Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: See-saw

ITALY-WOMEN/ABUSE
RTS3IXMK
July 10, 2020
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight...
Rome, Italy
Rome abuse protection centre risks closure despite surge in domestic violence during coronavirus lockdown...
A domestic abuse victim who since the end of April has been living in Rome's 'Lucha y Siesta' (Fight and Rest) women's house, a building run solely by activists to look after women suffering from domestic violence in the city, sleeps on the sofa, in Rome, Italy, July 8, 2020. ?Maybe I loved too much and this love was never returned to me. When I saw Lucha?s door for the first time, it was like seeing paradise after dying? said the woman. 'Lucha y Siesta' has been a crucial lifeline for women suffering from domestic violence and abuse in the city for 12 years, helping and supporting over 1,200 women and around 400 children. The previously abandoned building was occupied and transformed by women's rights activists in 2008, who also use to the space to hold workshops and training for all ages on how to fight gender violence. It is now under threat and risk of closure as owners of the building, the city's heavily indebted public transport company ATAC, plan to sell it for around 2.6 million euros to claw back some much needed finances. During lockdown, 'Lucha y Siesta' had a 30 percent increase in requests for help, and had to come up with alternative ways to accommodate the emergency situation after local authorities threatened to cut electricity and water in the building in an effort to push the women out. Volunteers warn losing the beds available will restrict critical help for vulnerable women in the Italian capital. The entire city of Rome has only 39 beds available for women escaping violence and Lucha y Siesta makes up 14 of those. Three women arrived at Lucha during lockdown. Picture taken July 8, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTS2UIRC
December 11, 2019
Smoke billows as fire engulfs the spire of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France, April 15, 2019. Reuters...
Paris, France
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
Smoke billows as fire engulfs the spire of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France, April 15, 2019. Reuters Photographer Benoit Tessier: "I was covering Vivendi's AGM when I was directed to Notre Dame because it was on fire. When I arrived, this was the first image I saw Ð the cathedral going up in smoke. I could not have imagined the fire would be so big or spread so quickly. It is difficult to find your way on the crowded sidewalks around the cathedral. This image was taken with a 24-70 mm lens at about 400m from the scene.Thousands of Parisians and tourists from around the world, came to see the fire with their own eyes. I remember two emotional young women in shock standing next to me. We couldn't even imagine the damage inside at that stage. The phone network was saturated and sending a photo was a nightmare. It was an urban landscape that was being transformed by this partial destruction. A symbol burned that day." REUTERS/Benoit Tessier/File Photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2019" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTS2UIQB
December 11, 2019
First lady Melania Trump kisses Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau next to U.S. President Donald...
Biarritz, France
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
First lady Melania Trump kisses Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau next to U.S. President Donald Trump during the family photo with invited guests at the G7 summit in Biarritz, France, August 25, 2019. Reuters Photographer Carlos Barria: "During the G7 meeting in France the leaders, with their spouses, gathered for the traditional family photo. As a member of the White House press pool, I travelled with President Trump to document his every move. I focused my lens on President Trump, while also keeping an eye on the First Lady. ItÕs a fast photo opportunity so I was filing directly from my camera Ð sending pictures instantaneously, like live TV. As I was focused on Trump, I could see in the corner of my frame that Melania Trump had a spontaneous and fleeting interaction with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. It happened so quickly it was almost imperceptible. I stopped and looked at my camera screen and thatÕs when I saw it. I sent it to the editor, who also saw its potential and sent it out quickly.Minutes after the event ended, people were already retweeting the image and creating memes. It underscores how even in a crowd of photographers focused on the same subjects, there are opportunities to capture something unique, and potentially viral." REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2019" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTS2UIQ5
December 11, 2019
People run as Haiti's Senator Jean Marie Ralph Fethiere (PHTK) fires a gun in the air, injuring Chery...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
People run as Haiti's Senator Jean Marie Ralph Fethiere (PHTK) fires a gun in the air, injuring Chery Dieu-Nalio, a photographer for Associated Press, while facing opposition supporters in the parking lot of the Haitian Parliament and Senate, as the government attempted to confirm the appointment of nominated Prime Minister Fritz William Michel, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, September 23, 2019. Reuters Photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "When Senator Jean Marie Ralph Fethiere pulled a pistol and started shooting outside the Haitian parliament to disperse who he described as 'violent militants,' I was prepared. Earlier another senator was seen with a pistol in his hand when confronted by angry opposition protesters as he arrived at the parliament. We decided to go and get our bulletproof vests and helmets. The situation was turning dangerous. When Fethiere shot into the air and at the ground, an Associated Press photographer and a security guard were injured. Fethiere later told a local radio station he was acting in self-defence. This picture captures the moment when protesters and journalists scrambled to get out of the line of fire as Fethiere fired several shots after getting out of his car in the parliament's parking lot in Port-au-Prince. The shooting only lasted two or three seconds. I took my pictures super-fast. This image shows the senator grimacing at the sound of the gun as he fires, while protesters and journalists bump into each other as they flee. The weapon is clearly visible against a clear blue sky. An AP photographer Dieu Nalio Chery was left behind, injured in the jaw. I saw Chery coming towards me, calling to me and pointing to his chin. At first, I could not see anything. Then I saw blood. I got out a bandage from my pouch and stopped the bleeding. A doctor came and checked Chery out and he was taken off for treatment." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares/File Photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2019" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. T
ISRAEL-ELECTION/SETTLEMENTS-PALESTINIANS
RTS2PTAV
September 09, 2019
Palestinian woman Bothena Turabe, 47, speaks on the phone as she works from her home in the village of...
Al-EIZARIYA, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Israel's settlers and the Palestinians they live among
Palestinian woman Bothena Turabe, 47, speaks on the phone as she works from her home in the village of Sarra near the Jewish settlement of Havat Gilad, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, July 30, 2019. Turabe, saw the settlement's growth from her Palestinian village Sarra, across the way. "In the night you look at them and you think there is nothing, and the next morning you look and you see there are more caravans," said Turabe, a member of the village council. "This land is not yours to take - you're stealing it." REUTERS/Raneen Sawafta SEARCH "SETTLEMENTS WEST BANK" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
SUDAN-POLITICS/WOMEN
RTS2LRZQ
July 11, 2019
Awadiya Mahmoud Koko Ahmed, 60, the head of Food and Tea Sellers Union, poses for a photograph in Khartoum,...
Khartoum, Sudan
The Wider Image: Beaten and abused, Sudan's women bear scars of fight for freedom
Awadiya Mahmoud Koko Ahmed, 60, the head of Food and Tea Sellers Union, poses for a photograph in Khartoum, Sudan, June 29, 2019. "I went to see the sit-in area to check what is happening there. I served them free tea with the money my daughter gave me. And we made a kitchen as a group of union members. We prepared food every day. All the people were good. They called me 'mom' When I was in America, I saw that even animals had rights. If I was the president, I would make sure that there was justice. I would treat everyone equally. I would secure the rights of women and children. We need better education for our children. Without education there will be no peace," she said. REUTERS/Umit Bektas SEARCH "SUDAN WOMEN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BRITAIN-EU/FISHING
RTX6TQ7M
April 30, 2019
In the small fishing town of Thyboron on the northwestern coast of Denmark, many fishermen worry the...
THYBORON, Denmark
The Wider Image: Danish fishing communities fear Brexit could sink them
In the small fishing town of Thyboron on the northwestern coast of Denmark, many fishermen worry the British waters they have become increasingly dependent on will be out of reach when Britain leaves the European Union. Since the 1970's, EU fishermen have had access to British waters under a deal, that many in Britain saw as unfair. Now some see Brexit as a chance to "take back control" of their waters and keep foreign vessels out. Between 30 and 40 percent of the catch landed in Thyboron Port come from British waters. Under a 'no deal' Brexit scenario, Britain can choose to close its sea border completely overnight or wait until the end of 2019, according to the Danish fishing minister. If a deal is reached, EU fishing vessels could have temporary access until a permanent trade deal is reached. The uncertainty is already having an impact on the local fishing industry, as new investments are being held back in ships and fishing quotas. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly SEARCH "KELLY JUTLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: BRITAIN-EU/FISHING
ISRAEL-PALESTINIANS/GAZA
RTS2F9T1
March 28, 2019
A woman begs outside a shopping mall in Gaza City, February 18, 2019. Despite widespread poverty seeing...
Gaza, Palestinian Territories
The Wider Image: Capturing 24 hours in Gaza, one hour at a time
A woman begs outside a shopping mall in Gaza City, February 18, 2019. Despite widespread poverty seeing anyone beg is rare and I saw nobody sleeping rough. A United Nations report in December said 53 percent of people in Gaza are living in poverty. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez SEARCH "MARTINEZ GAZA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
NIGERIA-SCHOOL/SURVIVOR
RTX6R7UY
March 14, 2019
The boy lay wide-eyed on a bed of outstretched arms. The men who carried him, and others looking on,...
Lagos, Nigeria
A Picture and its Story: Nigerian boy pulled from rubble remains calm amid chaos
The boy lay wide-eyed on a bed of outstretched arms. The men who carried him, and others looking on, cheered at the sight of the youngster who seconds earlier had been pulled from the rubble of a four-storey building that collapsed in Lagos, Nigeria. Nine-year-old Ademola Ayanbola had been in a classroom on the top floor of the building when it collapsed on Wednesday. One of around 100 pupils who attended the primary school in the Lagos Island district of Nigeria's commercial capital, he emerged with his face caked in white dust from the rubble and a bloody graze on the side of his head. "His eyes were open, so we knew he was alive. He wasn't shouting or crying. He was so calm," said Temilade Adelaja, the Reuters photographer who captured the moment. "People were shouting 'there's a child'. There were people everywhere, and lots of shouting. Then they brought him out," she said, describing the moments before his rescue. The men who surrounded him were a mix of rescue workers, residents and what locals refer to as "area boys" - youths who roam parts of Lagos in gangs. They were outside the collapsed building for hours under the tropical sun: searching, talking and sometimes arguing. The boy's father, Francis Ayanbola, had feared he would never see his son alive again when he heard the building had collapsed. First, he went to the site, he said. "When I got there everything was flat. I was just crying. I was expecting the death of my son," he said. Next, he said he visited two hospitals and saw six dead children. "I couldn't even look at their faces because I was feeling so bad," he said of the four boys and two girls he saw, none of whom he recognised. A friend eventually called Ayanbola to tell him his child was being treated at a hospital. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja SEARCH "NIGERIA BOY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: NIGERIA-SCHOOL/SURVIVOR
BRITAIN-ROYALS/BABY-ROCKING HORSES
RTX6PZVJ
March 07, 2019
A rocking horse themed see-saw stands outside the Stevenson Brothers workshop in Bethersden, Britain...
BETHERSDEN, United Kingdom
A rocking horse themed see-saw stands outside the Stevenson Brothers workshop in Bethersden
