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Search results for: STANG-Dorothy

BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/CHURCH
RTS2QAWU
September 12, 2019
A plate placed on a tree near the site where Sister Dorothy Stang was killed, reads "In memory to the...
Anapu, Brazil
A plate on a tree near the site where Sister Dorothy Stang was killed at Esperanca PDS in Anapu
A plate placed on a tree near the site where Sister Dorothy Stang was killed, reads "In memory to the martyrs who were killed in the fight for the preservation of the rainforest and the agrarian reform in the Amazon" at Esperanca PDS, a sustainable settlement project in Anapu, Para state, Brazil, September 3, 2019. The holes in the plate are from bullets shot by loggers and stockbreeders, according the residents. Picture taken September 3, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/CHURCH
RTS2QAU4
September 12, 2019
A cross stands at the site where Sister Dorothy Stang, a U.S.-born nun and environmental activist, was...
Anapu, Brazil
A cross stands at the site where Sister Dorothy Stang was assassinated, at Esperanca PDS in Anapu
A cross stands at the site where Sister Dorothy Stang, a U.S.-born nun and environmental activist, was assassinated in 2005 in retribution for her work with landless farmers at Esperanca PDS, a sustainable settlement project in Anapu, Para state, Brazil, September 3, 2019. Picture taken September 3, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/CHURCH
RTS2QAL6
September 12, 2019
Sister Jane Dwyer of Notre Dame de Namur, who was born in the U.S, holds a picture of Sister Dorothy...
Anapu, Brazil
Sister Jane Dwyer holds a picture of Dorothy Stang after an interview with Reuters in Anapu
Sister Jane Dwyer of Notre Dame de Namur, who was born in the U.S, holds a picture of Sister Dorothy Stang, an American nun and environmental activist, who was assassinated in 2005 in retribution for her work with landless farmers, after an interview with Reuters at her house in Anapu, Para state, Brazil, September 2, 2019. The phrase written on the picture of Dorothy reads "The death of the rainforest is the end of our life." Picture taken September 2, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
BRAZIL/
RTR338XQ
June 07, 2012
A Brazilian couple walk their home on what used to be the property of the rancher condemned to 30 years...
Anapu, Brazil
A Brazilian couple walk to their home on PDS Esperanca in Anapu
A Brazilian couple walk their home on what used to be the property of the rancher condemned to 30 years in jail for paying gunmen in 2005 to assassinate U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, inside the community named PDS Esperanca, the project in sustainable development that Stang founded, June 6, 2012. With the Rio+20 United Nations summit on sustainable development in Rio de Janeiro just days away, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has been burning the midnight oil to weed out the most objectionable parts of the country's new Forest Code and avoid a perception that the government is offering an amnesty those responsible for illegal forest felling, presidency sources said. Picture taken June 6, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS)
BRAZIL/
RTR338XM
June 07, 2012
Brazilian couple Marcio Ribeiro (L) and Natalha Almeida pose with their son Jeremias inside their home...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilian couple Ribeiro and Almeida pose with their son Jeremias inside their home in Anapu
Brazilian couple Marcio Ribeiro (L) and Natalha Almeida pose with their son Jeremias inside their home on what used to be the property of the rancher condemned to 30 years in jail for paying gunmen in 2005 to assassinate U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, inside the PDS Esperanca community, the project in sustainable development that Stang founded, June 6, 2012. With the Rio+20 United Nations summit on sustainable development in Rio de Janeiro just days away, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has been burning the midnight oil to weed out the most objectionable parts of the country's new Forest Code and avoid a perception that the government is offering an amnesty those responsible for illegal forest felling, presidency sources said. Picture taken June 6, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS)
BRAZIL/
RTR338V7
June 07, 2012
A commemorative plaque is nailed to a tree where U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, was murdered...
Anapu, Brazil
A commemorative plaque is nailed to a tree in Anapu
A commemorative plaque is nailed to a tree where U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, was murdered in in 2005, in the community PDS Esperanca, a project in sustainable development that Stang founded, in Anapu June 2, 2012. With the Rio+20 United Nations summit on sustainable development in Rio de Janeiro just days away, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has been burning the midnight oil to weed out the most objectionable parts of the country's new Forest Code and avoid a perception that the government is offering an amnesty those responsible for illegal forest felling, presidency sources said. The plaque reads, "In Memoriam to the martyrs who were felled in the struggle for the preservation of the forest and the agrarian reform in the Amazon." Picture taken June 2, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS)
BRAZIL/
RTR338UW
June 07, 2012
A cross stands on the spot where U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, was murdered in 2005, inside...
