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Search results for: Skin-disease

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MEXICO-NURSE
RTX7ILX2
May 12, 2020
Karen Miranda, a nurse who works in the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) intensive care unit where patients...
Mexico City, Mexico
Karen Miranda, a nurse who works in the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) intensive care unit, puts plasters...
Karen Miranda, a nurse who works in the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) intensive care unit where patients infected with the COVID-19 are treated, puts plasters to protect her skin from the googles as she gets ready to see her patients, at Juarez Hospital in Mexico City, Mexico May 7, 2020. Picture taken May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SPAIN
RTX7H5RH
May 04, 2020
Dermatologist Marta Maria Moratinos wears protective gear as she does a skin check-up on Gonzalo Hurtado...
Madrid, Spain
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Madrid
Dermatologist Marta Maria Moratinos wears protective gear as she does a skin check-up on Gonzalo Hurtado at her clinic, on the first day that some small businesses are allowed to open during lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Madrid, Spain, May 4, 2020. "I feel thankful we have been allowed to open. I've had to ask for a personal loan to rescue the business" Moratinos said. REUTERS/Susana Vera
IRAQ-SULFUR/TREATMENT
RTS2OC0U
August 29, 2019
People sit in water after being covered with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of...
Mosul, Iraq
People sit in water after being covered with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of...
People sit in water after being covered with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river west of Mosul, Iraq August 20, 2019. Picture taken August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Abdullah Rashid TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
IRAQ-SULFUR/TREATMENT
RTS2OC0Q
August 29, 2019
People sit in water after being covered with sulfur, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks...
Mosul, Iraq
People sit in water after being covered with sulfur, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks...
People sit in water after being covered with sulfur, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river west of Mosul, Iraq August 20, 2019. Picture taken August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Abdullah Rashid
IRAQ-SULFUR/TREATMENT
RTS2OC0N
August 29, 2019
A man washes himself after being covered with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases in Hammam Al-Alil...
Mosul, Iraq
A man washes himself after being covered with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases in Hammam Al-Alil...
A man washes himself after being covered with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases in Hammam Al-Alil south of Mosul, Iraq August 21, 2019. Picture taken August 21, 2019. REUTERS/Abdullah Rashid
IRAQ-SULFUR/TREATMENT
RTS2OC0G
August 29, 2019
A boy pours water at a man who has been covered with mud, which help to treat the skin diseases, on banks...
Mosul, Iraq
A boy pours water at a man who has been covered with mud, which help to treat the skin diseases, on banks...
A boy pours water at a man who has been covered with mud, which help to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river west of Mosul, Iraq August 20, 2019. Picture taken August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Abdullah Rashid
IRAQ-SULFUR/TREATMENT
RTS2OC0E
August 29, 2019
A man covers himself with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river west...
Mosul, Iraq
A man covers himself with sulfur, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river west...
A man covers himself with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river west of Mosul, Iraq August 20, 2019. Picture taken August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Abdullah Rashid
IRAQ-SULFUR/TREATMENT
RTS2OC0B
August 29, 2019
People sit inside the sulfur fountain, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river...
Mosul, Iraq
People sit inside the sulfur fountain, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river...
People sit inside the sulfur fountain, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river west of Mosul, Iraq August 20, 2019. Picture taken August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Abdullah Rashid
IRAQ-SULFUR/TREATMENT
RTS2OC06
August 29, 2019
A man and his son cover themselves with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris...
Mosul, Iraq
A man and his son cover themselves with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris...
A man and his son cover themselves with mud, which helps to treat the skin diseases, on banks of Tigris river west of Mosul, Iraq August 20, 2019. Picture taken August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Abdullah Rashid
YEMEN-SECURITY/MALNUTRITION
RTS26448
November 15, 2018
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATH Saleh al-Faqeh held the wasted arm...
