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Search results for: Stench

FOOTBALL-NCAA/
RTX7845U
November 09, 2019
Nov 9, 2019; Evanston, IL, USA; Purdue Boilermakers wide receiver David Bell (3) stenches for yardage...
Evanston, UNITED STATES
NCAA Football: Purdue at Northwestern
Nov 9, 2019; Evanston, IL, USA; Purdue Boilermakers wide receiver David Bell (3) stenches for yardage against the Northwestern Wildcats during the first half at Ryan Field. Mandatory Credit: David Banks-USA TODAY Sports
BASEBALL-MLB-WAS-HOU/
RTX6O70G
February 24, 2019
Feb 23, 2019; West Palm Beach, FL, USA; Houston Astros center fielder Jake Marisnick (6) stenches with...
West Palm Beach, UNITED STATES
MLB: Spring Training-Houston Astros at Washington Nationals
Feb 23, 2019; West Palm Beach, FL, USA; Houston Astros center fielder Jake Marisnick (6) stenches with a member of the training staff before a game against the Washington Nationals at FITTEAM Ballpark of the Palm Beaches. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports
BASEBALL-MLB-WAS-HOU/
RTX6O6YX
February 24, 2019
Feb 23, 2019; West Palm Beach, FL, USA; Houston Astros center fielder Jake Marisnick (6) stenches with...
West Palm Beach, UNITED STATES
MLB: Spring Training-Houston Astros at Washington Nationals
Feb 23, 2019; West Palm Beach, FL, USA; Houston Astros center fielder Jake Marisnick (6) stenches with a member of the training staff before a game against the Washington Nationals at FITTEAM Ballpark of the Palm Beaches. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports
BOLIVIA-LANDSLIDE/
RTS2CYBJ
January 30, 2019
A woman covers herself from accumulated rubbish stench after a landslide took place at a landfill in...
La Paz, Bolivia
A woman covers herself from accumulated rubbish stench after a landslide took place at a landfill in...
A woman covers herself from accumulated rubbish stench after a landslide took place at a landfill in La Paz, Bolivia, January 30, 2019. REUTERS/David Mercado
BOLIVIA-LANDSLIDE/
RTS2CYB5
January 30, 2019
Women cover themselves from accumulated rubbish stench after a landslide took place at a landfill in...
La Paz, Bolivia
Women cover themselves from accumulated rubbish stench after a landslide took place at a landfill in...
Women cover themselves from accumulated rubbish stench after a landslide took place at a landfill in La Paz, Bolivia, January 30, 2019. REUTERS/David Mercado
BOLIVIA-LANDSLIDE/
RTS2CYB1
January 30, 2019
Women cover themselves from accumulated rubbish stench after a landslide took place at a landfill in...
La Paz, Bolivia
Women cover themselves from accumulated rubbish stench after a landslide took place at a landfill in...
Women cover themselves from accumulated rubbish stench after a landslide took place at a landfill in La Paz, Bolivia, January 30, 2019. REUTERS/David Mercado
Ocean Shock
Ocean Shock
Fishmeal factories plunder Africa
25 PICTURES
MIDEAST-CRISIS/IRAQ-MOSUL-PICTURES
RTX3B125
July 11, 2017
A displaced Iraqi who fled his home has his beard shaved outside Hamam al-Alil camp, south of Mosul,...
Mosul, Iraq
A Picture and its Story: The battle for Mosul: urban warfare and civilian exodus
A displaced Iraqi who fled his home has his beard shaved outside Hamam al-Alil camp, south of Mosul, Iraq, March 10, 2017. Suhaib Salem: "The significance of my picture stems from the fact that after Islamic State captured Mosul in June 2014, it forced all local men to grow long thick beards. So after fleeing across front lines and arriving at the Hamam al-Alil camp run by Iraqi troops, many male refugees queued up for the opportunity to be shorn. I was walking around the camp all day looking for good pictures when I noticed men having their beards shaved off. I ran up and snapped the old man being shaved, though he and others at first refused to let me take pictures as they were still afraid of reprisal if battlefield fortunes shifted and the militants regained control of the area. They were eventually happy and gave me permission to take pictures. I faced challenges every day of my Mosul assignment. Road journeys were long and arduous, with mortar bombs crashing around us frequently and the stench of bodies rotting in the streets where we walked. I have covered wars for Reuters for 19 years and this is the most dangerous one yet." REUTERS/Suhaib Salem/File photo SEARCH "MOSUL PICTURES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24LDD
January 29, 2016
A butcher pulls a pig at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A butcher pulls a pig at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24LDC
January 29, 2016
A butcher holding his knives rests at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 18, 2015....