A rocking horse themed see-saw stands outside the Stevenson Brothers workshop in Bethersden, Britain March 1, 2019. Picture taken March 1, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
USA-IMMIGRATION/POY
RTX6J881
December 19, 2018
A caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America, en route to the United States, makes its way...
ARRIAGA, Mexico
Pictures of the Year: Caravans: the new face of migration
A caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America, en route to the United States, makes its way to San Pedro Tapanatepec from Arriaga, Mexico, October 27, 2018. Reuters photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "The caravan had gone through a tense night in Arriaga - the famous train "La Bestia", which many migrants use to travel north, wasn't running which frustrated their plan to shorten their journey. They continued by road and arrived at a police blockade. The migrants moved closer together to try to protect themselves as they feared the police might take action to stop the advance of the caravan. Tense moments ensued before the police allowed the migrants to pass. When I saw a van parked at the side of the road I climbed on the roof and was astonished at how many people I could see from up above." REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "IMMIGRATION POY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2018 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
USA-IMMIGRATION/POY
RTX6J87O
December 19, 2018
Maria Meza (C), a 40-year-old migrant woman from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central...
Tijuana, Mexico
Pictures of the Year: Caravans: the new face of migration
Maria Meza (C), a 40-year-old migrant woman from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, runs away from tear gas with her five-year-old twin daughters Saira Mejia Meza (L) and Cheili Mejia Meza (R) in front of the border wall between the U.S. and Mexico, in Tijuana, Mexico, November 25, 2018. Reuters Photographer Kim Kyung-Hoon: "After nearly two weeks of documenting the harrowing journey of a caravan of mostly Central American migrants headed towards the U.S.-Mexican border, I snapped a picture I will never forget. In the photo, Honduran mother Maria Meza grabs the thin arms of her two 5-year-old twin daughters Cheili and Saira as they frantically run from a tear gas canister next to the U.S-Mexico border barrier in Tijuana. Cheili is in diapers, Saira barefoot. Their mother is wearing a T-shirt from the Disney hit "Frozen," a movie I've seen many times with my own daughter. In the frantic moments after tear gas canisters hit the ground, the acrid smell engulfed the area. Children were crying, their eyes stung by the gas. The U.S. government said customs officers had used tear gas to stop a group of migrants who, they said, had violently attempted to cross the border. I did not see who fired the canister, but I heard the sound come from the direction of the border fence as I, too, broke into a run. It was one of the first of several tear gas canisters I saw being used by border agents. I did not witness migrants behaving violently, but we were in a large area and I could not see everything that was happening. It is not my place to say who is right and who is wrong. I just took a photo of what I saw happening in a given place and time." REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "IMMIGRATION POY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2018 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
CHINA-ANNIVERSARY/SANYO
RTX6IWHX
December 17, 2018
Former employee Lai Guixiang poses with a Sanyo pocket calculator she used to help make, in front of...
Shenzhen, China
Shenzhen marks the 40th anniversary of China's Reform and Opening program
Former employee Lai Guixiang poses with a Sanyo pocket calculator she used to help make, in front of the Sanyo electronics factory where she worked since 1985, in the Shekou area of Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China, December 14, 2018. "I feel like I have gone back twenty or thirty years ago, back to when we just started out here. Seeing all these exhibits. It has been 20 years since we saw each other. This time, at this 40th anniversary, everyone is here. Everyone is happy. We appreciate this opportunity. We were just girls then and now we are all grannies," she said about holding some of the old products and seeing former colleagues. Picture taken December 14, 2018. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
GLOBAL-POY/IMAGE
RTX6I8X8
December 12, 2018
A migrant family, part of a caravan of thousands traveling from Central America en route to the United...
Tijuana, Mexico
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story
A migrant family, part of a caravan of thousands traveling from Central America en route to the United States, run away from tear gas in front of the border wall between the U.S and Mexico in Tijuana, Mexico November 25, 2018. Reuters photographer Kim Kyung-Hoon: "After nearly two weeks of documenting the harrowing journey of a caravan of mostly Central American migrants headed towards the U.S.-Mexican border, I snapped a picture I will never forget. In the photo, Honduran mother Maria Meza grabs the thin arms of her two 5-year-old twin daughters Cheili and Saira as they frantically run from a tear gas canister next to the U.S-Mexico border barrier in Tijuana. Cheili is in diapers, Saira barefoot. Their mother is wearing a T-shirt from the Disney hit "Frozen," a movie I've seen many times with my own daughter. In the frantic moments after tear gas canisters hit the ground, the acrid smell engulfed the area. Children were crying, their eyes stung by the gas. The U.S. government said customs officers had used tear gas to stop a group of migrants who, they said, had violently attempted to cross the border. I did not see who fired the canister, but I heard the sound come from the direction of the border fence as I, too, broke into a run. It was one of the first of several tear gas canisters I saw being used by border agents. I did not witness migrants behaving violently, but we were in a large area and I could not see everything that was happening. It is not my place to say who is right and who is wrong. I just took a photo of what I saw happening in a given place and time." REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2018 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
GLOBAL-POY/IMAGE
RTX6I8WY
December 12, 2018
A police officer pepper sprays a protester as another protester stands in front of the race director's...
Carcassonne, France
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story
A police officer pepper sprays a protester as another protester stands in front of the race director's car at the 218-km Stage 16 from Carcassonne to Bagneres-de-Luchon of the Tour de France, July 24, 2018. Reuters photographer Stephane Mahe: "The Tour de France was in its final days. I was aboard a motorbike following a long 218-kilometre stage from Carcassonne in the deep southwest of France up to the Pyrenees. In the early part of the stage I got a little frustrated, unable to find a 'postcard' image or vantage point to shoot the race. After 25 kilometres, the motorbikes were told to gather three kilometres further along. Something was happening at last! I could see a flock of sheep with farmers and police. I jumped down and started to imagine a photo with sheep and the Tour peleton. As I got closer I quickly felt the tension: farmers were there with their livestock and tractors to demonstrate, not to watch the riders. I realised they intended to block the race. The Tour security asked me to leave but I decided to stay as something more than a sporting episode was unfolding. Just before the arrival of the peleton, I saw two young women rush onto the road, shouting and blocking an official Tour car as farmers cheered them on. The gendarmes immediately sprayed tear gas at the two protesters, who screamed and struggled. I took my picture. The two women were quickly removed from the road and the peleton arrived. The cyclists slowed and then stopped, troubled by the tear gas in the air. They struggled to breathe, wiped their eyes. One even asked me if someone had thrown acid in his face. It was chaos. The race was held up for 17 minutes - very unusual. I thought of the two protesters, I knew it was a striking image. That evening, after this stage of Tour was over, I discovered that the photo had gone viral. The protesters had an audience for their fight against the loss of local farming subsidies. But the Tour went on." REUTERS/Stephane Mahe SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR T
USA-IMMIGRATION/CARAVAN-IMAGES
RTS253CU
November 08, 2018
Migrants, part of a caravan traveling to the U.S., struggle to cross the river from Guatemala to Mexico...
CIUDAD HIDALGO, Mexico
A Picture and its Story: Central American migrants trek north to seek a better life
Migrants, part of a caravan traveling to the U.S., struggle to cross the river from Guatemala to Mexico in Ciudad Hidalgo and continue to walk in Mexico, October 29, 2018. Leah Mills: "In this image, the young man holding the child looks so exhausted to me and you can see others clutching all their worldly possessions. To me this shows how desperate these people are. They are willing to cross rivers with strong currents, to lose any belongings they had, to struggle through the water with their children. This was my first day working on the story. My colleague said we should keep an eye out for the group to start crossing the river because they had been stopped at the border gate, clashing with police the day before. I saw them from afar, a large group of them creating a column crossing the river. I started running to get to them. I ran through a number of hammocks and past police and many onlookers. Finally, I got to them and I waded into the river with the migrants jumping in from the Guatemala side. There were police sirens blaring as Mexican police formed up on the opposite shore, waiting for the caravan. A helicopter from the police flew by and dusted them all for minutes, spraying them with dust and water, blowing people around. The whole situation had an impact on me. We found a woman who was eight months pregnant. It's the people with the children and the elderly that stay with me. It's very hot, the sun is intense, hydration and keeping your feet in order are the two major challenges. But we are lucky, we have access to proper shoes, equipment, water and food. Whereas the migrants don't. I normally work in the White House. It was strange to capture the U.S. president talking about these people and then seeing them in person a few days later." REUTERS/Leah Millis/File photo SEARCH "LUIS ACOSTA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
BRAZIL-VIOLENCE/
RTS23RXA
October 02, 2018
On the morning of April 8, 12-year-old Eduarda Lopes watched as her mother, Valdilene da Silva, was shot...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
The Wider Image: Violence leaves lasting marks among Rio victims' families
On the morning of April 8, 12-year-old Eduarda Lopes watched as her mother, Valdilene da Silva, was shot by a stray bullet in Rio de Janeiro's Manguinhos slum, one of the countless innocent victims of rising gangland violence in the city. As she lay dying in a puddle of blood, Silva used her last breaths to tell her daughter to run and hide. But despite her fear of being killed, Lopes stayed with her mother. "I waited with her until the final moment, by her side," Lopes told Reuters, as tears streamed down her face. "I couldn't bear it," Lopes said, of when she got to see her mother's corpse later that day. "I saw her lying there and she looked like a doll, asleep. The only thing I could take with me were the earrings she was wearing." Brazil's violence is spiking and ever more victims are caught in the crossfire of gangs warring with each other or police. Rio de Janeiro state registered over 4,500 murders during the first eight months of 2018, up 6 percent compared with the same period in 2017. More than 1,000 people died in confrontations with police in the state between January and August, official data shows, up over 50 percent on the same period in 2017. Authorities say those killed are mostly suspected drug gang members, while critics allege innocent people are also slain. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "BECO DA SIRIA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching text: BRAZIL-VIOLENCE/?
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/OPENARMS
RTS1X7W4
August 13, 2018
Esam (L), 22, and Ahmed, 38, both from Sudan, stand on board NGO Proactiva Open Arms rescue boat in central...
Mediterranean Sea, Mid-Sea
A Picture and its Story: Spanish rescue boat finds life and death off Libya coast
