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Search results for: Shipbreaking

PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A4R 
May 26, 2018 
Labourers work without protective gear to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
Labourers work without protective gear to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard... 
Labourers work without protective gear to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1T 
May 26, 2018 
Labourers work without protective gear to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
Labourers work without protective gear to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard... 
Labourers work without protective gear to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1S 
May 26, 2018 
Labourers put on nylon shoes after work separating parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
Labourers put on nylon shoes after work separating parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard... 
Labourers put on nylon shoes after work separating parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1R 
May 26, 2018 
Labourers stand in front of a ship, part of which has been broken up for scrap metal, at ship-breaking... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
Labourers stand in front of a ship, part of which has been broken up for scrap metal, at ship-breaking... 
Labourers stand in front of a ship, part of which has been broken up for scrap metal, at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province, Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1Q 
May 26, 2018 
A labourer and his son stand outside their makeshift home, with a ship in the background that is to be... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
A labourer and his son stand outside their makeshift home, with a ship in the background that is to be... 
A labourer and his son stand outside their makeshift home, with a ship in the background that is to be dismantled for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1P 
May 26, 2018 
A labourer pauses during his work dismantling a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani,... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
A labourer pauses during his work dismantling a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani,... 
A labourer pauses during his work dismantling a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1N 
May 26, 2018 
A labourer uses a blow torch to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani,... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
A labourer uses a blow torch to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani,... 
A labourer uses a blow torch to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1M 
May 26, 2018 
Labourers walk past an anchored ship before dismantling it for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani,... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
Labourers walk past an anchored ship before dismantling it for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani,... 
Labourers walk past an anchored ship before dismantling it for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1L 
May 26, 2018 
Labourers separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
Labourers separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province... 
Labourers separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1J 
May 26, 2018 
Labourers work without protective gear to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
Labourers work without protective gear to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard... 
Labourers work without protective gear to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTX66A1I 
May 26, 2018 
A labourer boards a makeshift cable carriage as he transports supplies to a ship that is to be dismantled... 
GADANI, Pakistan 
A labourer boards a makeshift cable carriage as he transports supplies to a ship that is to be dismantled... 
A labourer boards a makeshift cable carriage as he transports supplies to a ship that is to be dismantled for scrap metal at ship-breaking yard in Gadani, Baluchistan province Pakistan May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro 
PAKISTAN-ACCIDENT/
RTX2RKEJ 
November 02, 2016 
Smoke rises from the burning oil tanker at a shipbreaking yard in Gaddani, Pakistan, November 2, 2016.... 
GADDANI, Pakistan 
Smoke rises from the burning oil tanker at a shipbreaking yard in Gaddani 
Smoke rises from the burning oil tanker at a shipbreaking yard in Gaddani, Pakistan, November 2, 2016. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
Wider Image
Wider Image 
Cleaning Up Shipbreaking - 31 Mar 2015 
21 PICTURES 
SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK8I 
March 31, 2015 
The dismantled steering cabin of a French navy vessel is seen the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
The dismantled steering cabin of a French navy vessel is seen the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent February 25, 2015.The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

PICTURE 20 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK8H 
March 31, 2015 
General view of the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent from a French seismic vessel February 25, 2015.... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
General view of the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent from a French seismic vessel February 25, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

PICTURE 21 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK8D 
March 31, 2015 
Workers dismantle steel plates of a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
Workers dismantle steel plates of a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave

PICTURE 18 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK8A 
March 31, 2015 
A worker dismantles a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat,... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker dismantles a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave

PICTURE 19 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK89 
March 31, 2015 
A worker uses a cutting torch on a large block cut from a vessel at the Galloo ship recycling plant in... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker uses a cutting torch on a large block cut from a vessel at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent March 23, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

PICTURE 17 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK85 
March 31, 2015 
A worker uses a hand fan as he watches a television during his break inside worker's rest area at the... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker uses a hand fan as he watches a television during his break inside worker's rest area at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave

PICTURE 16 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK7O 
March 31, 2015 
Workers pause as they dismantle parts of a French seismic vessel at the Galloo ship recycling plant in... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
Workers pause as they dismantle parts of a French seismic vessel at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent March 24, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

PICTURE 15 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK7N 
March 31, 2015 
A worker wearing a protective mask pauses near a barge being dismantled at the Galloo ship recycling... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker wearing a protective mask pauses near a barge being dismantled at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent March 24, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

PICTURE 13 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK7M 
March 31, 2015 
Workers dismantle the engine bearing of a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
Workers dismantle the engine bearing of a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave

PICTURE 14 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK7K 
March 31, 2015 
A worker uses a wielding machine to dismantle a part of a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker uses a wielding machine to dismantle a part of a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave

