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Search results for: Single-parent-family

USA-IMMIGRATION/
RTXG8VMK 
August 26, 2021 
Samuel, 4, plays in the single, small room his family is renting in an apartment in Chelsea, Massachusetts,... 
Chelsea, UNITED STATES 
La Colaborativa helps a migrant family in Chelsea 
Samuel, 4, plays in the single, small room his family is renting in an apartment in Chelsea, Massachusetts, U.S., August 26, 2021. Samuel and his parents recently migrated from Guatemala and had been sleeping on the floor because they arrived with few belongings and no furniture. REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
USA-IMMIGRATION/
RTXG8VMN 
August 26, 2021 
Samuel, 4, lies on the new mattress provided by La Colaborativa, a non-profit organization helping local... 
Chelsea, UNITED STATES 
La Colaborativa helps a migrant family in Chelsea 
Samuel, 4, lies on the new mattress provided by La Colaborativa, a non-profit organization helping local residents with food, housing and other community concerns, as his mother stands by the window of the single, small room they are renting in an apartment in Chelsea, Massachusetts, U.S., August 26, 2021. Samuel and his parents recently migrated from Guatemala and had been sleeping on the floor because they arrived with few belongings and no furniture. REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
GERMANY-POLITICS/MERKEL
RTX8X6HL 
February 04, 2021 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens'... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor speaks with families at virtual event 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens' dialogue series at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany February 4, 2021. John MacDougall/Pool via REUTERS 
GERMANY-POLITICS/MERKEL
RTX8X6HI 
February 04, 2021 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens'... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor speaks with families at virtual event 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens' dialogue series at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany February 4, 2021. John MacDougall/Pool via REUTERS 
GERMANY-POLITICS/MERKEL
RTX8X6HJ 
February 04, 2021 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens'... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor speaks with families at virtual event 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens' dialogue series at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany February 4, 2021. John MacDougall/Pool via REUTERS 
GERMANY-POLITICS/MERKEL
RTX8X6EA 
February 04, 2021 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens'... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor speaks with families at virtual event 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens' dialogue series at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany February 4, 2021. John MacDougall/Pool via REUTERS 
GERMANY-POLITICS/MERKEL
RTX8X6B6 
February 04, 2021 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens'... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor speaks with families at virtual event 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens' dialogue series at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany February 4, 2021. John MacDougall/Pool via REUTERS 
GERMANY-POLITICS/MERKEL
RTX8X6B3 
February 04, 2021 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens'... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor speaks with families at virtual event 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens' dialogue series at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany February 4, 2021. John MacDougall/Pool via REUTERS 
GERMANY-POLITICS/MERKEL
RTX8X689 
February 04, 2021 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens'... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor speaks with families at virtual event 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens' dialogue series at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany February 4, 2021. John MacDougall/Pool via REUTERS 
GERMANY-POLITICS/MERKEL
RTX8X654 
February 04, 2021 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens'... 
Berlin, Germany 
German Chancellor speaks with families at virtual event 
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses single parents during online talks as part of her citizens' dialogue series at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany February 4, 2021. John MacDougall/Pool via REUTERS 
SWISS-ANIMAL/
RTX6WP1Q 
May 27, 2019 
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis... 
Geneva, Switzerland 
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis... 
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis in Geneva, Switzerland May 27, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse 
SWISS-ANIMAL/
RTX6WP1P 
May 27, 2019 
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis... 
Geneva, Switzerland 
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis... 
A newly born cygnet falls in front of its pen, by the female swan, early morning at Bains des Paquis in Geneva, Switzerland May 27, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse 
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWV 
March 11, 2016 
Sophia, 18 days old, who is Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa's second child and was born with microcephaly, lies... 
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers 
Sophia, 18 days old, who is Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa's second child and was born with microcephaly, lies on a bed inside her house in Campina Grande, Brazil February 17, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWU 
March 11, 2016 
Rogerio dos Santos, 20, holds his daughter, 4-month-old Heloa Vitoria, who was born with microcephaly,... 
