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Search results for: Single-parent-family

SWISS-ANIMAL/
RTX6WP1Q
May 27, 2019
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis...
Geneva, Switzerland
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis...
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis in Geneva, Switzerland May 27, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
SWISS-ANIMAL/
RTX6WP1P
May 27, 2019
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis...
Geneva, Switzerland
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis...
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis in Geneva, Switzerland May 27, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWV
March 11, 2016
Sophia, 18 days old, who is Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa's second child and was born with microcephaly, lies...
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers
Sophia, 18 days old, who is Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa's second child and was born with microcephaly, lies on a bed inside her house in Campina Grande, Brazil February 17, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWU
March 11, 2016
Rogerio dos Santos, 20, holds his daughter, 4-month-old Heloa Vitoria, who was born with microcephaly,...
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers
Rogerio dos Santos, 20, holds his daughter, 4-month-old Heloa Vitoria, who was born with microcephaly, at Pedro I Hospital in Campina Grande, Brazil February 18, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWS
March 11, 2016
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child...
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child and was born with microcephaly, at her house in Campina Grande, Brazil February 17, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWQ
March 11, 2016
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child...
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child and was born with microcephaly, at her house in Campina Grande, Brazil February 17, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWO
March 11, 2016
Josemary da Silva, 34, holds 5-month-old Gilberto as her older son Jorge Gabriel, 4 (L), stands by her...
ALGODAO DE JANDAIRA, Brazil
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers
Josemary da Silva, 34, holds 5-month-old Gilberto as her older son Jorge Gabriel, 4 (L), stands by her side at her house in Algodao de Jandaira, Brazil February 17, 2016. Gilberto is da Silva's fifth child and was born with microcephaly. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWN
March 11, 2016
Physiotherapist Jeime Lara Leal exercises 19-day-old Sophia, who is Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa's second child...
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers
Physiotherapist Jeime Lara Leal exercises 19-day-old Sophia, who is Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa's second child and was born with microcephaly, at Pedro l Hospital in Campina Grande, Brazil February 18, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWM
March 11, 2016
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child...
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child and was born with microcephaly, at her house in Campina Grande, Brazil February 17, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWL
March 11, 2016
Josemary da Silva, 34, combs the hair of 5-month-old Gilberto after giving him a bath at her house in...
ALGODAO DE JANDAIRA, Brazil
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers
Josemary da Silva, 34, combs the hair of 5-month-old Gilberto after giving him a bath at her house in Algodao de Jandaira, Brazil February 17, 2016. Gilberto is da Silva's fifth child and was born with microcephaly. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-CHILD/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1W1O1
November 27, 2015
Jiang Weimao, 60, and his wife Zhang Yinxiu, 53, show a picture of their dead son as a baby and his "honourable...
ZHANGJIAKOU, China
The Wider Image: China: when an only child dies
Jiang Weimao, 60, and his wife Zhang Yinxiu, 53, show a picture of their dead son as a baby and his "honourable single child certification" at their house in in Zhangjiakou, China, November 21, 2015. Jiang and Zhang's son, Jiang Tingyi, was born in 1984 and died of diabetes in 2010. They recall the propaganda slogan in the 1980s: "Only having one child is good, the state will take care of the elderly." They both worked in the same glass factory and didn't think of having a second baby for fear of losing their job. Zhang had an abortion after falling pregnant a second time. Now retired, they live with Zhang's parents on the outskirts of Zhangjiakou city. The son's struggles with diabetes left them in heavy debt. Now they live on a pension but it's not enough to cover the family's medical bills. Zhang said the change of the one-child policy has nothing to do with them and has only deepened their sorrow caused by the loss of their only child. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon PICTURE 8 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "CHINA: WHEN AN ONLY CHILD DIES" SEARCH "KIM ONE CHILD" FOR ALL IMAGES
USA-BABLYLIFT/ANNIVERSARY
RTX1AKHK
April 28, 2015
Pu Lani Carlson, one of nearly 3,000 Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam during the last...
HOLMDEL, UNITED STATES
Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam pose during an event commemorating the 40th anniversary...
Pu Lani Carlson, one of nearly 3,000 Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam during the last days of the Vietnam war in April 1975 in what was known as "Operation BabyLift," poses for a photograph with two Vietnam war veterans during an event commemorating the 40th anniversary of "Operation BabyLift" at the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans War Memorial in Holmdel, New Jersey April 25, 2015. Carlson, birth name Duong thi Kim Lan, was adopted into a single-parent household near Detroit, Michigan where she was raised. She now lives in Dallas, Texas and has returned to her native Vietnam three times within the last 10 years to visit orphanages including her own, and has adopted a Vietnamese orphan girl into her own family. She says the lives of adopted orphans of Vietnam are "like stained glass artwork. It is not until time allows perspective and light shining through that one can see the beauty in the broken places". Picture taken April 25, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Segar
USA-BABLYLIFT/ANNIVERSARY
RTX1AKHJ
April 28, 2015
Pu Lani Carlson, one of nearly 3,000 Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam during the last...
HOLMDEL, UNITED STATES
Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam pose during an event commemorating the 40th anniversary...