PICTURE 12 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK7I 
March 31, 2015 
A worker uses a cutting torch to dismantle the hull of a barge at the Galloo ship recycling plant in... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker uses a cutting torch to dismantle the hull of a barge at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent March 24, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 11 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK7G 
March 31, 2015 
A worker dismantles a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat,... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker dismantles a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave

PICTURE 10 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK7E 
March 31, 2015 
A worker uses a cutting torch to dismantle parts of a barge at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker uses a cutting torch to dismantle parts of a barge at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent March 24, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 9 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK7C 
March 31, 2015 
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat,... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
Workers dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave

PICTURE 8 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK6Q 
March 31, 2015 
A crane is seen lifting a container near a French seismic vessel which is soon to be dismantled at the... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A crane is seen lifting a container near a French seismic vessel which is soon to be dismantled at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent March 23, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 7 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK6P 
March 31, 2015 
Workers prepare to dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
Workers prepare to dismantle a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015.The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 6 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK6N 
March 31, 2015 
Workers carry a rope line to fasten a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
Workers carry a rope line to fasten a decommissioned ship at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 4 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK6M 
March 31, 2015 
A crane lifts a large block cut from of a French seismic vessel at the Galloo ship recycling plant in... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A crane lifts a large block cut from of a French seismic vessel at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent March 24, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 5 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK6L 
March 31, 2015 
A goose swims past boats which are soon to be dismantled at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A goose swims past boats which are soon to be dismantled at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent March 23, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 3 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK66 
March 31, 2015 
A worker uses a cutting torch to dismantle the hull of a barge covered in barnacles near French navy... 
Ghent, Belgium 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker uses a cutting torch to dismantle the hull of a barge covered in barnacles near French navy vessels at the Galloo ship recycling plant in Ghent March 24, 2015. The site, which is Europe's largest ship recycling plant processes some 35,000 tonnes of metal every year. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 1 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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SHIPPING-RECYCLING/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4VK63 
March 31, 2015 
A worker sorts out the engine parts of a decommissioned ship as he dismantles it at the Alang shipyard... 
ALANG, India 
Wider Image: Cleaning up Shipbreaking 
A worker sorts out the engine parts of a decommissioned ship as he dismantles it at the Alang shipyard in the western Indian state of Gujarat, March 27, 2015. The European Union plans to impose strict new rules on how companies scrap old tankers and cruise liners, run aground and dismantled on beaches in South Asia. However the practice in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, hazardous for humans and the environment, will still be hard to stop. European, Turkish and Chinese recyclers are set to benefit from the revamped standards. Depending on raw material prices, ship owners can make up to $500 per tonne of steel from an Indian yard, compared with $300 in China and just $150 in Europe. REUTERS/Amit Dave

PICTURE 2 OF 21 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'CLEANING UP SHIPBREAKING'

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INDIA-DAILYLIFE/
RTR4FCX5 
November 24, 2014 
A worker uses metal cutter as others carry to dismantled parts of decommissioned Indian Navy Ship INS... 
Mumbai, India 
A worker uses metal cutter as others carry to dismantled parts of decommissioned Indian Navy Ship INS... 
A worker uses metal cutter as others carry to dismantled parts of decommissioned Indian Navy Ship INS Vikrant at a ship breaking yard in Mumbai November 24, 2014. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY MILITARY BUSINESS
EMPLOYMENT MARITIME TPX
IMAGES OF THE DAY)

FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE ALSO SEE: GF20000053237 
BANGLADESH/
RTX123VT 
July 29, 2013 
A worker stands in front of a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh... 
Chittagong, Bangladesh 
Worker stands in front of a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong 
A worker stands in front of a wrecked part of a ship at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km, and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: MARITIME ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
BANGLADESH/
RTX123R1 
July 29, 2013 
Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh... 
Chittagong, Bangladesh 
Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong 
Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km, and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: MARITIME BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT INDUSTRIAL) 
BANGLADESH/
RTX123PR 
July 29, 2013 
Workers pull a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 17, 2013. Bangladesh... 
Chittagong, Bangladesh 
Workers pull a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong 
Workers pull a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 17, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km, and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 17, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: MARITIME BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT) 
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1235G 
July 28, 2013 
Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh... 
Chittagong, Bangladesh 
Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong 
Workers carry a long rope at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km (12.4 miles), and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 35 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ' 
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX1235D 
July 28, 2013 
Workers use a makeshift ladder to board a boat as they come back to shore after finishing work at a ship-breaking... 
Chittagong, Bangladesh 
Workers use a makeshift ladder to board a boat as they come back to shore after finishing work at a ship-breaking... 
Workers use a makeshift ladder to board a boat as they come back to shore after finishing work at a ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh July 16, 2013. Bangladesh is dependent on ship-breaking for its domestic steel requirements. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, around 30,000 workers are employed in the ship-breaking industry in Chittagong, a highly polluted coastal belt of around 20 km (12.4 miles), and environmental organisations have said that the number of accidents and casualties at the yard is believed to be the highest in the region. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 31 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ' 
INDIA-SHIP/
RTR344XQ 
June 25, 2012 
A man walks past a ship docked at a ship-breaking yard in Mumbai June 25, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui... 
Mumbai, India 
Man walks past a ship docked at a ship-breaking yard in Mumbai 
A man walks past a ship docked at a ship-breaking yard in Mumbai June 25, 2012. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: BUSINESS MARITIME SOCIETY) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKNP 
February 28, 2012 
A labourer connects chains before separating parts of a ship
for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
A labourer connects chains before separating parts of a ship
for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles)
from Karachi November 24, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKNE 
February 28, 2012 
Labourers rest during a break while working on a ship separating parts of it into scrap metal at the... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers rest during a break while working on a ship separating parts of it into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKN9 
February 28, 2012 
Labourers check a portion of a ship while cutting it into scrap metal with gas blow torch at the Gaddani... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers check a portion of a ship while cutting it into scrap metal with gas blow torch at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKN7 
February 28, 2012 
A labourer is silhouetted against the sun as he holds a gas blow torch while working to separate parts... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
A labourer is silhouetted against the sun as he holds a gas blow torch while working to separate parts of a ship into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN/
RTR2YKN6 
February 28, 2012 
Labourers transport supplies to a ship by a makeshift cable carriage to separate it into scrap metal... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers transport supplies to a ship by a makeshift cable carriage to separate it into scrap metal at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard early in the morning, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKN0 
February 28, 2012 
Labourers board a makeshift cable carriage as they are transported with supplies to a ship to separate... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers board a makeshift cable carriage as they are transported with supplies to a ship to separate it into scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard early in the morning, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKMY 
February 28, 2012 
A labourer uses a gas blow torch to separate parts of a ship into scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
A labourer uses a gas blow torch to separate parts of a ship into scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKMX 
February 28, 2012 
Labourers stand on a makeshift cable carriage which transports them onto a ship to separate it into scrap... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers stand on a makeshift cable carriage which transports them onto a ship to separate it into scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKMP 
February 28, 2012 
Labourers climb up an iron chain and ladder to break down a ship for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers climb up an iron chain and ladder to break down a ship for scrap metal at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 24, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKMI 
February 28, 2012 
Mehmood, 20, a labourer uses his mobile while resting at his makeshift cabin during lunch break while... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Mehmood, 20, a labourer uses his mobile while resting at his makeshift cabin during lunch break while working at the Gaddani shipbreaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 24, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKME 
February 28, 2012 
Mohammad Fayyaz, 35, prepares bread during a lunch break while working at the Gaddani ship breaking yard,... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Mohammad Fayyaz, 35, prepares bread during a lunch break while working at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 24, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YKM8 
February 28, 2012 
Labourers eat during their lunch break at a nearby makeshift hotel at the Gaddani ship breaking yard,... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers eat during their lunch break at a nearby makeshift hotel at the Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi on November 24, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 24, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTS6E3M 
February 27, 2012 
Labourers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
Labourers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking... 
Labourers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 25, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YJDQ 
February 27, 2012 
A labourer uses a blow torch to separate a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
A labourer uses a blow torch to separate a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 25, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YJDM 
February 27, 2012 
A labourer climbs a ladder held by others, while working onboard a ship, separating it into scrap metal... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
A labourer climbs a ladder held by others, while working onboard a ship, separating it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 24, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 24, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YJDD 
February 27, 2012 
Labourers sit on a makeshift cable carriage as they wait for others to arrive before they are transported... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers sit on a makeshift cable carriage as they wait for others to arrive before they are transported with supplies to a ship at Gaddani ship breaking yard early in the morning, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 25, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YJCZ 
February 27, 2012 
Labourers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers pull an iron rope before separating a portion of a ship into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 25, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YJCQ 
February 27, 2012 
A labourer uses a blow torch to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard,... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
A labourer uses a blow torch to separate parts of a ship for scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 25, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
RTR2YJCH 
February 27, 2012 
Labourers pull an iron rope while working on a ship to separate it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking... 
Karachi, Pakistan 
To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/ 
Labourers pull an iron rope while working on a ship to separate it into scrap metal at Gaddani ship breaking yard, about 60 km (37 miles) from Karachi November 25, 2011. Pakistan is full of dangers, with tens of thousands of victims of suicide bombings, sectarian violence and ethnic bloodshed which make big headlines across the world. There is another less dramatic, but dark, side of the South Asian nation that rarely captures attention -- the large number of impoverished people forced to endure horrible conditions at work to survive. Fifteen thousand of them risk their lives every day, tearing down ships at Gaddani beach on the Arabian Sea coast, a 10 km-long death trap. They earn as little as $4 a day. Picture taken November 25, 2011. To match Feature PAKISTAN-SHIPBREAKING/
REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT) 
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