Esam (L), 22, and Ahmed, 38, both from Sudan, stand on board NGO Proactiva Open Arms rescue boat in central Mediterranean Sea, August 4, 2018. Ahmed travels with his 13-year-old son. "We are from Darfur. We arrived in Libya from Sudan. In the city of Sabratah, 22 people were kidnapped for seven days but our captors made a mistake and we broke a window and escaped. We went to Kasar- El Karabulli and waited a month and eleven days until it was our turn to get on a rubber boat for which we paid 2000 dinars each. On July 31 at night, it was time to board. We got on the boat and we were sailing for seven hours in an easterly direction because if we went straight north we could be caught by a Libyan coastguard patrol boat. We headed north and sailed for 15 hours until the engine of the boat broke. We were adrift for more than three hours, in the middle of the night, until we saw some lights approaching. We began to make signals with a telephone. There was a moment of great fear and nervousness because we did not see well and the worst thing that could happen is that the Libyan patrol arrived and forced us to return to that hell. But then we heard from one of the two fast speedboats that approached: "We are friends, we are a Spanish rescue ship". We began to shout with joy. Some did not understand the message, perhaps because they do not speak English, and thought that one of the two boats was the Libyan coastguard and threw themselves into the water, preferring to risk drowning than return to Libya. Luckily we are all alive. We have a new opportunity." REUTERS/Juan Medina/File photo SEARCH "MEDINA OPENARMS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/OPENARMS
RTS1X7VX
August 13, 2018
Ahmed, 38, from Sudan, prays on board NGO Proactiva Open Arms rescue boat in central Mediterranean Sea,...
Mediterranean Sea, Mid-Sea
A Picture and its Story: Spanish rescue boat finds life and death off Libya coast
Ahmed, 38, from Sudan, prays on board NGO Proactiva Open Arms rescue boat in central Mediterranean Sea, August 6, 2018. Ahmed travels with his 13-year-old son. "We are from Darfur. We arrived in Libya from Sudan. In the city of Sabratah, 22 people were kidnapped for seven days but our captors made a mistake and we broke a window and escaped. We went to Kasar- El Karabulli and waited a month and eleven days until it was our turn to get on a rubber boat for which we paid 2000 dinars each. On July 31 at night, it was time to board. We got on the boat and we were sailing for seven hours in an easterly direction because if we went straight north we could be caught by a Libyan coastguard patrol boat. We headed north and sailed for 15 hours until the engine of the boat broke. We were adrift for more than three hours, in the middle of the night, until we saw some lights approaching. We began to make signals with a telephone. There was a moment of great fear and nervousness because we did not see well and the worst thing that could happen is that the Libyan patrol arrived and forced us to return to that hell. But then we heard from one of the two fast speedboats that approached: "We are friends, we are a Spanish rescue ship". We began to shout with joy. Some did not understand the message, perhaps because they do not speak English, and thought that one of the two boats was the Libyan coastguard and threw themselves into the water, preferring to risk drowning than return to Libya. Luckily we are all alive. We have a new opportunity." REUTERS/Juan Medina/File photo SEARCH "MEDINA OPENARMS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/OPENARMS
RTS1X7VU
August 13, 2018
Ahmed, 38, from Sudan, sits on board the NGO Proactiva Open Arms rescue boat in the central Mediterranean...
Mediterranean Sea, Mid-Sea
A Picture and its Story: Spanish rescue boat finds life and death off Libya coast
Ahmed, 38, from Sudan, sits on board the NGO Proactiva Open Arms rescue boat in the central Mediterranean Sea, August 2, 2018. Ahmed travels with his 13-year-old son. "We are from Darfur. We arrived in Libya from Sudan. In the city of Sabratah, 22 people were kidnapped for seven days but our captors made a mistake and we broke a window and escaped. We went to Kasar- El Karabulli and waited a month and eleven days until it was our turn to get on a rubber boat for which we paid 2000 dinars each. On July 31 at night, it was time to board. We got on the boat and we were sailing for seven hours in an easterly direction because if we went straight north we could be caught by a Libyan coastguard patrol boat. We headed north and sailed for 15 hours until the engine of the boat broke. We were adrift for more than three hours, in the middle of the night, until we saw some lights approaching. We began to make signals with a telephone. There was a moment of great fear and nervousness because we did not see well and the worst thing that could happen is that the Libyan patrol arrived and forced us to return to that hell. But then we heard from one of the two fast speedboats that approached: "We are friends, we are a Spanish rescue ship". We began to shout with joy. Some did not understand the message, perhaps because they do not speak English, and thought that one of the two boats was the Libyan coastguard and threw themselves into the water, preferring to risk drowning than return to Libya. Luckily we are all alive. We have a new opportunity." REUTERS/Juan Medina/File photo SEARCH "MEDINA OPENARMS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
VALENTINES-DAY/COUPLES
RTX4W8W1
February 13, 2018
Pramodini Roul, 24, an acid attack survivor and a campaigner at Chhanv, an NGO that supports acid attack...
Noida, India
The Wider Image: Arranged marriage to Facebook: what's your love story?
Pramodini Roul, 24, an acid attack survivor and a campaigner at Chhanv, an NGO that supports acid attack victims, and her partner Saroj Sahoo, 26, a manager at Chhanv share a moment at the "Sheroes" home for acid attack victims in Noida, India, February 8, 2018. The couple met at a nursing home in Cuttack, India, where Pramodini was undergoing treatment for acid burns. Saroj was friends with the lady nurse who was treating Pramodini and would visit his friend at the nursing home while she was treating Pramodini, which is how the two met for the first time, on April 8, 2014. "On September 14, 2017, after an eye surgery, I was flying with Saroj and suddenly started seeing things clearly. That was the first time I saw Saroj's face. I had never imagined that I would be able to see Saroj in my lifetime," said Pramodini. The couple is scheduled to hold a ring ceremony on Valentine’s Day in Lucknow. REUTERS/Saumya Khandelwal SEARCH "GLOBAL LOVE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
GLOBAL-POY/MYANMAR-ROHINGYA
RTX3VACJ
December 19, 2017
Photographers help a Rohingya refugee to come out of Naf River as they cross the Myanmar-Bangladesh border...
Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
Pictures of the Year: Persecuted Rohingya Muslims flee violence in Myanmar
Photographers help a Rohingya refugee to come out of Naf River as they cross the Myanmar-Bangladesh border in Palong Khali, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 1, 2017. Hannah McKay: "We were standing, looking out over paddy fields and grasslands - lots of water and one thin path leading to the border with Myanmar. In the distance we could see a huge group of people. But they weren't moving. It was 4 p.m. in the afternoon with only two hours of daylight left. So we decided to move towards them. It took us about an hour along the muddy path, meeting border guards and persuading them to let us pass. Then we saw thousands of refugees just sitting there, with more Bangladeshi border guards telling us to go back. We could see something was going on behind the crowd. So we waited for an opportunity to move closer, and that's when we saw them. The crowd was sitting on a riverbank and behind them, about three metres below, in the river itself, there were just hundreds of refugees coming across every minute. It was non-stop. There was no end to the people. People carrying babies. Elderly people being escorted through the water and mud, more than knee-deep. And we were just photographing everyone coming towards us. Then this woman appeared. She got to the point where she needed to get up to the footpath where we were. But she was exhausted. Two refugee men on her level were trying to push her up, which was when we reached out to help. Reuters photographer, Adnan Abidi, took a hand. Another photographer took another and I got her leg when she got within range. It was a case of dragging her. She lay there for a few minutes. I have no idea what happened to her. You are there trying to do your job with a camera in your hand. And then your heart overrules your head." REUTERS/Hannah McKay/File photo SEARCH "POY ROHINGYA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
GLOBAL-POY/MYANMAR-ROHINGYA
RTX3VACE
December 19, 2017
Rohingya refugees carry their child as they walk through water after crossing the border by boat through...
Teknaf, Bangladesh
Pictures of the Year: Persecuted Rohingya Muslims flee violence in Myanmar
Rohingya refugees carry their child as they walk through water after crossing the border by boat through the Naf River in Teknaf, Bangladesh, September 7, 2017. Reuters photographer Mohammad Ponir Hossain: "I walked around for an hour on the muddy and very slippery path to get to the river bank. When I reached it I heard the sound of people who had arrived by boats. Because of the mangroves I couldn't see them properly. After some time I saw more than hundred people come out of the mangroves and start walking into the water with children, elderly people and their belongings. Due to low tide boats were unable to reach to the dry land. This Rohingya couple with a child had to get off the boat into a mangrove first; then walk through the water to reach dry land." REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain/File Photo SEARCH "POY ROHINGYA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTX3PB0K
December 11, 2017
A man kneels with a folded U.S. flag as the motorcade of U.S. President Donald Trump passes him after...
Indianapolis, UNITED STATES
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story
A man kneels with a folded U.S. flag as the motorcade of U.S. President Donald Trump passes him after an event at the state fairgrounds in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S., September 27, 2017. Jonathan Ernst: "Shooting through the window of a van in the U.S. president's motorcade is never an ideal way to make pictures - but sometimes it's the only way. Even then, if you spot something, it might be distorted by the glass in the front windshield, or a little bit fuzzy from the speed. In September, soon after President Donald Trump had made comments condemning NFL players who kneel during the national anthem, he made a day trip to a rally in Indianapolis. As we drove there from the airport, I wondered if I might see someone kneeling along the way. As the motorcade sped along there were sporadic groups of people, many with supportive signs or American flags. All of a sudden on my side of the van I saw a man on one knee with a tri-folded flag about to whoosh by. I was able to shoot a few frames without even time to bring the camera all the way to my eye. Did I get it? No. Out of focus. Unusable. But I was pretty sure neither of my competitors that day had spotted him at all. It's not often that you get a second chance to make a picture, but on our way back to the airport I was ready just in case he was there again. Sure enough, as I kept watch on the left-side sidewalk, there he was. I fired a burst of pictures and filed a pair of them. In one of the earlier photographs I had caught a portion of the sign on the building he was kneeling in front of. Using that information, a reporter was able to track the man down and tell his story in full. U.S. Army veteran Marvin Boatright wanted to send a message against social injustice, and he did. I was happy he gave the motorcade a second look on the way out of town - so that I could be a messenger." REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File photo SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES.
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTX3PAZN
December 11, 2017
Caleb Amisi Luyai an opposition politician of the National Super Alliance (NASA) coalition, reacts after...
Nairobi, Kenya
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story
Caleb Amisi Luyai an opposition politician of the National Super Alliance (NASA) coalition, reacts after a gas canister fired by policemen hits his car during a protest along a street in Nairobi, Kenya, October 13, 2017. Baz Ratner: "I was lucky to get this picture. I was covering an opposition protest with Thomas Mukoya, the chief photographer for East Africa. I was riding a motorbike ahead of a convoy going to Nairobi's main street in defiance of a government ban on rallies in city centres. Suddenly, I heard the crack of teargas being fired by riot police. The police were stationed at almost every intersection to block the protesters. I pulled over to put on my gas mask and saw that one of the canisters had landed inside a nearby car. A man was leaning out the window choking on fumes and frantically trying to get out. The gas was so thick he couldn't see anything. As I ran to help open the door I managed to take a few photos. I didn't recognise the man but Thomas Mukoya later identified him as an opposition MP Caleb Amisi Luyai. Opposition protests were almost a daily occurrence during Kenya's long election season and police often disperse them with teargas or live rounds. Sometimes civilians were caught. Two days before I took the photos of the MP I saw a teargas canister land in a crowded bus. A woman was so desperate to escape she climbed out of the vehicle's back window." REUTERS/Baz Ratner/File photo SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTX3PAZF
December 11, 2017
Photographers help a Rohingya refugee to come out of Nad River as they cross the Myanmar-Bangladesh border...
Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story
