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Search results for: Scar

In the Headlines
In the Headlines
Ugandans choose between long-time leader and popstar politician
46 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I66E
December 24, 2020
Elisa Dossena, 23, a student, poses for a photo on a street in Crema, Italy, December 15, 2020. While...
CREMA, Italy
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Elisa Dossena, 23, a student, poses for a photo on a street in Crema, Italy, December 15, 2020. While Dossena was studying in Milan, COVID-19 began ravaging her family and relatives in the town of Crema about 50 km (30 miles) away in Italy's first "red zone" in the northern Lombardy region. She returned home to help. Both her 59-year-old aunt and her 90-year-old grandmother succumbed to other illnesses and died after the virus weakened them. Her father had severe breathing difficulties, although it was never determined if COVID-19 was the cause. "I had to take care of the house, I had to manage everything for everyone because my mother was busy looking after my father, busy with my grandma, helping my cousin when her parents were ill. So I felt a lot of pressure, a lot of responsibility," she said. "It was a very negative period for me. But it also made me grow a lot," said Dossena. After a three-month lockdown in June, restrictions were lifted and Dossena could see her friends again. "People don't trust shaking hands, hugging or meeting new people," she said. "When I entered a closed space. I could feel the palpitations, the anxiety ... surely something changed." She is now studying remotely for a masters degree in management and hoping for just a bit of normality in 2021. "I hope people can leave their homes freely. I hope it will be possible to go for a coffee with friends at the bar. I hope it will be possible to return to school desks, places of work and university," she said. "I don't ask a lot but I hope for this." REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Wider Image
Wider Image
Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
10 PICTURES
LEBANON-CRISIS/BLAST-VICTIMS
RTX8I3BA
December 24, 2020
Paul Najjar, whose daughter Alexandra was killed in the Aug. 4 explosion at Beirut port, speaks during...
Beirut, Lebanon
Paul Najjar speaks during an interview with Reuters in Beirut
Paul Najjar, whose daughter Alexandra was killed in the Aug. 4 explosion at Beirut port, speaks during an interview with Reuters with his face scarred from the blast, in Beirut, Lebanon December 8, 2020. Picture taken December 8, 2020. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I31M
December 24, 2020
Galina Akselrod-Golikova, 23, poses for a photograph by the gates to the courtyard of her apartment block...
Moscow, Russia
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Galina Akselrod-Golikova, 23, poses for a photograph by the gates to the courtyard of her apartment block in Moscow, Russia, December 14, 2020. In early 2020, Akselrod-Golikova was preparing to travel from Moscow to Italy for a marketing and PR job at the Venice biennale's Russian pavilion. She couldn't wait to start. The dream never happened: the whole event was postponed, the job disappeared and, instead of travelling abroad, she ended up isolated from her friends and family in an apartment in Moscow as a tough lockdown suddenly began in April. The shock upset her deeply. She fretted so much that she developed stress-induced health issues. In time though, she said she was relieved to have a chance to refocus her life and have time to think. She said she slowed down for the first time and put her energy into decorating the apartment where she lives with her boyfriend with stylish ornaments, antique furniture and flower arrangements. "This year was the first time I started to devote so much time to my home, to buying some little things, and to stay there and to think about my space and to express myself through it," she said. She has not rushed to get a new job, and with time to reflect she has realised that she wants to enrol for a masters degree in food studies in Rome next year. Despite the upheaval, Akselrod-Golikova believes that the pandemic has brought many positive things into her life, though she acknowledges it was easier for younger people to adjust quickly. "I've started to appreciate my time as a resource and to devote it to my family, to my friends and to spend more time with them, including getting to know my parents and friends in new ways," she said. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I31L
December 24, 2020
Abdullah El-Berry, 22, a trainee sports journalist, poses for a photograph on a street in Cairo, Egypt,...
Cairo, Egypt
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Abdullah El-Berry, 22, a trainee sports journalist, poses for a photograph on a street in Cairo, Egypt, December 20, 2020. Berry entered 2020 thinking life would be tough. A severe knee injury needed daily physiotherapy and seriously affected his three-hour commute to Cairo from his home in the Delta city of Shebine al-Qanatir. After the pandemic hit, he could not continue physiotherapy as Egypt's hospitals were overrun with patients. He could not present his graduation project or attend his long-awaited graduation ceremony. The suspension of sports made it near impossible to do his job. And his daily commute was thrown in disarray by night curfews. Now, he believes 2021 will be even tougher. Paid very little as a trainee at a state-owned newspaper, the young graduate worries he will struggle to find a proper job. "We already suffer to find a job," he said. "Now, many people lost their jobs due to coronavirus and the economic crisis. It will definitely impact us all." Berry believes social distancing and wearing masks will continue to control lives in 2021, and make young people of his generation less likely to travel and explore new opportunities. His wishlist for 2021 includes advancing his career and resuming work on a YouTube channel he abandoned due to his studies and coronavirus. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I31K
December 24, 2020
Xiong Feng, 22, a dancer, poses for a photograph on a street in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, December...