Sanaa, Yemen
A Picture and its Story: Yemeni father mourns baby girl who died of starvation
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATH Saleh al-Faqeh held the wasted arm of his baby girl as she took her last breath on Thursday at the malnutrition ward of the main hospital in Yemen's capital Sanaa. Four-month-old Hajar al-Faqeh reached the al-Sabeen hospital last week from Saada province, one of thousands of Yemeni children suffering from malnutrition in a country that has been pushed to the brink of famine by more than three years of war. "She has spent two months in a hospital in Saada, but we had to bring her to Sanaa," her father said. Saada province is a stronghold of Iran-aligned Houthi rebels who have been fighting a Saudi-backed government for nearly four years in a war that has killed 10,000. Meritxell Relano, the UNICEF Representative in Yemen, said in September that more than 11 million children, or about 80 percent of the country's population under the age of 18, were facing the threat of food shortages, disease, displacement and acute lack of access to basic social services. The Faqeh family braved a dangerous journey along mountain roads where air strikes from the Saudi-led coalition are frequent. Fouad al-Reme, a nurse in al-Sabeen hospital, said Hajar was conscious when she came to the hospital but she suffered low oxygen levels. "She was like skin on bones, her body was emaciated," he said. REUTERS/Mohamed al-Sayaghi SEARCH "MALNUTRITION HASSAN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
MYANMAR-ROHINGYA/BANGLADESH
RTX3MLGQ
December 07, 2017
A Rohingya refugee holds her 7-month-old son Robi Alam, who suffers from severe malnutrition and skin...
Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
A Rohingya refugee holds her 7-month-old son Robi Alam, who suffers from severe malnutrition and skin...
A Rohingya refugee holds her 7-month-old son Robi Alam, who suffers from severe malnutrition and skin disease, at the Action Against Hunger centre, where the child is treated, at Kutupalong camp, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh December 7, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
MYANMAR-ROHINGYA/BANGLADESH
RTX3MLAZ
December 07, 2017
A Rohingya refugee holds her 7-month-old son Robi Alam, who suffers from severe malnutrition and skin...
Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
A Rohingya refugee holds her 7-month-old son Robi Alam, who suffers from severe malnutrition and skin...
A Rohingya refugee holds her 7-month-old son Robi Alam, who suffers from severe malnutrition and skin disease, at the Action Against Hunger centre, where the child is treated, at Kutupalong camp, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh December 7, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
HEALTH-BRAZIL/BURNS
RTX37LB5
May 25, 2017
Researchers in Brazil are experimenting with a new treatment for severe burns using the skin of tilapia...
Fortaleza, Brazil
The Wider Image: Healing burns with fish skin
Researchers in Brazil are experimenting with a new treatment for severe burns using the skin of tilapia fish, an unorthodox procedure they say can ease the pain of victims and cut medical costs. Frozen pig skin and even human tissue have long been placed on burns to keep them moist and allow the transfer of collagen, a protein that promotes healing. Brazil's public hospitals, however, lack human and pig skin supplies and the artificial alternatives easily available in Western countries. Instead, gauze bandage, which needs regular changing - often painfully - is the norm. Tilapia is abundant in Brazil's rivers and fish farms, which are expanding rapidly as demand grows for the mildly flavored freshwater fish. Scientists at the Federal University of Ceara in northern Brazil have found that tilapia skin has moisture, collagen and disease resistance at levels comparable to human skin, and can aid in healing. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker SEARCH "FISH BURN" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
YEMEN-SECURITY/
RTS13QOI
April 24, 2017
A woman shows skin disease on children at a camp for people displaced by the war near Sanaa, Yemen April...
Sanaa, Yemen
A woman shows skin disease on children at a camp for people displaced by the war near Sanaa, Yemen
A woman shows skin disease on children at a camp for people displaced by the war near Sanaa, Yemen April 24, 2017. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah
CHINA-CANCERHOTEL/
RTSQ00O
September 29, 2016
A ointment for skin disease sits by a window in a room at the accommodation where some patients and their...
Beijing, China
The Wider Image: China's cancer patients far from home
A ointment for skin disease sits by a window in a room at the accommodation where some patients and their family members stay while seeking medical treatments in Beijing, China, June 23, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "HOSPITAL ACCOMMODATION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
YEMEN-SECURITY/
RTSMEZQ
August 10, 2016
A woman shows the body of her son, who suffers a skin disease, at a camp for internally displaced people...
Sanaa, Yemen
A woman shows the body of her son, who suffers a skin disease, at a camp for internally displaced people...
A woman shows the body of her son, who suffers a skin disease, at a camp for internally displaced people near Sanaa, Yemen, August 10, 2016. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah
YEMEN-SECURITY/
RTSMEYX
August 10, 2016
A boy suffering from a skin disease stands at a camp for internally displaced people near Sanaa, Yemen,...
