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Search results for: Sinus

EGYPT-ODDLY/
RTR44AN4
August 29, 2014
Ibrahim Saied Al Sayeeh places a bee on the head of a man suffering from headaches and sinus problems,...
Cairo, Egypt
Ibrahim Saied Al Sayeeh places a bee on the head of a man suffering from headaches and sinus problems,...
Ibrahim Saied Al Sayeeh places a bee on the head of a man suffering from headaches and sinus problems, at the centre opened by his father Haj Saied Al Sayeeh, in Cairo August 29, 2014. Haj Saied Al Sayeeh believes that the venom released by bees when they sting has special properties, which when used on specific parts of the body, can cure ailments like kidney problems, appendicitis and even cancer. In 2004, Al Sayeeh opened this centre and began treating patients free of charge with bee venom to provide relief for those suffering from rheumatic pain, nerve inflammation and hepatitis C. The centre claims that they have succeeded in curing these conditions for people coming from all over Cairo. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh (EGYPT - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY ANIMALS)
USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI
RTR3FKXY
October 04, 2013
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Pascagoula, UNITED STATES
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System in Pascagoula, Mississippi September 26, 2013. The not-for-profit hospital system offers a menu of services that all cost $49, from school physicals to treatments for sinus infections and rashes. On bigger-ticket items, the hospital offers a 40 percent discount to patients who can pay cash at the time of service. Despite the clinic offering discounts for treatments paid in cash, many in the area still cannot afford the tests they need or visits with a specialist.
As Americans across the nation begin to find out what Obamacare has in store for them, many of Mississippi's most needy will find out the answer is nothing, since the state decided not to expand the Medicaid program for the poor under President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Picture taken September 26. To match Feature USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI REUTERS/Lyle Ratliff (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)
USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI
RTR3FKXX
October 04, 2013
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Pascagoula, UNITED STATES
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System in Pascagoula, Mississippi September 26, 2013. The not-for-profit hospital system offers a menu of services that all cost $49, from school physicals to treatments for sinus infections and rashes. On bigger-ticket items, the hospital offers a 40 percent discount to patients who can pay cash at the time of service. Despite the clinic offering discounts for treatments paid in cash, many in the area still cannot afford the tests they need or visits with a specialist.
As Americans across the nation begin to find out what Obamacare has in store for them, many of Mississippi's most needy will find out the answer is nothing, since the state decided not to expand the Medicaid program for the poor under President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Picture taken September 26. To match Feature USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI REUTERS/Lyle Ratliff (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)
USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI
RTR3FKXO
October 04, 2013
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Pascagoula, UNITED STATES
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System in Pascagoula, Mississippi September 26, 2013. The not-for-profit hospital system offers a menu of services that all cost $49, from school physicals to treatments for sinus infections and rashes. On bigger-ticket items, the hospital offers a 40 percent discount to patients who can pay cash at the time of service. Despite the clinic offering discounts for treatments paid in cash, many in the area still cannot afford the tests they need or visits with a specialist.
As Americans across the nation begin to find out what Obamacare has in store for them, many of Mississippi's most needy will find out the answer is nothing, since the state decided not to expand the Medicaid program for the poor under President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Picture taken September 26. To match Feature USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI REUTERS/Lyle Ratliff (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)
USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI
RTR3FKXN
October 04, 2013
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Pascagoula, UNITED STATES
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System in Pascagoula, Mississippi September 26, 2013. The not-for-profit hospital system offers a menu of services that all cost $49, from school physicals to treatments for sinus infections and rashes. On bigger-ticket items, the hospital offers a 40 percent discount to patients who can pay cash at the time of service. Despite the clinic offering discounts for treatments paid in cash, many in the area still cannot afford the tests they need or visits with a specialist.
As Americans across the nation begin to find out what Obamacare has in store for them, many of Mississippi's most needy will find out the answer is nothing, since the state decided not to expand the Medicaid program for the poor under President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Picture taken September 26. To match Feature USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI REUTERS/Lyle Ratliff (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)
USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI
RTR3FKXM
October 04, 2013
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Pascagoula, UNITED STATES
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System in Pascagoula, Mississippi September 26, 2013. The not-for-profit hospital system offers a menu of services that all cost $49, from school physicals to treatments for sinus infections and rashes. On bigger-ticket items, the hospital offers a 40 percent discount to patients who can pay cash at the time of service. Despite the clinic offering discounts for treatments paid in cash, many in the area still cannot afford the tests they need or visits with a specialist.
As Americans across the nation begin to find out what Obamacare has in store for them, many of Mississippi's most needy will find out the answer is nothing, since the state decided not to expand the Medicaid program for the poor under President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Picture taken September 26. To match Feature USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI REUTERS/Lyle Ratliff (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)
USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI
RTR3FKXL
October 04, 2013
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Pascagoula, UNITED STATES
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System...
