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Search results for: Republican-paramilitaries

BRITAIN-NIRELAND/VILLIERS
RTS17M3 
September 15, 2015 
People walk past a mural on the Falls road in Belfast depicting Britain's Northern Ireland Secretary... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
People walk past a mural on the Falls road in Belfast depicting Northern Ireland Secretary of State Theresa... 
People walk past a mural on the Falls road in Belfast depicting Britain's Northern Ireland Secretary of State Theresa Villiers, September 15, 2015. Theresa Villiers proposed the creation of an independent watchdog to monitor paramilitary organisations in Northern Ireland after a shooting linked to the Irish Republican Army (IRA) threatened to unravel a two-decade old peace deal. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
BRITAIN-POLITICS/
RTSA2C 
September 09, 2015 
A pigeon flies past a mural supporting the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast,... 
Belfast, BRITAIN 
A pigeon flies past a mural supporting the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast... 
A pigeon flies past a mural supporting the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast, September 9, 2015. Britain's secretary of state for Northern Ireland's Theresa Villiers is taking part in another round of cross-party talks at Stormont later today with the aim of resolving the crisis over a murder linked to the Irish Republican Army (IRA). REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton 
BRITAIN-POLITICS/
RTSA1Y 
September 09, 2015 
A man walks past a mural supporting the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast,... 
Belfast, BRITAIN 
A man walks past a mural supporting the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast... 
A man walks past a mural supporting the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in the Ardoyne area of north Belfast, September 9, 2015. Britain's secretary of state for Northern Ireland's Theresa Villiers is taking part in another round of cross-party talks at Stormont later today with the aim of resolving the crisis over a murder linked to the Irish Republican Army (IRA). REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton 
NORTHERNIRELAND-FLAGS/WIDERIMAGE
RTR44MDW 
September 02, 2014 
A Royal Irish Regiment Flag (RIR) flies in the Loyalist lower Shankill estate in West Belfast August... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
A Royal Irish Regiment Flag flies in the Loyalist lower Shankill estate in West Belfast 
A Royal Irish Regiment Flag (RIR) flies in the Loyalist lower Shankill estate in West Belfast August 19, 2014. The RIR flag is flown in support of the operations they undertook against Republican Paramilitaries. Faugh A Ballagh is the RIR battle cry which translates as 'clear the way'. In Belfast, the flags of Israel and the Palestinians are potent symbols of conflict, but they divide Catholics and Protestants rather than Jews and Muslims. In the complex web of alliances that underpins Northern Ireland politics, the star of David has been adopted by pro-British Loyalists, mainly Protestants, many of whom sympathise with Israel's struggle against Islamic militants. Flying the green, black and red of flag of the Palestinian territories, meanwhile, is a sign of support for Catholic Irish Nationalism and their aspiration for a united Ireland against what many see as a British occupation. The flags are among dozens that have been adopted by the working class Catholic and Protestant areas that have for decades been at the focus of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. Picture taken August 19, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY)

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NORTHERNIRELAND-FLAGS/WIDERIMAGE
RTR44MD8 
September 02, 2014 
The Starry Plough flag is etched onto a gravestone near the Republican plot in Milltown cemetery, West... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
The Starry Plough flag is etched onto a gravestone near the Republican plot in Milltown cemetery, West... 
The Starry Plough flag is etched onto a gravestone near the Republican plot in Milltown cemetery, West Belfast August 18, 2014. The Starry Plough was originally used by the Irish Citizen Army, a socialist, Republican movement and in modern times has been adopted by various Republic Paramilitary groups. In Belfast, the flags of Israel and the Palestinians are potent symbols of conflict, but they divide Catholics and Protestants rather than Jews and Muslims. In the complex web of alliances that underpins Northern Ireland politics, the star of David has been adopted by pro-British Loyalists, mainly Protestants, many of whom sympathise with Israel's struggle against Islamic militants. Flying the green, black and red of flag of the Palestinian territories, meanwhile, is a sign of support for Catholic Irish Nationalism and their aspiration for a united Ireland against what many see as a British occupation. The flags are among dozens that have been adopted by the working class Catholic and Protestant areas that have for decades been at the focus of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. Picture taken August 18, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY)

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NORTHERNIRELAND-FLAGS/WIDERIMAGE
RTR44MD0 
September 02, 2014 
A flag bearing the emblem of the Parachute Regiment flies in the Loyalist Tigers Bay area of North Belfast... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
A flag bearing the emblem of the Parachute Regiment flies in the Loyalist Tigers Bay area of North Belfast... 