Wuhan, China
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Xiong Feng, 22, a dancer, poses for a photograph on a street in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, December 14, 2020. Xiong teaches Wuhan's only class in Voguing, a highly stylized dance form popularised in U.S. gay and transgender communities in the late 1980s. Wuhan's surprise 76-day lockdown, which cut the city off from the rest of China overnight on Jan. 23, began long before other countries began to feel the pain of the pandemic. Xiong, like many other Gen Z people in Wuhan, saw his life, education and business thrown into turmoil. The pandemic meant he was unable to graduate alongside his classmates, and lockdown meant he lost the opportunity to form tight friendships at a formative time in his life. "I think I've lost some friends. The relationship faded away because we didn't get in touch with each other during the epidemic," he said. Looking forward, Xiong hopes he can still be a trailblazer in the city's growing LGBT dance scene in 2021. His Voguing class has attracted more students since the lockdown was lifted, as people emphasise lifestyle and leisure. "I hope I can establish the first (ballroom event for Vogue dancing) in Wuhan in my spare time. Because I see cities in China like Shanghai and Chengdu have developed a very good ballroom culture, and I believe Wuhan can do it too." REUTERS/Aly Song SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I31J
December 24, 2020
Jackline Bosibori, 17, a secondary school student, poses for a photograph within Lindi village of Kibera...
Nairobi, Kenya
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Jackline Bosibori, 17, a secondary school student, poses for a photograph within Lindi village of Kibera slums, in Nairobi, Kenya, December 16, 2020. For Bosibori, who gave birth in November, school closures defined 2020. Many Kenyan advocacy groups fear adolescent pregnancies increased as girls were forced to stay home while parents still went to work. "If I was in school, I could have not been pregnant," she said. For Bosibori, school closures have made her dream of becoming a lawyer seem far away. "I feel I have not progressed in any way this year," laments Bosibori. "If I was in school, I could have improved in my goals." The situation makes her anxious, she said from the one-room home where she lives with six other family members. Kenyan schools have been shut since March. Bosibori wants to return when they reopen in January, but she worries about the fees. "My mom lost her job ... at this time, we don't have rent," she said. "I am stressed." "2020 was a bad year to me and it was a good year to me," Bosibori said. "It was a bad year to me because I got pregnant unexpectedly." "But it was a good year to me because I delivered my baby and she is OK." REUTERS/Monicah Mwangi SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I31G
December 24, 2020
Solene Tissot, 19, a university student who studies at the Sciences Po, poses for a photograph on a street...
Paris, France
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Solene Tissot, 19, a university student who studies at the Sciences Po, poses for a photograph on a street in Paris, France, December 11, 2020. Tissot, who moved to Paris two years ago to study at the Sciences-Po university, is now seeing a psychologist. She has been diagnosed with depression and anxiety disorder, conditions she says were triggered by the loneliness brought on by COVID-19 lockdowns. Tissot no longer attends lectures in person because her university has cancelled them. Movement restrictions often make it unlawful for her to visit friends at home. She has not seen her grandparents in a year. Her course requires her to do an internship. But with many firms operating remotely, she is struggling to find somewhere to take her. Next year, she was due to do a study year in Lebanon - where her boyfriend lives - but it's unclear if travel restrictions will allow it. Once she graduates, finding work will be harder because of COVID-19. Tissot though, is looking to the future. She is learning Arabic, in preparation for the trip to Lebanon she hopes will go ahead. "What I hope for is also that we can go back to a life that is a bit more normal, and that means being able to see friends without it being illegal to go to their place," she said. "It's true that 2020 didn't leave much room for good cheer, and I would like to have that again." REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I31F
December 24, 2020
Joao Vitor Cavalcante, 19, a mechanics student and a keen cyclist, poses for a photograph at the building...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Joao Vitor Cavalcante, 19, a mechanics student and a keen cyclist, poses for a photograph at the building where he lives in Sao Paulo, Brazil, December 19, 2020. Cavalcante had trained hard throughout 2019 for his budding career as a professional cyclist. He thought 2020 would be his best year so far. But the pandemic upended that dream, prompting him to take a job at a car repair shop and give up his plans for a career in cycling. "Cycling is not easy, it is cruel, although I enjoyed that cruelty," Cavalcante said. "Now I don't want to live off of that anymore. Instead I want to live to do it." Cavalcante is one of millions of Brazilian Gen Zs who have had to drastically adjust their aspirations due to the pandemic's effect on the economy. Cavalcante's parents were forced to shut down the family clothing store during the first few months of the pandemic and his sponsor left him when cycling competitions were cancelled. His uncle, aware of the economic constraints, asked him to work at his car repair shop. "He was my salvation," Cavalcante said. "Either I took that job or I would be working for nothing. Last year, I sort of had a future (in cycling), but that time has passed." Cavalcante now works eight hours a day repairing cars, although he says he dislikes washing dirty auto parts. But it is a job that helped support his family during a rough time. He wants to compete again in 2021, but only as an amateur. "For 2021, I hope that things return to normal and that people can see their friends and family again and that they value their affection," he said. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I31E
December 24, 2020
Lee Ga-hyeon, 17, a high school student and a fan of the K-pop boyband BTS, poses for a photograph on...