Anapu, Brazil
A cross stands on the spot where U.S.-born nun and activist, Stang, was murdered in 2005, in Anapu
A cross stands on the spot where U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, was murdered in 2005, inside the PDS Esperanca community, a project in sustainable development that Stang founded, in Anapu June 2, 2012. With the Rio+20 United Nations summit on sustainable development in Rio de Janeiro just days away, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has been burning the midnight oil to weed out the most objectionable parts of the country's new Forest Code and avoid a perception that the government is offering an amnesty those responsible for illegal forest felling, presidency sources said. Picture taken June 2, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS OBITUARY)
BRAZIL/
RTR338UF
June 07, 2012
A security guard stands at the entrance to the community known as PDS Esperanca, a project in sustainable...
Anapu, Brazil
A security guard stands at the entrance to PDS Esperanca in Anapu
A security guard stands at the entrance to the community known as PDS Esperanca, a project in sustainable development founded by U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, who was murdered in Brazil in 2005, to prevent illegal loggers from entering, in Anapu June 2, 2012. With the Rio+20 United Nations summit on sustainable development in Rio de Janeiro just days away, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has been burning the midnight oil to weed out the most objectionable parts of the country's new Forest Code and avoid a perception that the government is offering an amnesty those responsible for illegal forest felling, presidency sources said. Picture taken June 2, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS)
BRAZIL/
RTR338SY
June 07, 2012
A soldier from Brazil's National Security Force patrols in the entrance to the community known as PDS...
Anapu, Brazil
A soldier from Brazil's National Security Force patrols in the entrance to the community known as PDS...
A soldier from Brazil's National Security Force patrols in the entrance to the community known as PDS Esperanca, a project in sustainable development founded by U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, who was murdered in Brazil in 2005, in search of illegal log extraction, in Anapu June 2, 2012. With the Rio+20 United Nations summit on sustainable development in Rio de Janeiro just days away, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has been burning the midnight oil to weed out the most objectionable parts of the country's new Forest Code and avoid a perception that the government is offering an amnesty those responsible for illegal forest felling, presidency sources said. Picture taken June 2, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS MILITARY)
BRAZIL/
RTR338SP
June 07, 2012
Soldiers from Brazil's National Security Force patrol near the entrance to the community known as PDS...
Anapu, Brazil
Soldiers from Brazil's National Security Force patrol in the entrance to the community known as PDS Esperanca...
Soldiers from Brazil's National Security Force patrol near the entrance to the community known as PDS Esperanca, a project in sustainable development founded by U.S.-born nun and activist, Dorothy Stang, who was murdered in Brazil in 2005, in search of illegal log extraction, in Anapu June 2, 2012. With the Rio+20 United Nations summit on sustainable development in Rio de Janeiro just days away, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff has been burning the midnight oil to weed out the most objectionable parts of the country's new Forest Code and avoid a perception that the government is offering an amnesty those responsible for illegal forest felling, presidency sources said. Picture taken June 2, 2012. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho (BRAZIL - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS MILITARY)
BRAZIL/
RTR20THH
August 09, 2008
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha arrives at his parent's home after he has received permission...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha arrives at his parent's home after he has received permission...
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha arrives at his parent's home after he has received permission to leave the prison for father's weekend day in Belem August 9, 2008. Cunha was convicted for the murder of American nun Dorothy Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu, Para in 2005. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL/
RTR20THE
August 09, 2008
Brazilian rancher Clodoaldo Carlos Batista arrives at his parent's home after he has received permission...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Clodoaldo Carlos Batista arrives at his parent's home after he has received permission...
Brazilian rancher Clodoaldo Carlos Batista arrives at his parent's home after he has received permission to leave the prison for father's weekend day in Belem August 9, 2008. Batista was convicted for the murder of American nun Dorothy Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu, Para in 2005. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PQ37
May 15, 2007
David (2R) and Thomas (C) Stang celebrate with Brazilians the guilty sentence handed down to rancher...
Belem, Brazil
Brothers of U.S.-born nun Dorothy Stang celebrate the sentencing of rancher Bida for their sister's murder...
