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Search results for: Roofer

STORM-IRMA/
RTX3GVBN
September 19, 2017
A roofer works on attaching a blue tarp to a roof following Hurricane Irma in Ramrod Key, Florida, U.S.,...
RAMROD KEY, UNITED STATES
A roofer works on attaching a blue tarp to a roof following Hurricane Irma in Ramrod Key, Florida
A roofer works on attaching a blue tarp to a roof following Hurricane Irma in Ramrod Key, Florida, U.S., September 18, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
STORM-IRMA/
RTX3GVBM
September 19, 2017
A roofer works on attaching a blue tarp to a roof following Hurricane Irma in Ramrod Key, Florida, U.S.,...
RAMROD KEY, UNITED STATES
A roofer works on attaching a blue tarp to a roof following Hurricane Irma in Ramrod Key, Florida
A roofer works on attaching a blue tarp to a roof following Hurricane Irma in Ramrod Key, Florida, U.S., September 18, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
STORM-IRMA/IMMIGRATION
RTX3FDLQ
September 09, 2017
Filomeno Romero, 52, reinforces his mobile home ahead of the approach of Hurricane Irma in Apopka, Florida,...
APOPKA, UNITED STATES
Filomeno Romero, 52, reinforces his mobile home ahead of the approach of Hurricane Irma in Apopka
Filomeno Romero, 52, reinforces his mobile home ahead of the approach of Hurricane Irma in Apopka, Florida, September 8, 2017. Romero, a U.S. citizen of Mexican origin, works as a roofer and is among the immigrants of Central Florida who will seek shelter from the storm. REUTERS/Dan Trotta
STORM-IRMA/IMMIGRATION
RTX3FDLP
September 09, 2017
Filomeno Romero, 52, reinforces his mobile home ahead of the approach of Hurricane Irma in Apopka, Florida,...
APOPKA, UNITED STATES
Filomeno Romero, 52, reinforces his mobile home ahead of the approach of Hurricane Irma in Apopka
Filomeno Romero, 52, reinforces his mobile home ahead of the approach of Hurricane Irma in Apopka, Florida, September 8, 2017. Romero, a U.S. citizen of Mexican origin, works as a roofer and is among the immigrants of Central Florida who will seek shelter from the storm. REUTERS/Dan Trotta
STORM-IRMA/IMMIGRATION
RTX3FDLO
September 09, 2017
Filomeno Romero, 52, reinforces his mobile home ahead of the approach of Hurricane Irma in Apopka, Florida,...
APOPKA, UNITED STATES
Filomeno Romero, 52, reinforces his mobile home ahead of the approach of Hurricane Irma in Apopka
Filomeno Romero, 52, reinforces his mobile home ahead of the approach of Hurricane Irma in Apopka, Florida, September 8, 2017. Romero, a U.S. citizen of Mexican origin, works as a roofer and is among the immigrants of Central Florida who will seek shelter from the storm. REUTERS/Dan Trotta
USA-FED/LABOR
RTS19SV
September 15, 2015
A roofer nails on shingles at a job site in northwest Washington September 15, 2015. When the Federal...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Roofers nails on shingles at job site in Washington
A roofer nails on shingles at a job site in northwest Washington September 15, 2015. When the Federal Reserve considers whether the U.S. economy is ready for an interest rate hike on Thursday, policymakers will want to be confident the jobless rate, now at 5.1 percent, is as strong as it looks. There appear to be reasons for optimism as many poorer and less educated workers are finding jobs or receiving bigger raises. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
USA-FED/LABOR
RTS19SO
September 15, 2015
Roofers work on a job site in northwest Washington September 15, 2015. When the Federal Reserve considers...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Roofers work on a job site in Washington
Roofers work on a job site in northwest Washington September 15, 2015. When the Federal Reserve considers whether the U.S. economy is ready for an interest rate hike on Thursday, policymakers will want to be confident the jobless rate, now at 5.1 percent, is as strong as it looks. There appear to be reasons for optimism as many poorer and less educated workers are finding jobs or receiving bigger raises. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
USA-FED/LABOR
RTS19SN
September 15, 2015
A roofer adjusts shingles at a job site in northwest Washington September 15, 2015. When the Federal...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Roofer adjusts shingles at job site in Washington
A roofer adjusts shingles at a job site in northwest Washington September 15, 2015. When the Federal Reserve considers whether the U.S. economy is ready for an interest rate hike on Thursday, policymakers will want to be confident the jobless rate, now at 5.1 percent, is as strong as it looks.There appear to be reasons for optimism as many poorer and less educated workers are finding jobs or receiving bigger raises. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
USA-FED/LABOR
RTS19S6
September 15, 2015
Roofers work on a job site in northwest Washington September 15, 2015. When the Federal Reserve considers...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Roofers work on a job site in Washington
Roofers work on a job site in northwest Washington September 15, 2015. When the Federal Reserve considers whether the U.S. economy is ready for an interest rate hike on Thursday, policymakers will want to be confident the jobless rate, now at 5.1 percent, is as strong as it looks. There appear to be reasons for optimism as many poorer and less educated workers are finding jobs or receiving bigger raises. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WIK
October 13, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado points to the United States across the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo),...
