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Search results for: Sodertalje-(City)

UKRAINE-CRISIS/SWEDEN-GERMANY
RTSAGSSQ 
August 16, 2022 
German Chancellor Olaf Scholz and Swedish Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson sit inside an electric truck... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
German Chancellor Scholz and Swedish PM Andersson meet in Sodertalje 
German Chancellor Olaf Scholz and Swedish Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson sit inside an electric truck during their visit to the Swedish truck manufacturer Scania headquarters in Sodertalje, Sweden August 16, 2022. REUTERS/Andreas Rinke 
UKRAINE-CRISIS/SWEDEN-GERMANY
RTSAGSR7 
August 16, 2022 
German Chancellor Olaf Scholz sits inside an electric truck during his visit at the Swedish truck manufacturer... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
German Chancellor Scholz and Swedish PM Andersson meet in Sodertalje 
German Chancellor Olaf Scholz sits inside an electric truck during his visit at the Swedish truck manufacturer Scania headquarters in Sodertalje, Sweden August 16, 2022. REUTERS/Andreas Rinke 
SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFH 
September 01, 2014 
Bob Azar, 48, cleans his car in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
Bob Azar cleans his car in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm 
Bob Azar, 48, cleans his car in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 5, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 06 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFB 
September 01, 2014 
Yusef Kaspo, 73, a retired mechanic poses for a photograph at the St. Jacob of Nsibin Syriac Orthodox... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
Yusef Kaspo, a retired mechanic poses for a photograph at the St. Jacob of Nsibin Syriac Orthodox Cathedral... 
Yusef Kaspo, 73, a retired mechanic poses for a photograph at the St. Jacob of Nsibin Syriac Orthodox Cathedral in the city of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 07 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IF6 
September 01, 2014 
Student Gabriella Edo, 15, originally from Aleppo in Syria poses for a photograph in a classroom at the... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
Student Gabriella Edo originally from Aleppo in Syria poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna... 
Student Gabriella Edo, 15, originally from Aleppo in Syria poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna School in the city of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 04 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IF5 
September 01, 2014 
Acting Principal Par Olsson, 39, poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna School in the city... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
Acting Principal Par Olsson poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna School in the city of... 
Acting Principal Par Olsson, 39, poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna School in the city of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 05 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IF3 
September 01, 2014 
Afram Yakoub, chairman of the Assyrian Federation of Sweden poses for a photograph in his office in the... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
Afram Yakoub, chairman of the Assyrian Federation of Sweden poses for a photograph in his office in the... 
Afram Yakoub, chairman of the Assyrian Federation of Sweden poses for a photograph in his office in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 08 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IEZ 
September 01, 2014 
The Swedish national flag flies in front of a house near the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
The Swedish national flag flies in front of a house near the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm... 
The Swedish national flag flies in front of a house near the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 5, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 01 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IEW 
September 01, 2014 
A man waves a Syrian flag during graduation celebrations in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
A man waves a Syrian flag during graduation celebrations in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm... 
A man waves a Syrian flag during graduation celebrations in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 5, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 02 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IEU 
September 01, 2014 
Student Alexandra Hannon, 20, poses for a photograph at a graduation party in the town of Sodertalje,... 
SODERTALJE, Sweden 
Student Alexandra Hannon poses for a photograph at a graduation party in the town of Sodertalje, south... 
Student Alexandra Hannon, 20, poses for a photograph at a graduation party in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 03 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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