Sanaa, Yemen
boy suffering from a skin disease stands at a camp for internally displaced people near Sanaa, Yemen
A boy suffering from a skin disease stands at a camp for internally displaced people near Sanaa, Yemen, August 10, 2016. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah
TECH-CES/
RTX211IY
January 05, 2016
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial...
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial Beautification System, that is designed to treat various skin-related disorders, at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
TECH-CES/
RTX211IJ
January 05, 2016
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial...
Jonathan Graff, director of clinical research for Apira Science demonstrates the company's iDerma Facial Beautification System, that is designed to treat various skin-related disorders, at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas January 4, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
WW2-ANNNIVERSARY/SOUTHKOREA-SLAVERY
RTX1NZGA
August 12, 2015
Chinese former "comfort woman" Hao Juxiang scratches her arm inside her house in Gucheng Town, Shanxi...
GUCHENG, China
Wider Image: "Comfort Woman" Survivors Tell Their Stories
Chinese former "comfort woman" Hao Juxiang scratches her arm inside her house in Gucheng Town, Shanxi Province, China, July 16, 2015. “Comfort women� is the Japanese euphemism for women who were forced into prostitution and sexually abused at Japanese military brothels before and during World War Two. 92-year-old Hao Juxiang is losing her hearing and is suffering from a chronic skin disease because of old age. Her physical condition is failing and she fears she will not live long enough to receive an apology and compensation from the Japanese government, something she wants and hopes for. According to information from China’s Commission of Inquiry into the Facts of Comfort Women being Victims, which is based on Hao's statement during the commission's research, Hao was abducted by Japanese soldiers when she was 15 or 16 and was forced to serve as a "comfort woman" for nearly 20 days during World War Two. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-HoonPICTURE 8 OF 33 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "COMFORT WOMAN SURVIVORS TELL THEIR STORIES" SEARCH "KIM COMFORT" FOR ALL PICTURES
WW2-ANNNIVERSARY/SOUTHKOREA-SLAVERY
RTX1NZAY
August 12, 2015
Chinese former "comfort woman" Hao Juxiang scratches her arm inside her house in Gucheng Town, Shanxi...
GUCHENG, China
Wider Image: "Comfort Woman" Survivors Tell Their Stories
Chinese former "comfort woman" Hao Juxiang scratches her arm inside her house in Gucheng Town, Shanxi Province, China, July 16, 2015. "Comfort women" is the Japanese euphemism for women who were forced into prostitution and sexually abused at Japanese military brothels before and during World War Two. 92-year-old Hao Juxiang is losing her hearing and is suffering from a chronic skin disease because of old age. Her physical condition is failing and she fears she will not live long enough to receive an apology and compensation from the Japanese government, something she wants and hopes for. According to information from China's Commission of Inquiry into the Facts of Comfort Women being Victims, which is based on Hao's statement during the commission's research, Hao was abducted by Japanese soldiers when she was 15 or 16 and was forced to serve as a "comfort woman" for nearly 20 days during World War Two. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon PICTURE 8 OF 33 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "COMFORT WOMAN SURVIVORS TELL THEIR STORIES" SEARCH "KIM COMFORT" FOR ALL PICTURES
BRAZIL-ANIMALS/
RTX1MFXG
July 30, 2015
A llama that has skin tumours receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo,...
Brasilia, Brazil
A llama that has skin tumours receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo...
A llama that has skin tumours receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The zoo's veterinary hospital uses acupuncture and laser therapy to improve the health and well-being of animals with chronic diseases. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ANIMALS/
RTX1MFXD
July 30, 2015
A llama that has skin tumours receives laser therapy treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia...
Brasilia, Brazil
A llama that has skin tumours receives laser therapy treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia...
A llama that has skin tumours receives laser therapy treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The zoo's veterinary hospital uses acupuncture and laser therapy to improve the health and well-being of animals with chronic diseases. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-ANIMALS/
RTX1MFWV
July 30, 2015
A llama that has skin tumours receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo,...
Brasilia, Brazil
A llama that has skin tumours receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo...
A llama that has skin tumours receives acupuncture treatment at the veterinary hospital in Brasilia Zoo, July 30, 2015. The zoo's veterinary hospital uses acupuncture and laser therapy to improve the health and well-being of animals with chronic diseases. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
AZERBAIJAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14U
June 27, 2015
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session in Naftalan health centre...