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Guardado points to the United States across the border between Mexico and the U.S. as...
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado points to the United States across the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo), the border between Mexico and the U.S., as he speaks to Reuters in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WIF
October 13, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado arranges things in his bag in the dormitory of a migrant shelter...
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado arranges things in his bag in the dormitory of a migrant shelter...
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado arranges things in his bag in the dormitory of a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WID
October 13, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado gestures while walking in the dormitory of a migrant shelter in...
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado gestures while walking in the dormitory of a migrant shelter in...
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado gestures while walking in the dormitory of a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WI6
October 13, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014....
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WGF
October 12, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014....
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado talks to Reuters at a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING
RTR49WFW
October 12, 2014
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado shaves while standing on the patio of a migrant shelter in Reynosa...
Reynosa, Mexico
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado shaves while standing on the patio of a migrant shelter in Reynosa...
Honduran migrant Juan Marcos Guardado shaves while standing on the patio of a migrant shelter in Reynosa October 2, 2014. Tens of thousands of Central American migrants are being kidnapped, abused and extorted by Mexican gangs just yards from the United States in a growing racket that may be worth up to $250 million (155.61 million pounds) a year. Guardado, a 27-year-old roofer, said he was betrayed by a fellow Honduran shortly after arriving by bus in Reynosa. The man handed Guardado over to men who said they were members of the feared Gulf Cartel and extorted $1,500 from his relatives. They then passed him onto another kidnapping group. The kidnapping of Central American migrants, some of the poorest people in the Americas, is not new. But a recent surge in the number of Central American migrants heading for the United States - coupled with successful operations by Mexican security forces to disrupt cartels' drug business - has turned a former sideline into an increasingly important revenue stream for rank and file cartel members. To match Insight USA-IMMIGRATION/KIDNAPPING Picture taken October 2, 2014. REUTERS/Simon Gardner (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY IMMIGRATION)
USA/
RTR3IWRE
March 27, 2014
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley...
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley in Las Vegas, Nevada April 5, 2013. The buying of foreclosed homes and other distressed homes by three big institutional buyers is reshaping the housing market in Las Vegas. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION)
USA/
RTR3IWRC
March 27, 2014
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley...
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley in Las Vegas, Nevada April 5, 2013. The buying of foreclosed homes and other distressed homes by three big institutional buyers is reshaping the housing market in Las Vegas. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION)
VEGAS-HOUSING/
RTXZ7BH
May 02, 2013
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley...
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley in Las Vegas, Nevada April 5, 2013. The once-beleaguered Las Vegas housing market has been on fire since investment firms began buying homes here some eight months ago. Picture taken April 5, 2013. To match Special Report VEGAS-HOUSING/ REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION)
VEGAS-HOUSING/
RTXZ7BF
May 02, 2013
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley...
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley in Las Vegas, Nevada April 5, 2013. The once-beleaguered Las Vegas housing market has been on fire since investment firms began buying homes here some eight months ago. Picture taken April 5, 2013. To match Special Report VEGAS-HOUSING/ REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: REAL ESTATE BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION)
STORM-SANDY/
RTR3ABP0
November 12, 2012
Roofers work to repair damage done to a home by Hurricane Sandy in the Annadale neighborhood of Staten...
New York, UNITED STATES
Roofers work to repair damage done to a home by Hurricane Sandy in the Annadale neighborhood of Staten...
Roofers work to repair damage done to a home by Hurricane Sandy in the Annadale neighborhood of Staten Island, New York November 12, 2012. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
SWITZERLAND/
RTR2VCLA
December 17, 2011
A roofer fixes a roof of a farmer's house after winter storm Joachim blowed away roofing tiles in Boll...
BOLL, Switzerland
A roofer fixes a roof of a farmer's house after winter storm Joachim blowed away roofing tiles in Boll...