David (2R) and Thomas (C) Stang celebrate with Brazilians the guilty sentence handed down to rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, for the murder of their sister, Dorothy Stang, the U.S.-born nun and activist who was murdered in Brazil in February 2005, outside the courthouse where the trial was held in Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. Bida was found guilty of hiring the gunmen who shot Stang on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, and sentenced to 30 years in jail. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PQ2X
May 15, 2007
American nun Julia Depurg (C) of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur congregation, to which Dorothy Stang...
Belem, Brazil
American nun Julia Depurg celebrates the guilty verdict for the killer of Dorothy Stang in Belem
American nun Julia Depurg (C) of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur congregation, to which Dorothy Stang belonged before she was murdered for her work protecting the Amazon rainforest, celebrates with others after a judge handed a guilty sentence to rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura for Stang's murder in February 2005, outside the courthouse where the trial was held in Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. Bastos Moura, known as Bida, was found guilty of hiring the gunmen who shot Stang on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, and sentenced to 30 years in jail. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PQ2V
May 15, 2007
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura (L), nicknamed Bida, listens as Judge Raimundo Flexa (R) reads...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Bida listens to his sentence for the murder of Dorothy Stang in Belem
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura (L), nicknamed Bida, listens as Judge Raimundo Flexa (R) reads his sentence for the murder of U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang in February 2005, at the conclusion of his trial in a courtroom in Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. Bida was found guilty of hiring the gunmen who shot Stang on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, and sentenced to 30 years in jail. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PQ2O
May 15, 2007
David (C) and Thomas (2L) Stang celebrate with Brazilians the guilty sentence handed down to rancher...
Belem, Brazil
Brothers of U.S.-born nun Dorothy Stang celebrate the sentencing of rancher Bida for their sister's murder...
David (C) and Thomas (2L) Stang celebrate with Brazilians the guilty sentence handed down to rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, for the murder of their sister, Dorothy Stang, the U.S.-born nun and activist who was murdered in Brazil in February 2005, outside the courthouse where the trial was held in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. Bida was found guilty of hiring the gunmen who shot Stang on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, and sentenced to 30 years in jail. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PQ2J
May 15, 2007
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits as a prosecutor holds up the gun with...
Belem, Brazil
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso holds up the gun with which Dorothy Stang was murdered in Belem
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits as a prosecutor holds up the gun with which U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang was murdered in February 2005, during Bida's trial for Stang's murder in a courtroom in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. Bida was found guilty of hiring the gunmen who shot Stang on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, and sentenced to 30 years in jail. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PQ1I
May 15, 2007
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Bida stands trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun Dorothy Stang in Belem
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang in February 2005, in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. Bida was found guilty of hiring the gunmen who shot Stang on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, and sentenced to 30 years in jail. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PPZA
May 15, 2007
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso (R) holds up the gun with which U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang was...
Belem, Brazil
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso holds up the gun with which Dorothy Stang was murdered in Belem
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso (R) holds up the gun with which U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang was murdered in February 2005, as Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, listens during his trial for Stang's murder in a courtroom in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. The trial of Bida, accused of hiring the gunmen who shot Sister Dorothy on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, is viewed by many as a test case for Brazil's justice system because it is rare for landowners to stand trial for ordering killings. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PPZ9
May 15, 2007
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso holds up the gun with which U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang was murdered...
Belem, Brazil
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso holds up the gun with which Dorothy Stang was murdered in Belem
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso holds up the gun with which U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang was murdered in February 2005, during the trial of Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, for Stang's murder in a courtroom in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. The trial of Bida, accused of hiring the gunmen who shot Sister Dorothy on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, is viewed by many as a test case for Brazil's justice system because it is rare for landowners to stand trial for ordering killings. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PPZ5
May 15, 2007
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso (R) holds up the gun with which U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang was...
Belem, Brazil
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso holds up the gun with which Dorothy Stang was murdered in Belem
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso (R) holds up the gun with which U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang was murdered in February 2005, as Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, listens during his trial for Stang's murder in a courtroom in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. The trial of Bida, accused of hiring the gunmen who shot Sister Dorothy on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, is viewed by many as a test case for Brazil's justice system because it is rare for landowners to stand trial for ordering killings. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PPYZ
May 15, 2007
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso (R) holds up the gun with which U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang was...
