23 Oct 2014
8 PICTURES
Religion
Religion
Religious Conversion in India - 05 Sep 2014
14 PICTURES
INDIA-RELIGION/MODI
RTR4500T
September 04, 2014
A man holds sacred water during a religion conversion ceremony from Christianity to Hinduism at Hasayan...
HASAYAN, India
A man holds sacred water during a religion conversion ceremony in Uttar Pradesh
A man holds sacred water during a religion conversion ceremony from Christianity to Hinduism at Hasayan town in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh August 29, 2014. Picture taken August 29, 2014. To match Insight INDIA-RELIGION/MODI REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: RELIGION POLITICS SOCIETY)
INDIA-RELIGION/MODI
RTR44ZVS
September 04, 2014
People take part in a religion conversion ceremony from Christianity to Hinduism at Hasayan town in the...
HASAYAN, India
People take part in a religion conversion ceremony in Uttar Pradesh
People take part in a religion conversion ceremony from Christianity to Hinduism at Hasayan town in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh August 29, 2014. Picture taken August 29, 2014. To match Insight INDIA-RELIGION/MODI REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: RELIGION POLITICS)
INDIA-RELIGION/MODI
RTR44ZVE
September 04, 2014
A man climbs down after partially chipping out the cross from the entrance of his house, after taking...
HASAYAN, India
A man climbs down after partially chipping out the cross from the entrance of his house in Uttar Pradesh...
A man climbs down after partially chipping out the cross from the entrance of his house, after taking part in a religion conversion ceremony from Christianity to Hinduism, at Hasayan town in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh August 29, 2014. Picture taken August 29, 2014. To match Insight INDIA-RELIGION/MODI REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY RELIGION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
BRITAIN-MUSLIM/VEILS
RTR437DS
August 21, 2014
This photograph may only be used together with the 21 August 2014 package WEARING A VEIL IN BRITAIN.

Brenda...
London, United Kingdom
Brenda gets her eyes tested in east London
This photograph may only be used together with the 21 August 2014 package WEARING A VEIL IN BRITAIN.

Brenda gets her eyes tested in east London March 26, 2014. Brenda who is originally from Mexico converted from Catholicism when she came to London. Brenda has always lived a strictly religious life. She thought about becoming a nun before she realised she wanted children. She says "I know I'm in a non-Muslim country and so I try to respect the rules. Sometimes people say nice things about my children or they smile at me and I try to smile back at them. I know they can't see my face but I hope they know I'm smiling with my eyes." Reuters photographer Olivia Harris took portraits of a range of Muslim women in Britain and asked them why they chose to wear a hijab or veil. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Olivia Harris (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 06 OF 15 FOR PACKAGE 'WEARING A VEIL IN BRITAIN'
SEARCH 'HARRIS HIJAB' FOR ALL IMAGE
BRITAIN-MUSLIM/VEILS
RTR437DR
August 21, 2014
This photograph may only be used together with the 21 August 2014 package WEARING A VEIL IN BRITAIN.

Brenda...
London, United Kingdom
Brenda talks while her daughters eat ice cream in Westfield, east London
This photograph may only be used together with the 21 August 2014 package WEARING A VEIL IN BRITAIN.

Brenda talks while her daughters eat ice cream in Westfield, east London October 30, 2013. Brenda, who is originally from Mexico, converted from Catholicism when she came to London. Brenda has always lived a strictly religious life. She thought about becoming a nun before she realised she wanted children. She says "I know I'm in a non-Muslim country and so I try to respect the rules. Sometimes people say nice things about my children or they smile at me and I try to smile back at them. I know they can't see my face but I hope they know I'm smiling with my eyes." Reuters photographer Olivia Harris took portraits of a range of Muslim women in Britain and asked them why they chose to wear a hijab or veil. Picture taken October 30, 2013. REUTERS/Olivia Harris (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION)

ATTENTION EDITORS PICTURE 05 OF 15 FOR PACKAGE 'WEARING A VEIL IN BRITAIN'
SEARCH 'HARRIS HIJAB' FOR ALL IMAGE
Iraq Conflict
Iraq Conflict
The Christian Community - 21 Jul 2014
33 PICTURES
IRAQ-SECURITY/CHRISTIANS
RTR3ZG1K
July 20, 2014
Members of the clergy conduct a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head...