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers 
Rogerio dos Santos, 20, holds his daughter, 4-month-old Heloa Vitoria, who was born with microcephaly, at Pedro I Hospital in Campina Grande, Brazil February 18, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWS 
March 11, 2016 
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child... 
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers 
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child and was born with microcephaly, at her house in Campina Grande, Brazil February 17, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWQ 
March 11, 2016 
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child... 
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers 
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child and was born with microcephaly, at her house in Campina Grande, Brazil February 17, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWO 
March 11, 2016 
Josemary da Silva, 34, holds 5-month-old Gilberto as her older son Jorge Gabriel, 4 (L), stands by her... 
ALGODAO DE JANDAIRA, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers 
Josemary da Silva, 34, holds 5-month-old Gilberto as her older son Jorge Gabriel, 4 (L), stands by her side at her house in Algodao de Jandaira, Brazil February 17, 2016. Gilberto is da Silva's fifth child and was born with microcephaly. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWN 
March 11, 2016 
Physiotherapist Jeime Lara Leal exercises 19-day-old Sophia, who is Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa's second child... 
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers 
Physiotherapist Jeime Lara Leal exercises 19-day-old Sophia, who is Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa's second child and was born with microcephaly, at Pedro l Hospital in Campina Grande, Brazil February 18, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWM 
March 11, 2016 
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child... 
CAMPINA GRANDE, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers 
Ianka Mikaelle Barbosa, 18, poses for a photograph with Sophia, 18 days old, who is her second child and was born with microcephaly, at her house in Campina Grande, Brazil February 17, 2016. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-ZIKA/WOMEN
RTSADWL 
March 11, 2016 
Josemary da Silva, 34, combs the hair of 5-month-old Gilberto after giving him a bath at her house in... 
ALGODAO DE JANDAIRA, Brazil 
The Wider Image: Zika: Single mothers 
Josemary da Silva, 34, combs the hair of 5-month-old Gilberto after giving him a bath at her house in Algodao de Jandaira, Brazil February 17, 2016. Gilberto is da Silva's fifth child and was born with microcephaly. Single parents are common in Brazil where some studies show as many as one in three children from poor families grow up without a biological father, but doctors on the frontline of the Zika outbreak say they are concerned about how many mothers of babies with microcephaly are being abandoned. With the health service already under strain, abortion prohibited, and the virus hitting the poorest hardest, an absent father is yet another burden on mothers already struggling to cope with raising a child that might never walk or talk. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "ZIKA SINGLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
CHINA-CHILD/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1W1O1 
November 27, 2015 
Jiang Weimao, 60, and his wife Zhang Yinxiu, 53, show a picture of their dead son as a baby and his "honourable... 
ZHANGJIAKOU, China 
The Wider Image: China: when an only child dies
Jiang Weimao, 60, and his wife Zhang Yinxiu, 53, show a picture of their dead son as a baby and his "honourable single child certification" at their house in in Zhangjiakou, China, November 21, 2015. Jiang and Zhang's son, Jiang Tingyi, was born in 1984 and died of diabetes in 2010. They recall the propaganda slogan in the 1980s: "Only having one child is good, the state will take care of the elderly." They both worked in the same glass factory and didn't think of having a second baby for fear of losing their job. Zhang had an abortion after falling pregnant a second time. Now retired, they live with Zhang's parents on the outskirts of Zhangjiakou city. The son's struggles with diabetes left them in heavy debt. Now they live on a pension but it's not enough to cover the family's medical bills. Zhang said the change of the one-child policy has nothing to do with them and has only deepened their sorrow caused by the loss of their only child. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon PICTURE 8 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "CHINA: WHEN AN ONLY CHILD DIES" SEARCH "KIM ONE CHILD" FOR ALL IMAGES 
Nepal Earthquake
Nepal Earthquake 
Israel Evacuates Surrogate Born Babies - 28 Apr 2015 
9 PICTURES 
USA-BABLYLIFT/ANNIVERSARY
RTX1AKHK 
April 28, 2015 
Pu Lani Carlson, one of nearly 3,000 Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam during the last... 