Belem, Brazil
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso holds up the gun with which Dorothy Stang was murdered in Belem
Prosecutor Edson Cardoso (R) holds up the gun with which U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang was murdered in February 2005, as Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, listens during his trial for Stang's murder in a courtroom in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. The trial of Bida, accused of hiring the gunmen who shot Sister Dorothy on a remote track in the Amazon jungle, is viewed by many as a test case for Brazil's justice system because it is rare for landowners to stand trial for ordering killings. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PPWH
May 15, 2007
David (2nd R) and Thomas (2nd L) Stang sit with nuns that were former companions of their late sister...
Belem, Brazil
The brothers of U.S.-born nun Dorothy Stang watch the trial of rancher Bida in Belem
David (2nd R) and Thomas (2nd L) Stang sit with nuns that were former companions of their late sister Dorothy Stang, the U.S.-born nun and activist who was murdered on a remote track in the Amazon jungle in February 2005, during the trial of Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura for her murder, in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. The trial of Bastos Moura also known as Bida, accused of hiring the gunmen who shot Sister Dorothy, is viewed by many as a test case for Brazil's justice system because it is rare for landowners to stand trial for ordering killings. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PPWC
May 15, 2007
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Bida stands trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun Dorothy Stang in Belem
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang, in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. The trial of Bida, accused of hiring the gunmen who shot Sister Dorothy on a remote track in the Amazon jungle in February 2005, is viewed by many as a test case for Brazil's justice system because it is rare for landowners to stand trial for ordering killings. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PPW6
May 15, 2007
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Bida stands trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun Dorothy Stang in Belem
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang, in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. The trial of Bida, accused of hiring the gunmen who shot Sister Dorothy on a remote track in the Amazon jungle in February 2005, is viewed by many as a test case for Brazil's justice system because it is rare for landowners to stand trial for ordering killings. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PPVX
May 15, 2007
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Bida stands trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun Dorothy Stang in Belem
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang, in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. The trial of Bida, accused of hiring the gunmen who shot Sister Dorothy on a remote track in the Amazon jungle in February 2005, is viewed by many as a test case for Brazil's justice system because it is rare for landowners to stand trial for ordering killings. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL-NUN/
RTR1PPVM
May 15, 2007
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Bida stands trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun Dorothy Stang in Belem
Brazilian rancher Vitalmiro Bastos Moura, nicknamed Bida, sits in a courtroom during his trial for the murder of U.S.-born nun and activist Dorothy Stang, in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River, May 15, 2007. The trial of Bida, accused of hiring the gunmen who shot Sister Dorothy on a remote track in the Amazon jungle in February 2005, is viewed by many as a test case for Brazil's justice system because it is rare for landowners to stand trial for ordering killings. REUTERS/Paulo Santos (BRAZIL)
BRAZIL
RTR1CU3I
April 27, 2006
Mary Stang (L), sister of American nun Dorothy Stang, celebrates with a member of Brazil's Landless Movement...
Belem, Brazil
Sister of American nun Dorothy Stang celebrates with member of Brazil's Landless Movement atfer trial...
Mary Stang (L), sister of American nun Dorothy Stang, celebrates with a member of Brazil's Landless Movement after hearing the verdict in the trial of Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha, for Dorothy's murder in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, was sentenced to 18 years in prison for paying gunmen to kill Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu in 2005. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CU3H
April 27, 2006
David (2nd R), Mary (3rd R) and Margaret Stang (R), siblings of American nun Dorothy Stang, celebrate...
Belem, Brazil
Siblings of American nun Dorothy Stang celebrate after hearing verdict in trial of Brazilian rancher...
David (2nd R), Mary (3rd R) and Margaret Stang (R), siblings of American nun Dorothy Stang, celebrate with an unidentified man after hearing the verdict in the trial of Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha, for Dorothy's murder in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, was sentenced to 18 years in prison for paying gunmen to kill Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu in 2005. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CU2T
April 26, 2006
David (L), Mary (2nd L) and Margaret Stang (R), siblings of American nun Dorothy Stang, attend a news...
Belem, Brazil
Margaret, David and Mary Stang, siblings of American nun Dorothy Stang, stand inside the courtroom where...