A roofer fixes a roof of a farmer's house after winter storm Joachim blowed away roofing tiles in Boll near Bern December 17, 2011 REUTERS/Pascal Lauener (SWITZERLAND - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
USA-ECONOMY/
RTR2BYHY
March 23, 2010
Roof tiles are seen arranged on the roof of a home under construction in Lancaster, California March...
Lancaster, UNITED STATES
Roof tiles are seen arranged on the roof of a home under construction in Lancaster
Roof tiles are seen arranged on the roof of a home under construction in Lancaster, California March 22, 2010. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
PROPERTY-BRITAIN/VILLAGE
RTXCVVI
March 17, 2009
Master thatcher Paul Raynsford works on a roof in Linkenholt, southern England March 17, 2009. An entire...
LINKENHOLT, United Kingdom
Master thatcher Paul Raynsford works on a roof in Linkenholt, southern England
Master thatcher Paul Raynsford works on a roof in Linkenholt, southern England March 17, 2009. An entire English village, complete with 22 houses and cottages, two blacksmiths and a cricket pitch, goes on sale this week. The charitable trust which owns Linkenholt, has decided to sell up and use the capital it raises elsewhere. The asking price when the village goes on the open market on Wednesday is 22-25 million pounds ($31-35 million), according to Jackson-Stops & Staff estate agents who are handling the sale. REUTERS/ Eddie Keogh (BRITAIN BUSINESS SOCIETY)
GERMANY/RENEWABLES
RTR22GX4
December 11, 2008
Workers install solar panels on the roof of a kindergarten in the town of Falkensee near Berlin December...
FALKENSEE, Germany
To match feature GERMANY-RENEWABLES/
Workers install solar panels on the roof of a kindergarten in the town of Falkensee near Berlin December 10, 2008. While the rest of the economy plunges into recession, Germany's solar power industry is full of optimism, fat order books and factories humming at full capacity -- in stark contrast to the surrounding economic gloom. "There's no recession here," said Frank Asbeck, chairman of SolarWorld AG, showing reporters round his ever-expanding $600 million plant in Freiberg. "We're always recruiting staff and are glad to hire workers laid off elsewhere." To match feature GERMANY-RENEWABLES/ REUTERS/Erik Kirschbaum (GERMANY)
GERMANY/RENEWABLES
RTR22GX3
December 11, 2008
Workers install solar panels on the roof of a kindergarten in the town of Falkensee near Berlin, December...
FALKENSEE, Germany
To match feature GERMANY-RENEWABLES/
Workers install solar panels on the roof of a kindergarten in the town of Falkensee near Berlin, December 10, 2008. While the rest of the economy plunges into recession, Germany's solar power industry is full of optimism, fat order books and factories humming at full capacity -- in stark contrast to the surrounding economic gloom. "There's no recession here," said Frank Asbeck, chairman of SolarWorld AG, showing reporters round his ever-expanding $600 million plant in Freiberg. "We're always recruiting staff and are glad to hire workers laid off elsewhere." To match feature GERMANY-RENEWABLES/ REUTERS/Erik Kirschbaum (GERMANY)
SWITZERLAND/
RTR21I2N
August 21, 2008
Employees of Solstis, a specialist solar roofing company, install photovoltaic tiles on a roof of a private...
PENTHALAZ, Switzerland
Employees of Solstis install photovoltaic tiles on a roof of a private house in Penthalaz
Employees of Solstis, a specialist solar roofing company, install photovoltaic tiles on a roof of a private house in Penthalaz, Southern Switzerland, August 21, 2008. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse (SWITZERLAND)
CHINA-GDP/
RTX4DSQ
December 04, 2007
A man works on the roof of the Tiananmen Gate in Beijing December 4, 2007. China's economy is forecast...
Beijing, China
A man works on the roof of the Tiananmen Gate in Beijing
A man works on the roof of the Tiananmen Gate in Beijing December 4, 2007. China's economy is forecast to grow 10.8 percent in 2008, while consumer prices are expected to increase 4.5 percent, the State Information Centre said on Monday. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA)
TURKEY/
RTR1URWM
October 10, 2007
Workers take a break during construction on the roof of a museum in Istanbul October 10, 2007. A mosque...
Istanbul, Turkey
Workers take a break during construction on the roof of a museum in Istanbul
Workers take a break during construction on the roof of a museum in Istanbul October 10, 2007. A mosque and a church are seen in the background. REUTERS/Fatih Saribas (TURKEY)
MARKETS-FEDFUNDS
RTR1U06E
September 18, 2007
Construction work continues on new homes in Carlsbad, California September 18, 2007. The U.S. Federal...