Pu Lani Carlson, one of nearly 3,000 Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam during the last days of the Vietnam war in April 1975 in what was known as "Operation BabyLift," poses holding a picture of herself as a baby in her Saigon orphanage during an event commemorating the 40th anniversary of "Operation BabyLift" at the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans War Memorial in Holmdel, New Jersey April 25, 2015. Carlson, birth name Duong thi Kim Lan, was adopted into a single-parent household near Detroit, Michigan where she was raised. She now lives in Dallas, Texas and has returned to her native Vietnam three times within the last 10 years to visit orphanages including her own, and has adopted a Vietnamese orphan girl into her own family. She says the lives of adopted orphans of Vietnam are "like stained glass artwork. It is not until time allows perspective and light shining through that one can see the beauty in the broken places". Picture taken April 25, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Segar
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPXB
December 19, 2014
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern...
Bern, Switzerland
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern...
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS)
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPWV
December 19, 2014
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern...
Bern, Switzerland
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern...
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS)
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPWP
December 19, 2014
A so called contract child, now an adult, attends the initiative of seeking a restituition package in...
Bern, Switzerland
A so called contract child, now an adult, attends the initiative of seeking a restituition package in...
A so called contract child, now an adult, attends the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS)
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPWA
December 19, 2014
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern...
Bern, Switzerland
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern...
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS)
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPV7
December 19, 2014
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern...
Bern, Switzerland
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern...
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS)
MYANMAR-CHILDSOLDIERS/
RTR47Q49
September 25, 2014
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon September 25, 2014. Myanmar's...
Yangon, Myanmar
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon September 25, 2014. Myanmar's army released 109 children from its military ranks on Thursday in its single biggest discharge of child soldiers, but boys are still being illegally recruited from poor families, the United Nations said. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
MYANMAR-CHILDSOLDIERS/
RTR47Q48
September 25, 2014
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon September 25, 2014. Myanmar's...
Yangon, Myanmar
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon September 25, 2014. Myanmar's army released 109 children from its military ranks on Thursday in its single biggest discharge of child soldiers, but boys are still being illegally recruited from poor families, the United Nations said. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNB9
June 19, 2014
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Rowan at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three...
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Rowan at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Rowan at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of his children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNAX
June 19, 2014
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (R) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular...
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (R) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNAO
June 19, 2014
Joe Smith rides on a swing with his daughter Rowan as his wife Andrea plays with her children Norah and...
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Joe Smith rides on a swing with his daughter Rowan as his wife Andrea plays with her children Norah and...
Joe Smith rides on a swing with his daughter Rowan as his wife Andrea plays with her children Norah and Chase at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of their children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNA9
June 19, 2014
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Norah as his son Chase looks on at a playground in Winthrop Harbor,...
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Norah as his son Chase looks on at a playground in Winthrop Harbor,...
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Norah as his son Chase looks on at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of his children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNA1
June 19, 2014
Andrea Smith plays with her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014....
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Andrea Smith plays with their daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois
Andrea Smith plays with her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of her children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN9Z
June 19, 2014
Andrea Smith holds her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three...
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Andrea Smith holds her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois
Andrea Smith holds her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of her children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN98
June 19, 2014
Andrea Smith and her husband Joe play with their daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois,...
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Andrea Smith and her husband Joe play with their daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois...
Andrea Smith and her husband Joe play with their daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of their children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN7Q
June 19, 2014
Director of Human Molecular Genetics Center Dr. Howard Jacob is reflected in a monitor at the Medical...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Director of Human Molecular Genetics Center Dr. Howard Jacob is reflected in a monitor at the Medical...
Director of Human Molecular Genetics Center Dr. Howard Jacob is reflected in a monitor at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN73
June 19, 2014
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt works in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt works in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center...
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt works in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN6Z
June 19, 2014
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (L) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular...
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (L) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN68
June 19, 2014
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (R) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular...
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (R) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN3X
June 19, 2014
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt looks at a slide containing DNA at the Human and...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt looks at a slide containing DNA at the Human and...
