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Search results for: Sea-mine

NATO-TURKEY/
RTX85T3Z
October 29, 2020
Bulgarian Navy minehunter BGS Tsibar sails in the Bosphorus towards the Black Sea, in Istanbul, Turkey...
Istanbul, Turkey
Bulgarian Navy minehunter BGS Tsibar sails in Istanbul's Bosphorus
Bulgarian Navy minehunter BGS Tsibar sails in the Bosphorus towards the Black Sea, in Istanbul, Turkey October 29, 2020, after participating in the Turkish Navy-led multinational Mine Warfare Exercise Nusret-2020. REUTERS/Murad Sezer
NATO-TURKEY/
RTX85T40
October 29, 2020
Hellenic Navy general support ship Aliakmon (A470), flagship of the Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures...
Istanbul, Turkey
Hellenic Navy general support ship Aliakmon sails in Istanbul's Bosphorus
Hellenic Navy general support ship Aliakmon (A470), flagship of the Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group 2 (SNMCMG2), sails in the Bosphorus towards the Black Sea in Istanbul, Turkey October 29, 2020, after participating in the Turkish Navy-led multinational Mine Warfare Exercise Nusret-2020. REUTERS/Murad Sezer
BRAZIL-INDIGENOUS/MINING
RTS311P1
February 06, 2020
A gold dredge is seen at the banks of Uraricoera River during Brazil's environmental agency operation...
AMAZON, Brazil
A gold dredge is seen at the banks of Uraricoera River during Brazil's environmental agency operation...
A gold dredge is seen at the banks of Uraricoera River during Brazil's environmental agency operation against illegal gold mining on indigenous land, in the heart of the Amazon rainforest, in Roraima state, Brazil April 15, 2016. Picture taken April 15, 2016. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly
CLIMATE-CHANGE/GERMANY
RTX788DM
November 10, 2019
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete attends a protest against the Garzweiler open...
KEYENBERG, Germany
Carola Rackete attends a protest against the Garzweiler open cast brown coal mine
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete attends a protest against the Garzweiler open cast brown coal mine in Keyenberg, west of Cologne, Germany November 10, 2019. REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen
CLIMATE-CHANGE/GERMANY
RTX788DD
November 10, 2019
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete attends a news conference nearby the Garzweiler...
Juechen, Germany
Carola Rackete attends a news conference nearby the Garzweiler open cast brown coal mine
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete attends a news conference nearby the Garzweiler open cast brown coal mine, near Juechen, west of Cologne, Germany, November 10, 2019. REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen
CLIMATE-CHANGE/GERMANY
RTX788DC
November 10, 2019
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete poses at the edge of the Garzweiler open cast...
Juechen, Germany
Carola Rackete poses at the edge of the Garzweiler open cast brown coal mine
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete poses at the edge of the Garzweiler open cast brown coal mine near Juechen, west of Cologne, Germany November 10, 2019. REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen
CLIMATE-CHANGE/GERMANY
RTX788DB
November 10, 2019
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete speaks during a protest against the Garzweiler...
KEYENBERG, Germany
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete speaks during a protest against the Garzweiler...
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete speaks during a protest against the Garzweiler open cast brown coal mine in Keyenberg, west of Cologne, Germany November 10, 2019. REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen
CLIMATE-CHANGE/GERMANY
RTX788DA
November 10, 2019
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete attends a protest against the Garzweiler open...
KEYENBERG, Germany
Carola Rackete attends a protest against the Garzweiler open cast brown coal mine
German captain of rescue ship Sea Watch 3 Carola Rackete attends a protest against the Garzweiler open cast brown coal mine in Keyenberg, west of Cologne, Germany November 10, 2019. REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen
USA-IRAN/HORMUZ
RTS20XVY
September 11, 2018
U.S. Navy Mark VI Patrol Boat makes its way towards an exercise area during a U.S./UK Mine Countermeasures...
Arabian Sea, Bahrain
U.S. Navy Mark VI Patrol Boat makes its way towards an exercise area during a U.S./UK Mine Countermeasures...
U.S. Navy Mark VI Patrol Boat makes its way towards an exercise area during a U.S./UK Mine Countermeasures Exercise (MCMEX) taking place in Arabian Sea, September 11, 2018. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-IRAN/HORMUZ
RTS20XV3
September 11, 2018
A U.S. Navy soldier onboard Mark VI Patrol Boat stands guard as a tanker makes its way towards Bahrain...
Arabian Sea, Bahrain
A U.S. Navy soldier onboard Mark VI Patrol Boat stands guard as a tanker makes its way towards Bahrain...