Carlsbad, UNITED STATES
Construction work continues on new homes in Carlsbad, California as Federal Reserve lowers interest rates...
Construction work continues on new homes in Carlsbad, California September 18, 2007. The U.S. Federal Reserve on Tuesday slashed benchmark U.S. interest rates by a half-percentage point in a bold bid to buffer the economy from a housing slump and related financial market turbulence. The unanimous decision by the central bank's Federal Open Market Committee took the overnight federal funds rate down to 4.75 percent, its lowest level since May of last year. REUTERS/Mike Blake (UNITED STATES)
CHINA-INVESTMENT/PLANNER
RTR1SYCX
August 21, 2007
A construction worker works on the roof of a new building in Beijing August 21, 2007. Too much government...
Beijing, China
A construction worker works on the roof of a new building in Beijing
A construction worker works on the roof of a new building in Beijing August 21, 2007. Too much government revenue is being used for urban construction and other fixed-asset investments, making it difficult to rein in China's rapid economic growth, Xinhua news agency reported over the weekend, citing a government think-tank official. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
LEBANON-ISRAEL/
RTR1RU7G
July 14, 2007
Workers rebuild the roof of a house that was damaged during last year's war between Israel and Lebanon's...
Houla, Lebanon
Workers rebuild the roof of a house that was damaged during last year's war between Israel and Lebanon's...
Workers rebuild the roof of a house that was damaged during last year's war between Israel and Lebanon's Hezbollah in Houla village in south Lebanon July 14, 2007. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho (LEBANON)
SINGAPORE/
RTR1NKIT
March 17, 2007
Construction labourers work on the roof on an under-construction high rise building in Singapore March...
Singapore, Singapore
Construction labourers work on the roof on an under-construction high rise building in Singapore
Construction labourers work on the roof on an under-construction high rise building in Singapore March 17, 2007. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (SINGAPORE)
CHINA TIBET
RTR1F76R
July 05, 2006
Tibetan workers sing and dance while repairing a roof section of the Potala Palace in Lhasa in Tibet...
Lhasa, China
Tibetan workers sing and dance while repairing a roof section of the Potala Palace in Lhasa
Tibetan workers sing and dance while repairing a roof section of the Potala Palace in Lhasa in Tibet Autonomous Region July 5, 2006. The Potala Palace, the Dalai Lama's traditional home, is more than 1,300 years old and is more than 3,700 meters above sea level. It is a UNESCO World Heritage site. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV (CHINA)
HURRICANE
RTR19MCL
October 17, 2005
Workers prepare the roof of the Superdome stadium for repairs as the sun sets in New Orleans, Louisiana...
New Orleans, UNITED STATES
Workers prepare roof of the Superdome stadium for repairs as the sun sets in New Orleans, Louisiana
Workers prepare the roof of the Superdome stadium for repairs as the sun sets in New Orleans, Louisiana October 17, 2005. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
UNITED STATES
RTR98A3
April 25, 2005
U.S. actor Ray Romano, who guest stars as a voice talent on the 350th episode titled "Don't Fear The...
Los Angeles, USA
US actor Ray Romano arrives as a guest at "The Simpsons" 350th episode party in Los Angeles.
U.S. actor Ray Romano, who guest stars as a voice talent on the 350th episode titled "Don't Fear The Roofer" of the Fox television network's animated television series "The Simpsons", poses as he arrives for a block party on the Fox studio lot celebrating the series' 350th episode in Los Angeles, California April 25, 2005. REUTERS/Fred Prouser FSP/JK
WEATHER HURRICANE
RTRBQO2
September 25, 2004
Roofers apply plywood to the roof of the VFW Post 2420 in Lake Wales, Florida September 25, 2004. Hurricanes...
Lake Wales, USA
Roofers make repairs to roof damaged by Charley and Frances, as Hurricane Jeanne approaches.
Roofers apply plywood to the roof of the VFW Post 2420 in Lake Wales, Florida September 25, 2004. Hurricanes Charley and Frances have already hit Lake Wales causing extensive damage. Hurricane Jeanne is the fourth hurricane since August 13 to threaten Lake Wales. Previous to this hurricane season Lake Wales has not been hit since Hurricane Donna hit in 1960. Lake Wales is 70 miles west of Vero Beach. Allen Fredrickson REUTERS AF
POLITICS GRAHAM
RTR660Y
November 03, 2003
During one of his "work days" and with a pop rivet in his mouth, U.S.