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt looks at a slide containing DNA at the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS)
BRITAIN/
RTR3CLZN
January 18, 2013
Pedestrians walk in the snow along the South Bank by the River Thames in central London January 18, 2013....
London, United Kingdom
Pedestrians walk in the snow along the South Bank by the River Thames in central London
Pedestrians walk in the snow along the South Bank by the River Thames in central London January 18, 2013. A band of heavy snow affected most of Britain on Friday, bringing chaos to roads, and causing power cuts and school closures. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth (BRITAIN - Tags: CITYSCAPE ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
CHINA-MATCHMAKING/
RTR33Y1G
June 21, 2012
A woman checks an information card displayed on a wall, for details a bachelor, during a blind date party...
Shanghai, China
A woman checks an information card during a blind date party in Shanghai
A woman checks an information card displayed on a wall, for details a bachelor, during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo. In traditional Chinese society, marriages were arranged by families and matchmakers and tying the knot was never in question. Although customs are changing rapidly, the one-child policy in modern China piles on even more pressure on children to get on with the business of producing offspring. Matchmaking events are increasingly common, with eager singles - often accompanied by concerned parents - gathering in parks on the weekends to search for love among personal information strung up on trees and notice boards. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY)
CHINA-MATCHMAKING/
RTR33Y1C
June 21, 2012
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo....
Shanghai, China
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo. In traditional Chinese society, marriages were arranged by families and matchmakers and tying the knot was never in question. Although customs are changing rapidly, the one-child policy in modern China piles on even more pressure on children to get on with the business of producing offspring. Matchmaking events are increasingly common, with eager singles - often accompanied by concerned parents - gathering in parks on the weekends to search for love among personal information strung up on trees and notice boards. REUTERS/Aly Song/Files (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY)
CHINA-MATCHMAKING/
RTR33Y18
June 21, 2012
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo....
Shanghai, China
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo. In traditional Chinese society, marriages were arranged by families and matchmakers and tying the knot was never in question. Although customs are changing rapidly, the one-child policy in modern China piles on even more pressure on children to get on with the business of producing offspring. Matchmaking events are increasingly common, with eager singles - often accompanied by concerned parents - gathering in parks on the weekends to search for love among personal information strung up on trees and notice boards. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY)
KOREA-ELECTION/
RTX4U5V
December 18, 2007
Lee Myung-bak, the presidential candidate of the conservative main opposition Grand National Party (GNP),...
Seoul, South Korea
Lee, the presidential candidate of the GNP, greets children at Angel's Haven in Seoul
Lee Myung-bak, the presidential candidate of the conservative main opposition Grand National Party (GNP), greets children at Angel's Haven, a house for poor teenagers, children from parentless or single parent families and disabled orphans, in Seoul December 18, 2007. The conservative candidate, widely expected to be South Korea's new president, denied on Tuesday fresh allegations of involvement in a financial scandal that threatens to haunt him into office if he wins. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA)
KOREA-ELECTION/
RTX4U5U
December 18, 2007
Lee Myung-bak (C), the presidential candidate of the conservative main opposition Grand National Party...
Seoul, South Korea
Lee, the presidential candidate of the GNP, walks on an uphill path to visit Angel's Haven in Seoul
Lee Myung-bak (C), the presidential candidate of the conservative main opposition Grand National Party (GNP), walks on an uphill path to visit Angel's Haven, a house for poor teenagers, children from parentless or single parent families and disabled orphans, in Seoul December 18, 2007. The conservative candidate, widely expected to be South Korea's new president, denied on Tuesday fresh allegations of involvement in a financial scandal that threatens to haunt him into office if he wins. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA)
KOREA-ELECTION/
RTX4U5T
December 18, 2007
Lee Myung-bak, the presidential candidate of the conservative main opposition Grand National Party (GNP),...
Seoul, South Korea
Lee, presidential candidate of the conservative main opposition Grand National Party, meets with handicapped...
Lee Myung-bak, the presidential candidate of the conservative main opposition Grand National Party (GNP), meets with handicapped children during his visit to Angel's Haven, a house for poor teenagers, children from parentless families or single parent families and disabled orphans, in Seoul December 18, 2007. The conservative candidate widely expected to be South Korea's new president denied on Tuesday fresh allegations of involvement in a financial scandal that threatens to haunt him into office if he wins. REUTERS/Jo Yong-Hak (SOUTH KOREA)
RUSSIA
RTRE7SF
October 26, 2004
Prince Andrew chats with children at the building of the Taganka Children's Fund in Moscow October 26,...
Moscow, Russia
Prince Andrew meets disadvantaged children in Moscow.
Prince Andrew chats with children at the building of the Taganka Children's Fund in Moscow October 26, 2004. Prince Andrew visited the fund, which supports over 600 single parent families and disadvantaged children, as part of his two day visit as UK Special Representative for International Trade and Investment. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin WAW/ABP
RUSSIA
RTRE7PL
October 26, 2004
Russian children stand with Britain's Prince Andrew as he holds a mock cheque from the British Business...
Moscow, Russia
Russian children stand with Britain's Prince Andrew in Moscow.
Russian children stand with Britain's Prince Andrew as he holds a mock cheque from the British Business Club to be presented to the Taganka Children's Fund in Moscow October 26, 2004. Prince Andrew handed the donation to the fund on Tuesday, which supports over 600 single parent families and disadvantaged children. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin WAW/DL
SERBIAMONTENEGRO KOSOVO
RTROUPZ
June 04, 2003
Jagoda Stolic (R) cries for her two parents and brother murdered
overnight in the town of Obilic, some...
Obilic, Yugoslavia
THREE SERBS KILLED AT KOSOVO TOWN.
Jagoda Stolic (R) cries for her two parents and brother murdered
overnight in the town of Obilic, some seven kilometres west of the
Kosovo's capital Pristina, June 4, 2003. This was the worst single
attack against the small Serb minority in over two years just before
some 20 Serb families were planing to return to their homes in the same
town. REUTERS/Hazir Reka