Cheonan, South Korea
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Lee Ga-hyeon, 17, a high school student and a fan of the K-pop boyband BTS, poses for a photograph on a street in Cheonan, South Korea, December 16, 2020. Lee has a big wish for 2021 - to finally escape her bedroom in a city about 100 km (60 miles) from Seoul and see her pop idols BTS in person at a live event. "BTS is like a vitamin for me, but the coronavirus took it from me which made me really angry," said Lee. The pandemic forced BTS to cancel a world tour in 2020 that would have taken the seven-member band through Asia, Europe and the United States, and its New Year's Eve concert will be online. For Lee, there were no more trips to Seoul to see concerts and hang out with friends, and instead life has gone largely online, where South Korea's hyper-connectivity helped her host a YouTube channel showcasing BTS events from the past three years. It was a year that reminded her how special it was to have friends even though they remained apart. But it left her hoping that the new year will allow her to pursue her dream of studying mass communications and law at university. "Last year I spent a lot of time chatting with friends face-to-face on break time and lunch time, but I couldn't do it at all this year," said Lee. "I finally realized how precious that time was." REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I31D
December 24, 2020
Nomvula Mbatha, 23, South Africa's number one women sabre fencer, poses for a photograph outside her...
Soweto, South Africa
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Nomvula Mbatha, 23, South Africa's number one women sabre fencer, poses for a photograph outside her home in Soweto, South Africa, March 14, 2020. When Mbatha finished top in a national women's sabre competition in 2019, she seemed set for the Olympics via the African Championships in Egypt, scheduled for April 2020. Then COVID-19 hit. All competition was suspended and a strict lockdown at the end of March seriously curbed training for the her and her team. "The pandemic has been disastrous for us," said Mbatha. "We basically didn't get to accomplish anything. This year was cancelled in our lives." Even when competition resumed, Mbatha, ranked number one with 17 gold medals, faced enormous difficulties raising funding to attend the international events that would secure her a berth at the Tokyo Olympics, postponed to 2021. A member of the Soweto Fencing Club, she is just one of the country's next generation of star athletes struggling to raise cash to compete in an economy hit by low growth and high unemployment, especially for young people. As officials look to programmes that can stimulate employment, Mbatha's focus is on the next African Championships. Once again, though, the pandemic looms. A recent spike in infections has prompted new restrictions. "What if we go back to lockdown?" she said. "I don't have a resolution for 2021 ... I don't have anything because I am scared." REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I305
December 24, 2020
Valeria Murguia, 21, a university student, poses for a photograph in a field near her home in McFarland,...
MCFARLAND, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Valeria Murguia, 21, a university student, poses for a photograph in a field near her home in McFarland, California, U.S., December 17, 2020. Murguia was finishing her junior year at California State University, Fresno, studying communications and working part time at the campus health centre when the pandemic hit. All of a sudden, classes went online and her modest income from crafting social media messages to help students stay healthy evaporated. Living in Fresno, a fast-growing city where housing costs were rising, became too expensive, so within a few weeks Murguia found herself back home with her parents in the small farming town of McFarland. At home, Murguia concentrated on schoolwork, and on skills she would need after graduation: she learned how to build websites, improved her graphic design proficiency and studied event planning. She also worked with her parents, both immigrants from Mexico, picking grapes in California's Central Valley vineyards. "It made people more serious," she said of the pandemic, "not so loosey-goosey ... It's going to for sure leave a mark on our generation." Murguia will graduate in May into a tight job market. Even so, Murguia is optimistic about her post-pandemic future. "I'm really staying positive, because if I start looking at the negative things, I just start playing games in my head," she said. "And I don't want to end in that space." REUTERS/Brandon Bell SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
RTX8I306
December 24, 2020
Lives that had been focussed on school, university, sports or even going to K-pop concerts vanished overnight...