A U.S. Navy soldier onboard Mark VI Patrol Boat stands guard as a tanker makes its way towards Bahrain port, during an exercise of U.S./UK Mine Countermeasures (MCMEX) taking place in Arabian Sea, Bahrain September 11, 2018. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-IRAN/HORMUZ
RTS20XUR
September 11, 2018
U.S. Navy personnel onboard Mark VI Patrol Boat, deploy a sonar detector in the sea during a U.S./UK...
Arabian Sea, Bahrain
U.S. Navy personnel onboard Mark VI Patrol Boat, deploy a sonar detector in the sea during a U.S./UK...
U.S. Navy personnel onboard Mark VI Patrol Boat, deploy a sonar detector in the sea during a U.S./UK Mine Countermeasures Exercise (MCMEX) taking place in Arabian Sea, September 11, 2018. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-IRAN/HORMUZ
RTS20XU8
September 11, 2018
A U.S. Navy soldier onboard Mark VI Patrol Boat stands guard as an oil tanker makes its way towards Bahrain...
Bahrain, Bahrain
A U.S. Navy soldier onboard Mark VI Patrol Boat stands guard during an exercise of U.S./UK Mine Countermeasures...
A U.S. Navy soldier onboard Mark VI Patrol Boat stands guard as an oil tanker makes its way towards Bahrain port, during an exercise of U.S./UK Mine Countermeasures (MCMEX) taking place in Arabian Sea, Bahrain September 11, 2018. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-IRAN/HORMUZ
RTS20S08
September 10, 2018
A U.S. Navy ground technician inspects the sonar object detector on an MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter at...
Arabian Sea, Bahrain
A U.S. Navy ground technician inspects the sonar object detector on an MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter at...
A U.S. Navy ground technician inspects the sonar object detector on an MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter at the U.S. Naval air-support unit in Bahrain, prior to its flight to take part in a U.S. and U.K. Mine Countermeasures Exercise (MCMEX) taking place at the Arabian Sea, September 10, 2018. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-IRAN/HORMUZ
RTS20RZW
September 10, 2018
U.S. Navy MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopters are seen making their way to an exercise area as they take part...
Arabian Sea, Bahrain
U.S. Navy MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopters are seen making their way to an exercise area as they take part...
U.S. Navy MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopters are seen making their way to an exercise area as they take part in a U.S. and U.K. Mine Countermeasures Exercise (MCMEX) taking place at the Arabian Sea, as a cargo ship is seen sailing towards Straits of Harmoz, September 10, 2018. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-IRAN/HORMUZ
RTS20RZU
September 10, 2018
A U.S. Navy MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter flies over U.S. and U.K. Navy ships during a U.S. and U.K. Mine...
Arabian Sea, Bahrain
A U.S. Navy MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter flies over U.S. and U.K. Navy ships during a U.S. and U.K. Mine...
A U.S. Navy MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter flies over U.S. and U.K. Navy ships during a U.S. and U.K. Mine Countermeasures Exercise (MCMEX) taking place at the Arabian Sea, September 10, 2018. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-IRAN/HORMUZ
RTS20RZ8
September 10, 2018
US and UK navy ships are seen conducting Mine Countermeasures Exercise (MCMEX) taking place at Arabian...
Arabian Sea, Bahrain
US and UK navy ships are seen conducting Mine Countermeasures Exercise (MCMEX) taking place at Arabian...
US and UK navy ships are seen conducting Mine Countermeasures Exercise (MCMEX) taking place at Arabian Sea, September 10, 2018. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
TAIWAN-MILITARY/DRILLS
RTS1LV7L
January 31, 2018
Training naval mines blast during a military drill in Kaohsiung's Zuoying naval base, Taiwan January...
Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Training naval mines blast during a military drill in Kaohsiung's Zuoying naval base
Training naval mines blast during a military drill in Kaohsiung's Zuoying naval base, Taiwan January 31, 2018. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu
TAIWAN-MILITARY/DRILLS
RTS1LV7E
January 31, 2018
A training naval mine blasts during a military drill in Kaohsiung's Zuoying naval base, Taiwan January...
Kaohsiung, Taiwan
A training naval mine blasts during a military drill in Kaohsiung's Zuoying naval base
A training naval mine blasts during a military drill in Kaohsiung's Zuoying naval base, Taiwan January 31, 2018. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTX3PB22
December 11, 2017
Migrants try to stay afloat after falling off their rubber dinghy during a rescue operation by the Malta-based...