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A butcher holding his knives rests at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 18, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5P
January 29, 2016
A butcher cuts the skin of an animal as he peels it at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti,...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A butcher cuts the skin of an animal as he peels it at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5O
January 29, 2016
Jesner Sakage takes a goat head out of a pot at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Jesner Sakage takes a goat head out of a pot at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 20, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5L
January 29, 2016
Two men push a wheelbarrow loaded with two pigs to be butchered at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince,...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Two men push a wheelbarrow loaded with two pigs to be butchered at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5J
January 29, 2016
Sheep for sale lie on the ground at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015....
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Sheep for sale lie on the ground at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5I
January 29, 2016
A butcher carries a butchered goat on his head at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti,...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A butcher carries a butchered goat on his head at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5H
January 29, 2016
Jesner Sakage peels a goat head at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015....
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Jesner Sakage peels a goat head at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5G
January 29, 2016
A man pulls two goats at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A man pulls two goats at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5F
January 29, 2016
A man ties animals on his motorbike to transport them at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince,...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A man ties animals on his motorbike to transport them at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5D
January 29, 2016
Jesner Sakage takes a goat head out of a pot at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Jesner Sakage takes a goat head out of a pot at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 20, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5C
January 29, 2016
A butcher blows the skin of a goat at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 20, 2015....
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A butcher blows the skin of a goat at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 20, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K5B
January 29, 2016
Jean Libonet hangs a butchered goat to be sold at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti,...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Jean Libonet hangs a butchered goat to be sold at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K59
January 29, 2016
A butcher is seen at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015. Reuters photographer...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A butcher is seen at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K58
January 29, 2016
A butcher carries a butchered goat at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015....
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A butcher carries a butchered goat at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K57
January 29, 2016
Two butchered goats lie on a table at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015....
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Two butchered goats lie on a table at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K56
January 29, 2016
Jesner Sakage peels a goat head at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 20, 2015....
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Jesner Sakage peels a goat head at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 20, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K55
January 29, 2016
Sheep for sale lie on the ground La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Sheep for sale lie on the ground La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K4S
January 29, 2016
A street vendor has breakfast at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015. Reuters...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A street vendor has breakfast at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, April 4, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K4F
January 29, 2016
Live goats stands in La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 27, 2015. Reuters photographer...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Live goats stands in La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 27, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K4E
January 29, 2016
A butcher peels the skin of a pig at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 20, 2015....
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A butcher peels the skin of a pig at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 20, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K4B
January 29, 2016
Dead and live goats are seen at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Dead and live goats are seen at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K49
January 29, 2016
A wheelbarrow loaded with two butchered pigs is seen at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti,...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
A wheelbarrow loaded with two butchered pigs is seen at La Saline slaughterhouse in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, March 19, 2015. Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES
HAITI-ANIMALS/
RTX24K44
January 29, 2016
Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one...
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
The Wider Image: Inside a Haitian slaughterhouse
Reuters photographer Andres Martinez Casares: "The grunts of a pig or the bleating of a goat are one thing. Then there's the sound of animals about to be killed. That's something else. If you haven't heard that before, it's quite something. It's very early in the morning when this happens, well before dawn. Day after day, it's the same toil over and over again. The market of Croix des Bossales, in an area that once held a slave market, stands among impoverished Haiti's interim parliament compound, shipping ports, and downtown Port-au-Prince. The outdoor slaughterhouse of La Saline, which supplies the market, is mired in mud and littered with rubbish. It's a cluster of shacks, some with tin roofs, other with tarpaulins. It isn't among the best neighbourhoods, so to start with it was complicated being there. Little by little people became more trusting and let me work in peace to document the daily grind of killing and preparing the market. Smell is one of the most basic associations we have, taking us back to childhood or reminding us of a loved one. The stench produced from burning animal skins is very distinctive. But the smell that best defines this place is a mix of damp earth, animal dung and blood, which you can savour from the road when you pass by. If in the future I happen to chance on that kind of smell again, I am sure it will take me back to Port-au-Prince in the hours before dawn." REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "SLAUGHTERHOUSE" FOR ALL IMAGES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Picture and its Story
A Picture and its Story
Inside a Haitian Slaughterhouse
21 PICTURES
NIGERIA-TECHNOLOGY/YABA
RTX1M6M3
July 28, 2015
Software developers work at the Information Technology Developers Entrepreneurship Accelerator (iDEA)...