The Wider Image: Scarred by 2020, Gen Z looks to a COVID-free future
Lives that had been focussed on school, university, sports or even going to K-pop concerts vanished overnight for members of Gen Z as the global pandemic struck. While a lot was heard about older people at risk from COVID-19, this younger generation - born between the late 1990s and the early 2010s - also saw their worlds turned upside down in 2020. Reuters profiled 10 young people around the world to learn how their lives had been affected by the coronavirus. Shut up in bedrooms - many forced to live with their parents - some went from being students, athletes and workers to caring for sick relatives and doing whatever they could to earn money to support families. One teen even became a mother. Like everything to do with the pandemic, nothing was equal. Some were hit harder than others, depending on personal circumstance, location and how quickly the virus was contained. As they look towards 2021, members of Generation Z share concerns that their lives may have taken a worse hit from COVID-19 than their predecessors, the Millennials, suffered after the 2008/09 financial crisis. Beyond the immediate damage to education and job prospects is the risk of what economists call "scarring", or long-term harm to earnings, training, career prospects and even mental wellbeing. REUTERS/ SEARCH "GEN-Z COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GEN-Z
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUQ
November 23, 2020
A leukaemia patient and her mother coming from Hubei province cross a checkpoint at the Jiujiang Yangtze...
Jiujiang, China
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
A leukaemia patient and her mother coming from Hubei province cross a checkpoint at the Jiujiang Yangtze River Bridge in Jiujiang, Jiangxi province, China, as the country is hit by an outbreak of a new coronavirus, February 1, 2020. Reuters photographer Thomas Peter: "The clock was running out on farmer Lu Yuejin, desperate to get her 26-year-old daughter Hu Ping to chemotherapy for her leukaemia. But Hubei was under coronavirus lockdown and she struggled to pass a checkpoint to get to the hospital in the neighbouring province.'She needs to have her treatment. But they won't let us through,' she said when we met her at the police cordon. In February, the coronavirus had not yet become a global scourge, but for people in China, the epidemic was already a new reality. The authorities had closed off the city of Wuhan, where the virus was first discovered, and put the surrounding Hubei province under a virtual lockdown. Checkpoints had sprung up along its borders to prevent residents from leaving. People were scarred. Many stayed home and only ducked out to get food. Clad in full PPE, we travelled along the edge of the exclusion zone to report on how life was changing. Navigating the police and local government officials was the hardest part of our reporting as our presence was often not welcome. We found Lu Yuejin crying and pleading with the police. At one point she dropped to the ground, wailing. About an hour after she spoke with us, an ambulance arrived that took them to the hospital. I felt relieved to see them go. That morning they eventually got lucky, but this incident made me think of all the other untold tragedies during this pandemic, which has turned routine journeys into an obstacle course. For some, overcoming those hurdles is a question of life or death." REUTERS/Thomas Peter/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HALLOWEEN-DAY/USA
RTX867UP
October 31, 2020
Lydia Hassebroek applies a scar tattoo for her Chuckie costume before going trick or treating on Halloween,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lydia Hassebroek applies a scar tattoo for her Chuckie costume before going trick or treating on Halloween,...
Lydia Hassebroek applies a scar tattoo for her Chuckie costume before going trick or treating on Halloween, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues, in New York, U.S., October 31, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin Ochs
ISRAEL-HEALTH/BREAST CANCER
RTX85LDW
October 28, 2020
Karina Shtotland, editor-in-chief of Israeli women's magazine Laisha, poses for a photograph as she holds...
Rishon Lezion, Israel
"Flat and fierce": Israel breast cancer survivor celebrates scars topless
Karina Shtotland, editor-in-chief of Israeli women's magazine Laisha, poses for a photograph as she holds up a copy of the magazine with a cover photo of Eylon Nuphar, an Israeli performing artist who chose not to have her breasts reconstructed after a double mastectomy, in Rishon Lezion, Israel October 21, 2020. Picture taken October 21, 2020. REUTERS/Corinna Kern
ISRAEL-HEALTH/BREAST CANCER
RTX85LD8
October 28, 2020
Eylon Nuphar, an Israeli performing artist who chose not to have her breasts reconstructed after a double...
