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Search results for: Soil-contamination

BRAZIL-ENVIRONMENT/OIL
RTS2R3QV
October 14, 2019
A man works on removing an oil spill on Coruripe beach, Alagoas state, Brazil October 14, 2019. REUTERS/Adriano...
CORURIPE, Brazil
A man works on removing an oil spill on Coruripe beach, Alagoas state
A man works on removing an oil spill on Coruripe beach, Alagoas state, Brazil October 14, 2019. REUTERS/Adriano Machado
INDIA-WEATHER/
RTX6Z7L8
June 13, 2019
Empty metal pitchers to fetch water are seen in an opening made to filter water next to a polluted lake...
Thane, India
Empty metal pitchers to fetch water are seen in an opening made to filter water next to a polluted lake...
Empty metal pitchers to fetch water are seen in an opening made to filter water next to a polluted lake in Thane, India June 13, 2019. REUTERS/Prashant Waydande
ITALY-ENVIRONMENT/
RTS272CH
November 22, 2018
REFILE - REMOVING MATERIAL A flip-flop is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November...
Maccarese, Italy
A flip-flop is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach
REFILE - REMOVING MATERIAL A flip-flop is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
ITALY-ENVIRONMENT/
RTS272CF
November 22, 2018
REFILE - REMOVING MATERIAL A shoe sole is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November...
Maccarese, Italy
A shoe sole is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach
REFILE - REMOVING MATERIAL A shoe sole is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26XAB
November 21, 2018
Plastic bottles and a flip-flop lie on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018....
Maccarese, Italy
Plastic bottles and a flip-flop lie on the sand at Maccarese beach
Plastic bottles and a flip-flop lie on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26XAA
November 21, 2018
A plastic shoe platform lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max...
Maccarese, Italy
A plastic shoe platform lies on the sand at Maccarese beach
A plastic shoe platform lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X9Y
November 21, 2018
A plastic lighter lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max...
Maccarese, Italy
A plastic lighter lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome
A plastic lighter lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X9W
November 21, 2018
A plastic bumper lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi...
Maccarese, Italy
A plastic bumper lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome
A plastic bumper lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X9U
November 21, 2018
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi...
Maccarese, Italy
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X9T
November 21, 2018
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max...
Maccarese, Italy
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X9S
November 21, 2018
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi...
Maccarese, Italy
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach in Rome, Italy, November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X72
November 21, 2018
A flip-flop made of plastic is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21,...
Maccarese, Italy
A flip-flop made of plastic is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach
A flip-flop made of plastic is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X71
November 21, 2018
A plastic jerrycan lies on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max...
Maccarese, Italy
A plastic jerrycan lies on the sand at Maccarese beach
A plastic jerrycan lies on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X6P
November 21, 2018
A plastic toy sword lies on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max...
Maccarese, Italy
A plastic toy sword lies on the sand at Maccarese beach
A plastic toy sword lies on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X6C
November 21, 2018
A shoe sole made out of plastic is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November...
Maccarese, Italy
A shoe sole made out of plastic is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach
A shoe sole made out of plastic is seen on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
GLOBAL-PLASTIC/
RTS26X5X
November 21, 2018
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max...
Maccarese, Italy
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach
A plastic bottle lies on the sand at Maccarese beach, west of Rome, Italy November 21, 2018. REUTERS/Max Rossi
FRANCE-POLLUTION/
RTX6FBZV
October 16, 2018
Hydrocarbon slabs, from an oil spill after two ships collided in the waters off Corsica, October 7, are...
RAMATUELLE, France
Hydrocarbon slabs, from an oil spill after two ships collided in the waters off Corsica, are seen on...
Hydrocarbon slabs, from an oil spill after two ships collided in the waters off Corsica, October 7, are seen on the Plage de Pampelonne beach near Ramatuelle, France, October 16, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
FRANCE-POLLUTION/
RTX6FBZ3
October 16, 2018
Hydrocarbon slabs, from an oil spill after two ships collided in the waters off Corsica, October 7, are...
RAMATUELLE, France
Hydrocarbon slabs, from an oil spill after two ships collided in the waters off Corsica, are seen on...
Hydrocarbon slabs, from an oil spill after two ships collided in the waters off Corsica, October 7, are seen on the Plage de Pampelonne beach near Ramatuelle, France, October 16, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
FRANCE-POLLUTION/
RTX6FBYX
October 16, 2018
Hydrocarbon slabs, from an oil spill after two ships collided in the waters off Corsica, October 7, are...
RAMATUELLE, France
Hydrocarbon slabs, from an oil spill after two ships collided in the waters off Corsica, are seen on...
Hydrocarbon slabs, from an oil spill after two ships collided in the waters off Corsica, October 7, are seen on the Plage de Pampelonne beach near Ramatuelle, France, October 16, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