Photographers help a Rohingya refugee to come out of Nad River as they cross the Myanmar-Bangladesh border in Palong Khali, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, November 1, 2017. Hannah McKay: "We were standing, looking out over paddy fields and grasslands - lots of water and one thin path leading to the border with Myanmar. In the distance we could see a huge group of people. But they weren't moving. It was 4 o'clock in the afternoon with only two hours of daylight left. So we decided to move towards them. It took us about an hour along the muddy path, meeting border guards and persuading them to let us pass. Then we saw thousands of refugees just sitting there, with more Bangladeshi border guards telling us to go back. We could see something was going on behind the crowd. So we waited for an opportunity to move closer, and that's when we saw them. The crowd was sitting on a riverbank and behind them, about three metres below, in the river itself, there were just hundreds of refugees coming across every minute. It was non-stop. There was no end to the people. People carrying babies. Elderly people being escorted through the water and mud, more than knee-deep. And we were just photographing everyone coming towards us. Then this woman appeared. She got to the point where she needed to get up to the footpath where we were. But she was exhausted. Two refugee men on her level were trying to push her up, which was when we reached out to help. Reuters photographer, Adnan Abidi, took a hand. Another photographer took another and I got her leg when she got within range. It was a case of dragging her. She lay there for a few minutes. I have no idea what happened to her. You are there trying to do your job with a camera in your hand. And then your heart overrules your head." REUTERS/Hannah McKay/File photo SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
GLOBAL-POY/VENEZUELA
RTX3KIO1
November 30, 2017
An injured opposition supporter is helped by volunteer members of a primary care response team during...
Caracas, Venezuela
Pictures of the Year: Venezuela crisis
An injured opposition supporter is helped by volunteer members of a primary care response team during clashes with riot security forces at a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's government in Caracas, Venezuela, June 22, 2017. Ivan Alvarado: "This image was taken next to an airforce base where another protestor was fatally injured that day. I don't know how this man was injured, I first saw him as the first aid volunteers carried him out from the midst of the tear gas. You can really see the pain in his expression as he cries out. After I took the image the motorbike speeded off down the highway." REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado/File Photo SEARCH "POY VENEZUELA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
GLOBAL-POY/VENEZUELA
RTX3KINX
November 30, 2017
A demonstrators attends a rally against Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro's government in Caracas,...
Caracas, Venezuela
Pictures of the Year: Venezuela crisis
A demonstrators attends a rally against Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro's government in Caracas, Venezuela, June 19, 2017. Ivan Alvarado: "I was under the highway photographing some protestors who had surrounded a woman they accused of stealing a phone from someone. I turned around to check what was happening behind me and saw this man appearing from the shadows to see what was going on. The white on his face is salt, which the protestors said helped to reduce the effects of the tear gas." REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado/File Photo SEARCH "POY VENEZUELA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "REUTERS POY" FOR ALL BEST OF 2017 PACKAGES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
MYANMAR-ROHINGYA/BANGLADESH-IMAGE
RTS1I82L
November 02, 2017
Hannah McKay was on her first foreign assignment photographing Rohingya Muslims in refugee camps in Bangladesh....
Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
A Picture and its Story: Reaching out to rescue a Rohingya woman
Hannah McKay was on her first foreign assignment photographing Rohingya Muslims in refugee camps in Bangladesh. Then she and other photographers heard around 5,000 more people were heading to the area, trying to find their way across the border from neighbouring Myanmar. Here is her account of what happened next: "We were standing, looking out over paddy fields and grasslands Ð lots of water and one thin path leading to the border with Myanmar. In the distance we could see a huge group of people. But they werenÕt moving. It was 4 oÕclock in the afternoon with only two hours left of daylight. So we decided to move towards them. It took us about an hour along the muddy path, meeting border guards and persuading them to let us pass. Then we saw thousands of refugees just sitting there, with more Bangladeshi border guards telling us to go back. We could see something was going on behind the crowd. So we waited for an opportunity to move closer, and thatÕs when we saw them. The crowd was sitting on a riverbank and behind them, about three metres below, in the river itself, there were just hundreds of refugees coming across every minute. There was no end to the people. And we were just photographing everyone coming towards us. Then this woman appeared. She got to the point where she needed to get up to the footpath where we were. But she was just exhausted. She didnÕt have anything left to get herself up. Two refugee men on her level were trying to push her up, which was when we reached out to help. Another Reuters photographer, Adnan Abidi, took a hand. Another photographer took another and I got her leg when she got within range. It was a case of dragging her. She lay there for a few minutes and then, I have no idea what happened to her. There were so many people round and it was chaos." REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "ROHINGYA PHOTOGRAPHERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: MYANMAR-ROHINGYA/BANG
USA-METOO/
RTS1HOSO
October 30, 2017
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. October 29, 2017. Hanahentzen...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. October 29, 2017. Hanahentzen said: "When I saw the #MeToo hashtag I was just coming to terms with my sexual assault. It happened when I was in middle school by one of my teachers. It took me a while to come forward with what had happened to me and then when I went to the administration I was told I didn't have enough evidence to prove anything and I should just keep quiet about it because I and the school could be sued for slander if I went public with my experience. It was really silencing because when I was being assaulted it was that stereotypical line of 'let's keep this between me and you.' And then when I found the courage to come out with it I was told again 'let's keep this quiet.' So for me too, it was a way to have a voice and it was a way for me to see that I'm not the only one that has gone through this and that women all around the world have all experienced the same thing. It was really unifying." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-METOO/
RTS1HO31
October 30, 2017
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. October 29, 2017. Picture...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. October 29, 2017. Picture taken October 29, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson??Hanahentzen said: "When I saw the #MeToo hashtag I was just coming to terms with my sexual assault. It happened when I was in middle school by one of my teachers. It took me a while to come forward with what had happened to me and then when I went to the administration I was told I didn't have enough evidence to prove anything and I should just keep quiet about it because I and the school could be sued for slander if I went public with my experience. It was really silencing because when I was being assaulted it was that stereotypical line of "let's keep this between me and you." And then when I found the courage to come out with out I was told again "let's keep this quiet." So for me too, it was a way to have a voice and it was a way for me to see that I'm not the only one that has gone through this and that women all around the world have all experienced the same thing. It was really unifying."?
USA-METOO/
RTS1HO2Y
October 30, 2017
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. October 29, 2017. Picture...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. October 29, 2017. Picture taken October 29, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson??Hanahentzen said: "When I saw the #MeToo hashtag I was just coming to terms with my sexual assault. It happened when I was in middle school by one of my teachers. It took me a while to come forward with what had happened to me and then when I went to the administration I was told I didn't have enough evidence to prove anything and I should just keep quiet about it because I and the school could be sued for slander if I went public with my experience. It was really silencing because when I was being assaulted it was that stereotypical line of "let's keep this between me and you." And then when I found the courage to come out with out I was told again "let's keep this quiet." So for me too, it was a way to have a voice and it was a way for me to see that I'm not the only one that has gone through this and that women all around the world have all experienced the same thing. It was really unifying."?
USA-METOO/
RTS1HO2U
October 30, 2017
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. October 29, 2017. Picture...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. October 29, 2017. Picture taken October 29, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson??Hanahentzen said: "When I saw the #MeToo hashtag I was just coming to terms with my sexual assault. It happened when I was in middle school by one of my teachers. It took me a while to come forward with what had happened to me and then when I went to the administration I was told I didn't have enough evidence to prove anything and I should just keep quiet about it because I and the school could be sued for slander if I went public with my experience. It was really silencing because when I was being assaulted it was that stereotypical line of "let's keep this between me and you." And then when I found the courage to come out with out I was told again "let's keep this quiet." So for me too, it was a way to have a voice and it was a way for me to see that I'm not the only one that has gone through this and that women all around the world have all experienced the same thing. It was really unifying."?
CYPRUS-MIGRANTS/IMAGE
RTX3G2DH
September 13, 2017
After more than a year of separation Syrian refugee Ammar Hammasho was finally, though briefly, reunited...
KOKKINOTRIMITHIA, Cyprus
A Picture and its Story: Syrian family shares kisses through fence
After more than a year of separation Syrian refugee Ammar Hammasho was finally, though briefly, reunited with his wife and four children through a chain link fence topped with barbed wire in Cyprus. Falling to his knees, Hammasho, who is from the war-battered city of Idlib, kissed each of his three eldest children through the three metre-high barrier encircling a migrant reception centre at Kokkinotrimithia, west of the Cypriot capital Nicosia. "The policeman told me to wait half an hour to finish the count. I couldnÕt wait, I saw the kids through the fence and I did this," he said, waving his hands over his head. "The kids ran over. I just wanted to see them, for my heart to go back into its place," the 34-year-old construction worker told Reuters on Wednesday. The reunion came on Sunday, just hours after HammashoÕs wife and their children aged 7, 5, 4 and 18 months came ashore with 300 other Syrians in north-western Cyprus after a 24-hour trip on a small boat from Mersin in Turkey, in what was one of the largest mass landings on the island since the Syrian war began. Hammasho knew his family were trying to leave Syria, but didnÕt know precisely when. "When I read on the Internet that about 250 were heading to Cyprus I knew it was them," he said with a broad smile. REUTERS/Yiannis Kourtoglou SEARCH "HAMMASHO REFUGEE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: CYPRUS-MIGRANTS/IMAGE
ISRAEL-PALESTINIANS/IMAGE
RTX3CF23
July 21, 2017
When Muslim elders called for a "Day of Rage" on Friday to protest at new Israeli security measures at...
Jerusalem, Israel
A Picture and its Story: Tear gas scene from Jerusalem's "Day of Rage\