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
AZERBAIJAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14T
June 27, 2015
A man gets his back cleaned of crude oil as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man gets his back cleaned of crude oil as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan...
A man gets his back cleaned of crude oil as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
AZERBAIJAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14S
June 27, 2015
A man gets his arms cleaned of crude oil as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man gets his arms cleaned of crude oil as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan...
A man gets his arms cleaned of crude oil as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
AZERBAIJAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14R
June 27, 2015
A man smears crude oil on his body as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man smears crude oil on his body as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan...
A man smears crude oil on his body as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
AZERBAIJAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14Q
June 27, 2015
A man cleans crude oil of his hands as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man cleans crude oil of his hands as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan...
A man cleans crude oil of his hands as he lies in a bathtub during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
AZERBAJIAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14P
June 27, 2015
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center...
Baku, Azerbaijan
Man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center...
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
AZERBAIJAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14O
June 27, 2015
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session in Naftalan health centre...
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
AZERBAIJAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14N
June 27, 2015
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session in Naftalan health centre...
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
AZERBAIJAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14M
June 27, 2015
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session in Naftalan health centre...
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
AZERBAIJAN-HEALTH/
RTX1I14J
June 27, 2015
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session in Naftalan health centre...
A man lies in a bathtub filled with crude oil during a health therapy session at Naftalan Health Center in Baku, Azerbaijan June 27, 2015. According to Hashim Hashimov, a medical specialist at the centre, the oil can heal more than seventy diseases, including neurological diseases, skin conditions and impotence. Centres like Naftalan attract people coming from Russia, Kazakhstan and Germany, Hashimov told Reuters. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov
NEPAL-RELIGION/
RTR4W2IB
April 04, 2015
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu April 4, 2015. Devotees believe that the water from these stone spouts, which is collected from the catchment area of the Nagarjun forest behind the spouts, will cure pains and skin diseases. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-RELIGION/
RTR4W2IA
April 04, 2015
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu April 4, 2015. Devotees believe that the water from these stone spouts, which is collected from the catchment area of the Nagarjun forest behind the spouts, will cure pains and skin diseases. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-RELIGION/
RTR4W2I9
April 04, 2015
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu April 4, 2015. Devotees believe that the water from these stone spouts, which is collected from the catchment area of the Nagarjun forest behind the spouts, will cure pains and skin diseases. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-RELIGION/
RTR4W2I8
April 04, 2015
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu April 4, 2015. Devotees believe that the water from these stone spouts, which is collected from the catchment area of the Nagarjun forest behind the spouts, will cure pains and skin diseases. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-RELIGION/
RTR4W2I7
April 04, 2015
A hand of a devotee is pictured along the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A hand of a devotee is pictured along the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan...
A hand of a devotee is pictured along the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu April 4, 2015. Devotees believe that the water from these stone spouts, which is collected from the catchment area of the Nagarjun forest behind the spouts, will cure pains and skin diseases. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-RELIGION/
RTR4W2I6
April 04, 2015
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
A devotee takes a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu April 4, 2015. Devotees believe that the water from these stone spouts, which is collected from the catchment area of the Nagarjun forest behind the spouts, will cure pains and skin diseases. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-RELIGION/
RTR4W2I5
April 04, 2015
Devotees take a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Devotees take a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival...
Devotees take a holy bath at the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu April 4, 2015. Devotees believe that the water from these stone spouts, which is collected from the catchment area of the Nagarjun forest behind the spouts, will cure pains and skin diseases. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
NEPAL-RELIGION/
RTR4W2I4
April 04, 2015
A devotee walks along the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu...
Kathmandu, Nepal
A devotee walks along the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu...
A devotee walks along the Balaju Baise Dhara (22 water spouts) during the Baishak Asnan festival in Kathmandu April 4, 2015. Devotees believe that the water from these stone spouts, which is collected from the catchment area of the Nagarjun forest behind the spouts, will cure pains and skin diseases. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7ZM
June 23, 2014
Qin Wenji, 82, who suffers from skin cancer, watches TV in his bedroom at Heshan village, in Shimen county,...
SHIMEN, China
Qin Wenji, who suffers from skin cancer, watches TV in his bedroom at Heshan village, in Shimen county...