GREECE-ENVIRONMENT/
RTS21O9G
September 17, 2018
A wheel is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Sifnos, Greece, August 18, 2018. Picture taken...
SIFNOS, Greece
A wheel is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Sifnos
A wheel is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Sifnos, Greece, August 18, 2018. Picture taken August 18, 2018. REUTERS/Stelios Misinas
GREECE-ENVIRONMENT/
RTS21O9B
September 17, 2018
A glass bottle is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Sifnos, Greece, August 18, 2018. Picture...
SIFNOS, Greece
A glass bottle is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Sifnos
A glass bottle is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Sifnos, Greece, August 18, 2018. Picture taken August 18, 2018. REUTERS/Stelios Misinas
GREECE-ENVIRONMENT/
RTS21O99
September 17, 2018
A fish swims by an anchor at the bottom of the sea off the island of Sifnos, Greece, August 16, 2018....
SIFNOS, Greece
A fish swims by an anchor at the bottom of the sea off the island of Sifnos
A fish swims by an anchor at the bottom of the sea off the island of Sifnos, Greece, August 16, 2018. Picture taken August 16, 2018. REUTERS/Stelios Misinas
GREECE-ENVIRONMENT/
RTS21O8R
September 17, 2018
A tin container is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Thasos, Greece, August 29, 2018. Picture...
SALAMINA, Greece
A tin container is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Thasos
A tin container is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Thasos, Greece, August 29, 2018. Picture taken August 29, 2018. REUTERS/Stelios Misinas
GREECE-ENVIRONMENT/
RTS21O8J
September 17, 2018
A wheel is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Thasos, Greece, August 29, 2018. Picture taken...
SALAMINA, Greece
A wheel is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Thasos
A wheel is seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Thasos, Greece, August 29, 2018. Picture taken August 29, 2018. REUTERS/Stelios Misinas
GREECE-ENVIRONMENT/
RTS21O8G
September 17, 2018
Two chairs are seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Thasos, Greece, August 29, 2018. Picture...
SALAMINA, Greece
Two chairs are seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Thasos
Two chairs are seen at the bottom of the sea off the island of Thasos, Greece, August 29, 2018. Picture taken August 29, 2018. REUTERS/Stelios Misinas
BOLIVIA-CLIMATE CHANGE/INDIGENOUS
RTS1ZVXF
September 03, 2018
An Urus Muratos offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) is seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate...
LAKE POOPO, Bolivia
An Urus Muratos offering to Kota Mama Mother Water) is seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate...
An Urus Muratos offering to Kota Mama (Mother Water) is seen on the dried lake Poopo affected by climate change, in the Oruro Department, Bolivia, September 1, 2017. Picture taken September 1, 2017. REUTERS/David Mercado
WATER-DAY/INDIA
RTS1OKYZ
March 21, 2018
A man looks for recyclable items in the polluted waters of the Sabarmati river, ahead of World Water...
Ahmedabad, India
A man looks for recyclable items in the polluted waters of the Sabarmati river, ahead of World Water...
A man looks for recyclable items in the polluted waters of the Sabarmati river, ahead of World Water Day, in Ahmedabad, India, March 21, 2018. REUTERS/Amit Dave
INDONESIA-RIVER/
RTX50C8Q
March 02, 2018
A dead goat floats among garbage and debris towards the mouth of the Citarum river north-west of Muara...
MUARA GEMBONG, Indonesia
The Wider Image: Indonesia aims to banish toxic waste from lifeline river
A dead goat floats among garbage and debris towards the mouth of the Citarum river north-west of Muara Gembong, West Java province, Indonesia, February 22, 2018. REUTERS/Darren Whiteside SEARCH "WHITESIDE CITARUM" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
SAFRICA-DROUGHT/
RTX4Y5LT
February 21, 2018
A pipe used to pump water lies in the polluted Kuils river in Cape Town, South Africa, February 2, 2018....
Cape Town, South Africa
The Wider Image: Cape Town dreads "Day Zero" when taps will run dry
A pipe used to pump water lies in the polluted Kuils river in Cape Town, South Africa, February 2, 2018. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings SEARCH "HUTCHINGS ZERO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTX3N3CO
December 08, 2017
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical...
YIXING, China
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical...
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical manufacturing industry, in his locality outside one of the factories that he says breaks environmental protection rules, in Yixing city, Jiangsu province, China November 14, 2017. Picture taken November 14, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Shepherd
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/
RTX3MW12
December 08, 2017
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical...
YIXING, China
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical...
Environmental activist Wu Lihong describes water and soil pollution caused by contaminants from chemical manufacturing industry, in his locality outside one of the factories that he says breaks environmental protection rules, in Yixing city, Zhejiang province, China November 14, 2017. Picture taken November 14, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Shepherd
USA-LEAD/LA
RTS19C1B
July 01, 2017
A sign on the fence from the now close Exide factory, a former battery recycling facility in Vernon that...
Vernon, UNITED STATES
A sign on the fence from the now closed Exide Vernon Recycling Center is seen in Vernon, California
A sign on the fence from the now close Exide factory, a former battery recycling facility in Vernon that has contaminated the surrounding area with lead in its soil is seen in Vernon, California, U.S., April 5, 2017. Picture taken April 5, 2017. REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
USA-LEAD/LA