Senator Bob Graham (D-Fl) strains...
Tallahassee, United States of America
SENATOR BOB GRAHAM HELPS INSTALL NEW ROOF ON FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL.
During one of his "work days" and with a pop rivet in his mouth, U.S.
Senator Bob Graham (D-Fl) strains to install a stainless steel pop
rivet in some flashing on the new roof of Lincoln High School in
Tallahassee, Florida, November 3, 2003. Graham worked alongside David
Morrison (R), of Garrison design, as a roofer to stay in touch with the
working American on his 391st work day prior to his announcement to not
seek a 4th term in the U.S. Senate. REUTERS/Mark Wallheiser

MW/HB
USA
RTXIEN2
April 18, 1998
Roofers mend a roof before the rain falls as debris still lines the street in Nashville,Tn. April 18...
Roofers mend a roof before the rain falls as debris still lines the street in Nashville,Tn. April 18.....
Roofers mend a roof before the rain falls as debris still lines the street in Nashville,Tn. April 18 after a tornado swept though the area. At least 150 people were injured and 11 killed from the storms that ravaged a series of southern states.
RTRDA4R
April 18, 1998
Roofers mend a roof before the rain falls as debris still lines the street in Nashville,Tn. April 18...
UNITED STATES
ROOFERS WORK AFTER TORNADO DAMAGE IN NASHVILLE.
Roofers mend a roof before the rain falls as debris still lines the street in Nashville,Tn. April 18 after a tornado swept though the area. At least 150 people were injured and 11 killed from the storms that ravaged a series of southern states. tlc/Photo by Tami L.

REUTERS
EGRAZ
RTXIMMM
January 14, 1998
Thirty-eight-year-old France's wandering horseman Franck Egraz poses on his horse on the beach of the...
Thirty-eight-year-old France's wandering horseman Franck Egraz poses on his horse on the beach of th.....
Thirty-eight-year-old France's wandering horseman Franck Egraz poses on his horse on the beach of the Elbe river in Oevelgoenne, a suburb of the northern German city of Hamburg, January 14. Egraz offered interviews to the press in the final stages of his 18-month long journey westwards from Ulan Bator, Mongolia, which he modelled on routes once taken by mediaeval conqueror Genghis Khan. Egraz, a roofer by profession, says he simply grew bored of life in Paris and used six horses to accomplish the trip.
RTRAFPO
January 14, 1998
Thirty-eight-year-old French wandering horseman Franck Egraz poses on his horse on the beach of the Elbe...
Germany
FRENCH WANDERING HORSEMAN EGRAZ POSES FOR THE PRESS IN HAMBURG
Thirty-eight-year-old French wandering horseman Franck Egraz poses on his horse on the beach of the Elbe river in Oevelgoenne, a suburb of the northern German city of Hamburg, January 14. Egraz offered interviews to the press in the final stages of his 18-month long journey westwards from Ulan Bator, Mongolia, which he modelled on routes once taken by mediaeval conqueror Genghis Khan. Egraz, a roofer by profession, says he simply grew bored of life in Paris and used six horses to accomplish the trip.

GERMANY
RTRU118
January 13, 1998
Thirty-eight-year-old wandering French horseman Franck Egraz poses on his horse in Barskamp near the...
Germany
FRENCH WANDERING HORSEMAN EGRAZ POSES FOR THE PRESS IN BARSKAMP
Thirty-eight-year-old wandering French horseman Franck Egraz poses on his horse in Barskamp near the northern German town of Lueneburg January 13. Egraz offered interviews to the press in the final stages of his 18-month long journey westwards from Ulan Bator, Mongolia on routes once taken by medieval conqueror Genghis Khan. Egraz, a roofer by profession, who said he simply grew bored of life in Paris, used six horses to accomplish the trip.

GERMANY
RTRAE9J
January 13, 1998
Thirty-eight -ear-old wandering French horseman Franck Egraz rides his horse on a tree lined avenue in...
Germany
WANDERING FRENCH HORSEMAN EGRAZ POSES FOR THE PRESS IN BARSKAMP
Thirty-eight -ear-old wandering French horseman Franck Egraz rides his horse on a tree lined avenue in Barskamp near the northern German town of Lueneburg January 13. Egraz offered interviews to the press in the final stages of his 18-month long journey westwards from Ulan Bator, Mongolia on routes once taken by medieval conqueror Genghis Khan. Egraz, a roofer by profession, who said he simply grew bored of life in Paris, used six horses to accomplish the trip.

GERMANY
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