When Muslim elders called for a "Day of Rage" on Friday to protest at new Israeli security measures at Jerusalem's holiest site, photographer Ammar Awad knew where he had to be. A native of Jerusalem who has covered the city for Reuters for 17 years, Awad headed to Ras al-Amud, directly across the valley from the Old City, from where the Aqsa Mosque and the golden Dome of the Rock stand out in the near distance. Knowing there were likely to be clashes between Israeli security forces and Palestinian worshippers, and that Muslims intended to pray in the street outside, he climbed up to the roof of a nearby mosque to gain a higher vantage point. "I know all these areas and the people know me, so it helps," said Awad, 36, explaining how he managed to gain access to the mosque, which was shut by the imam to ensure that the faithful held their prayers outside. "I was on the roof and took lots of pictures of the men praying in the street, with the Old City and the Dome of the Rock in the background," he explained. "After they finished praying, they started shouting 'Allah wa-Akbar' and some were chanting "I will sacrifice myself for al Aqsa" in Arabic. The Israeli police started to explode sound bombs to disperse the crowd. "I was going to come down, but I decided to stay and see what more pictures I could get." As the sound bombs erupted, many of those who had been praying started to run. Others were still completing their prayers as the scene turned chaotic. Awad fired off 20 frames as a tear gas canister was unleashed on the crowd. The light from the blast lit the scene, highlighting the colours as scores of men cowered from the bang. "I was lucky to get the picture," he said. "As soon as I saw it, I knew it was the picture of the day. The men were finishing prayers, there's al Aqsa and the Old City in the background - it told the whole story." REUTERS/Ammar Awad SEARCH "AWAD GAS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GLOBAL-HIGHLIGHTS/PICTURES
RTSUX9H
December 06, 2016
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATH A body is seen on the ground in Nice,...
Nice, France
2016: A Picture and its Story
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATH A body is seen on the ground in Nice, France July 15, 2016, after the Bastille Day truck attack on July 14. Eric Gaillard: 'I was at home, on holiday after a gruelling few weeks covering the Euro 2016 soccer championships, when a colleague called from Paris to say a truck had hit people in central Nice. I assumed it was a traffic accident - not something we would usually cover. But then I received an alert on my phone, the local authorities announcing there had been an attack. I didn't stop to wonder what it was, I grabbed my cameras and set out on my motorbike. I couldn't get through on my motorbike and, as I parked, I noticed there was a body lying on the curb. It was when I looked into my rearview mirror that I saw all the other bodies just behind me. Around a dozen bodies, some already covered with tablecloths taken from nearby restaurants, lay on the seaside promenade. Police and soldiers - many pointing their guns - were still in a state of confusion. The conditions were very difficult, it was dark, police trying to stop us work ... and some people there were aggressive. I understood. The situation was very chaotic. The doll photo went viral on the Internet, often mis-captioned by the site, saying it showed a dead child beneath the foil emergency blanket. But in fact nobody knows for sure the age of the victim. Given size of the victim, I don't think it was a child. I don't know why the doll is there. Was it a parent who was with a child - hence the doll? Did someone put the doll there at some point? Everyone has asked me. When you go to a war you know it's a hostile environment, you expect to see some unpleasant things but I was very shaken by what I saw that night because the horror had come home to my city, Nice. The attack happened just 500 meters from my home and during France's traditionally festive Bastille Day setting.' REUTERS/Eric Gaillard TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "2016 PIX" FO
BRITAIN-DAILYLIFE/
RTSQXKW
October 05, 2016
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil...
London, United Kingdom
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil Hall
BRITAIN-DAILYLIFE/
RTSQXKV
October 05, 2016
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil...
London, United Kingdom
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil Hall
BRITAIN-DAILYLIFE/
RTSQXKU
October 05, 2016
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil...
London, United Kingdom
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil Hall
BRITAIN-DAILYLIFE/
RTSQXKS
October 05, 2016
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil...
London, United Kingdom
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil Hall
BRITAIN-DAILYLIFE/
RTSQXKL
October 05, 2016
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil...
London, United Kingdom
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London
Visitors interact with a light up seesaw installation in London, Britain October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Neil Hall
VENEZUELA-ECONOMY/ANIMALS
RTX2OI4T
September 07, 2016
Alvaro is pictured at the Famproa dogs shelter in Los Teques, Venezuela August 18, 2016. "He was brought...
Los Teques, Venezuela
The Wider Image: It's a dog's life
Alvaro is pictured at the Famproa dogs shelter in Los Teques, Venezuela August 18, 2016. "He was brought to the shelter by a neighbour called Alvaro after he saw a car run him over. He was in a very bad condition and almost died, but instead of putting him down, it was decided to give him a few days and wait to see if he could recover," said Maria Silva who takes care of dogs at the shelter. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins SEARCH "DOG LIFE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ALGERIA-SAHARA
RTS96QU
March 03, 2016
Indigenous Sahrawi girls play on an improvised see-saw at a refugee camp of Boudjdour in Tindouf, southern...
Tindouf, Algeria
Indigenous Sahrawi girls play on an improvised see-saw at a refugee camp of Boudjdour in Tindouf
Indigenous Sahrawi girls play on an improvised see-saw at a refugee camp of Boudjdour in Tindouf, southern Algeria March 3, 2016. The UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is scheduled to visit the Sahrawi refugees in south-west Algeria's Tindouf region. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
STORY-YEAR ENDER/2015
RTX1XWNH
December 09, 2015
Protesters drag a female police officer accused of shooting a protester in the Buterere neighbourhood...
Bujumbura, Burundi
Yearend 2015: A Picture and Its Story
Protesters drag a female police officer accused of shooting a protester in the Buterere neighbourhood of Bujumbura, Burundi, May 12, 2015. Goran Tomasevic: Protesters started throwing stones at a group of police, who then started to run away. The policewoman in the photo, Medikintos Inabeza, 33, got left behind and then some protesters started to push her, saying that she had shot a female protestor in the stomach with an AK47 rifle. I didn't see anything of that. There were 5 or 10 protesters pushing the policewoman at first, then others came and joined in. Up to 20 or 30 protesters were surrounding her at one point. The protesters kicked and beat her very badly; I also saw a couple of knives. I thought they were going to kill her. The people attacking her were really aggressive. What was really surprising to me was that the other police abandoned her when the stones were thrown. Maybe some were initially too scared to help, other than the two policemen who were doing what they could to rescue her. There was even one protester who tried to protect the policewoman. The whole thing lasted 20 or 30 minutes. It ended when, for some reason that was hard to figure out, the protestors let the policewoman go, handing her over to another group of police further on. I was the only photographer there when this incident happened. I've been in situations with angry crowds before but I've never seen something like this. Pictures sometimes tell a bigger story than words. This was one of those occasions. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic SEARCH "STORY-YEAR" FOR ALL 14 PICTURES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
STORY-YEAR ENDER/2015
RTX1XWMJ
December 09, 2015
A Syrian refugee holding a baby swims towards the Greek island of Lesbos, September 12, 2015. Alkis...
LESBOS, Greece
Yearend 2015: A Picture and Its Story
A Syrian refugee holding a baby swims towards the Greek island of Lesbos, September 12, 2015. Alkis Konstantinidis: Another inflatable boat packed with dozens of migrants and refugees heading towards the shore. That’s what I noticed in the distance. The sea was calm and they were cheering on the dinghy. Suddenly, some 200 metres away, the rear of the boat deflated for no obvious reason, and people started falling into the sea. Screams replaced cheers as they frantically tried to stay afloat on life tubes, or by clinging on to the boat. Those who could swim tried to help those who couldn’t. As this dramatic scene unfolded and people drifted away from each other, the biggest challenge was to capture as many of the different scenes as I could. There were people falling overboard; two men trying to keep their friend afloat; a man still on the boat lifting his child in the air; another man, nearing collapse from exhaustion, swimming towards the shore; volunteers rushing towards the boat. In this hectic moment, one man, tense and yelling really loudly, caught my eye so I shot some frames. Later, as he tried to catch his breath on the beach, I asked him where he was from. “Syria," he told me before heading towards a volunteer holding a baby. The distance of the shot hadn’t allowed me to see the details of the picture clearly. It was only when I began editing that I could make out the tiny head of a baby in a life tube, and the screaming man trying to keep himself and the baby above water. Everything I cover, from riots to politics and sports, trains me to be on the alert and try to get the best from what I am shooting. I learned from this experience that disaster can occur even in what appears to be the calmest of situations. Looking back, the most memorable moment was when I opened the picture and saw the baby, who looked fast asleep as if in a cradle - dreaming or listening to a lullaby. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis SEARCH "STORY-YEAR" FOR ALL 14 PICTURES
EGYPT-SLUM/
RTSI59
September 10, 2015
Reuters photographer Amr Abdallah Dalsh: Residents of the Eshash el-Sudan slum clashed with police in...
Giza, Egypt
A Picture And Its Story: Life In Eshash el-Sudan
Reuters photographer Amr Abdallah Dalsh: Residents of the Eshash el-Sudan slum clashed with police in the heat of late August, when about 50 of the ramshackle huts were destroyed and at least 20 people were injured by teargas, local media reported, as authorities attempt to clear the area and rehouse residents. People there were stressed and angry, that’s what struck me most about this slum in the Dokki neighbourhood of Giza, south of Cairo. There was rubbish everywhere and the smell was terrible. Located near a busy street, the noise was intense and constant. Animals such as chicken or goats are usually kept in an eshash – a coop or pen. I saw 12 people living in a shack of about 3 square metres. The slum dwellers, some of whom have called this settlement near Sudan Street home for 50 years, say there are not enough apartments built nearby to rehouse them. Some 145 housing units are being built to rehouse the residents of this slum, local media have quoted General Alaa Haras, the deputy governor of Giza, as saying. The slum’s residents eke out a living by disposing of rubbish or, in some cases, baking bread. Schooling is too expensive for most of their children, who play with salvaged rubbish amid shacks made of discarded wood and leather. One man offered me tea but apologised because no water was available. Back in the countryside, where he came from, that would have been possible, he told me. There is only one tap for the whole slum settlement, and the supply is very erratic. It can take an hour to get water, one drip at a time. It pained me to see bedraggled, dirty children go in search of water. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYSEARCH "ESHASH EL-SUDAN" FOR ALL PICTURES
MEXICO-GUZMAN/
RTX1L8IQ
July 21, 2015
A flashlight illuminates a judicial worker as he shines a torch into an area of the tunnel connected...
Mexico City, Mexico
A Picture And Its Story: Escape From El Altiplano
A flashlight illuminates a judicial worker as he shines a torch into an area of the tunnel connected to Altiplano Federal Penitentiary and used by drug lord Joaquin 'El Chapo' Guzman to escape, in Almoloya de Juarez, on the outskirts of Mexico City, July 14, 2015. Reuters Photographer Edgard Garrido: "After photographing Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman when recaptured last year, “El Chapo”, or "Shorty", escaped again earlier this month, this time through a tunnel from the high-security prison El Altiplano. It was only after waiting more than two days that the authorities let us see the tunnel’s exit in a warehouse. Two metres down was a basement with buckets, ropes, dug earth and a pulley above the tunnel exit. I had five minutes to take photos. Next day I was able to go into the tunnel, I went down to the basement area and started to clamber down a rickety ladder about 8 metres long. The darkness was intense and I couldn’t see my feet. Air was in short supply. At the bottom I looked for details of the adapted motorbike which allowed “El Chapo” to make a speedy escape through the tunnel. After a while we also got access to his prison cell. Security was extremely tight. After 10 minutes walking through a maze of staircases and corridors, we arrived. Two minutes for photos: his unmade bed, a desk. A cement wall divided the cell from the shower, his point of escape. I saw the security camera in a corner of the cell and tried to figure out the two blind spots mentioned by the authorities. With Guzman still on the run, those blind spots could tell quite a story." REUTERS/Edgard Garrido/files TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