Lagos, Nigeria
Software developers work at the iDEA hub in the Yaba district in Lagos
Software developers work at the Information Technology Developers Entrepreneurship Accelerator (iDEA) hub in the Yaba district in Lagos June 25, 2015. At first glance, Yaba is like many other parts of Nigeria's sprawling commercial capital: a cacophony of car horns and shouting street vendors, mingling with exhaust fumes and the occasional stench of sewage. But in between the run-down buildings in this seemingly inauspicious part of Lagos, a city of around 21 million, tech start-ups are taking root and creating a buzz that is drawing international venture capitalists and more established digital firms. Picture taken June 25, 2015. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
NIGERIA-TECHNOLOGY/YABA
RTX1M6M2
July 28, 2015
Software developers work on computer sytems at the Information Technology Developers Entrepreneurship...
Lagos, Nigeria
Software developers work on computer sytems at the iDEA hub in the Yaba district in Lagos
Software developers work on computer sytems at the Information Technology Developers Entrepreneurship Accelerator (iDEA) hub in the Yaba district in Lagos June 25, 2015. At first glance, Yaba is like many other parts of Nigeria's sprawling commercial capital: a cacophony of car horns and shouting street vendors, mingling with exhaust fumes and the occasional stench of sewage. But in between the run-down buildings in this seemingly inauspicious part of Lagos, a city of around 21 million, tech start-ups are taking root and creating a buzz that is drawing international venture capitalists and more established digital firms. Picture taken June 25, 2015. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
NIGERIA-TECHNOLOGY/NIGERIA
RTX1M6LS
July 28, 2015
A view of the Yaba district in Lagos June 25, 2015. At first glance, Yaba is like many other parts of...
Lagos, Nigeria
A view of the Yaba district in Lagos
A view of the Yaba district in Lagos June 25, 2015. At first glance, Yaba is like many other parts of Nigeria's sprawling commercial capital: a cacophony of car horns and shouting street vendors, mingling with exhaust fumes and the occasional stench of sewage. But in between the run-down buildings in this seemingly inauspicious part of Lagos, a city of around 21 million, tech start-ups are taking root and creating a buzz that is drawing international venture capitalists and more established digital firms. Picture taken June 25, 2015. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
NIGERIA-TECHNOLOGY/YABA
RTX1M6LR
July 28, 2015
A view of the Yaba district in Lagos June 25, 2015. At first glance, Yaba is like many other parts of...
Lagos, Nigeria
A view of the Yaba district in Lagos
A view of the Yaba district in Lagos June 25, 2015. At first glance, Yaba is like many other parts of Nigeria's sprawling commercial capital: a cacophony of car horns and shouting street vendors, mingling with exhaust fumes and the occasional stench of sewage. But in between the run-down buildings in this seemingly inauspicious part of Lagos, a city of around 21 million, tech start-ups are taking root and creating a buzz that is drawing international venture capitalists and more established digital firms. Picture taken June 25, 2015. REUTERS/Akintunde Akinleye
LEBANON-GOVERNMENT
RTX1LSNR
July 25, 2015
Residents set uncollected garbage on fire in Beirut, Lebanon July 25, 2015. The stench of uncollected...
Beirut, Lebanon
Residents set uncollected garbage on fire in Beirut, Lebanon
Residents set uncollected garbage on fire in Beirut, Lebanon July 25, 2015. The stench of uncollected refuse in the streets of Beirut is a stark reminder of the crisis of government afflicting Lebanon, where politicians divided by local and regional conflicts have been unable to agree on where to dump the capital's rubbish. REUTERS/Aziz Taher
LEBANON-GOVERNMENT
RTX1LSNP
July 25, 2015
Protestors set uncollected garbage on fire and block a road as they protest against the ongoing refuse...
Beirut, Lebanon
Protestors set uncollected garbage on fire and block a road as they protest against the ongoing refuse...
Protestors set uncollected garbage on fire and block a road as they protest against the ongoing refuse crisis in Beirut, Lebanon July 25, 2015. The stench of uncollected refuse in the streets of Beirut is a stark reminder of the crisis of government afflicting Lebanon, where politicians divided by local and regional conflicts have been unable to agree on where to dump the capital's rubbish. REUTERS/Aziz Taher
LEBANON-GOVERNMENT
RTX1LSNO
July 25, 2015
Heavy traffic fills a street after protestors set uncollected garbage on fire and blocked the road in...
Beirut, Lebanon
Heavy traffic fills a street after protestors set uncollected garbage on fire and blocked the road in...