Mediterranean Sea, Mid-Sea
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story
Migrants try to stay afloat after falling off their rubber dinghy during a rescue operation by the Malta-based NGO Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) ship in the central Mediterranean in international waters some 15 nautical miles off the coast of Zawiya in Libya, April 14, 2017. All 134 sub-Saharan migrants survived and were rescued by MOAS. Darrin Zammit Lupi: "I spent five weeks with the Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) on their ship, Phoenix, covering search and rescue operations in the Mediterranean. At the start of the Easter weekend we were on a routine rescue around 15 nautical miles off the Libyan coast. I was on the MOAS fast rubber boat with crew members handing out life jackets to a group of 134 Sub-Saharan migrants on a flimsy dinghy before we would transfer them to the Phoenix. I had one camera up to my eye to shoot some wide angle frames. Suddenly, one migrant balancing on the rim of a dinghy slipped sideways and like dominos several of his colleagues lost their balance and fell into the sea. I captured the whole sequence by keeping my finger on the shutter button. It was chaos. I kept shooting as the rescuers leapt into action, helping several of the migrants pull themselves onto our boat. I was grabbing hold of people with one hand and shooting with the other. Then, through my viewfinder, a few metres away, I noticed one man struggling more than the others, stretching out his arm towards us. I screamed to alert our specialist rescue swimmer that one man was going under. He reacted instantly, jumped in, and pulled the man to safety. Afterwards, I did a lot of soul searching. Should I have put down my cameras altogether and just grabbed hold of whoever I could? That evening I discussed it with the rescuers, who felt I'd done the right thing. Their job was to rescue lives. Mine was to document the harsh reality of what's happening. Everyone survived that day." REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi/File photo SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR THIS STORY.
In the Headlines
In the Headlines
Down river from Brazil dam flood
20 PICTURES
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1VG7B
November 23, 2015
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, work on clearing dead fish...
LINHARES, Brazil
Local fishermen work on clearing dead fish found on the beach of Povoacao Village, near the mouth of...
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, work on clearing dead fish found on the beach of Povoacao Village, near the mouth of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, at an area where the river joins the sea on the coast of Espirito Santo, Brazil, November 23, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1VFYE
November 23, 2015
A local fisherman working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clears dead fish found on...
LINHARES, Brazil
A local fisherman working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clears dead fish found on...
A local fisherman working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clears dead fish found on the beach of Povoacao Village, near the mouth of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, at an area where the river joins the sea on the coast of Espirito Santo, Brazil, November 23, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1VFYD
November 23, 2015
A local fisherman working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clears dead fish found on...
LINHARES, Brazil
A local fisherman working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clears dead fish found on...
A local fisherman working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clears dead fish found on the beach of Povoacao Village, near the mouth of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, at an area where the river joins the sea on the coast of Espirito Santo, Brazil, November 23, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1VFVP
November 23, 2015
A local fisherman working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clears up dead fish found...
LINHARES, Brazil
A local fisherman working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clears up dead fish found...
A local fisherman working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clears up dead fish found on the beach of Povoacao Village, near the mouth of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, at an area where the river joins the sea on the coast of Espirito Santo, Brazil, November 23, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1VFRX
November 23, 2015
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clear dead fish found on the...
LINHARES, Brazil
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clear dead fish found on the...
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, clear dead fish found on the beach of Povoacao Village, near the mouth of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, at an area where the river joins the sea on the coast of Espirito Santo, Brazil, November 23, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1VFRT
November 23, 2015
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, work on the clearing of dead...
LINHARES, Brazil
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, work on the clearing of dead...
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, work on the clearing of dead fish found on the beach of Povoacao Village, near the mouth of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, at an area where the river joins the sea on the coast of Espirito Santo, Brazil, November 23, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1VFRR
November 23, 2015
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, work on the clearing of dead...
LINHARES, Brazil
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, work on the clearing of dead...
Local fishermen working for a company contracted by Samarco mine operator, work on the clearing of dead fish found on the beach of Povoacao Village, near the mouth of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, at an area where the river joins the sea on the coast of Espirito Santo, Brazil, November 23, 2015. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V6A6
November 21, 2015
Gilmar, who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after...
LINHARES, Brazil
Gilmar, who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce, which was flooded with mud after a dam, owned...
Gilmar, who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, is pictured in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. Gilmar said he won't use the river water for the irrigation of his agriculture anymore. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V696
November 21, 2015
A resident sits on the banks of Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA...
LINHARES, Brazil
A resident sits on the banks of Rio Doce, flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton...
A resident sits on the banks of Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V68Y
November 21, 2015
Gilmar (L), who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud...