SEARCH "GUZMAN GARRIDO" FOR ALL PICTURES
MEXICO-GUZMAN/
RTX1L8IL
July 21, 2015
Reuters Photographer Edgard Garrido: "After photographing Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman...
Mexico City, Mexico
A Picture And Its Story: Escape From El Altiplano
Reuters Photographer Edgard Garrido: "After photographing Mexican drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman when recaptured last year, “El Chapo”, or "Shorty", escaped again earlier this month, this time through a tunnel from the high-security prison El Altiplano. It was only after waiting more than two days that the authorities let us see the tunnel’s exit in a warehouse. Two metres down was a basement with buckets, ropes, dug earth and a pulley above the tunnel exit. I had five minutes to take photos. Next day I was able to go into the tunnel, I went down to the basement area and started to clamber down a rickety ladder about 8 metres long. The darkness was intense and I couldn’t see my feet. Air was in short supply. At the bottom I looked for details of the adapted motorbike which allowed “El Chapo” to make a speedy escape through the tunnel. After a while we also got access to his prison cell. Security was extremely tight. After 10 minutes walking through a maze of staircases and corridors, we arrived. Two minutes for photos: his unmade bed, a desk. A cement wall divided the cell from the shower, his point of escape. I saw the security camera in a corner of the cell and tried to figure out the two blind spots mentioned by the authorities. With Guzman still on the run, those blind spots could tell quite a story." REUTERS/Edgard Garrido TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