A flag bearing the emblem of the Parachute Regiment flies in the Loyalist Tigers Bay area of North Belfast August 18, 2014. Loyalists fly the flag to show support for the British Soldiers which carried out operations against Republican Paramilitaries. In Belfast, the flags of Israel and the Palestinians are potent symbols of conflict, but they divide Catholics and Protestants rather than Jews and Muslims. In the complex web of alliances that underpins Northern Ireland politics, the star of David has been adopted by pro-British Loyalists, mainly Protestants, many of whom sympathise with Israel's struggle against Islamic militants. Flying the green, black and red of flag of the Palestinian territories, meanwhile, is a sign of support for Catholic Irish Nationalism and their aspiration for a united Ireland against what many see as a British occupation. The flags are among dozens that have been adopted by the working class Catholic and Protestant areas that have for decades been at the focus of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. Picture taken August 18, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY)

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NORTHERNIRELAND-FLAGS/WIDERIMAGE
RTR44MC9 
September 02, 2014 
A flag bearing the emblem of the Special Air Services (SAS) flies in the Loyalist Tigers Bay area of... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
A flag bearing the emblem of the Special Air Services (SAS) flies in the Loyalist Tigers Bay area of... 
A flag bearing the emblem of the Special Air Services (SAS) flies in the Loyalist Tigers Bay area of North Belfast August 19, 2014. Loyalists fly the flag to show support for the British Special Forces group which carried out operations against Republican Paramilitaries. In Belfast, the flags of Israel and the Palestinians are potent symbols of conflict, but they divide Catholics and Protestants rather than Jews and Muslims. In the complex web of alliances that underpins Northern Ireland politics, the star of David has been adopted by pro-British Loyalists, mainly Protestants, many of whom sympathise with Israel's struggle against Islamic militants. Flying the green, black and red of flag of the Palestinian territories, meanwhile, is a sign of support for Catholic Irish Nationalism and their aspiration for a united Ireland against what many see as a British occupation. The flags are among dozens that have been adopted by the working class Catholic and Protestant areas that have for decades been at the focus of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. Picture taken August 19, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY)

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Highlight Edit
Highlight Edit 
Gerry Adams Released - 06 May 2014 
25 PICTURES 
Politics
Politics 
Gerry Adams Released - 06 May 2014 
55 PICTURES 
Highlight Edit
Highlight Edit 
Legacy of the IRA 
27 PICTURES 
Society
Society 
Legacy of the IRA - 01 May 2014 
40 PICTURES 
Political Profile
Political Profile 
Gerry Adams Arrested - 01 May 2014 
51 PICTURES 
IRISH-INQUIRY/
RTR3FSBO 
February 27, 2014 
An Irish Republican Army (IRA) sign is seen nailed to a telegraph pole in the Kilwilkie estate, near... 
Lurgan, United Kingdom 
An Irish Republican Army (IRA) sign is seen nailed to a telegraph pole in the Kilwilkie estate, near... 
An Irish Republican Army (IRA) sign is seen nailed to a telegraph pole in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern Ireland February 27, 2014. Northern Ireland's most senior politician threatened to resign unless there was a full inquiry into guarantees of immunity given by British authorities to paramilitary suspects as part of peace agreements for the province. The issue came to light when an Irishman accused in a 1982 car bombing in London's Hyde Park that killed four soldiers on ceremonial duty walked free on a court finding that he had been given assurances he would not be prosecuted. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST) 
IRISH-INQUIRY/
RTR3FSBF 
February 27, 2014 
A woman walks her dog past an Irish Republican hoarding in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern... 