RTS19C1A
July 01, 2017
A sign on the fence from the now closed Exide factory, a former battery recycling facility in Vernon...
Vernon, UNITED STATES
A sign on the fence from the now closed Exide Vernon Recycling Center is seen in Vernon, California
A sign on the fence from the now closed Exide factory, a former battery recycling facility in Vernon that has contaminated the surrounding area with lead in its soil is seen in Vernon, California, U.S., April 5, 2017. Picture taken April 5, 2017. REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
USA-LEAD/LA
RTS19C19
July 01, 2017
A sign on the fence from the now closed Exide factory, a former battery recycling facility in Vernon...
Vernon, UNITED STATES
A sign on the fence from the now closed Exide factory is seen in Vernon
A sign on the fence from the now closed Exide factory, a former battery recycling facility in Vernon that has contaminated the surrounding area with lead in its soil is seen in Vernon, California, U.S., April 5, 2017. Picture taken April 5, 2017. REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
USA-LEAD/LA
RTS134GQ
April 20, 2017
A building from the the now closed Exide factory, a former battery recycling facility in Vernon that...
Vernon, UNITED STATES
A building from the the now closed Exide factory, a former battery recycling facility in Vernon that...
A building from the the now closed Exide factory, a former battery recycling facility in Vernon that has contaminated the surrounding area with lead in its soil, is seen without a logo attached in Vernon, California, United States April 5, 2017. Picture taken April 5, 2017. To match Special Report USA-LEAD/LA REUTERS/Danny Moloshok
CHINA-BLAST/
RTX1OM1U
August 18, 2015
Soil samples taken from an area near last week's explosions are placed on a table at a monitoring station...
Tianjin, China
Soil samples taken from an area near last week's explosions are placed on a table at a monitoring station...
Soil samples taken from an area near last week's explosions are placed on a table at a monitoring station to check for environmental pollution located within a 3-km (2-mile) exclusion zone from the explosion site in Binhai new district in Tianjin, China, August 18, 2015. The explosions late last Wednesday in Tianjin, the world's 10th-busiest port in China's industrial northeast, forced the evacuation of thousands of people after toxic chemicals were detected in the air. More than 700 people were injured and another 70, mostly fire fighters, are still missing. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
JAPAN-NUCLEAR/RESTARTS
RTX1NTQR
August 11, 2015
79-year-old Shouhei Nomura checks radiation levels close to the protesters' campsite near Kyushu Electric...
SATSUMASENDAI, Japan
Wider Image: Protesting Japan’s Nuclear Restart
79-year-old Shouhei Nomura checks radiation levels close to the protesters' campsite near Kyushu Electric Power's Sendai nuclear power station in Satsumasendai, Kagoshima prefecture, Japan, August 8, 2015. Japan is due to switch on a nuclear reactor for the first time in nearly two years as Prime Minister Shinzo Abe seeks to reassure a nervous public that tougher standards mean the sector is now safe after the Fukushima disaster in 2011. The head of Japan's atomic watchdog has said that the new safety regime meant a repeat of the Fukushima disaster would not happen, but protesters outside the Sendai plant are not convinced. REUTERS/Issei KatoPICTURE 6 OF 30 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "PROTESTING JAPAN'S NUCLEAR RESTART".SEARCH "KATO SENDAI" FOR ALL PICTURES.
USA-OILSPILL/CALIFORNIA
RTX1MIHM
July 31, 2015
A small tarball of unknown origin is seen in the sand at Goleta Beach Park in Goleta, California July...
Goleta, UNITED STATES
A small tarball of unknown origin is seen in the sand at Goleta Beach Park in Goleta, California
A small tarball of unknown origin is seen in the sand at Goleta Beach Park in Goleta, California July 30, 2015. The U.S. Coast Guard was investigating a large, patchy oil sheen that appeared off the Southern California coast west of Santa Barbara on Wednesday, not far from the site of a petroleum pipeline spill in May, officials said. The slick, spanning approximately 3 square miles (8 square km) of the Pacific about 1,000 yards (meters) from shore, was spotted off Goleta State Beach, but the origin of the sheen was unknown, said Coast Guard spokeswoman Petty Officer Sondra-Kay Kneen. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
USA-OILSPILL/CALIFORNIA
RTX1MI54
July 31, 2015
A small tarball of unknown origin is seen in the sand at Goleta Beach Park in Goleta, California July...
Goleta, UNITED STATES
A small tarball of unknown origin is seen in the sand at Goleta Beach Park in Goleta, California
A small tarball of unknown origin is seen in the sand at Goleta Beach Park in Goleta, California July 30, 2015. The U.S. Coast Guard was investigating a large, patchy oil sheen that appeared off the Southern California coast west of Santa Barbara on Wednesday, not far from the site of a petroleum pipeline spill in May, officials said. The slick, spanning approximately 3 square miles (8 square km) of the Pacific about 1,000 yards (meters) from shore, was spotted off Goleta State Beach, but the origin of the sheen was unknown, said Coast Guard spokeswoman Petty Officer Sondra-Kay Kneen. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
 Wider Image
Wider Image
Radioactive Fukushima – Four Years On
27 PICTURES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK7D
March 09, 2015
A temporary housing complex covered in snow that accommodates nuclear evacuees from Okuma, a town inside...
AIZUWAKAMATSU, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
A temporary housing complex covered in snow that accommodates nuclear evacuees from Okuma, a town inside the exclusion zone next to Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, is seen in front of downtown in Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima prefecture, February 17, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