HOLMDEL, UNITED STATES 
Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam pose during an event commemorating the 40th anniversary... 
Pu Lani Carlson, one of nearly 3,000 Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam during the last days of the Vietnam war in April 1975 in what was known as "Operation BabyLift," poses for a photograph with two Vietnam war veterans during an event commemorating the 40th anniversary of "Operation BabyLift" at the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans War Memorial in Holmdel, New Jersey April 25, 2015. Carlson, birth name Duong thi Kim Lan, was adopted into a single-parent household near Detroit, Michigan where she was raised. She now lives in Dallas, Texas and has returned to her native Vietnam three times within the last 10 years to visit orphanages including her own, and has adopted a Vietnamese orphan girl into her own family. She says the lives of adopted orphans of Vietnam are "like stained glass artwork. It is not until time allows perspective and light shining through that one can see the beauty in the broken places". Picture taken April 25, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
USA-BABLYLIFT/ANNIVERSARY
RTX1AKHJ 
April 28, 2015 
Pu Lani Carlson, one of nearly 3,000 Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam during the last... 
HOLMDEL, UNITED STATES 
Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam pose during an event commemorating the 40th anniversary... 
Pu Lani Carlson, one of nearly 3,000 Vietnamese orphans evacuated from Saigon Vietnam during the last days of the Vietnam war in April 1975 in what was known as "Operation BabyLift," poses holding a picture of herself as a baby in her Saigon orphanage during an event commemorating the 40th anniversary of "Operation BabyLift" at the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans War Memorial in Holmdel, New Jersey April 25, 2015. Carlson, birth name Duong thi Kim Lan, was adopted into a single-parent household near Detroit, Michigan where she was raised. She now lives in Dallas, Texas and has returned to her native Vietnam three times within the last 10 years to visit orphanages including her own, and has adopted a Vietnamese orphan girl into her own family. She says the lives of adopted orphans of Vietnam are "like stained glass artwork. It is not until time allows perspective and light shining through that one can see the beauty in the broken places". Picture taken April 25, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Segar 
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPXB 
December 19, 2014 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern... 
Bern, Switzerland 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern... 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS) 
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPWV 
December 19, 2014 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern... 
Bern, Switzerland 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern... 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS) 
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPWP 
December 19, 2014 
A so called contract child, now an adult, attends the initiative of seeking a restituition package in... 
Bern, Switzerland 
A so called contract child, now an adult, attends the initiative of seeking a restituition package in... 
A so called contract child, now an adult, attends the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS) 
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPWA 
December 19, 2014 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern... 
Bern, Switzerland 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern... 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS) 
SWISS-VOTE/CONTRACT CHILDREN
RTR4IPV7 
December 19, 2014 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern... 
Bern, Switzerland 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern... 
So called contract children, now adults, attend the initiative of seeking a restituition package in Bern December 19, 2014. A campaign seeking financial restitution for thousands of Swiss children, who were forced into foster families and used as cheap farming labour, has garnered the necessary support to force a national vote on the issue. Switzerland has been slow to come to terms with one of the darkest chapters in its history, when orphans and children from single-parent or poor homes were placed with farming families and used as cheap labour until they were of legal age. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-CHILDSOLDIERS/
RTR47Q49 
September 25, 2014 
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon September 25, 2014. Myanmar's... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon 
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon September 25, 2014. Myanmar's army released 109 children from its military ranks on Thursday in its single biggest discharge of child soldiers, but boys are still being illegally recruited from poor families, the United Nations said. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS) 
MYANMAR-CHILDSOLDIERS/
RTR47Q48 
September 25, 2014 
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon September 25, 2014. Myanmar's... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon 
Parents of child soldiers attend their children's discharge ceremony in Yangon September 25, 2014. Myanmar's army released 109 children from its military ranks on Thursday in its single biggest discharge of child soldiers, but boys are still being illegally recruited from poor families, the United Nations said. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNB9 
June 19, 2014 
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Rowan at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three... 