Lurgan, United Kingdom 
A woman walks her dog past an Irish Republican hoarding in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern... 
A woman walks her dog past an Irish Republican hoarding in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern Ireland February 27, 2014. Northern Ireland's most senior politician threatened to resign unless there was a full inquiry into guarantees of immunity given by British authorities to paramilitary suspects as part of peace agreements for the province. The issue came to light when an Irishman accused in a 1982 car bombing in London's Hyde Park that killed four soldiers on ceremonial duty walked free on a court finding that he had been given assurances he would not be prosecuted. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST) 
IRISH-INQUIRY/
RTR3FSBC 
February 27, 2014 
People walk past Irish Republican graffiti in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern Ireland February... 
Lurgan, United Kingdom 
People walk past Irish Republican graffiti in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern Ireland 
People walk past Irish Republican graffiti in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern Ireland February 27, 2014. Northern Ireland's most senior politician threatened to resign unless there was a full inquiry into guarantees of immunity given by British authorities to paramilitary suspects as part of peace agreements for the province. The issue came to light when an Irishman accused in a 1982 car bombing in London's Hyde Park that killed four soldiers on ceremonial duty walked free on a court finding that he had been given assurances he would not be prosecuted. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST) 
IRISH-INQUIRY/
RTR3FSAY 
February 27, 2014 
A man walks past Irish Republican hoardings in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern Ireland... 
Lurgan, United Kingdom 
A man walks past Irish Republican hoardings in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern Ireland 
A man walks past Irish Republican hoardings in the Kilwilkie estate, near Lurgan in Northern Ireland February 27, 2014. Northern Ireland's most senior politician threatened to resign unless there was a full inquiry into guarantees of immunity given by British authorities to paramilitary suspects as part of peace agreements for the province. The issue came to light when an Irishman accused in a 1982 car bombing in London's Hyde Park that killed four soldiers on ceremonial duty walked free on a court finding that he had been given assurances he would not be prosecuted. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST) 
IRISH -VIOLENCE/
RTX12HBX 
August 11, 2013 
A member of a Republican band takes part in a parade commemorating dead IRA members in the village of... 
CASTLEDERG, United Kingdom 
A member of a Republican band takes part in a parade commemorating dead IRA members in the village of... 
A member of a Republican band takes part in a parade commemorating dead IRA members in the village of Castlederg, in County Tyrone August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY RELIGION) 
Society
Society 
Changing Murals in Northern Ireland - 28 Feb 2013 
14 PICTURES 
BRITAIN/
RTR3EDUE 
February 28, 2013 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic... 
Derry, United Kingdom 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic... 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic rights, February 21, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 21, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDUC 
February 28, 2013 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which... 
Derry, United Kingdom 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which took place in 1969 between residents of the area and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, February 19, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 19, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 10 14 FOR PACKAGE 'CHANGING MURALS IN NOR RN IRELAND'
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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDUB 
February 28, 2013 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which... 
Derry, United Kingdom 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which took place in 1969 between residents of the area and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, February 19, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 19, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU9 
February 28, 2013 
A man checks his mobile phone beside a loyalist paramilitary mural in the Waterside area of Derry, February... 
Derry, United Kingdom 
A man checks his mobile phone beside a loyalist paramilitary mural 
A man checks his mobile phone beside a loyalist paramilitary mural in the Waterside area of Derry, February 22, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 22, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN- Tags: SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 12 14 FOR PACKAGE 'CHANGING MURALS IN NOR RN IRELAND'
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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU8 
February 28, 2013 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic... 
Derry, United Kingdom 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic... 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry commemorates the beginning of the struggle in Derry for democratic rights, February 21, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 21, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU7 
February 28, 2013 
A mural in the village of Cushendall in north Antrim commemorates 100 years of the local Gaelic Athletic... 
Antrim, United Kingdom 
A mural in the village of Cushendall in north Antrim commemorates 100 years of the local Gaelic Athletic... 