Baghdad, Iraq
Members of the clergy conduct a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad
Members of the clergy conduct a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head of Iraq's largest church said on Sunday that Islamic State militants who drove Christians out of Mosul were worse than Mongol leader Genghis Khan and his grandson Hulagu who ransacked medieval Baghdad. Chaldean Catholic Patriarch Louis Raphael Sako led a wave of condemnation for the Sunni Islamists who demanded Christians either convert, submit to their radical rule and pay a religious levy or face death by the sword. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY)
IRAQ-SECURITY/CHRISTIANS
RTR3ZG1J
July 20, 2014
Members of the clergy conduct a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head...
Baghdad, Iraq
Members of the clergy conduct a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad
Members of the clergy conduct a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head of Iraq's largest church said on Sunday that Islamic State militants who drove Christians out of Mosul were worse than Mongol leader Genghis Khan and his grandson Hulagu who ransacked medieval Baghdad. Chaldean Catholic Patriarch Louis Raphael Sako led a wave of condemnation for the Sunni Islamists who demanded Christians either convert, submit to their radical rule and pay a religious levy or face death by the sword. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY)
IRAQ-SECURITY/CHRISTIANS
RTR3ZG09
July 20, 2014
Iraqi Christians attend a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head of Iraq's...
Baghdad, Iraq
Iraqi Christians attend a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad
Iraqi Christians attend a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head of Iraq's largest church said on Sunday that Islamic State militants who drove Christians out of Mosul were worse than Mongol leader Genghis Khan and his grandson Hulagu who ransacked medieval Baghdad. Chaldean Catholic Patriarch Louis Raphael Sako led a wave of condemnation for the Sunni Islamists who demanded Christians either convert, submit to their radical rule and pay a religious levy or face death by the sword. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY)
IRAQ-SECURITY/CHRISTIANS
RTR3ZFZY
July 20, 2014
Iraqi Christians attend a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head of Iraq's...
Baghdad, Iraq
Iraqi Christians attend a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad
Iraqi Christians attend a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head of Iraq's largest church said on Sunday that Islamic State militants who drove Christians out of Mosul were worse than Mongol leader Genghis Khan and his grandson Hulagu who ransacked medieval Baghdad. Chaldean Catholic Patriarch Louis Raphael Sako led a wave of condemnation for the Sunni Islamists who demanded Christians either convert, submit to their radical rule and pay a religious levy or face death by the sword. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY)
IRAQ-SECURITY/CHRISTIANS
RTR3ZFZJ
July 20, 2014
Iraqi Christians enter the St. Joseph Chaldean Church to attend a mass, in Baghdad July 20, 2014. The...
Baghdad, Iraq
Iraqi Christians enter the St. Joseph Chaldean Church to attend a mass, in Baghdad
Iraqi Christians enter the St. Joseph Chaldean Church to attend a mass, in Baghdad July 20, 2014. The head of Iraq's largest church said on Sunday that Islamic State militants who drove Christians out of Mosul were worse than Mongol leader Genghis Khan and his grandson Hulagu who ransacked medieval Baghdad. Chaldean Catholic Patriarch Louis Raphael Sako led a wave of condemnation for the Sunni Islamists who demanded Christians either convert, submit to their radical rule and pay a religious levy or face death by the sword. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY)
IRAQ-SECURITY/CHRISTIANS
RTR3ZFZB
July 20, 2014
Iraqi Christians attend a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head of Iraq's...