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES 
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Rowan at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois 
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Rowan at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of his children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNAX 
June 19, 2014 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (R) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular... 
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular... 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (R) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNAO 
June 19, 2014 
Joe Smith rides on a swing with his daughter Rowan as his wife Andrea plays with her children Norah and... 
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES 
Joe Smith rides on a swing with his daughter Rowan as his wife Andrea plays with her children Norah and... 
Joe Smith rides on a swing with his daughter Rowan as his wife Andrea plays with her children Norah and Chase at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of their children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNA9 
June 19, 2014 
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Norah as his son Chase looks on at a playground in Winthrop Harbor,... 
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES 
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Norah as his son Chase looks on at a playground in Winthrop Harbor,... 
Joe Smith plays with his daughter Norah as his son Chase looks on at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of his children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UNA1 
June 19, 2014 
Andrea Smith plays with her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014.... 
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES 
Andrea Smith plays with their daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois 
Andrea Smith plays with her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of her children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN9Z 
June 19, 2014 
Andrea Smith holds her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three... 
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES 
Andrea Smith holds her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois 
Andrea Smith holds her daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of her children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN98 
June 19, 2014 
Andrea Smith and her husband Joe play with their daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois,... 
WINTHROP HARBOR, UNITED STATES 
Andrea Smith and her husband Joe play with their daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois... 
Andrea Smith and her husband Joe play with their daughter Norah at a playground in Winthrop Harbor, Illinois, May 9, 2014. Three of their children have been diagnosed with atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, and one is a carrier which was diagnosed using genome sequencing. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN7Q 
June 19, 2014 
Director of Human Molecular Genetics Center Dr. Howard Jacob is reflected in a monitor at the Medical... 
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES 
Director of Human Molecular Genetics Center Dr. Howard Jacob is reflected in a monitor at the Medical... 
Director of Human Molecular Genetics Center Dr. Howard Jacob is reflected in a monitor at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN73 
June 19, 2014 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt works in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center... 
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt works in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center... 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt works in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/ REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN6Z 
June 19, 2014 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (L) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular... 
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular... 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (L) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN68 
June 19, 2014 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (R) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular... 
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular... 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt (R) and Mike Tschannen work in the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
HEALTH-SEQUENCING/
RTR3UN3X 
June 19, 2014 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt looks at a slide containing DNA at the Human and... 
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt looks at a slide containing DNA at the Human and... 
Molecular Genetics Technical Specialist Jaime Wendt looks at a slide containing DNA at the Human and Molecular Genetics Center Sequencing Core at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 9, 2014. Once strictly the domain of research labs, gene-sequencing tests increasingly are being used to help understand the genetic causes of rare disease, putting insurance companies in the position of deciding whether to pay the $5,000 to $17,000 for the tests. Genetics experts say that sequencing more than doubles the chances that families get a diagnosis, and saves spending on multiple tests of single genes. Even if no treatment is found, the tests can also end hugely expensive medical odysseys as parents frantically search for the cause of their child's furtive illness. Picture taken May 9, 2014. To match Insight HEALTH-SEQUENCING/REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH SOCIETY BUSINESS) 
SPAIN/
RTR3FNCX 
October 06, 2013 
Maria Isabel Rodriguez Romero reacts as she packs her family's belongings outside her apartment, where... 
Madrid, Spain 
Maria Isabel Rodriguez Romero packs her family's belongings outside her apartment, where they had been... 