Qin Wenji, 82, who suffers from skin cancer, watches TV in his bedroom at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 23 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'HESHAN'
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7XJ
June 23, 2014
Qin Zhengyu, 78, shows moles and tumours on her back in her home at Heshan village, in Shimen county,...
SHIMEN, China
Qin Zhengyu shows moles and tumours on her back in her home at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central...
Qin Zhengyu, 78, shows moles and tumours on her back in her home at Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 4, 2014. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 11 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/HEALTH
RTR3V7X5
June 23, 2014
Skin ulcers are seen on 69-year-old Gong Zhaoyuan's torso in Heshan village, in Shimen county, central...
SHIMEN, China
Skin ulcers are seen on Gong Zhaoyuan's torso in Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan...
Skin ulcers are seen on 69-year-old Gong Zhaoyuan's torso in Heshan village, in Shimen county, central China's Hunan Province, June 3, 2014. Zhaoyuan suffers from skin cancer, which developed as result of arsenic poisoning. From the 1950s, mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the area around Heshan which is rich in realgar, or arsenic disulphide. They were shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused but dust and runoff from arsenic plagues Heshan to this day. In 2010, 157 villagers from Heshan, with a population of about 1,500, had died of cancer caused by arsenic poisoning in the previous two decades, and another 190 had developed cancer due to arsenic poisoning, the villagers wrote in a letter to the local government, seen by Reuters, seeking compensation and aid. Picture taken June 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS - PICTURE 06 OF 27 FOR PACKAGE 'HESHAN - A POISONOUS LEGACY'
TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'HESHAN'
SYRIA-CRISIS/
RTR3HBEE
March 16, 2014
A Syrian refugee boy infected with a skin disease by what activists said is due to poor hygiene, is pictured...
AZAZ, Syria
A Syrian refugee boy is infected with a skin disease is pictured at the Bab Al-Salam refugee camp in...
A Syrian refugee boy infected with a skin disease by what activists said is due to poor hygiene, is pictured at the Bab Al-Salam refugee camp in Azaz, near the Syrian-Turkish border March 16, 2014. REUTERS/Mahmoud Hebbo (SYRIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT SOCIETY)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123VA
July 29, 2013
Jaynal, 60, takes a break as he works in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district,...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Jaynal takes a break as he works in a small "bidi" factory at Haragach in Rangpur district
Jaynal, 60, takes a break as he works in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH- Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123V3
July 29, 2013
A worker unfolds a sack of locally grown tobacco as he works in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Worker unfolds sack of locally grown tobacco as he works in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach...
A worker unfolds a sack of locally grown tobacco as he works in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH- Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123V0
July 29, 2013
A boy carries a stack of cigarettes as he works in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Boy carries stack of cigarettes as he works in a small 'bidi' factory at Haragach in Rangpur district...
A boy carries a stack of cigarettes as he works in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123UW
July 29, 2013
Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" factory at Haragach...
Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH- Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123UR
July 29, 2013
A child fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Child fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" factory at Haragach...
A child fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH- Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123UK
July 29, 2013
Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" factory at Haragach...
Workers fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123UF
July 29, 2013
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" factory at Haragach...
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH- Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123UE
July 29, 2013
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" factory at Haragach...
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 13, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 13, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH- Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123UC
July 29, 2013
Workers crush locally grown tobacco inside a grinding machine in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Workers crush locally grown tobacco in a grinding machine in a small "bidi" factory at Haragach in Rangpur...
Workers crush locally grown tobacco inside a grinding machine in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH- Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123UA
July 29, 2013
Rubel, 8, stands inside a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory as he works at Haragach in Rangpur district,...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Rubel stands inside small "bidi" factory as he works at Haragach in Rangpur district
Rubel, 8, stands inside a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory as he works at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH- Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123U7
July 29, 2013
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" factory at Haragach...
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small "bidi" (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH- Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123U0
July 29, 2013
A worker fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small 'bidi' (cigarette)...
Rangpur, Bangladesh
Worker fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small 'bidi' factory at Haragach...
A worker fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small 'bidi' (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: DRUGS SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123TY
July 29, 2013
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi factory at Haragach...
Children fill up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: DISASTER DRUGS SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH/
RTX123TT
July 29, 2013
A boy fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory...
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Boy fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi factory at Haragach...
A boy fills up empty cigarettes manually with locally grown tobacco in a small bidi (cigarette) factory at Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes "many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty." A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers' safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: DISASTER DRUGS SOCIETY BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
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