LINHARES, Brazil
Gilmar, who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce, which was flooded with mud after a dam, owned...
Gilmar (L), who lives at a farm on the banks of of Rio Doce (Doce River), which was flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, poses with his family in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. Gilmar said he won't use the river water for the irrigation of his agriculture anymore. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V68U
November 21, 2015
A resident fishes at Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton...
LINHARES, Brazil
A resident fishes at Rio Doce, flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst,...
A resident fishes at Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V61B
November 21, 2015
Birds fly on Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd...
LINHARES, Brazil
Birds fly on Rio Doce, flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in...
Birds fly on Rio Doce (Doce River), flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Linhares, Brazil, November 21, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the forecast of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4BL
November 21, 2015
A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) lays her eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth...
LINHARES, Brazil
A loggerhead sea turtle lays eggs on the beach in Regencia village
A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) lays her eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeasternBrazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4BJ
November 21, 2015
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program (Projeto Tamar) checks a loggerhead...
LINHARES, Brazil
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program checks a loggerhead sea turtle after...
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program (Projeto Tamar) checks a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) after it laid eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeasternBrazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4BI
November 21, 2015
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program (Projeto Tamar) checks a loggerhead...
LINHARES, Brazil
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program checks a loggerhead sea turtle after...
A member of the Brazilian Sea Turtle National Conservation Program (Projeto Tamar) checks a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) after it laid eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeasternBrazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4AP
November 21, 2015
A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) crawls to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach, about...
LINHARES, Brazil
A loggerhead sea turtle crawls to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach in Regencia village
A loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) crawls to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers of the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeasternBrazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTX1V4AA
November 21, 2015
People observe a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) crawling to the sea after laying her eggs on...
LINHARES, Brazil
People observe a loggerhead sea turtle crawling to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach in Regencia...
People observe a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) crawling to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach, about 4 kilometers from the mouth of Rio Doce in Regencia village, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the river is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, in Brazil November 20, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on November 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to IBAMA's forecast, the sediment will reach the sea in Espirito Santo state coast this weekend. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819O
November 19, 2015
Birds fly over the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator...
LINHARES, Brazil
Birds fly over the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator...
Birds fly over the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819N
November 19, 2015
Researchers observe fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according...
LINHARES, Brazil
Researchers observe fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according...
Researchers observe fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819J
November 19, 2015
Fisherman Lucimar Souza reacts as he talks about the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according...
LINHARES, Brazil
Fisherman Lucimar Souza talks about the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's...
Fisherman Lucimar Souza reacts as he talks about the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819G
November 19, 2015
Volunteers carry a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where,...
LINHARES, Brazil
Volunteers carry a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where,...
Volunteers carry a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819E
November 19, 2015
A shrimp is seen after being rescued by volunteers from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,...
LINHARES, Brazil
A shrimp is seen after being rescued by volunteers from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,...
A shrimp is seen after being rescued by volunteers from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS819B
November 19, 2015
A view of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator...
LINHARES, Brazil
A view of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator...
A view of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS818L
November 19, 2015
A boy swims in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental...
LINHARES, Brazil
A boy swims in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental...
A boy swims in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS818K
November 19, 2015
A volunteer holds a fish rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according...
LINHARES, Brazil
A volunteer holds a fish rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according...
A volunteer holds a fish rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS818J
November 19, 2015
A volunteer carries a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,...
LINHARES, Brazil
A volunteer carries a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,...
A volunteer carries a box of fishes rescued from the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
BRAZIL-DAMBURST/ENVIRONMENT
RTS818F
November 19, 2015
Fisherman Lucimar Souza works on the rescue of fishes in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,...
LINHARES, Brazil
Fisherman Lucimar Souza works on the rescue of fishes in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares,...
Fisherman Lucimar Souza works on the rescue of fishes in the waters of the Rio Doce (Doce River) in Linhares, where, according to Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, is about to be flooded with mud after a dam, owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd burst, Brazil, November 19, 2015. The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come. Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed. According to the predictions of Brazil's environmental regulator IBAMA, the mud will touch the sea, in Espirito Santo state coast, on this Friday. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TORM
October 28, 2015
A rotary dredge loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of...
Borodino, Russia
Rotary dredge loads wagons with coal at Borodinsky opencast colliery near Siberian town of Borodino
A rotary dredge loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TORK
October 28, 2015
A coal face is seen from the top of a rotary dredge which loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast...
Borodino, Russia
Coal face is seen from top of rotary dredge which loads wagons with coal at Borodinsky opencast colliery...