Maria Isabel Rodriguez Romero reacts as she packs her family's belongings outside her apartment, where they had been camping out for a week and a half after their eviction in Madrid October 5, 2013. Rodriguez Romero lived with her husband, daughter and parents in a social rental flat of the Municipal Housing and Land Company (EMVS) in Madrid. With everyone out of job, the family fell behind with the payments resulting in debt. Despite paying off their debt, the EMVS told them to move out, Rodriguez Romero says. The family lives on benefits for the disabled (Rodriguez Romero's mother suffers from bipolar syndrome and her father has a degenerative disease) as well as Rodriguez Romero's father's pension. Their eviction was executed on September 25, 2013 despite efforts of anti-eviction activists to stop it. The family moved on Saturday to a vacant home owned by a family who found out about their predicament and decided to help them out. Picture taken October 5, 2013. REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY BUSINESS REAL ESTATE ANIMALS) 
BRITAIN/
RTR3CLZN 
January 18, 2013 
Pedestrians walk in the snow along the South Bank by the River Thames in central London January 18, 2013.... 
London, United Kingdom 
Pedestrians walk in the snow along the South Bank by the River Thames in central London 
Pedestrians walk in the snow along the South Bank by the River Thames in central London January 18, 2013. A band of heavy snow affected most of Britain on Friday, bringing chaos to roads, and causing power cuts and school closures. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth (BRITAIN - Tags: CITYSCAPE ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY) 
KOREA-BABIES/
RTR38VEA 
October 07, 2012 
Lee Sae-byeok, 3, who was abandoned at a "baby box" at Joosarang church, is seen at the church in Seoul... 
Seoul, South Korea 
Lee Sae-byeok, 3, who was abandoned at a "baby box" at Joosarang church, is seen at the church in Seoul... 
Lee Sae-byeok, 3, who was abandoned at a "baby box" at Joosarang church, is seen at the church in Seoul September 20, 2012.Pastor Lee Jong-rak, who runs the "baby box" where mothers can leave unwanted infants, has seen a sharp increase in the number of newborns being left there because, the pastor says, of a new law aimed protecting the rights of children. South Korea is trying to shed a reputation of being a source of babies for adoption by people abroad. It is encouraging domestic adoption and tightening up the process of a child's transfer from birth mother to adoptive parents. Picture taken September 20, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: SOCIETY) 
KOREA-ADOPTION/
RTR38VCA 
October 07, 2012 
A baby abandoned in a "baby box" at Joosarang church waits for a medical examination at a children's... 
Seoul, South Korea 
A baby abandoned in a "baby box" at Joosarang church waits for a medical examination at a children's... 
A baby abandoned in a "baby box" at Joosarang church waits for a medical examination at a children's hospital in Seoul September 19, 2012. Pastor Lee Jong-rak of the church, who runs a "baby box" where mothers can leave unwanted infants, has seen a sharp increase in the number of newborns being left there because, the pastor says, of a new law aimed protecting the rights of children. South Korea is trying to shed a reputation of being a source of babies for adoption by people abroad. It is encouraging domestic adoption and tightening up the process of a child's transfer from birth mother to adoptive parents. Picture taken September 19, 2012. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: SOCIETY) 
CHINA-MATCHMAKING/
RTR33Y1G 
June 21, 2012 
A woman checks an information card displayed on a wall, for details a bachelor, during a blind date party... 
Shanghai, China 
A woman checks an information card during a blind date party in Shanghai 
A woman checks an information card displayed on a wall, for details a bachelor, during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo. In traditional Chinese society, marriages were arranged by families and matchmakers and tying the knot was never in question. Although customs are changing rapidly, the one-child policy in modern China piles on even more pressure on children to get on with the business of producing offspring. Matchmaking events are increasingly common, with eager singles - often accompanied by concerned parents - gathering in parks on the weekends to search for love among personal information strung up on trees and notice boards. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY) 
CHINA-MATCHMAKING/
RTR33Y1C 
June 21, 2012 
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo.... 
Shanghai, China 
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai 
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo. In traditional Chinese society, marriages were arranged by families and matchmakers and tying the knot was never in question. Although customs are changing rapidly, the one-child policy in modern China piles on even more pressure on children to get on with the business of producing offspring. Matchmaking events are increasingly common, with eager singles - often accompanied by concerned parents - gathering in parks on the weekends to search for love among personal information strung up on trees and notice boards. REUTERS/Aly Song/Files (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY) 
CHINA-MATCHMAKING/
RTR33Y18 
June 21, 2012 
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo.... 