Dr. Pamela Banister poses while working at a clinic which is part of the Singing River Health System in Pascagoula, Mississippi September 26, 2013. The not-for-profit hospital system offers a menu of services that all cost $49, from school physicals to treatments for sinus infections and rashes. On bigger-ticket items, the hospital offers a 40 percent discount to patients who can pay cash at the time of service. Despite the clinic offering discounts for treatments paid in cash, many in the area still cannot afford the tests they need or visits with a specialist.
As Americans across the nation begin to find out what Obamacare has in store for them, many of Mississippi's most needy will find out the answer is nothing, since the state decided not to expand the Medicaid program for the poor under President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Picture taken September 26. To match Feature USA-HEALTHCARE/MISSISSIPPI REUTERS/Lyle Ratliff (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)
PALESTINIANS/
RTXYEO4
April 09, 2013
A Palestinian boy suffering from Paranasal sinus cries as he receives treatment at a bee venom therapy...
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories
A Palestinian boy suffering from Paranasal sinus cries as he receives treatment at a bee venom therapy...
A Palestinian boy suffering from Paranasal sinus cries as he receives treatment at a bee venom therapy center in Gaza City, April 8, 2013. The treatment, using the venom of honeybees, is known to be effective for diseases like epilepsy, spinal disorders, hearing problems and nasal allergy, according to Ratib Samoor, an agricultural engineer and owner of the center. The center, which was founded in 2003, treats dozens of Palestinians on a daily basis. Picture taken April 8, 2013. REUTERS/Suahib Salem (GAZA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
PALESTINIANS/
RTXYENV
April 09, 2013
A Palestinian boy suffering from Paranasal sinus cries as he receives treatment at a bee venom therapy...
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories
A Palestinian boy suffering from Paranasal sinus cries as he receives treatment at a bee venom therapy...
A Palestinian boy suffering from Paranasal sinus cries as he receives treatment at a bee venom therapy center in Gaza City, April 8, 2013. The treatment, using the venom of honeybees, is known to be effective for diseases like epilepsy, spinal disorders, hearing problems and nasal allergy, according to Ratib Samoor, an agricultural engineer and owner of the center. The center, which was founded in 2003, treats dozens of Palestinians on a daily basis. Picture taken April 8, 2013. REUTERS/Suahib Salem (GAZA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
PALESTINIANS/
RTXYENQ
April 09, 2013
A Palestinian boy suffering from Paranasal sinus cries as he receives treatment at a bee venom therapy...
Gaza City, Palestinian Territories
A Palestinian boy suffering from Paranasal sinus cries as he receives treatment at a bee venom therapy...
A Palestinian boy suffering from Paranasal sinus cries as he receives treatment at a bee venom therapy center in Gaza City, April 8, 2013. The treatment, using the venom of honeybees, is known to be effective for diseases like epilepsy, spinal disorders, hearing problems and nasal allergy, according to Ratib Samoor, an agricultural engineer and owner of the center. The center, which was founded in 2003, treats dozens of Palestinians on a daily basis. Picture taken April 8, 2013. REUTERS/Suahib Salem (GAZA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
RTR3C0TE
January 01, 2013
USA-CLINTON/HEALTH - Graphic showing details of a right transverse sinus venous thrombosis, the type...
Washington, UNITED STATES
USA-CLINTON/HEALTH C
USA-CLINTON/HEALTH - Graphic showing details of a right transverse sinus venous thrombosis, the type of blood clot affecting U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. RNGS. (SIN02)
NBA/
RTXF1O2
May 09, 2009
Orlando Magic's Courtney Lee wears a facemask as he recovers from a fractured sinus as his team met the...
Orlando, UNITED STATES
Orlando Magic's Courtney Lee wears a facemask during the Boston Celtics NBA Eastern Conference basketball...
Orlando Magic's Courtney Lee wears a facemask as he recovers from a fractured sinus as his team met the Boston Celtics in Game 3 of their NBA Eastern Conference basketball playoff series in Orlando, Florida May 8, 2009. REUTERS/Kevin Kolczynski (UNITED STATES SPORT BASKETBALL)
SPORT BASEBALL
RTRWEM2
May 06, 2004
San Francisco Giants star Barry Bonds looks up as he pops up foul in the fourth inning May 6, 2004 in...
New York, United States of America
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS BONDS POPS UP TO NEW YORK METS PIAZZA.
San Francisco Giants star Barry Bonds looks up as he pops up foul in the fourth inning May 6, 2004 in New York. Bonds sat out the first two games of the series with a sinus infection. He was hitless in three at bats with two intentional walks as the Mets won 2-1 in 11 innings. REUTERS/Ray Stubblebine RFS
SPORT BASEBALL
RTRWEJ5
May 06, 2004
Fans at New York's Shea Stadium react at their first look at San Francisco Giants batter Barry Bonds...
New York, United States of America
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS BONDS FINALLY PLAYS IN GAME AGAINST METS.
Fans at New York's Shea Stadium react at their first look at San Francisco Giants batter Barry Bonds as he walks to the dugout after flying out against New York Mets pitcher Al Leiter in the second inning May 6, 2004. Bonds sat out the first two games of the series while suffering a sinus infection. REUTERS/Ray Stubblebine RFS/GAC
SOMMER
RTXKDOO
March 20, 2001
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom addresses a news conference in Hanover, March 20, 2001 as...
Hanover, Germany
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom addresses a news conference in Hanover, March 20, 2001 a.....
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom addresses a news conference in Hanover, March 20, 2001 as he presents a new high speed wireless internet Sinus pad to surf the internet. The world's largest computer fair Cebit will open to the public on Thursday March 22.
SOMMER
RTXKDON
March 20, 2001
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom displays a new high speed wireless internet Sinus pad to surf...
Hanover, Germany
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom displays a new high speed wireless internet Sinus pad to .....
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom displays a new high speed wireless internet Sinus pad to surf the internet during a news conference in Hanover, March 20, 2001. The world's largest computer fair Cebit will open to the public on Thursday March 22.
GERMANY TELECOM
RTRFVFH
March 20, 2001
Ron Sommer (R), chairman of the German Telekom explains details of new high speed wireless internet Sinus...
Hanover, Germany
GERMAN TELEKOM CHAIRMAN RON SOMMER AND DIRECTOR GENERAL OF THE ZDF GERMAN TELEVISION IN HANOVER.
Ron Sommer (R), chairman of the German Telekom explains details of new high speed wireless internet Sinus pad to surf the internet to Dieter Stolte (R), director general of the Second German Television (ZDF) ahead to a news conference in Hanover, March 20, 2001. ZDF television and German Telekom signed a contract for collaboration and the presentation of ZDF on the internet.