Heavy traffic fills a street after protestors set uncollected garbage on fire and blocked the road in Beirut, Lebanon July 25, 2015. The stench of uncollected refuse in the streets of Beirut is a stark reminder of the crisis of government afflicting Lebanon, where politicians divided by local and regional conflicts have been unable to agree on where to dump the capital's rubbish. REUTERS/Aziz Taher
Wider Image
Wider Image
World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump - 03 Jul 2015
18 PICTURES
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IURF
July 03, 2015
A new factory which is to be used for recycling waste is under construction at a government managed area...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A new factory which is to be used for recycling waste is under construction at a government managed area in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 17 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IURD
July 03, 2015
A man rides a motorcycle through the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10,...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A man rides a motorcycle through the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 18 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQZ
July 03, 2015
A worker recycles CD players at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A worker recycles CD players at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 13 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQW
July 03, 2015
A polluted river flows past a workshop that is used for recycling electronic waste in the township of...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A polluted river flows past a workshop that is used for recycling electronic waste in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 16 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQV
July 03, 2015
Old cellular phone components are discarded inside a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Old cellular phone components are discarded inside a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 12 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQS
July 03, 2015
Plastic components of electronic waste are packed on a roadside in the township of Guiyu in China's southern...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Plastic components of electronic waste are packed on a roadside in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 14 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQQ
July 03, 2015
CD players for recycling are seen at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
CD players for recycling are seen at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 11 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQO
July 03, 2015
Motor tricycles carrying electronic waste are transported to one of the small workshops for recycling...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Motor tricycles carrying electronic waste are transported to one of the small workshops for recycling in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 15 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQN
July 03, 2015
Workers recycle CD players at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Workers recycle CD players at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 10 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQB
July 03, 2015
A worker distributes electronic waste at a government managed recycling centre at the township of Guiyu...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A worker distributes electronic waste at a government managed recycling centre at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 7 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQ7
July 03, 2015
A toy tricycle is seen on circuit boards at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A toy tricycle is seen on circuit boards at a workshop in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 8, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 9 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQ2
July 03, 2015
Circuit boards lie inside a home in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Circuit boards lie inside a home in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 8, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 8 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQ1
July 03, 2015
A polluted river flows past a workshop used for processsing plastic components of electronic waste at...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A polluted river flows past a workshop used for processsing plastic components of electronic waste at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 6 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUQ0
July 03, 2015
A motor tricycle transports electronic waste to one of the small workshops for recycling in the township...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A motor tricycle transports electronic waste to one of the small workshops for recycling in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 4 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPY
July 03, 2015
Workers illegally distribute old computers and printers to others for future recycling outside the government...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Workers illegally distribute old computers and printers to others for future recycling outside the government designated recycling centre, at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 8, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

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TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPR
July 03, 2015
Buffalos are seen adjacent to workshops recycling plastic components from electronic waste at the township...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Buffalos are seen adjacent to workshops recycling plastic components from electronic waste at the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015.The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 3 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPP
July 03, 2015
Metal cases are piled up on the outskirts of the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
Metal cases are piled up on the outskirts of the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 9, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 2 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPO
July 03, 2015
A recycling electronic waste factory is seen beside a field in the township of Guiyu in China's southern...
GUIYU, China
Wider Image: World's Largest Electronics Waste Dump
A recycling electronic waste factory is seen beside a field in the township of Guiyu in China's southern Guangdong province June 10, 2015. The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

PICTURE 1 OF 18 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP"
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CHINA-ENVIRONMENT/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1IUPD
July 03, 2015
ATTENTION EDITORS - WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP" FOLLOWS THIS ADVISORY

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GUIYU, China
ATTENTION EDITORS - WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP" FOLLOWS THIS ADVISORY
ATTENTION EDITORS - WIDER IMAGE STORY "WORLD'S LARGEST ELECTRONIC WASTE DUMP" FOLLOWS THIS ADVISORY

SEARCH "GUIYU SIU" FOR ALL IMAGES

The town of Guiyu in the economic powerhouse of Guangdong province in China has long been known as one of the world’s largest electronic waste dump sites. At its peak, some 5,000 workshops in the village recycle 15,000 tonnes of waste daily including hard drives, mobile phones, computer screens and computers shipped in from across the world. Many of the workers, however, work in poorly ventilated workshops with little protective gear, prying open discarded electronics with their bare hands. Plastic circuit boards are also melted down to salvage bits of valuable metals such as gold, copper and aluminum. As a result, large amounts of pollutants, heavy metals and chemicals are released into the rivers nearby, severely contaminating local water supplies, devastating farm harvests and damaging the health of residents. The stench of burnt plastic envelops the small town of Guiyu, while some rivers are black with industrial effluent. According to research conducted by Southern China’s Shantou University, Guiyu’s air and water is heavily contaminated by toxic metal particles. As a result, children living there have abnormally high levels of lead in their blood, the study found. While most of the e-waste was once imported into China and processed in Guiyu, much more of the discarded e-waste now comes from within China as the country grows in affluence. China now produces 6.1 million metric tonnes of e-waste a year, according to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, second only to the U.S with 7.2 million tonnes. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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