SHB/
SERBIAMONTENEGRO KOSOVO
RTROUPU
June 04, 2003
Jagoda Stolic (L) cries for her two parents and brother murdered
overnight in the town of Obilic, some...
Obilic, Yugoslavia
THREE SERBS KILLED AT KOSOVO TOWN.
Jagoda Stolic (L) cries for her two parents and brother murdered
overnight in the town of Obilic, some seven kilometres west of the
Kosovo's capital Pristina, June 4, 2003. This was the worst single
attack against the small Serb minority in over two years just before
some 20 Serb families were planing to return to their homes in the same
town. REUTERS/Hazir Reka

SHB/
GERMANY
RTRP2A8
November 06, 2001
Vice President of the German Federal Constitutional Court Hans-Juergen
Papier (C) opens a hearing in...
Karlsruhe, Germany
GERMAN FEDERAL CONSTITUTIONAL COURT OPENS HEARING ON NAMING OF CHILDREN
IN KARLSRUHE.
Vice President of the German Federal Constitutional Court Hans-Juergen
Papier (C) opens a hearing in Karlsruhe, sitting together the judges
Evelyn Haas (L), Christine Hohmann-Dennhardt (2ndL) and Renate Jaeger
(R) November 6, 2001. The German Federal Constitutional Court will rule
whether children are allowed to use double-barrelled names if their
parents do not have a single family name. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski

ROR/JOH
CHINA
RTRIYHP
May 31, 2001
Schoolchildren perform in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001. Thousands of Chinese children converged...
Beijing, China - Peoples Republic of
SCHOOLCHILDREN PERFORM IN TIANANMEN SQUARE IN BEIJING.
Schoolchildren perform in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001. Thousands of Chinese children converged upon the square to celebrate International Children's Day which falls on June 1. Spending on children takes up a large part of family budgets in most urban families, and parents are willing to lavish money on the only child they are allowed to have. Average spending on a single child in the Chinese capital is 1,009 yuan ($122) a month.