Tel Aviv, Israel
"Flat and fierce": Israel breast cancer survivor celebrates scars topless
Eylon Nuphar, an Israeli performing artist who chose not to have her breasts reconstructed after a double mastectomy, gestures during her interview with Reuters in Tel Aviv, Israel October 21, 2020. Picture taken October 21, 2020. REUTERS/Corinna Kern
ISRAEL-HEALTH/BREAST CANCER
RTX85LD9
October 28, 2020
Employees look at a computer screen displaying images from Israeli women's magazine, Laisha's article...
Rishon Lezion, Israel
"Flat and fierce": Israel breast cancer survivor celebrates scars topless
Employees look at a computer screen displaying images from Israeli women's magazine, Laisha's article on Eylon Nuphar, an Israeli performing artist who chose not to have her breasts reconstructed after a double mastectomy, at the magazine's offices in Rishon Lezion, Israel October 21, 2020. Picture taken October 21, 2020. REUTERS/Corinna Kern
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/COLOMBIA-EVICTIONS
RTX7J5SD
May 15, 2020
Ysmail Perez, 16, shows the scar on his head caused by a projectile fired by the riot police, ESMAD,...
Bogota, Colombia
Evictions amid COVID-19 outbreak in Bogota
Ysmail Perez, 16, shows the scar on his head caused by a projectile fired by the riot police, ESMAD, during an eviction operation, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bogota, Colombia May 15, 2020. REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Spotlight
Spotlight
Berlin's battle scars linger 75 years after Nazi defeat
17 PICTURES
USA-IMMIGRATION/TRANSGENDER
RTS34EK8
March 02, 2020
Transgender migrant Shannel Cruz brushes hair extensions as she wears a wrap covering her scars that...
Albuquerque, UNITED STATES
Transgender migrant Shannel Cruz brushes hair extensions as she wears a wrap covering her scars that...
Transgender migrant Shannel Cruz brushes hair extensions as she wears a wrap covering her scars that resulted from gang violence as she gets ready in Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S., July 29, 2018. Picture taken July 29, 2018. REUTERS/Adria Malcolm
USA-IMMIGRATION/TRANSGENDER
RTS34EJE
March 02, 2020
Shannel Cruz shows the large scar on her abdomen in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., May 15, 2019. Picture...
Charlottesville, UNITED STATES
Shannel Cruz shows the large scar on her abdomen in Charlottesville
Shannel Cruz shows the large scar on her abdomen in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., May 15, 2019. Picture taken May 15, 2019. REUTERS/Adria Malcolm
MEXICO-MEDICINE/
RTS32DMN
February 17, 2020
Hermes Soto shows the scar on his left arm at his house in Mexico City, Mexico February 16, 2020. Picture...
Mexico City, Mexico
Hermes Soto shows the scar on his left arm at his house in Mexico City
Hermes Soto shows the scar on his left arm at his house in Mexico City, Mexico February 16, 2020. Picture taken February 16, 2020. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares
PEOPLE-KOBE BRYANT/
RTS2ZWI8
January 28, 2020
Personnel collect debris beneath a hillside fire burn scar while working with investigators at the helicopter...
Calabasas, UNITED STATES
Personnel collect debris beneath a hillside fire burn scar while working with investigators at the helicopter...
Personnel collect debris beneath a hillside fire burn scar while working with investigators at the helicopter crash site of NBA star Kobe Bryant in Calabasas, California, U.S., January 28, 2020. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
Ten years after devastating quake, Haitians struggle to survive
10 PICTURES
Pictures Report
Pictures Report
Ten years after devastating quake, Haitians struggle to survive
10 PICTURES
CHRISTMAS-SEASON/BANKSY
RTS2VUFV
December 22, 2019
A man takes pictures of an artwork dubbed "scar of Bethlehem" by street artist Banksy in the Walled Off...
Bethlehem, Palestinian Territories
Man takes pictures of an artwork dubbed "scar of Bethlehem" by street artist Banksy in the Walled Off...
A man takes pictures of an artwork dubbed "scar of Bethlehem" by street artist Banksy in the Walled Off hotel, in Bethlehem in the Israeli-occupied West Bank December 22, 2019. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma
CHRISTMAS-SEASON/BANKSY
RTS2VUEY
December 22, 2019
An artwork dubbed "scar of Bethlehem" by street artist Banksy is displayed in the Walled Off hotel, in...