David (L), Mary (2nd L) and Margaret Stang (R), siblings of American nun Dorothy Stang, attend a news conference outside the courtroom where Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha was tried for Dorothy's murder in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, was sentenced to 18 years in prison for paying gunmen to kill Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu in 2005. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CU2Q
April 26, 2006
Margaret (L) and Mary Stang, sisters of American nun Dorothy Stang, stand inside the courtroom where...
Belem, Brazil
Sisters of American nun Dorothy Stang stand inside courtroom where Brazilian rancher is on trial for...
Margaret (L) and Mary Stang, sisters of American nun Dorothy Stang, stand inside the courtroom where Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha is on trial for Dorothy's murder, in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, was sentenced to 18 years in prison for paying gunmen to kill Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu in 2005. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CTZP
April 26, 2006
Margaret (L) and Mary (2nd L) Stang, sisters of American nun Dorothy Stang, pass through a security post...
Belem, Brazil
Sisters of American nun Stang arrive for trial of Brazilian rancher accused of ordering her murder at...
Margaret (L) and Mary (2nd L) Stang, sisters of American nun Dorothy Stang, pass through a security post as they enter the courtroom where Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha is on trial for Dorothy's murder, in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil, April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, is charged with paying gunmen to kill Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu in 1995. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CTZL
April 26, 2006
Margaret (L) and Mary (2nd L) Stang, sisters of American nun Dorothy Stang, pass through a security post...
Belem, Brazil
Sisters of American nun Stang arrive for trial of Brazilian rancher accused of ordering her murder at...
Margaret (L) and Mary (2nd L) Stang, sisters of American nun Dorothy Stang, pass through a security post as they enter the courtroom where Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha is on trial for Dorothy's murder, in Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil, April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, is charged with paying gunmen to kill Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu in 1995. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CTVI
April 26, 2006
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha (L) listens to a state prosecutor (R) during his trial for the...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Feijoli da Cunha listens to prosecutor during trial for murder of American nun Stang...
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha (L) listens to a state prosecutor (R) during his trial for the murder of American nun Dorothy Stang, at a courthouse Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil, April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, is charged in the 2005 killing of Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CTVH
April 26, 2006
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha sits before a judge during his trial for the murder of American...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Feijoli da Cunha sits before judge during trial for murder of American nun Stang at...
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha sits before a judge during his trial for the murder of American nun Dorothy Stang, at a courthouse Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil, April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, is charged in the 2005 killing of Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CTVF
April 26, 2006
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha sits before a judge during his trial for the murder of American...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Feijoli da Cunha sits before judge during his trial for murder of American nun Stang...
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha sits before a judge during his trial for the murder of American nun Dorothy Stang, at a courthouse in Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil, April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, is charged in the 2005 killing of Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CTVC
April 26, 2006
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha sits before a judge during his trial for the murder of American...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Feijoli da Cunha sits before judge during trial for murder of American nun Stang in...
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha sits before a judge during his trial for the murder of American nun Dorothy Stang, at a courthouse in Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil, April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, is charged in the 2005 killing of Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL
RTR1CTV0
April 26, 2006
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha (L) listens to a state prosecutor (R) during his trial for the...
Belem, Brazil
Brazilian rancher Feijoli da Cunha listens to prosecutor during trial for murder of American nun Stang...
Brazilian rancher Amair Feijoli da Cunha (L) listens to a state prosecutor (R) during his trial for the murder of American nun Dorothy Stang, at a courthouse in Belem, at the mouth of the Amazon River in Brazil, April 26, 2006. Feijoli, nicknamed Tato, is charged in the 2005 killing of Stang, an Amazon forest defender, near the jungle village of Anapu. REUTERS/Paulo Santos-Interfoto
BRAZIL STANG
RTR165V3
February 13, 2006
Some 200 people march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first anniversary...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilians march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang
Some 200 people march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first anniversary of her assassination in the Brazilian jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hardwood-rich rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon. Picture taken February 12, 2006. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR165R0
February 13, 2006
Some 200 people hold a march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilians march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang
Some 200 people hold a march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first anniversary of her assassination in the Brazilian jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hardwood-rich rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon. Picture taken February 12, 2006. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR165QP
February 13, 2006
A Brazilian girl plays amongst the 774 white crosses erected on the first anniversary of the assassination...
Anapu, Brazil
A Brazilian girl plays amongst the crosses erected on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S....