Shanghai, China 
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai 
Participants interview each other during a blind date party in Shanghai in this May 26, 2012 file photo. In traditional Chinese society, marriages were arranged by families and matchmakers and tying the knot was never in question. Although customs are changing rapidly, the one-child policy in modern China piles on even more pressure on children to get on with the business of producing offspring. Matchmaking events are increasingly common, with eager singles - often accompanied by concerned parents - gathering in parks on the weekends to search for love among personal information strung up on trees and notice boards. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY) 
MEXICO-DRUG/ORPHANS
RTXT4HR 
October 06, 2010 
A little girl uses play dough as nail polish during occupational therapy at the Ciudad Juarez branch... 
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico 
To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUG/ORPHANS 
A little girl uses play dough as nail polish during occupational therapy at the Ciudad Juarez branch of Mexico's DIF family development agency August 16, 2010. Neither Mexico's government nor the various independent groups studying organized crime keep track of the number of children dubbed "narco orphans," who have lost one or both parents to the drug war, yet with poor education already holding back Mexico's youth social workers worry about the impact on society of tens of thousands of kids growing up emotionally traumatized. Picture taken August 16, 2010. To match Special Report MEXICO-DRUG/ORPHANS REUTERS/Claudia Daut (MEXICO - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS SOCIETY) 
PHILIPPINES/
RTXQK4G 
November 10, 2009 
A child waits for her parents as they collect food rations after their house was engulfed in a fire outbreak... 
Manila, Philippines 
A child waits for her parents as they collect food rations after their house was engulfed in a fire outbreak... 
A child waits for her parents as they collect food rations after their house was engulfed in a fire outbreak in Mirones, Tondo city, metro Manila November 10, 2009. At least more than 50 families lost their homes and sought refuge in a gym, local media reported. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco (PHILIPPINES DISASTER SOCIETY) 
QUAKE/JUSTICE
RTX6JH3 
June 05, 2008 
Yao Yong, 35, the mother of 11-year-old Jiang Yao, who was killed during the May 12 earthquake in Fuxin... 
MIANZHU, China 
Yao Yong, 35, the mother of 11-year-old Jiang Yao, who was killed during the May 12 earthquake in Fuxin... 
Yao Yong, 35, the mother of 11-year-old Jiang Yao, who was killed during the May 12 earthquake in Fuxin Number Two Primary School, sits with other mothers at the school's courtyard, Mianzhu County, Sichuan province June 5, 2008. In the town of Wufu, where the Fuxin Number Two primary school is the only building that collapsed in the quake, killing hundreds of children, parents say the local government has promised them the results of an investigation by June 20. The parents, who come everyday and sit together at the school courtyard, say they will do so until "justice will be done". REUTERS/Nir Elias (CHINA) 
QUAKE/CHILDREN
RTX6ELC 
June 01, 2008 
A mother holds a photo of her son during a protest outside a government office in Mianzhu in Sichuan... 
MIANZHU, China 
A mother holds a photo of her son during a protest outside a government office in Mianzhu 
A mother holds a photo of her son during a protest outside a government office in Mianzhu in Sichuan province June 1, 2008. Parents of students from Fuxing Primary School gathered on Sunday at the site of the school, which was totally destroyed during the May 12 earthquake, and walked from there to the government office holding photos of their children as part of a protest. REUTERS/Nir Elias (CHINA) 
HONDURAS/
RTR1ZCF4 
April 10, 2008 
Nine-year-old Jason Lopez rests on his bed at the Catarino Rivas hospital where he is being treated for... 
San Pedro Sula, Honduras 
Nine-year-old Jason Lopez rests on a bed at the Catarino Rivas hospital in San Pedro Sula 
Nine-year-old Jason Lopez rests on his bed at the Catarino Rivas hospital where he is being treated for severe malnutrition after police were tipped off to his condition by neighbors of his family's home in San Pedro Sula, April 10, 2008. Jason, whose 11 kg of weight is an extreme case in Honduras where nearly 30 percent of all children suffer from malnutrition, according to a report from the United Nations' World Food Programme. The child was abandoned by his parents who were detained by the police and later released by the authorities. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS) 
HONDURAS/
RTR1ZCF1 
April 10, 2008 
Nine-year-old Jason Lopez rests on his bed at the Catarino Rivas hospital where he is being treated for... 