Baghdad, Iraq
Iraqi Christians attend a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad
Iraqi Christians attend a mass at St. Joseph Chaldean Church in Baghdad, July 20, 2014. The head of Iraq's largest church said on Sunday that Islamic State militants who drove Christians out of Mosul were worse than Mongol leader Genghis Khan and his grandson Hulagu who ransacked medieval Baghdad. Chaldean Catholic Patriarch Louis Raphael Sako led a wave of condemnation for the Sunni Islamists who demanded Christians either convert, submit to their radical rule and pay a religious levy or face death by the sword. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS RELIGION SOCIETY)
POPE
RTX15F1B
November 15, 2013
New bishop Fernando Vergez Alzaga lies in front of the altar during his ordination ceremony leaded by...
Vatican City, Vatican City
New bishop Fernando Vergez Alzaga lies in front of the altar during his ordination ceremony leaded by...
New bishop Fernando Vergez Alzaga lies in front of the altar during his ordination ceremony leaded by Pope Francis in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican November 15, 2013. REUTERS/Tony Gentile (VATICAN - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE/
RTX14MJJ
October 24, 2013
New bishops lie in front of the altar during their ordination ceremony leaded by Pope Francis in Saint...
Vatican City, Vatican City
New bishops lie in front of altar during ordination ceremony leaded by Pope Francis in Saint Peter's...
New bishops lie in front of the altar during their ordination ceremony leaded by Pope Francis in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican October 24, 2013. REUTERS/Tony Gentile (VATICAN - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE
RTX14MH0
October 24, 2013
Pope Francis leads a bishops ordination ceremony in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican October 24,...
Vatican City, Vatican City
Pope Francis leads bishops ordination ceremony in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican
Pope Francis leads a bishops ordination ceremony in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican October 24, 2013. REUTERS/Tony Gentile (VATICAN - Tags: RELIGION)
POPE/
RTX14MGV
October 24, 2013
Pope Francis leads a bishops ordination ceremony in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican October 24,...
Vatican City, Vatican City
Pope Francis leads a bishops ordination ceremony in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican
Pope Francis leads a bishops ordination ceremony in Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican October 24, 2013. REUTERS/Tony Gentile (VATICAN - Tags: RELIGION)
BOLIVIA/
RTX12MU3
August 15, 2013
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, leads a religious session at the Islamic association...
La Paz, Bolivia
Muslim convert Chambi leads a religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, leads a religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz, August 13, 2013. Some 30 members and sympathizers of Ahlul-Bait gather in an apartment in La Paz to study the holy Quran and learn Arabic. The background displays a poster of Bolivia's President Evo Morales, Bolivia's national flag and images of muslim leaders. Picture taken August 13, 2013. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: RELIGION)
BOLIVIA/
RTX12MQ6
August 15, 2013
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, prays during a religious session at the Islamic...
La Paz, Bolivia
Muslim convert Chambi prays during a religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz...
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, prays during a religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz, August 13, 2013. Some 30 members and sympathizers of Ahlul-Bait gather in an apartment in La Paz to study the holy Quran and learn Arabic. Picture taken August 13, 2013. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: RELIGION)
BOLIVIA/
RTX12MPY
August 15, 2013
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, prays during a religious session at the Islamic...
La Paz, Bolivia
Muslim convert Chambi prays during a religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz...
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, prays during a religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz, August 13, 2013. Some 30 members and sympathizers of Ahlul-Bait gather in an apartment in La Paz to study the holy Quran and learn Arabic. Picture taken August 13, 2013. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: RELIGION)
BOLIVIA/
RTX12MPP
August 15, 2013
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, prays during a religious session at the Islamic...
La Paz, Bolivia
Muslim convert Chambi prays during a religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz...
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, prays during a religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz, August 13, 2013. Some 30 members and sympathizers of Ahlul-Bait gather in an apartment in La Paz to study the holy Quran and learn Arabic. Picture taken August 13, 2013. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: RELIGION)
BOLIVIA/
RTX12MPL
August 15, 2013
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, leads a religious session at the Islamic association...