SEARCH "GUZMAN GARRIDO" FOR ALL PICTURES
A Picture And Its Story
A Picture And Its Story
Escape From El Altiplano - 21 July 2015
19 PICTURES
MIDEAST-CRISIS/SYRIA
RTX1CTYJ
May 13, 2015
Ghazal, 4, (L) and Judy, 7, carrying 8-month-old Suhair, react after what activists said was shelling...
Damascus, Syria
A Picture and Its Story: From Smiles to Tears
Ghazal, 4, (L) and Judy, 7, carrying 8-month-old Suhair, react after what activists said was shelling by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad near the Syrian Arab Red Crescent center in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus May 6, 2015. Bassam Khabieh: I was covering the Red Crescent’s arrival to the area carrying medical aid and supplies used for activities to give psychological support to children affected by the war.

Whenever the aid convoy entered the Eastern Ghouta, children would gather around it, happy that they were going to be supplied with food and medicine. While I was there, the children asked me to take their pictures so they could see them on the camera’s screen. The children gathered around me so I could photograph them. First I took a photo of Ghazal, then her sister Judy who was carrying a baby called Suhair asked me to take a picture of her kissing the baby.

While I was taking these photos, a shell landed on the area. The children started to scream and cry amid the dust and blood around them. The shell killed a female volunteer from the Red Crescent. The children were terrified, especially when they saw the female volunteer covered with blood.

This was the first time I had seen how children's innocent laughter could turn into screams, fear and tears. Seconds before the strike, the children were looking at me happily, getting ready for a picture. It was a very sad moment when I put my eye to the viewfinder to take pictures of laughing children; then when I looked back after taking the picture, I saw the same children crying, distraught. REUTERS/Bassam Khabieh
BURUNDI-POLITICS/
RTX1CS3U
May 13, 2015
Protesters drag a female police officer accused of shooting a protester in the Buterere neighbourhood...
Bujumbura, Burundi
A Picture and Its Story: Protesters Attack Policewoman
Protesters drag a female police officer accused of shooting a protester in the Buterere neighbourhood of Bujumbura, Burundi, May 12, 2015.
Goran Tomasevic: "Protesters started throwing stones at a group of police, who then started to run away. The policewoman in the photo, Medikintos Inabeza, 33, got left behind and then some protesters started to push her, saying that she had shot a female protestor in the stomach with an AK47 rifle. I didn’t see anything of that. There were 5 or 10 protesters pushing the policewoman at first, then others came and joined in. Up to 20 or 30 protesters were surrounding her at one point. The protesters kicked and beat her very badly; I also saw a couple of knives. I thought they were going to kill her. The people attacking her were really aggressive. What was really surprising to me was that the other police abandoned her when the stones were thrown. Maybe some were initially too scared to help, other than the two policemen who were doing what they could to rescue her. There was even one protester who tried to protect the policewoman. The whole thing lasted 20 or 30 minutes. It ended when, for some reason that was hard to figure out, the protestors let the policewoman go, handing her over to another group of police further on. I was the only photographer there when this incident happened. I’ve been in situations with angry crowds before but I’ve never seen something like this. Pictures sometimes tell a bigger story than words. This was one of those occasions." REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

FOR MORE IMAGES ON THIS STORY SEARCH "FEMALE POLICE GORAN"

MIDEAST-CRISIS/SYRIA
RTX1CS1V
May 13, 2015
Ghazal, 4, stands along a street near the Syrian Arab Red Crescent centre, minutes before what activists...
Damascus, Syria
A Picture and Its Story: From Smiles to Tears
Ghazal, 4, stands along a street near the Syrian Arab Red Crescent centre, minutes before what activists said was shelling by forces of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in the Douma neighbourhood of Damascus May 6, 2015. Bassam Khabieh: I was covering the Red Crescent’s arrival to the area carrying medical aid and supplies used for activities to give psychological support to children affected by the war.

Whenever the aid convoy entered the Eastern Ghouta, children would gather around it, happy that they were going to be supplied with food and medicine. While I was there, the children asked me to take their pictures so they could see them on the camera’s screen. The children gathered around me so I could photograph them. First I took a photo of Ghazal, then her sister Judy who was carrying a baby called Suhair asked me to take a picture of her kissing the baby.

While I was taking these photos, a shell landed on the area. The children started to scream and cry amid the dust and blood around them. The shell killed a female volunteer from the Red Crescent. The children were terrified, especially when they saw the female volunteer covered with blood.

This was the first time I had seen how children's innocent laughter could turn into screams, fear and tears. Seconds before the strike, the children were looking at me happily, getting ready for a picture. It was a very sad moment when I put my eye to the viewfinder to take pictures of laughing children; then when I looked back after taking the picture, I saw the same children crying, distraught. REUTERS/Bassam Khabieh
MIDEAST-CRISIS/SYRIA
RTX1CS1N
May 13, 2015
Judy, 7, carries 8-month-old Suhair along a street near the Syrian Arab Red Crescent centre, minutes...
Damascus, Syria
A Picture and Its Story: From Smiles to Tears
Judy, 7, carries 8-month-old Suhair along a street near the Syrian Arab Red Crescent centre, minutes before what activists said was shelling by forces of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in the Douma neighbourhood of Damascus May 6, 2015. Bassam Khabieh: I was covering the Red Crescent’s arrival to the area carrying medical aid and supplies used for activities to give psychological support to children affected by the war.