PICTURE 27 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

SEARCH 'OKUMA TORU' FOR ALL IMAGES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK7C
March 09, 2015
A woman is seen at a temporary housing complex covered in snow that accommodates nuclear evacuees from...
AIZUWAKAMATSU, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
A woman is seen at a temporary housing complex covered in snow that accommodates nuclear evacuees from Okuma, a town inside the exclusion zone next to Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima prefecture, February 17, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 26 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

SEARCH 'OKUMA TORU' FOR ALL IMAGES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK7B
March 09, 2015
Tomoko Hoshino, 78, who was evacuated from Okuma, a town inside the exclusion zone next to Tokyo Electric...
AIZUWAKAMATSU, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Tomoko Hoshino, 78, who was evacuated from Okuma, a town inside the exclusion zone next to Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, cries as she attends a town hall meeting with the town officials at a temporary housing complex in Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima prefecture, February 17, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 25 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

SEARCH 'OKUMA TORU' FOR ALL IMAGES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK7A
March 09, 2015
People who were evacuated from Okuma, a town inside the exclusion zone next to Tokyo Electric Power Co's...
AIZUWAKAMATSU, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
People who were evacuated from Okuma, a town inside the exclusion zone next to Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, attend a town hall meeting as Toshitsuna Watanabe (top), Mayor of Okuma town stands to speak at a temporary housing complex in Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima prefecture, February 17, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 24 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

SEARCH 'OKUMA TORU' FOR ALL IMAGES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK76
March 09, 2015
Tomoko Hoshino, 78, and her husband Akira (R), 79, who were evacuated from Okuma, a town inside the exclusion...
AIZUWAKAMATSU, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Tomoko Hoshino, 78, and her husband Akira (R), 79, who were evacuated from Okuma, a town inside the exclusion zone next to Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, talk at their house in a temporary housing complex in Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima prefecture, February 17, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 23 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