San Pedro Sula, Honduras 
Nine-year-old Jason Lopez rests on his bed at the Catarino Rivas hospital where he is being treated for... 
Nine-year-old Jason Lopez rests on his bed at the Catarino Rivas hospital where he is being treated for severe malnutrition after police were tipped off to his condition by neighbors of his family's home in San Pedro Sula, April 10, 2008. Jason, whose 11 kg of weight is an extreme case in Honduras where nearly 30 percent of all children suffer from malnutrition, according to a report from the United Nations' World Food Programme. The child was abandoned by his parents who were detained by the police and later released by the authorities. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS) 
HONDURAS/
RTR1ZCEN 
April 10, 2008 
Nine-year-old Jason Lopez rests on a bed at the Catarino Rivas hospital where he is being treated for... 
San Pedro Sula, Honduras 
Nine-year-old Jason Lopez rests on a bed at the Catarino Rivas hospital in San Pedro Sula 
Nine-year-old Jason Lopez rests on a bed at the Catarino Rivas hospital where he is being treated for severe malnutrition after police were tipped off to his condition by neighbors of his family's home in San Pedro Sula, April 10, 2008. Jason, whose 11 kg of weight is an extreme case in Honduras where nearly 30 percent of all children suffer from malnutrition, according to a report from the United Nations' World Food Programme. The child was abandoned by his parents who were detained by the police and later released by the authorities. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido (HONDURAS) 
CHINA/
RTX4W55 
December 20, 2007 
A child from the Yi ethnic minority cries at Dayingpan Village in Yuexi County, Sichuan province December... 
Yuexi, China 
A child from the Yi ethnic minority cries at Dayingpan Village in Yuexi County 
A child from the Yi ethnic minority cries at Dayingpan Village in Yuexi County, Sichuan province December 15, 2007. Children in the village have to take care of themselves as most of their parents are working in the fields. Dayingpan Village, known by locals in the surrounding area as "ghost village", used to be the place of exile for lepers, and is now home to around 80 families, including 105 residents still suffering from the disease, local media reported. Picture taken December 15, 2007. REUTERS/Joe Chan (CHINA) 
CHINA/
RTX4W4Z 
December 20, 2007 
A child from the Yi ethnic minority carries branches used as fertiliser in Dayingpan Village in Yuexi... 
Yuexi, China 
A child from the Yi ethnic minority carries branches used as fertiliser in Dayingpan Village in Yuexi... 
A child from the Yi ethnic minority carries branches used as fertiliser in Dayingpan Village in Yuexi County, Sichuan province December 16, 2007. Children in the village have to take care of themselves as most of their parents are working in the fields. Dayingpan Village, known by locals in the surrounding area as "ghost village", used to be the place of exile for lepers, and is now home to around 80 families, including 105 residents still suffering from the disease, local media reported. Picture taken December 16, 2007. REUTERS/Joe Chan (CHINA) 
CHINA/
RTX4W4X 
December 20, 2007 
A child from the Yi ethnic minority stands outside his house in Dayingpan Village in Yuexi County, Sichuan... 
Yuexi, China 
A child from the Yi ethnic minority stands outside his house in Dayingpan Village in Yuexi County 
A child from the Yi ethnic minority stands outside his house in Dayingpan Village in Yuexi County, Sichuan province December 15, 2007. Children in the village have to take care of themselves as most of their parents are working in the fields. Dayingpan Village, known by locals in the surrounding area as "ghost village", used to be the place of exile for lepers, and is now home to around 80 families, including 105 residents still suffering from the disease, local media reported. Picture taken December 15, 2007. REUTERS/Joe Chan (CHINA) 
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