FAB/WS
GERMANY TELECOM
RTRFVEX
March 20, 2001
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom addresses a news conference in Hanover, March 20, 2001 as...
Hanover, Germany
GERMAN TELEKOM CHAIRMAN RON SOMMER ADDRESSES NEWS CONFERENCE IN HANOVER.
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom addresses a news conference in Hanover, March 20, 2001 as he presents a new high speed wireless internet Sinus pad to surf the internet. The world's largest computer fair Cebit will open to the public on Thursday March 22.

FAB/WS
GERMANY TELECOM
RTRFVEA
March 20, 2001
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom displays a new high speed wireless internet Sinus pad to surf...
Hanover, Germany
GERMAN TELEKOM CHAIRMAN RON SOMMER PRESENTS NEW INTERNET SINUS PAD IN HANOVER.
Ron Sommer, chairman of the German Telekom displays a new high speed wireless internet Sinus pad to surf the internet during a news conference in Hanover, March 20, 2001. The world's largest computer fair Cebit will open to the public on Thursday March 22.

FAB/WS
FORD
RTXJW6S
August 01, 2000
Former U.S. President Gerald Ford acknowledges the cheers from the crowd following a tribute in his honor...
Philadelphia, USA
Former U.S. President Gerald Ford acknowledges the cheers from the crowd following a tribute in his .....
Former U.S. President Gerald Ford acknowledges the cheers from the crowd following a tribute in his honor at the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia August 1, 2000. Ford was readmitted to a Philadelphia hospital August 2, after suffering a stroke just hours after being treated and released for a sinus infection.
RTR4FD5
June 13, 1997
Austrian driver Alexander Wurz gets help from a pit crew member prior to the first practice session at...
Canada
AUSTRIAN ALEXANDER WURZ REPLACES GERHARD BERGER DURING PRACTICE
Austrian driver Alexander Wurz gets help from a pit crew member prior to the first practice session at the Canadian Grand Prix, June 13. Wurz replaced fellow Austrian Gerhard Berger, who was unable to drive for the Benetton-Renault team due to a sinus infection.

SPORT PRIX
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