CMC/DL
CHINA
RTRIYH4
May 31, 2001
Teenagers dance for Children's Day festivites in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001. Thousands...
Beijing, China - Peoples Republic of
TEEN-AGERS DANCE FOR CHILDREN'S DAY FESTIVITES IN TIANANMEN SQUARE IN BEIJING.
Teenagers dance for Children's Day festivites in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001. Thousands of Chinese children converged upon the square to celebrate ahead of International Children's Day on June 1. Spending on children takes up a large part of family budgets in most urban families, and parents are willing to lavish money on the only child they are allowed to have. Average spending on a single child in the Chinese capital is 1,009 yuan ($122) a month.

CMC/CP
CHINA
RTRIYG6
May 31, 2001
Teenagers dance for Children's Day festivites in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001. Thousands...
Beijing, China - Peoples Republic of
TEEN-AGERS DANCE FOR CHILDREN'S DAY FESTIVITES IN TIANANMEN SQUARE IN BEIJING.
Teenagers dance for Children's Day festivites in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001. Thousands of Chinese children converged upon the square to celebrate ahead of International Children's Day on June 1. Spending on children takes up a large part of family budgets in most urban families, and parents are willing to lavish money on the only child they are allowed to have. Average spending on a single child in the Chinese capital is 1,009 yuan ($122) a month.

CMC/CP
CHINA
RTRIYFZ
May 31, 2001
Schoolchildren wait for festivities to start in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001. Thousands of...
Beijing, China - Peoples Republic of
SCHOOLCHILDREN WAIT FOR FESTIVITIES TO START IN TIANANMEN SQUARE IN BEIJING.
Schoolchildren wait for festivities to start in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001. Thousands of Chinese children converged upon the square to celebrate ahead of International Children's Day on June 1. Spending on children takes up a large part of family budgets in most urban families, and parents are willing to lavish money on the only child they are allowed to have. Average spending on a single child in the Chinese capital is 1,009 yuan ($122) a month.

CMC/CP
CHINA
RTRIYFQ
May 31, 2001
Volunteers adjust props used for children's day festivites in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001....
Beijing, China - Peoples Republic of
VOLUNTEERS ADJUST PROPS USED FOR CHILDREN'S DAY FESTIVITES IN TIANANMEN SQUARE IN BEIJING.
Volunteers adjust props used for children's day festivites in Tiananmen Square in Beijing May 31, 2001. Thousands of Chinese children converged upon the square to celebrate ahead of International Children's Day on June 1. Spending on children takes up a large part of family budgets in most urban families, and parents are willing to lavish money on the only child they are allowed to have. Average spending on a single child in the capital city is 1,009 yuan ($122) a month.

CMC/CP
BANGLADESH
RTXJWQE
July 31, 2000
A Bangladeshi girl bathes her sister in the Buriganga river in Dhaka July 31, 2000. According to a local...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
A Bangladeshi girl bathes her sister in the Buriganga river in Dhaka July 31, 2000. According to a l.....
A Bangladeshi girl bathes her sister in the Buriganga river in Dhaka July 31, 2000. According to a local newspaper report, family support networks are on a decline in Bangladesh and the population of single parent households are growing. In Bangladesh, many children of poor families are left unsupervised and uncared, and many have no choice but to work to suppliment the family's income.
BANGLADESH
RTR6U1Z
July 31, 2000
A Bangladeshi girl bathes her sister in the Buriganga river in Dhaka July 31, 2000. According to a local...
Dhaka, Bangladesh - Peoples Republic of
BANGLADESHI GIRL BATHES SISTER IN DHAKA.
A Bangladeshi girl bathes her sister in the Buriganga river in Dhaka July 31, 2000. According to a local newspaper report, family support networks are on a decline in Bangladesh and the population of single parent households are growing. In Bangladesh, many children of poor families are left unsupervised and uncared, and many have no choice but to work to suppliment the family's income.