A mural in the village of Cushendall in north Antrim commemorates 100 years of the local Gaelic Athletic Club, February 20, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 20, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU6 
February 28, 2013 
Pigeons fly past a mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast depicting a Gaelic myth about the... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
Pigeons fly past a mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast 
Pigeons fly past a mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast depicting a Gaelic myth about the claiming of Ulster, February 20, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 20, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN- Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU5 
February 28, 2013 
Loyalist paramilitary and political murals are pictured in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
Loyalist paramilitary and political murals are pictured in the Shankill Road area 
Loyalist paramilitary and political murals are pictured in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February 20, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 20, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU4 
February 28, 2013 
Golfer Rory McIlroy is pictured on a wall in the Holylands area of Belfast, February 23, 2013. Historically... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
Golfer Rory McIlroy is pictured on a wall in Holylands area of Belfast 
Golfer Rory McIlroy is pictured on a wall in the Holylands area of Belfast, February 23, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 23, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN- Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU3 
February 28, 2013 
A mural shows the apparition of the Virgin Mary to six Catholics in the town of Medjugorje in Bosnia... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
A mural shows the apparition of the Virgin Mary to six Catholics in the town of Medjugorje in Bosnia... 
A mural shows the apparition of the Virgin Mary to six Catholics in the town of Medjugorje in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Ardoyne area of North Belfast, February 20, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 20, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU2 
February 28, 2013 
People walk past a Loyalist Paramilitary mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February 20,... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
People walk past a Loyalist Paramilitary mural in the Shankill Road area 
People walk past a Loyalist Paramilitary mural in the Shankill Road area of West Belfast, February 20, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 20, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU1 
February 28, 2013 
A mural features Irish boxer Michael Conlan winning a bronze medal in the flyweight division at the 2012... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
A mural features Irish boxer Michael Conlan winning a bronze medal in the flyweight division 
A mural features Irish boxer Michael Conlan winning a bronze medal in the flyweight division at the 2012 Summer Olympics on a wall in the Falls road area of West Belfast February 23, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 23, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDU0 
February 28, 2013 
A mural on the Shankill road shows tributes to Britain's Queen Elizabeth in West Belfast, February 21,... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
A mural on the Shankill road shows tributes to Britain's Queen Elizabeth 
A mural on the Shankill road shows tributes to Britain's Queen Elizabeth in West Belfast, February 21, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 21, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)

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BRITAIN/
RTR3EDTZ 
February 28, 2013 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts Operation Motorman, February 21, 2013. Historically... 
Derry, United Kingdom 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts Operation Motorman 
A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts Operation Motorman, February 21, 2013. Historically most of the hundreds of murals across Northern Ireland promoted either republican or loyalist political beliefs, often glorifying paramilitary groups such as the Irish Republican Army or the Ulster Volunteer Force, or commemorating people who lost their lives in paramilitary or military attacks. However, since the paramilitary ceasefires some of the paintings have become less sectarian, celebrating sporting successes and cultural achievements. Picture taken February 21, 2013.

REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY)

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IRISH-QUEEN/
RTR347LR 
June 27, 2012 
Britain's Queen Elizabeth shakes hands with Northern Ireland deputy first minister Martin McGuinness,... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
Britain's Queen Elizabeth shakes hands with Northern Ireland deputy first minister Martin McGuinness... 
Britain's Queen Elizabeth shakes hands with Northern Ireland deputy first minister Martin McGuinness, watched by first minister Peter Robinson (C) at the Lyric Theatre in Belfast June 27, 2012. Queen Elizabeth shook the hand of former Irish Republican Army (IRA) commander McGuinness for the first time on Wednesday, drawing a line under a conflict that cost the lives of thousands of soldiers and civilians, including that of her cousin. REUTERS/Paul Faith/pool (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: ROYALS SOCIETY POLITICS CIVIL UNREST) 
YEMEN/
RTR3465D 
June 25, 2012 
A tribal fighter jumps off a truck on a road linking the Yemeni capital Sanaa with the oil-producing... 