A Brazilian girl plays amongst the 774 white crosses erected on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon defender Dorothy Stang to represent all those who have been murdered defending the forest, in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. Picture taken February 12, 2006. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR164ZC
February 13, 2006
Some 200 people hold a demonstration in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang,...
Anapu, Brazil
People hold demonstration in memory of US nun and Amazon forest defender Stang in Brazilian town of Anapu...
Some 200 people hold a demonstration in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first anniversary of her assassination in the Brazilian jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hardwood-rich rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR1AUCD
February 12, 2006
Some 200 people march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first anniversary...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilians march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang
Some 200 people march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first anniversary of her assassination in the Brazilian jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hardwood-rich rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon. Picture taken February 12, 2006. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR1AU8L
February 12, 2006
Some 200 people hold a march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilians march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang
Some 200 people hold a march in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first anniversary of her assassination in the Brazilian jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hardwood-rich rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon. Picture taken February 12, 2006. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR1AU5Y
February 12, 2006
A Brazilian girl plays amongst the 774 white crosses erected on the first anniversary of the assassination...
Anapu, Brazil
A Brazilian girl plays amongst the crosses erected on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S....
A Brazilian girl plays amongst the 774 white crosses erected on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon defender Dorothy Stang to represent all those who have been murdered defending the forest, in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. Picture taken February 12, 2006. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR1ARMK
February 12, 2006
Brazilian farmer Antonio Filgueiras remembers the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilian remembers first anniversary of assassination of US nun and Amazon defender Dorothy Stang
Brazilian farmer Antonio Filgueiras remembers the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon jungle defender Dorothy Stang, by placing one of the 774 white crosses that represent the people murdered defending the forest next to 48 red crosses representing those that are currently threatened with death, in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR194CS
February 12, 2006
Some 200 people hold a demonstration in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang,...
Anapu, Brazil
People hold demonstration in memory of US nun and Amazon forest defender Stang in Brazilian town of Anapu...
Some 200 people hold a demonstration in memory of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, on the first anniversary of her assassination in the Brazilian jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hardwood-rich rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR193RN
February 12, 2006
Brazilians attend a mass on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon forest...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilians attend mass on first anniversary of assassination of US nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy...
Brazilians attend a mass on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, in the Santa Luzia church in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR193RJ
February 12, 2006
Brazilians attend a mass on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon forest...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilians attend mass on first anniversary of assassination of US nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy...
Brazilians attend a mass on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, in the Santa Luzia church in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR193R0
February 12, 2006
A Brazilian farmer remembers the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon jungle...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilian remembers first anniversary of the assassination of US nun and Amazon defender Dorothy Stang...
A Brazilian farmer remembers the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon jungle defender Dorothy Stang, by placing one of the 774 white crosses that represent the people murdered defending the forest next to 48 red crosses representing those that are currently threatened with death, in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR164JE
February 12, 2006
Brazilians attend a mass on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon forest...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilians attend mass on first anniversary of assassination of US nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy...
Brazilians attend a mass on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, in the Santa Luzia church in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR164JA
February 12, 2006
Brazilians attend a mass on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon forest...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilians attend mass on first anniversary of assassination of US nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy...
Brazilians attend a mass on the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon forest defender Dorothy Stang, in the Santa Luzia church in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR164J5
February 12, 2006
A Brazilian farmer remembers the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon jungle...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilian remembers first anniversary of the assassination of US nun and Amazon defender Dorothy Stang...
A Brazilian farmer remembers the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon jungle defender Dorothy Stang, by placing one of the 774 white crosses that represent the people murdered defending the forest next to 48 red crosses representing those that are currently threatened with death, in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL STANG
RTR164J3
February 12, 2006
Brazilian farmer Antonio Filgueiras remembers the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun...
Anapu, Brazil
Brazilian remembers first anniversary of assassination of US nun and Amazon defender Dorothy Stang
Brazilian farmer Antonio Filgueiras remembers the first anniversary of the assassination of U.S. nun and Amazon jungle defender Dorothy Stang, by placing one of the 774 white crosses that represent the people murdered defending the forest next to 48 red crosses representing those that are currently threatened with death, in the jungle town of Anapu near where Stang was killed, February 12, 2006. Stang was murdered one year ago at a time when she was setting up a natural reserve in a valuable, hard-wood rich rain forest. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL NUN TRIAL
RTR1AQ0S
December 10, 2005
Margaret Stang (L) and David Stang, siblings of American nun and rain forest activist Dorothy Stang,...