La Paz, Bolivia
Muslim convert Chambi leads religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz
Muslim convert Roberto Chambi (L), a lawyer by profession, leads a religious session at the Islamic association Ahlul-Bait in La Paz, August 13, 2013. Some 30 members and sympathizers of Ahlul-Bait gather in an apartment in La Paz to study the holy Quran and learn Arabic. Picture taken August 13, 2013. REUTERS/David Mercado (BOLIVIA - Tags: RELIGION)
PALESTINIANS-ECONOMY/
RTR34L21
July 04, 2012
A salesperson watches as a Palestinian woman sits inside a BMW for sale at a car dealership in the West...
Ramallah, Palestinian Territories
Salesperson watches as a Palestinian woman sits inside a BMW for sale at a car dealership in the West...
A salesperson watches as a Palestinian woman sits inside a BMW for sale at a car dealership in the West Bank city of Ramallah March 20, 2012. Past the Israeli sentry towers blackened by firebombs and the entrance to a refugee camp emblazoned with posters of rifle-clenching militants, downtown Ramallah sparkles. Picture taken March 20, 2012. To match Feature PALESTINIANS-ECONOMY/ REUTERS/Ammar Awad (WEST BANK - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS TRANSPORT)
BRITAIN/
RTR2YKYI
February 28, 2012
Hussain, a 34 year old Muslim convert, gazes out of a window of an overground train in London, December...
London, United Kingdom
Hussain, a 34 year old Muslim convert, gazes out of a window of an overground train in London
Hussain, a 34 year old Muslim convert, gazes out of a window of an overground train in London, December 5, 2011. Hussain, formerly Jason Thomas, whose family are Christians and originate from the Caribbean, adopted the religion after a troublesome upbringing saw him end up homeless and eventually imprisoned. "I got involved in robbing shops and business people and stealing designer clothes from the West End's expensive shops. My life consisted of waking up in the morning, smoking weed, hanging out on the council estate and doing crime," he said. "But when I was in prison, I thought there must be more to life than just robbing and stealing." Thomas, who now visits socially deprived areas and counsels troubled youths against committing crime, was taken to the Brixton Mosque in South London by his cousin, who introduced him to Islam. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (BRITAIN - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
BRITAIN/
RTR2YKY3
February 28, 2012
Hussain, a 34 year old Muslim convert visits the neighborhood where he spent his childhood in west London,...
London, United Kingdom
Hussain, a 34 year old Muslim convert, visits the neighborhood where he spent his childhood in west London...
Hussain, a 34 year old Muslim convert visits the neighborhood where he spent his childhood in west London, December 5, 2011. Hussain, formerly Jason Thomas, whose family are Christians and originate from the Caribbean, adopted the religion after a troublesome upbringing saw him end up homeless and eventually imprisoned. "I got involved in robbing shops and business people and stealing designer clothes from the West End's expensive shops. My life consisted of waking up in the morning, smoking weed, hanging out on the council estate and doing crime," he said. "But when I was in prison, I thought there must be more to life than just robbing and stealing." Thomas, who now visits socially deprived areas and counsels troubled youths against committing crime, was taken to the Brixton Mosque in South London by his cousin, who introduced him to Islam. Picture taken December 5, 2011. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (BRITAIN - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
IRAN-SEAN-STONE/ISLAM
RTR2XYSL
February 16, 2012
EDITORS' NOTE: Reuters and other foreign media are subject to Iranian restrictions on leaving the office...
Tehran, Iran
Sean Stone, son of U.S. film director Oliver Stone, reads a religious book before an interview with Reuters...
EDITORS' NOTE: Reuters and other foreign media are subject to Iranian restrictions on leaving the office to report, film or take pictures in Tehran.