Sanaa, Yemen 
A tribal fighter jumps off a truck on a road linking the Yemeni capital Sanaa with the oil-producing... 
A tribal fighter jumps off a truck on a road linking the Yemeni capital Sanaa with the oil-producing province of Marib June 26, 2012. The road was opened for the first time in more than a year this week, after the army and tribal fighters agreed to withdraw from positions along the route. Yemen's Republican Guard had skirmished with tribal groups in the area, blocking deliveries of gas and other products from Marib to the capital. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY) 
YEMEN/
RTR33VHN 
June 19, 2012 
Members of Yemen's elite Republican Guard and pro-army tribesmen gather for a group photo atop a military... 
Lawdar, Yemen 
Members of Yemen's elite Republican Guard and pro-army tribesmen stand atop a military vehicle as they... 
Members of Yemen's elite Republican Guard and pro-army tribesmen gather for a group photo atop a military vehicle as they secure a road leading to Lawdar town in the southern province of Abyan June 19, 2012. Al Qaeda-linked militants retreated from Lawdar last month after encountering stiff resistance from pro-army tribal fighters, who have arranged themselves into popular committees to defend their town against attempts by the militants to control it. Yemen's army recaptured the last al Qaeda stronghold in restive Abyan province on Friday in a major advance in its U.S.-backed offensive to drive militants from towns across the south of the country. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY) 
NORTHERNIRELAND/
RTR2CGLN 
April 05, 2010 
A dissident republican colour party parades through Derry's Creggan housing estate on their way to a... 
Derry, United Kingdom 
A dissident republican colour party parades through Derry's Creggan housing estate on their way to a... 
A dissident republican colour party parades through Derry's Creggan housing estate on their way to a Republican Memorial service in the city April 5, 2010. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: CIVIL UNREST) 
NORTHERN IRELAND/
RTXQU8L 
November 17, 2009 
A statue of a a Republican paramilitary is displayed in the Open Window art studio workshop in Belfast,... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
A statue of a a Republican paramilitary is displayed in an art studio workshop in Belfast 
A statue of a a Republican paramilitary is displayed in the Open Window art studio workshop in Belfast, Northern Ireland, November 17, 2009. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND SOCIETY) 
NORTHERN IRELAND/
RTXQU8K 
November 17, 2009 
A statue of a Republican paramilitary is displayed in the Open Window art studio workshop in Belfast,... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
A statue of a Republican paramilitary is displayed in an art studio workshop in Belfast 
A statue of a Republican paramilitary is displayed in the Open Window art studio workshop in Belfast, Northern Ireland, November 17, 2009. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND ENTERTAINMENT CONFLICT) 
IRISH-IRA/
RTXDYCL 
April 13, 2009 
A member of the Real IRA reads a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern... 
United Kingdom 
A member of the Real IRA reads a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern... 
A member of the Real IRA reads a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13, 2009. The Real IRA, a splinter paramilitary group of the Irish Republican Army, have claimed responsibility for the murders of two soldiers at an Army Barracks in Antrim last month. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND CONFLICT POLITICS HEADSHOT) 
IRISH-IRA/
RTXDYCI 
April 13, 2009 
A member of the Real IRA reads a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern... 
United Kingdom 
A member of the Real IRA reads a statement in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland 
A member of the Real IRA reads a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13, 2009. The Real IRA, a splinter paramilitary group of the Irish Republican Army, have claimed responsibility for the murders of two soldiers at an Army Barracks in Antrim last month. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND CONFLICT POLITICS HEADSHOT) 
IRISH-IRA/
RTXDYCA 
April 13, 2009 
A member of the Real IRA (3rd L) is applauded as he makes his way through the crowd to read a statement... 
United Kingdom 
A member of the Real IRA is applauded in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland 
A member of the Real IRA (3rd L) is applauded as he makes his way through the crowd to read a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13, 2009. The Real IRA, a splinter paramilitary group of the Irish Republican Army, have claimed responsibility for the murders of two soldiers at an Army Barracks in Antrim last month. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND CONFLICT POLITICS) 
IRISH-IRA/
RTXDYC5 
April 13, 2009 
A member of the Real IRA is applauded as he makes his way through the crowd to read a statement at a... 