Belem, Brazil
Siblings of American nun and rain forest activist Dorothy Stang speak to media after trial at Justice...
Margaret Stang (L) and David Stang, siblings of American nun and rain forest activist Dorothy Stang, speak to the media after trial at the Justice Tribunal in the Brazilian city of Belem, capital of Para state, December 10, 2005. A Brazilian court on Saturday found ranch hand Raifran das Neves Sales and farmworker Clodoaldo Carlos Batista guilty of murdering Stang in a contract killing. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL NUN TRIAL
RTR1APU3
December 10, 2005
Raifran das Neves Sales listens during his trial at the Justice Tribunal in the Brazilian city of Belem,...
Belem, Brazil
Raifran das Neves Sales listens during trial at the Justice Tribunal in Belem
Raifran das Neves Sales listens during his trial at the Justice Tribunal in the Brazilian city of Belem, capital of Para state, December 10, 2005. Sales and Clodoaldo Carlos Batista, accused of killing Dorothy Stang, attended their trial on Saturday. But human rights groups and government officials say contract killings of land rights activists are on the rise in the state of Para, where 73-year-old Stang was shot six times near the town of Anapu in February. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL NUN TRIAL
RTR1APQD
December 10, 2005
A supporter of American nun and rainforest activist Dorothy Stang protests after the trial at the Justice...
Belem, Brazil
Supporter of American nun and rainforest activist Stang protests after the trial in Brazilian city of...
A supporter of American nun and rainforest activist Dorothy Stang protests after the trial at the Justice Tribunal in the Brazilian city of Belem, capital of Para state, December 10, 2005. A Brazilian court on Saturday found ranch hand Raifran das Neves Sales and farmworker Clodoaldo Carlos Batista guilty of murdering Stang in a contract killing. REUTERS/Paulo Santos
BRAZIL NUN TRIAL
RTR1AP91
December 10, 2005
A member of the Landless Movement (MST) shouts during a protest asking for justice for murdered nun Dorothy...
Belem, Brazil
MST member shouts during protest asking for justice for murdered nun Stang in Belem
A member of the Landless Movement (MST) shouts during a protest asking for justice for murdered nun Dorothy Stang, in front of the Justice Tribunal in the Brazilian city of Belem, capital of Para state, December 10, 2005. Two men accused of killing Dorothy Stang face trial on Friday. But human rights groups and government officials say contract killings of land rights activists are on the rise in the state of Para, where 73-year-old Stang was shot six times near the town of Anapu. REUTERS/Paulo Santos/Interfoto
BRAZIL NUN TRIAL
RTR1AP8R
December 10, 2005
President of CPT (Pastoral commission of the Land), Tomas Balduino speaks to members of Landless Movement...
Belem, Brazil
President of CPT Balduino speaks to members of Landless Movement in front of Justice Tribunal in Belem...
President of CPT (Pastoral commission of the Land), Tomas Balduino speaks to members of Landless Movement (MST) in front of the Justice Tribunal in the Brazilian city of Belem, capital of Para state, December 10, 2005. Raifran das Neves Sales and Batista are expected to plead guilty on Friday to killing 73-year-old American nun, Dorothy Stang, who defended the poor in Brazil's Amazon rain forest in a landmark case that challenges the power of ranchers and loggers advancing on the jungle. REUTERS/Paulo Santos/Interfoto
BRAZIL NUN TRIAL
RTR1AOZ1
December 10, 2005
Members of the Landless Movement (MST) shout during a protest asking for justice for murdered nun Dorothy...
Belem, Brazil
MST members shouts during protest asking for justice for murdered nun Stang in Belem
Members of the Landless Movement (MST) shout during a protest asking for justice for murdered nun Dorothy Stang, in front of the Justice Tribunal in the Brazilian city of Belem, capital of Para state, December 10, 2005. Two men accused of killing Dorothy Stang face trial on Friday. But human rights groups and government officials say contract killings of land rights activists are on the rise in the state of Para, where 73-year-old Stang was shot six times near the town of Anapu. REUTERS/Paulo Santos/Interfoto
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