Bethlehem, Palestinian Territories
Artwork dubbed "scar of Bethlehem" by street artist Banksy is displayed in the Walled Off hotel, in Bethlehem...
An artwork dubbed "scar of Bethlehem" by street artist Banksy is displayed in the Walled Off hotel, in Bethlehem in the Israeli-occupied West Bank December 22, 2019. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma
CHRISTMAS-SEASON/BANKSY
RTS2VUEI
December 22, 2019
Wisam Salsa, general manager of the Walled Off hotel, shows "scar of Bethlehem" artwork by street artist...
Bethlehem, Palestinian Territories
Wisam Salsa, general manager of the Walled Off hotel, shows "scar of Bethlehem" artwork by street artist...
Wisam Salsa, general manager of the Walled Off hotel, shows "scar of Bethlehem" artwork by street artist Banksy, in Bethlehem in the Israeli-occupied West Bank December 22, 2019. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma
MYANMAR-ROHINGYA/WORLD COURT-PREVIEW
RTS2U71A
December 09, 2019
Yousuf Ali, a survivor of ethnic-based violence against the Rohingya minority in Myanmar, shows his scars...
The Hague, Netherlands
Yousuf Ali, a survivor of ethnic-based violence against the Rohingya minority in Myanmar, shows his scars...
Yousuf Ali, a survivor of ethnic-based violence against the Rohingya minority in Myanmar, shows his scars during an interview at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in The Hague, Netherlands December 9, 2019. REUTERS/Eva Plevier
MYANMAR-ROHINGYA/WORLD COURT-PREVIEW
RTS2U716
December 09, 2019
Yousuf Ali, a survivor of ethnic-based violence against the Rohingya minority in Myanmar, shows his scars...
The Hague, Netherlands
Yousuf Ali, a survivor of ethnic-based violence against the Rohingya minority in Myanmar, shows his scars...
Yousuf Ali, a survivor of ethnic-based violence against the Rohingya minority in Myanmar, shows his scars during an interview at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in The Hague, Netherlands December 9, 2019. REUTERS/Eva Plevier
FRANCE-SECURITY/MILIPOL
RTX79LDG
November 19, 2019
A visitor looks at FN SCAR (Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle) by FN Herstal displayed at...
Villepinte, France
A visitor looks at FN SCAR (Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle) by FN Herstal displayed at...
A visitor looks at FN SCAR (Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle) by FN Herstal displayed at the 21st Milipol Paris, the worldwide exhibition dedicated to homeland security, in Villepinte near Paris, France, November 19, 2019. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX77KCL
November 06, 2019
Suleiman Surajo, 25, shows scars on his back that he says he received from his time as an inmate at an...
Daura, Nigeria
Suleiman Surajo, 25, shows scars on his back that he says he received from his time as an inmate at an...
Suleiman Surajo, 25, shows scars on his back that he says he received from his time as an inmate at an Islamic rehabilitation centre in the nearby town of Daura, Nigeria October 19, 2019. Picture taken October 19, 2019. REUTERS/Paul Carsten
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX77KCB
November 06, 2019
A boy shows scars on his ankles from what he said were shackles he wore during his 13 days at an Islamic...
Daura, Nigeria
A boy shows scars on his ankles in his homeÕs courtyard in the town of Daura
A boy shows scars on his ankles from what he said were shackles he wore during his 13 days at an Islamic rehabilitation centre, as he stands in his homeÕs courtyard in the town of Daura, Nigeria October 18, 2019. Picture taken October 18, 2019. REUTERS/Paul Carsten
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX77KCA
November 06, 2019
A boy shows scars on his back from what he says were beatings during his 13 days at an Islamic rehabilitation...
Daura, Nigeria
A boy shows scars on his back in his home's courtyard in the town of Daura
A boy shows scars on his back from what he says were beatings during his 13 days at an Islamic rehabilitation centre as he stands in his home's courtyard in the town of Daura, Nigeria October 18, 2019. Picture taken October 18, 2019. REUTERS/Paul Carsten TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/BOSNIA-CAMP
RTS2TQSJ
November 01, 2019
A migrant from Pakistan shows his arm with self-inflicted scars because he said he misses his girlfriend,...