United Kingdom 
A member of the Real IRA is applauded in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland 
A member of the Real IRA is applauded as he makes his way through the crowd to read a statement at a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, April 13 2009. The Real IRA, a splinter paramilitary group of the Irish Republican Army, have claimed responsibility for the murders of two soldiers at an Army Barracks in Antrim last month. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND CONFLICT POLITICS) 
IRISH-IRA/
RTXDYBY 
April 13, 2009 
A masked youth holds petrol bombs as he stands near a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry,... 
United Kingdom 
A masked youth holds petrol bombs in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland 
A masked youth holds petrol bombs as he stands near a Republican memorial in the Creggan area of Derry, Northern Ireland, where a member of the Real IRA was reading a statement, April 13 2009. The Real IRA, a splinter paramilitary group of the Irish Republican Army, have claimed responsibility for the murders of two soldiers at an Army Barracks in Antrim last month. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND CONFLICT POLITICS) 
BRITAIN
RTR1J74N 
November 09, 2006 
George Churchill Coleman (R), commander of the police anti-terrorist squad surveys the scene after a... 
London, United Kingdom 
Commander of the police anti-terrorist squad surveys scene after bomb exploded in Soho area of London... 
George Churchill Coleman (R), commander of the police anti-terrorist squad surveys the scene after a bomb exploded in the Soho area of London April 6, 1992. There were no casualties in the blast and no warning was given. REUTERS/Andre Camara (BRITAIN) 
IRISH COMMISSION IRA
RTR1I0A9 
October 04, 2006 
Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair speaks inside Downing Street in London, on a report from the Independent... 
London, United Kingdom 
Britain's Prime Minister Blair speaks inside Downing Street in London 
Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair speaks inside Downing Street in London, on a report from the Independent Monitoring Commission on paramilitary activity in Northern Ireland, October 4, 2006. The Irish Republican Army's violent campaign in Northern Ireland is over, Blair said on Wednesday following a report that raised hopes of reviving self-rule. REUTERS/Peter Macdiarmid/ Getty Images/Pool (BRITAIN) 
IRISH COMMISSION IRA
RTR1I0A3 
October 04, 2006 
Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair speaks inside Downing Street in London, on a report from the Independent... 
London, United Kingdom 
Britain's Prime Minister Blair speaks inside Downing Street in London 
Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair speaks inside Downing Street in London, on a report from the Independent Monitoring Commission on paramilitary activity in Northern Ireland, October 4, 2006. The Irish Republican Army's violent campaign in Northern Ireland is over, Blair said on Wednesday following a report that raised hopes of reviving self-rule. REUTERS/Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images/Pool (BRITAIN) 
IRISH COMMUNITY
RTR1HRG0 
September 27, 2006 
A woman walks past an Irish Republican mural challenging the policing issue in Northern Ireland on the... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
To match feature IRISH COMMUNITY 
A woman walks past an Irish Republican mural challenging the policing issue in Northern Ireland on the Falls Road in west Belfast in this April 28, 2003 file photo. Despite the repeated failure of Northern Ireland's politicians to agree on how the province should be governed, the local signs of normalisation are everywhere apparent with policemen increasingly patrolling on bike and on foot and community groups working to tone down provocative displays of allegiance to paramilitary groups. To match feature IRISH COMMUNITY REUTERS/Paul McErlane/Files (NORTHERN IRELAND) 
BRITAIN
RTR16E8V 
February 19, 2006 
An armed police officer holds his self-loading carbine at a new security check point as tourists look... 
London, United Kingdom 
An armed police officer stands at a new security check point as tourists look on and miss their first... 