SEARCH 'OKUMA TORU' FOR ALL IMAGES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK74
March 09, 2015
A school jersey that belonged to Yuna Kimura, the youngest daughter of the Kimura family, who was swept...
OKUMA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
A school jersey that belonged to Yuna Kimura, the youngest daughter of the Kimura family, who was swept away by the tsunami of March 11, 2011, is displayed at a temple inside the exclusion zone in Okuma town, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 23, 2015. The label on the jersey says, " Kumamachi Elementary School, First Grade Second Class, Yuna Kimura." Japan is trying to build a radioactive waste facility in Kimura's hometown, but he has refused to sell or lease his land to the government. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

PICTURE 22 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

SEARCH 'OKUMA TORU' FOR ALL IMAGES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK71
March 09, 2015
A monument and a stone statue of Jizo (R) for victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, are...
TOMIOKA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
A monument and a stone statue of Jizo (R) for victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, are seen near big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation at a temporary storage site in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 22, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

PICTURE 20 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK70
March 09, 2015
Dictionaries are left on desks at a classroom of Kumamachi Elementary School inside the exclusion zone...
OKUMA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Dictionaries are left on desks at a classroom of Kumamachi Elementary School inside the exclusion zone in Okuma town, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 23, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

PICTURE 21 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6Z
March 09, 2015
Eiichi Shincho,67, walks at a temple, damaged by March 11, 2011 earthquake near his home land where Japan...
OKUMA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Eiichi Shincho,67, walks at a temple, damaged by March 11, 2011 earthquake near his home land where Japan is trying to build a radioactive waste facility inside the exclusion zone in Okuma town, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 23, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 19 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6X
March 09, 2015
Eiichi Shincho, 67, walks in the spot where his house, which was washed away by the March 11, 2011 tsunami,...
OKUMA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Eiichi Shincho, 67, walks in the spot where his house, which was washed away by the March 11, 2011 tsunami, used to stand inside the exclusion zone in Okuma town, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 23, 2015. Japan is trying to build a radioactive waste facility in Shincho's hometown, but he has refused to sell or lease his land to the government. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 18 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6W
March 09, 2015
Big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation...
TOMIOKA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation are dumped at a seaside, devastated by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 22, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

PICTURE 17 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6V
March 09, 2015
Workers move big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination...
TOMIOKA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Workers move big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation at a temporary storage site in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 23, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 16 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6U
March 09, 2015
A worker uses a high pressure water washing machine during a radioactive decontamination at a private...
TOMIOKA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
A worker uses a high pressure water washing machine during a radioactive decontamination at a private residence in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 24, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 15 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6Q
March 09, 2015
Men wearing radiation protective masks work in front of big black plastic bags containing radiated grass...
NAMIE TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Men wearing radiation protective masks work in front of big black plastic bags containing radiated grass from the decontamination operation as cranes and chimneys of Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are seen in the background at an area devastated by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture February 24, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

PICTURE 14 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6P
March 09, 2015
Decontamination workers wearing protective suits and masks, work on big black plastic bags containing...
TOMIOKA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Decontamination workers wearing protective suits and masks, work on big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 24, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 13 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6L
March 09, 2015
A decontamination worker removes radiated soil and leaves from a bamboo forest in Tomioka town, Fukushima...
TOMIOKA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
A decontamination worker removes radiated soil and leaves from a bamboo forest in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 24, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 12 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6K
March 09, 2015
Decontamination workers wearing protective suits and masks, remove radiated soil and leaves from a forest...
TOMIOKA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Decontamination workers wearing protective suits and masks, remove radiated soil and leaves from a forest in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 24, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

PICTURE 11 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6J
March 09, 2015
Big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation...
NAMIE TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation are seen at an area devastated by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 24, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 10 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6E
March 09, 2015
Big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation...
TOMIOKA TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation are dumped at a temporary storage site in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 22, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 9 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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JAPAN-TSUNAMI/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4SK6D
March 09, 2015
Workers operate heavy machinery to remove debris at an area devastated by the March 11, 2011 earthquake...
NAMIE TOWN, Japan
Wider Image: Radioactive Fukushima - Four Years On
Workers operate heavy machinery to remove debris at an area devastated by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 24, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)

PICTURE 8 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY 'RADIOACTIVE FUKUSHIMA - FOUR YEARS ON'

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