Bihac, Bosnia and Herzegovina
The Wider Image: Winter poses new threat to migrants in Bosnian forest camp
A migrant from Pakistan shows his arm with self-inflicted scars because he said he misses his girlfriend, inside Vucjak camp near Bihac, Bosnia and Herzegovina, October 30, 2019. REUTERS/Marko Djurica SEARCH "BIHAC CAMP" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX755TJ
September 29, 2019
A 14 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
Kaduna, Nigeria
A 14 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
A 14 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to be an Islamic school, reveals scars on his back at a transit camp set up to take care of the released captives in Kaduna, Nigeria September 28, 2019. Picture taken September 28, 2019. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX755TH
September 29, 2019
A 14 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
Kaduna, Nigeria
A 14 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
A 14 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to be an Islamic school, reveals scars on his arm at a transit camp set up to take care of the released captives in Kaduna, Nigeria September 28, 2019. Picture taken September 28, 2019. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX755TG
September 29, 2019
A 7 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
Kaduna, Nigeria
A 7 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
A 7 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to be an Islamic school, reveals scars on his back at a transit camp set up to take care of the released captives in Kaduna, Nigeria September 28, 2019. Picture taken September 28, 2019. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX755TD
September 29, 2019
A 12 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
Kaduna, Nigeria
A 12 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
A 12 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to be an Islamic school, reveals scars on his back at a transit camp set up to take care of the released captives in Kaduna, Nigeria September 28, 2019. Picture taken September 28, 2019. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX755T5
September 29, 2019
A 15 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
Kaduna, Nigeria
A 15 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
A 15 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to be an Islamic school, reveals scars on his back at a transit camp set up to take care of the released captives in Kaduna, Nigeria September 28, 2019. Picture taken September 28, 2019. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX755SY
September 29, 2019
A 14-year-old boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
Kaduna, Nigeria
A 14-year-old boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
A 14-year-old boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to be an Islamic school, reveals scars on his back at a transit camp set up to take care of the released captives in Kaduna, Nigeria September 28, 2019. Picture taken September 28, 2019. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX755SV
September 29, 2019
A 6 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
Kaduna, Nigeria
A 6 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
A 6 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to be an Islamic school, reveals scars on his back at a transit camp set up to take care of the released captives in Kaduna, Nigeria September 28, 2019. Picture taken September 28, 2019. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
NIGERIA-CAPTIVES/
RTX755SS
September 29, 2019
A 14 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
Kaduna, Nigeria
A 14 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to...
A 14 year-old-boy, one of hundreds of men and boys rescued by police from an institution purporting to be an Islamic school, reveals scars in his ear at a transit camp set up to take care of the released captives in Kaduna, Nigeria September 28, 2019. Picture taken September 28, 2019. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde
AFRICA-SLAVERY/HISTORICSITES
RTS2OASW
August 29, 2019
Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South...
Cape Town, South Africa
Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town
Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South Africa, August 28, 2019. The tree a milkwood is believed to be 500 years old and was originally located on a beach which has long since disappeared as the city reclaimed land from the sea for the expansion of it's port. Picture taken August 28, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
AFRICA-SLAVERY/HISTORICSITES
RTS2OARY
August 29, 2019
Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South...
Cape Town, South Africa
Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town
Scars are seen on the trunk of a tree under which slaves were sold in colonial times, in Cape Town, South Africa, June 21, 2019. The tree a milkwood is believed to be 500 years old and was originally located on a beach which has long since disappeared as the city reclaimed land from the sea for the expansion of it's port. Picture taken June 21, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings
MYANMAR-POLITICS/WOMEN
RTS2MNS7
August 15, 2019
Khin Wutt Yee, 33, shows a scar, which she says were sustained from a broomstick beating by her abusive...
SHWELAUNG, Myanmar
Khin Wutt Yee, 33, shows a scar, which she says were sustained from a broomstick beating by her abusive...