An armed police officer holds his self-loading carbine at a new security check point as tourists look on and miss their first glance of London's St Paul's Cathedral, July 3, 1993. Security check points have been set up in London's financial City district to try and prevent a repetition of the blockbuster IRA bomb which wrecked the area earlier this year. REUTERS/Andre Camara 
IRISH MURALS
RTR1AYKA 
September 14, 2005 
A boy walks past an Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) mural on the Shankill Road in Belfast, northern Ireland... 
Belfast, United Kingdom 
To match feature Irish-Murals 
A boy walks past an Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) mural on the Shankill Road in Belfast, northern Ireland in this September 14, 2005 file photo. Change in Northern Ireland may be so slow it appears imperceptible, but the writing is on the wall for one of the most negative of its cultural traditions - murals glorifying paramilitary violence. With the Irish Republican Army pledging to down arms against British rule and pressure mounting on pro-British paramilitaries to follow suit, the menacing paintings that for decades symbolised Northern Ireland's conflict have started to be replaced. To match feature Irish-Murals REUTERS/Jeff J Mitchell/File 
IRISH
RTRNT89 
February 19, 2005 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams speaks to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February 19, 2005.... 
Dublin, Ireland 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams speaks to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel. 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams speaks to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February 19, 2005. Leaders of the Irish Republican Army's political ally Sinn Fein met for crisis talks on Saturday as a cross-border money laundering investigation piled pressure on the party over alleged links to paramilitary crime. In recent days police in Ireland have quizzed eight people and recovered more than 2.5 million pounds ($4.73 million) in cash - some of which may be linked to a 26.5 million pound Belfast bank raid in December - in what they say is a probe into illegal IRA funding. REUTERS/Paul McErlane PM/MD 
IRISH
RTRNT73 
February 19, 2005 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February... 
Dublin, Ireland 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel. 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February 19, 2005. Leaders of the Irish Republican Army's political ally Sinn Fein met for crisis talks on Saturday as a cross-border money laundering investigation piled pressure on the party over alleged links to paramilitary crime. In recent days police in Ireland have quizzed eight people and recovered more than 2.5 million pounds ($4.73 million) in cash - some of which may be linked to a 26.5 million pound Belfast bank raid in December - in what they say is a probe into illegal IRA funding. REUTERS/Paul McErlane PM/MD 
IRISH
RTRNT6W 
February 19, 2005 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February... 
Dublin, Ireland 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel. 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February 19, 2005. Leaders of the Irish Republican Army's political ally Sinn Fein met for crisis talks on Saturday as a cross-border money laundering investigation piled pressure on the party over alleged links to paramilitary crime. In recent days police in Ireland have quizzed eight people and recovered more than 2.5 million pounds ($4.73 million) in cash - some of which may be linked to a 26.5 million pound Belfast bank raid in December - in what they say is a probe into illegal IRA funding. REUTERS/Paul McErlane PM/MD 
IRISH
RTRNT5I 
February 19, 2005 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February... 
Dublin, Ireland 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel. 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February 19, 2005. Leaders of the Irish Republican Army's political ally Sinn Fein met for crisis talks on Saturday as a cross-border money laundering investigation piled pressure on the party over alleged links to paramilitary crime. In recent days police in Ireland have quizzed eight people and recovered more than 2.5 million pounds ($4.73 million) in cash - some of which may be linked to a 26.5 million pound Belfast bank raid in December - in what they say is a probe into illegal IRA funding. REUTERS/Paul McErlane PM/MD 
IRISH
RTRNT4B 
February 19, 2005 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February... 
Dublin, Ireland 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel. 
Sinn Fein party leader Gerry Adams prepares to speak to fellow republicans in a Dublin hotel, February 19, 2005. Leaders of the Irish Republican Army's political ally Sinn Fein met for crisis talks on Saturday as a cross-border money laundering investigation piled pressure on the party over alleged links to paramilitary crime. In recent days police in Ireland have quizzed eight people and recovered more than 2.5 million pounds ($4.73 million) in cash - some of which may be linked to a 26.5 million pound Belfast bank raid in December - in what they say is a probe into illegal IRA funding. REUTERS/Paul McErlane PM/MD 
BROSNAN
RTXMKG9 
April 20, 2004 
Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) member and former Secretary General of the Department of Justice... 