A coal face is seen from the top of a rotary dredge which loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TORJ
October 28, 2015
A dredge loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery near the Siberian town of Borodino,...
Borodino, Russia
Dredge loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery near the Siberian town of Borodino
A dredge loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia, October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TOR7
October 28, 2015
A rotary dredge works on the coal face of the Borodinsky opencast colliery near the Siberian town of...
Borodino, Russia
Rotary dredge works on the coal face of Borodinsky opencast colliery near the Siberian town of Borodino...
A rotary dredge works on the coal face of the Borodinsky opencast colliery near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia, October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TOQQ
October 28, 2015
A general view shows the Borodinsky opencast colliery near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk,...
Borodino, Russia
General view shows Borodinsky opencast colliery near Siberian town of Borodino
A general view shows the Borodinsky opencast colliery near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TOQN
October 28, 2015
A dredge works on a coal storage at the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino,...
Borodino, Russia
Dredge works on coal storage at Borodinsky opencast colliery near Siberian town of Borodino
A dredge works on a coal storage at the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TOQI
October 28, 2015
Machinist of a loading mechanism Sergey Volkov operates a rotary dredge which loads wagons with coal...
Borodino, Russia
Machinist of loading mechanism Volkov operates rotary dredge which loads wagons with coal at Borodinsky...
Machinist of a loading mechanism Sergey Volkov operates a rotary dredge which loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TOQ7
October 28, 2015
A rotary dredge works on the coal face of the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of...
Borodino, Russia
Rotary dredge works on the coal face of Borodinsky opencast colliery near the Siberian town of Borodino...
A rotary dredge works on the coal face of the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia, October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TOFL
October 28, 2015
Machinist Alexander Kozhakin operates a rotary dredge which loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky...
Borodino, Russia
Machinist Kozhakin operates rotary dredge which loads wagons with coal at Borodinsky opencast colliery...
Machinist Alexander Kozhakin operates a rotary dredge which loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken with fish eye lens October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TN5D
October 28, 2015
A rotary dredge loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of...
Borodino, Russia
Rotary dredge loads wagons with coal at Borodinsky opencast colliery near Siberian town of Borodino
A rotary dredge loads wagons with coal at the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin
RUSSIA-ENERGY/
RTX1TN4S
October 28, 2015
Master Sergey Suprun uses a portable radio set as he stands near a rotary dredge which works on the coal...
Borodino, Russia
Master Suprun uses portable radio set as he stands near rotary dredge which works on coal face of Borodinsky...
Master Sergey Suprun uses a portable radio set as he stands near a rotary dredge which works on the coal face of the Borodinsky opencast colliery, near the Siberian town of Borodino, east of Krasnoyarsk, Russia October 27, 2015. The Borodinsky colliery, 9 km (5.6 miles) long and more than 100 meters (328 feet) deep, annually produces more than 20 million tons of coal and is considered to be the biggest opencast coal mine in Russia, according to official representatives. Picture taken October 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ilya Naymushin TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-OBAMA/ALASKA
RTX1QN8P
September 01, 2015
U.S. President Barack Obama asks members of the traveling press corps if they would like a pastry as...
Anchorage, UNITED STATES
Obama asks members of the traveling press corps if they would like a pastry as he orders at Snow City...
U.S. President Barack Obama asks members of the traveling press corps if they would like a pastry as he orders at Snow City Cafe in Anchorage, Alaska, September 1, 2015. Obama on Tuesday proposed a faster timetable for buying a new heavy icebreaker for the U.S. Arctic, where quickly melting sea ice has spurred more maritime traffic, and the United States has fallen far behind Russian resources. The move, part of a push to convince Americans to support Obama's plans to curb climate change, has long been urged by Arctic advocates as climate change opens up the region to more shipping, mining and drilling. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
USA-OBAMA/ALASKA
RTX1QN85
September 01, 2015
U.S. President Barack Obama makes a pastry order at Snow City Cafe in Anchorage, Alaska, September 1,...
Anchorage, UNITED STATES
Obama makes a pastry order at Snow City Cafe in Anchorage
U.S. President Barack Obama makes a pastry order at Snow City Cafe in Anchorage, Alaska, September 1, 2015. Obama on Tuesday proposed a faster timetable for buying a new heavy icebreaker for the U.S. Arctic, where quickly melting sea ice has spurred more maritime traffic, and the United States has fallen far behind Russian resources. The move, part of a push to convince Americans to support Obama's plans to curb climate change, has long been urged by Arctic advocates as climate change opens up the region to more shipping, mining and drilling. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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