AA/HL/DL
WARD
RTXJ47E
July 29, 1999
Actress Sela Ward, star of the new ABC television network drama series "Once and Again" poses at the...
Pasadena, USA
Actress Sela Ward, star of the new ABC television network drama series "Once and Again" poses at the.....
Actress Sela Ward, star of the new ABC television network drama series "Once and Again" poses at the ABC summer press tour party in Pasadena July 28. I[n the drama series, Ward portrays one of two single parents involved in a burgeoning romance that forever changes their lives and the lives of their families. ]
??»
TELEVISION
RTRQO6N
July 29, 1999
Actress Sela Ward, star of the new ABC television network drama series "Once and Again" poses at the...
Pasadena, USA
ACTRESS SELA WARD AT ABC TV PARTY.
Actress Sela Ward, star of the new ABC television network drama series "Once and Again" poses at the ABC summer press tour party in Pasadena July 28. In the drama series, Ward portrays one of two single parents involved in a burgeoning romance that forever changes their lives and the lives of their families.

FSP/RC
NORTHERN IRELAND
RTXIXV8
April 24, 1999
A single rose lays beside the name of Belfast born Philip S Bancroft whose name along with others is...
Belfast, UK
A single rose lays beside the name of Belfast born Philip S Bancroft whose name along with others i.....
A single rose lays beside the name of Belfast born Philip S Bancroft whose name along with others is on a replica black grantie Vietnam memorial Wall at Belfast's Queens University, April 24. Bancroft was born in 1949, left west Belfast after living with his aunt to join his parents in Pittsburgh were he joined up with the United States Marines and was killed in action in the late 1960's. The visit of the wall is part of an all-Ireland tour organised by the Vietnam Veterans War Memorial Fund to enable the families of those of Irish descent to see for themselves the names of all who died.
**DIGITAL IMAGE**
IRISH
RTROFDD
April 24, 1999
Margaret and Stanley Bancroft from Belfast perpare to lay a single rose next to the name of their nephew,...
Belfast, UK
VIETNAM VETERANS WAR MEMORIAL VISITS BELFAST.
Margaret and Stanley Bancroft from Belfast perpare to lay a single rose next to the name of their nephew, Belfast born Philip S Bancroft displayed on the replica black grantie Vietnam Memorial Wall at Belfast's Queens University, April 24. Philip Bancroft was born in west Belfast in 1949 only to leave his Aunt and Uncle to join his parents in Pittsburgh where he later joined up with the United States Marines. The visit of the wall is part of an all-Ireland tour organised by the Vietnam Veterans War Memorial Fund to enable the families of those of Irish descent to see for themselves the names of all who died.

PM/PS/ME
IRISH
RTROFD0
April 24, 1999
A single rose lays beside the name of Belfast born Philip S Bancroft whose name along with others is...
Belfast, UK
VIETNAM VETERANS WAR MEMORIAL VISITS BELFAST.
A single rose lays beside the name of Belfast born Philip S Bancroft whose name along with others is on a replica black grantie Vietnam memorial Wall at Belfast's Queens University, April 24. Bancroft was born in 1949, left west Belfast after living with his aunt to join his parents in Pittsburgh were he joined up with the United States Marines and was killed in action in the late 1960's. The visit of the wall is part of an all-Ireland tour organised by the Vietnam Veterans War Memorial Fund to enable the families of those of Irish descent to see for themselves the names of all who died.

PM/PS
RTRER0A
June 09, 1998
First lady Hillary Clinton stands with Johnny and Amanda Brandon and their father John Brandon during...
multiple countries
HILLARY CLINTON WITH KIDS AT HEALTH CARE ANNOUNCEMENT.
First lady Hillary Clinton stands with Johnny and Amanda Brandon and their father John Brandon during a news conference to announce a Democratic child care proposal June 9. The new initiative would double the number of families receiving assistance to pay for child care. John Brandon, a single parent, currently spends 30 percent of his income on child care.

RC/SV/ME
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