Sean Stone, son of U.S. film director Oliver Stone, reads a religious book he received as a gift from Iranian Muslim preacher Hamid Alimi (L) before an interview with Reuters Television in northern Tehran February 16, 2012. Stone, a defender of Iran's nuclear programme, converted to Islam on Tuesday while filming a documentary in the Shi'ite-dominated state. Following his conversion, the 27-year-old told Reuters television in an exclusive interview that the reason behind his decision to become a Shi'ite was to help rebuild the image of Islam in the west. Stone is wearing around his neck a small silver sword, representing the sword of Imam Ali, also known as 'zulfiqar'. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl (IRAN - Tags: SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT RELIGION TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWET
October 20, 2011
Sajama Baig, 60, collects bundles of corn stalks in Anish village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Sajama Baig, 60, collects bundles of corn stalks in Anish village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 13, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 13, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY POLITICS TRAVEL)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWEN
October 20, 2011
Kalash boys share a laugh while sitting in a tea shop in Krakal village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Kalash boys share a laugh while sitting in a tea shop in Krakal village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 13, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 13, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWEH
October 20, 2011
Jardana Khan, 50, shells walnuts at her house in Krakal , located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 13,...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Jardana Khan, 50, shells walnuts at her house in Krakal , located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 13, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 13, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWE5
October 20, 2011
A village leader Palawan, 60, works on the reconstruction of a Kalash festival site in Grom village located...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
A village leader Palawan, 60, works on the reconstruction of a Kalash festival site in Grom village located in Rumbur Kalash valley October 12, 2011, as part of a project run by the Norweigan-funded Chitral Integrated Area Development Organisation. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 12, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWDY
October 20, 2011
Easter Bibi, 22, a member of the Kalash community, sits outside her house in Krakal village, located...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Easter Bibi, 22, a member of the Kalash community, sits outside her house in Krakal village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 11, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 11, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWC9
October 20, 2011
Kalash female students walk to class through the entrance of the Kalasha Dur and community centre in...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Kalash female students walk to class through the entrance of the Kalasha Dur and community centre in Brun village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 14, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 14, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWBY
October 20, 2011
Girls from the Kalash community wash clothes in a river in the Rumbur Kalash valley October 12, 2011....
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Girls from the Kalash community wash clothes in a river in the Rumbur Kalash valley October 12, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken on October 12, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWBL
October 20, 2011
A girl attends a Kalasha language class at the Kalasha Dur school and community centre in Brun village,...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
A girl attends a Kalasha language class at the Kalasha Dur school and community centre in Brun village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 13, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 13, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWBB
October 20, 2011
Gulistan Bibi, 20, cooks bread made from flour and corn at her house in Balanguru village, located in...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Gulistan Bibi, 20, cooks bread made from flour and corn at her house in Balanguru village, located in Rumbur Kalash valley October 12, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 12, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWB3
October 20, 2011
A Kalash woman carries her child through Krakal village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 14,...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
A Kalash woman carries her child through Krakal village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 14, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 14, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SWAY
October 20, 2011
Shohor Gul, 23, a member of the Kalash community sits inside her house in Balanguru village, located...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Shohor Gul, 23, a member of the Kalash community sits inside her house in Balanguru village, located in Rumbur Kalash valley, October 12, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ Picture taken October 12, 2011. REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
PAKISTAN-KALASH/
RTR2SW8C
October 20, 2011
Kalash students walk to class through the entrance of the Kalasha Dur and community centre in Brun village,...
KALASH, Pakistan
To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/
Kalash students walk to class through the entrance of the Kalasha Dur and community centre in Brun village, located in Bumboret Kalash valley October 14, 2011. Nestled among the valleys of Pakistan's mountainous northwest, the Kalash are a tiny religious community that claim descent from Alexander the Great's army, and say they are under increasing pressure to convert to Islam. The Kalash, who number about 3,500 in Pakistan's population of 180 million, are spread over three valleys along the border with Afghanistan and are known for their distinctive dress, vibrant religious festivals, and polytheism. To match Feature PAKISTAN-KALASH/ REUTERS/Rebecca Conway (PAKISTAN - Tags: SOCIETY)
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