Belfast, UK 
Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) member and former Secretary General of the Department of Jus..... 
Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) member and former Secretary General of the Department of Justice in Dublin, Joe Brosnan, listens during a news conference on the IMC's recent report into paramilitary groups in Belfast, April 20, 2004. [The report said that paramilitary activity on the part of both republican and loyalist groups was disturbingly high.] 
IRISH
RTRHUA6 
April 20, 2004 
Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) members, former Metropolitan Police deputy assistant commissioner... 
Belfast, United Kingdom of Great Britain 
INDEPENDENT MONITORING COMMISSION MEMBERS ADDRESS A NEWS CONFERENCE IN BELFAST. 
Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) members, former Metropolitan Police deputy assistant commissioner John Grieve (L) former Northern Ireland Assembly Speaker Lord Alderdice (C) and former Secretary General of the Department of Justice in Dublin, Joe Brosnan, conduct a news conference on the IMC's recent report into paramilitary groups in Belfast, April 20, 2004. The report said that paramilitary activity on the part of both republican and loyalist groups was disturbingly high. REUTERS/Paul McErlane PM/DW/AA 
IRISH
RTRHU92 
April 20, 2004 
Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) member and former Secretary General of the Department of Justice... 
Belfast, United Kingdom of Great Britain 
INDEPENDENT MONITORING COMMISSION MEMBER JOE BROSNAN ADDRESSES A NEWS CONFERENCE IN BELFAST. 
Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) member and former Secretary General of the Department of Justice in Dublin, Joe Brosnan, listens during a news conference on the IMC's recent report into paramilitary groups in Belfast, April 20, 2004. The report said that paramilitary activity on the part of both republican and loyalist groups was disturbingly high. REUTERS/Paul McErlane PM/DW/AA 
IRISH
RTRHU8W 
April 20, 2004 
Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) member and former Northern Ireland Assembly Speaker Lord Alderdice... 
Belfast, United Kingdom of Great Britain 
LORD ALDERDICE INDEPENDENT MONITORING COMMISSION MEMBER ADDRESSES A NEWS CONFERENCE IN BELFAST. 
Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) member and former Northern Ireland Assembly Speaker Lord Alderdice addresses a news conference on the IMC's recent report into paramilitary groups in Belfast, April 20, 2004. The report said that paramilitary activity on the part of both republican and loyalist groups was disturbingly high. REUTERS/Paul McErlane PM/DW/AA 
IRISH
RTRHU85 
April 20, 2004 
Former CIA chief Richard Kerr speaks during a news conference on Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC)... 
Belfast, United Kingdom of Great Britain 
FORMER CIA CHIEF KERR SPEAKS IN BELFAST ON LATEST IMC REPORT INTO PARAMILITARY VIOLENCE IN NORTHERN IRELAND.... 
Former CIA chief Richard Kerr speaks during a news conference on Independent Monitoring Commission (IMC) report into paramilitary groups still involved in violence, Belfast, Northern Ireland, April 20, 2004. Northern Ireland's biggest Catholic political party, Sinn Fein, is to be hit with financial sanctions over alleged Irish Republican Army (IRA) violence afterthe IMC's report published on Tuesday said key members hold senior ranks in the outlawed guerrilla group. REUTERS/Paul McErlane PM/DW/CRB 
IRAQ
RTR6SAV 
November 12, 2003 
Portuguese Republican Guards embark on an aircraft to Iraq at Lisbon
airport November 12, 2003. In a... 
Nassiriya 
PORTUGUESE REPUBLICAN GUARDS EMBARK FOR IRAQ AT LISBON AIRPORT. 
Portuguese Republican Guards embark on an aircraft to Iraq at Lisbon
airport November 12, 2003. In a reinforcement of coalition forces, 128
paramilitary police officers from Portugal departed for Iraq to be
based in Nassiriya, south of Baghdad, where a suicide car bomb struck
the Italian military police headquarters on Wednesday. REUTERS/Jose
Manuel Ribeiro

JR/CRB 
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