Whenever the aid convoy entered the Eastern Ghouta, children would gather around it, happy that they were going to be supplied with food and medicine. While I was there, the children asked me to take their pictures so they could see them on the camera’s screen. The children gathered around me so I could photograph them. First I took a photo of Ghazal, then her sister Judy who was carrying a baby called Suhair asked me to take a picture of her kissing the baby.

While I was taking these photos, a shell landed on the area. The children started to scream and cry amid the dust and blood around them. The shell killed a female volunteer from the Red Crescent. The children were terrified, especially when they saw the female volunteer covered with blood.

This was the first time I had seen how children's innocent laughter could turn into screams, fear and tears. Seconds before the strike, the children were looking at me happily, getting ready for a picture. It was a very sad moment when I put my eye to the viewfinder to take pictures of laughing children; then when I looked back after taking the picture, I saw the same children crying, distraught. REUTERS/Bassam Khabieh
A Picture and Its Story
A Picture and Its Story
From Smiles to Tears - 13 May 2015
4 PICTURES
A Picture and Its Story
A Picture and Its Story
Protesters Attack Policewoman in Burundi - 12 May 2015
14 PICTURES
SYRIA-CRISIS/
RTR4PNSP
February 15, 2015
Children carry banners inside a cage during a protest, against forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar...
Damascus, Syria
Children carry banners inside a cage during a protest, against forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar...
Children carry banners inside a cage during a protest, against forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad, in Douma Eastern Al-Ghouta, near Damascus, February 15, 2015. The protest, which made children wear orange suits depicting victims of the Islamic State, calls to compare forces loyal to Syria's president Bashar al-Assad to Islamic State forces, and to draw attention to residents living under seige and dieing from strikes by forces loyal to Syria's president Bashar Al-Assad, activists said. The text on the banner reads in Arabic:" we saw your writings about the burning Jordanian pilot, and we didnt see them when Douma children were burnt, #douma-exterminated". REUTERS/ Bassam Khabieh (SYRIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
REUTERS-PICTURES30/
RTR4PF8E
February 13, 2015
A man clings to the top of a vehicle before being rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard from the flooded streets...
New Orleans, UNITED STATES
File photo of a man clinging to the top of a vehicle in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans...
A man clings to the top of a vehicle before being rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard from the flooded streets of New Orleans, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, in Louisiana in this September 4, 2005 file photo.

Robert Galbraith: I arrived in New Orleans three days after the hurricane struck, and was flown via a Coast Guard four-seat airplane from Alexander, Louisiana to the U.S. Coast Guard Station in New Orleans.

Unable to see anything other than the death and destruction visible through the open door, we began circling and descending and suddenly I saw a man, dressed in khakis, tennis shoes and shirtless, looking desperately toward us from the top of the van in rising flood water. With the helicopter rotating closer, he rolled to his side and clung to the top of the vehicle.

Moments later a rescue swimmer loaded him into a basket and he was raised into the helicopter. We then flew to Louis Armstrong Airport, where he was placed on a stretcher and provided medical attention.

It was odd to see someone, six days after the hurricane struck, sitting on top of the van, a tall can of Budweiser beer and a broom nearby, visible in other pictures that were filed. When he entered the helicopter, he asked of my camera "What's that?"

The story had a major impact on me personally. I've covered many disasters - massive fires, floods, riots, earthquakes - but Hurricane Katrina was beyond category in what I had previously experienced. When I returned home I was in the process of moving, and didn't watch television or connect my telephone for a couple of months. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE IS PART OF PACKAGE '30 YEARS OF REUTERS PICTURES'

TO FIND ALL 56 IMAGES SEARCH '30 YEARS'
REUTERS-PICTURES30/
RTR4PF88
February 13, 2015
Kenji Nagai of APF lies dying after police and military officials fired on him in Yangon in this September...
Yangon, Myanmar
File photo of Nagai of APF trying to take photographs as he lies injured after police and military officials...
Kenji Nagai of APF lies dying after police and military officials fired on him in Yangon in this September 27, 2007 file photo.
Adrees Latif: I was covering the "Saffron Revolution" in Myanmar where rising fuel prices ignited protests. After weeks of protests mostly led by monks, security forces raided monasteries and arrested monks in an effort to quell the demonstrations. On Sept. 27, tens of thousands of protesters took to the center of Yangon, near the Sule Pagoda. Armed military forces arrived to the scene and dispersed the crowd with smoke bombs and machine guns. Seconds after the military opened fire on the crowd, I saw a man falling to the ground and turned my camera to his direction to photograph. I would later learn it was Japanese video journalist Kenji Nagai working amidst the protesters.

On this particular morning, the military had set up roadblocks and there was an eerie silence in the air. The streets were empty and I found refuge in a monastery for novice monks. Before midday, I made my way by foot to the city center. As I arrived, some dozens of protesters were shouting slogans. With every passing minute, their numbers multiplied.

I took position on a pedestrian bridge. From atop I could see dozens of military vehicles approaching. The soldiers opened fire soon after their arrival. While photographing, I took refuge amidst a bridge full of protesters lying flat to avoid being shot. Soon after I felt a strong urge to preserve the images I had made and found a way off the bridge.

Over the years, I read of previous crackdowns by the junta on protesters but never saw photographic proof from reliable or unbiased sources. This image provided a rare public glimpse of the raw brutality of one of the world's most secretive regimes. REUTERS/Adrees Latif/Files (MYANMAR) - (POLITICS CIVIL UNREST TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE IS PART OF PACKAGE '30 YEARS OF REUTERS PICTURES'

TO FIND ALL 56 IMAGES SEARCH '30 YEARS'
PHOTOGRAPHERS-STORY/POY2014
RTR4FOZF
November 26, 2014
A masked pro-Russian protester sits on a chair as he poses for a picture inside a regional government...
Donetsk, Ukraine
RNPS - PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2014 - PHOTOGRAPHERS' STORY
A masked pro-Russian protester sits on a chair as he poses for a picture inside a regional government building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine in this April 25, 2014 file photo.

On March 3, a couple hundred pro-Russian demonstrators stormed the Donetsk regional government building after clashing with police who were guarding the main entrance. They successfully entered through a side door, and in the end made it to the second floor where the parliament sits. Unrest continued to spiral in Ukraine and the following month separatists declared a "People's Republic of Donetsk". Two months after these initial attacks, protestors were still inside the regional government buildings and masked men guarded the barricades. I asked to take a series of portraits of these men. I saw a massive chair underneath a neon light and I picked my lens, adjusted the light, and people began to pose in shifts. Each subject was relaxed, and struck whatever pose suited him.

Later, they asked with interest how people in Europe see the situation in Ukraine and wanted to know if anyone supports them, and what will happen in the end. They seemed a bit scared. I didn't have a good answer to their last question. - Marko Djurica
REUTERS/Marko Djurica (UKRAINE - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST PORTRAIT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: THIS PICTURE IS PART OF THE PACKAGE 'PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2014 - THE PHOTOGRAPHERS' STORY'. SEARCH 'PHOTOGRAPHERS' STORY' FOR ALL IMAGES'
PHOTOGRAPHERS-STORY/POY2014
RTR4FOWM
November 26, 2014
Italy's Giorgio Chiellini shows teeth marks on his shoulder where he was bitten by Uruguay's Luis Suarez,...
Natal, Brazil
Italy's Chiellini shows teeth marks on this shoulder where he was bitten by Uruguay's Luis Suarez, during...
Italy's Giorgio Chiellini shows teeth marks on his shoulder where he was bitten by Uruguay's Luis Suarez, during their 2014 World Cup match at the Dunas arena in Natal in this June 24, 2014 file photo.

I was covering Italy v. Uruguay and it felt almost just like any other match. But in the second half, there was some strange contact between Italy's Giorgio Chiellini and Uruguay's Luis Suarez. I was following the action elsewhere on the pitch, but I saw them both fall down. They both looked like they were in pain, and I started to take pictures until Chiellini reacted angrily right in front of me, pulling down his shirt to reveal his shoulder.

I shot some photos and, for me, the story was finished.

But I only did part of the work. The second, very important part of the job was done by our great editors who spotted the teeth marks on Chiellini's shoulder, and a cropped version of my picture was sent out to our clients so they could see too. - Tony Gentile REUTERS/Tony Gentile (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCCER SPORT WORLD CUP TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: THIS PICTURE IS PART OF THE PACKAGE 'PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2014 - THE PHOTOGRAPHERS' STORY'. SEARCH 'PHOTOGRAPHERS' STORY' FOR ALL IMAGES'
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 4