Khin Wutt Yee, 33, shows a scar, which she says were sustained from a broomstick beating by her abusive husband, in the village around Shwelaung, Ayeyarwady, Myanmar August 7, 2019. Picture taken August 7, 2019. REUTERS/Ann Wang
Pictures Report
Pictures Report
In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
22 PICTURES
Wider Image
Wider Image
In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
27 PICTURES
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XAQ
July 25, 2019
Residents of Pankisi Gorge pray during the rally held to stop the planned construction of hydropower...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
Residents of Pankisi Gorge pray during the rally held to stop the planned construction of hydropower plant near Birkiani village, Georgia, April 21, 2019. REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya SEARCH "PANKISI WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XAN
July 25, 2019
Leila Achishvili, 53, the owner of Leila's Guesthouse, hosts tourists from Poland and Belgium for a dinner...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
Leila Achishvili, 53, the owner of Leila's Guesthouse, hosts tourists from Poland and Belgium for a dinner in Jokolo village of Pankisi, Georgia, July 4, 2019. Barbara Konkolewska (R), who is an old friend of Achishvili, owns a travel company Caucasus X-trek in Poland and brings tourists to Pankisi. She works with guides from Pankisi and is in the process of registering her company locally. REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya SEARCH "PANKISI WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XAK
July 25, 2019
Women are having a break after singing and dancing on a very hot day for a traditional Sufi ceremony,...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
Women are having a break after singing and dancing on a very hot day for a traditional Sufi ceremony, zikr, performed every Friday in Duisi village of Pankisi, Georgia, July 5, 2019. REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya SEARCH "PANKISI WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XAJ
July 25, 2019
An old bus stands outside a garage in Duisi village of Pankisi, Georgia, July 5, 2019. REUTERS/Ekaterina...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
An old bus stands outside a garage in Duisi village of Pankisi, Georgia, July 5, 2019. REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya SEARCH "PANKISI WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XAF
July 25, 2019
Men pray in a mosque after Eid-al-Fitr during Ramadan month in Jokolo village of Pankisi, Georgia, May...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
Men pray in a mosque after Eid-al-Fitr during Ramadan month in Jokolo village of Pankisi, Georgia, May 29, 2019. REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya SEARCH "PANKISI WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XAE
July 25, 2019
Mariam Kebadze, 16, uses her phone as she sits outside Leila's Guesthouse, owned by her mother, in Jokolo...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
Mariam Kebadze, 16, uses her phone as she sits outside Leila's Guesthouse, owned by her mother, in Jokolo village of Pankisi, Georgia, July 4, 2019. Mariam used to live with her father in Telavi and moved to Pankisi where she now lives and studies to support her mother Leila Achishvili who is running the guesthouse. "It's really boring sometimes here, there's not much to do in the village because it's the same routine all the time - school, classes, jogging by the river sometimes. Girls don't go outside at night because they are embarrassed and sometimes I really miss going for a walk in the evening, I like nights," she said. "One of my dreams is to live somewhere in the mountains, maybe in Switzerland. I read about a music festival in a forest there with beautiful lights at night, and people just dancing and laughing, they are so free and cheerful." REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya SEARCH "PANKISI WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XAC
July 25, 2019
Women gather for a traditional Sufi ceremony, zikr, performed every Friday in Duisi village of Pankisi,...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
Women gather for a traditional Sufi ceremony, zikr, performed every Friday in Duisi village of Pankisi, Georgia, July 5, 2019. REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya SEARCH "PANKISI WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XAB
July 25, 2019
Students attend an English class for intermediate level in a school in Jokolo village of Pankisi, Georgia,...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
Students attend an English class for intermediate level in a school in Jokolo village of Pankisi, Georgia, June 1, 2019. The school is supported by Roddy Scott foundation started by parents of the British journalist who was killed in Ingushetia covering the Second Chechen war. REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya SEARCH "PANKISI WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XAA
July 25, 2019
Leila Achishvili, 53, the owner of Leila's Guesthouse in Jokolo village, visits the first gym in Pankisi...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
Leila Achishvili, 53, the owner of Leila's Guesthouse in Jokolo village, visits the first gym in Pankisi Gorge for both men and women, in Duisi village of Pankisi, Georgia, May 29, 2019. Sumaya, a resident of Pankisi, opened the gym, which is one the few public places where women can meet. She says many are too fearful to attend. Sumaya's husband was killed in Syria. Fearing her four children's prospects could be damaged if their name was associated with the conflict, she declined to be identified by her family name. She wanted to "do something for women and keep herself busy not to think about her husband's death all the time". REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya
GEORGIA-PANKISI/
RTX70XA9
July 25, 2019
Mariam Kebadze, 16, poses for a photograph in one of the rooms inside her house where she lives with...
PANKISI, Georgia
The Wider Image: In Georgian valley, war-scarred women battle tradition
Mariam Kebadze, 16, poses for a photograph in one of the rooms inside her house where she lives with her mother Leila Achishvili and her grandmother Nadya in Jokolo village of Pankisi, Georgia, July 4, 2019. Mariam's mother owns Leila's Guesthouse in Pankisi. She said that she is dreaming of her own room where she would have privacy. "I used to live in Telavi and could talk to friends about many things, here it is harder, I prefer to talk to adults, they know and understand more," she said. REUTERS/Ekaterina Anchevskaya SEARCH "PANKISI WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
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