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Search results for: Straitjacket-

USA-ELECTION/PROTESTS-WASHINGTON
RTX7S4QB
August 28, 2020
A demonstrator displays a mannequin dressed as U.S. President Donald Trump in a straitjacket during a...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Protest in Washington
A demonstrator displays a mannequin dressed as U.S. President Donald Trump in a straitjacket during a protest in Washington, U.S. August 27, 2020. REUTERS/Leah Millis
NEW YORK-SIDESHOW/
RTR1ZH21
April 14, 2008
Performer Donny Vomit demonstrates his hanging upside-down escape from a straitjacket trick to students...
New York, UNITED STATES
Donny Vomit demonstrates hanging upside-down at Coney Island Sideshow school in New York
Performer Donny Vomit demonstrates his hanging upside-down escape from a straitjacket trick to students at the Coney Island Sideshow school in Coney Island, New York, April 10, 2008. Four students were taking part in a week-long school at the famed Coney Island Sideshow learning fire eating, sword swallowing and other stunts from the sideshow performers. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES)
BASEBALL/
RTR1TXGB
September 16, 2007
A man wearing a straitjacket runs to evade security personnel after entering the playing field during...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
A man wearing a straitjacket runs to evade security personnel after entering the playing field during...
A man wearing a straitjacket runs to evade security personnel after entering the playing field during the sixth inning of an MLB National League baseball game between the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Los Angeles Dodgers in Los Angeles, California September 16, 2007. REUTERS/Danny Moloshok (UNITED STATES)
AUSTRALIA/CHENEY
RTR1MOQP
February 22, 2007
Protesters clash with police during a demonstration against the visit of U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney...
Sydney, Australia
Protesters clash with police during a demonstration against the visit of U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney...
Protesters clash with police during a demonstration against the visit of U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney in Sydney February 22, 2007. Cheney is in Australia for a three-day visit and will meet Australia's Prime Minister John Howard in Sydney tomorrow. REUTERS/Andrew Sheargold (AUSTRALIA)
WALLER HUNTER
RTXN994
February 16, 2005
Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Joke Waller-Hunter...
Kyoto, Japan
Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Joke Walle.....
Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Joke Waller-Hunter makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. [After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia.]
MAATHAI
RTXN993
February 16, 2005
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech...
Kyoto, Japan
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote spee.....
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. [After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia.]
GONZALEZ GARCIA
RTXN992
February 16, 2005
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)/COP10 and Argentine Health...
Kyoto, Japan
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)/COP10 and Argentine Heal.....
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)/COP10 and Argentine Health Minister Gines Gonzalez Garcia makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. [After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally took effect on Wednesday and a ceremony in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto, where the pact was signed in 1997, is set for later in the day.]
MDF1962406.TIF
RTR17YLV
February 16, 2005
Smoke pours from a paper factor in Durango, northern Spain, February 16, 2005. After years of delays,...
Durango, United Kingdom
QUALITY REPEAT Smoke pours from a paper factor in Durango, northern Spain
Smoke pours from a paper factor in Durango, northern Spain, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, the Kyoto Protocol , a world plan to fight global warming, went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Vincent West
ENVIRONMENT BRAZIL KYOTO
RTRNJPR
February 16, 2005
Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's Chief of Staff Jose Dirceu (L) shakes hands with Environment...
Brasilia, Brazil
Brazil's President Lula da Silva's Chief of Staff Dirceu with Environment Minister Silva in Brasilia....
Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's Chief of Staff Jose Dirceu (L) shakes hands with Environment Minister Marina Silva (R) during a ceremony to mark the official launch of the Kyoto Protocol, in Brasilia, February 16, 2005.Luiz Pinguelli Rosa, General Secretary of Brazilian Climate Change Forum, looks on. After years of delays, the U.N. Kyoto Protocol on curbing human emissions of heat-trapping gases blamed for disrupting the climate took effect on Wednesday with muted celebrations of a deal Washington dismisses as an economic straitjacket. Supporters of the 141-nation pact say it is a tiny step to slow global warming by imposing legally binding caps on greenhouse gas emissions in 35 developed nations, mainly from burning fossil fuels in power plants, factories and cars. REUTERS/Jamil Bittar JB
ENVIRONMENT BRAZIL KYOTO
RTRNJPM
February 16, 2005
Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's Chief of Staff Jose Dirceu (L) speaks during a ceremony...
Brasilia, Brazil
Brazil's President Lula da Silva's Chief of Staff Dirceu attends a ceremony in Brasilia.
Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's Chief of Staff Jose Dirceu (L) speaks during a ceremony to mark the official launch of the Kyoto Protocol, in Brasilia, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, the U.N. Kyoto Protocol on curbing human emissions of heat-trapping gases blamed for disrupting the climate took effect Wednesday with muted celebrations of a deal Washington dismisses as an economic straitjacket. Supporters of the 141-nation pact say it is a tiny step to slow global warming by imposing legally binding caps on greenhouse gas emissions in 35 developed nations, mainly from burning fossil fuels in power plants, factories and cars. REUTERS/Jamil Bittar JB
JB
RTRNIX3
February 16, 2005
Japan Ambassador to Brazil Horimura plants a tree in Brasilia's Botanic Garden on day of Kyoto protocol...
Brasilia, Brazil
Japan Ambassador to Brazil Horimura plants a tree in Brasilia's Botanic Garden on day of Kyoto ...
Japan Ambassador to Brazil Horimura plants a tree in Brasilia's Botanic Garden on day of Kyoto protocol launch. Japan Ambassador to Brazil Takahiko Horimura plants a symbolic tree inside the Botanical Garden in the capital, during a ceremony to mark the official launch of the Kyoto Protocol, in Brasilia, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, the U.N. Kyoto Protocol on curbing human emissions of heat-trapping gases blamed for disrupting the climate took effect at 0500 GMT with muted celebrations of a deal Washington dismisses as an economic straitjacket. Supporters of the 141-nation pact say it is a tiny step to slow global warming by imposing legally binding caps on greenhouse gas emissions in 35 developed nations, mainly from burning fossil fuels in power plants, factories and cars. REUTERS/Jamil Bittar
JB
RTRNISS
February 16, 2005
Brazilian government officials plants a tree in Brasilia's Botanical Garden on day of Kyoto Protocol...
Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian government officials plants a tree in Brasilia's Botanical Garden on day of Kyoto Protocol...
Brazilian government officials plants a tree in Brasilia's Botanical Garden on day of Kyoto Protocol launch. Brazilian representative of the Environment Ministry Victor Zweibel (2nd R), Science and Technology Minister Jose Miguez (L) and Foreign Affairs Minister Everton Vargas (C) plant a symbolic tree inside the Botanical Garden in the capital during ceremony to mark the official launch of the Kyoto Protocol, in Brasilia, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, the U.N. Kyoto Protocol on curbing human emissions of heat-trapping gases blamed for disrupting the climate took effect at 0500 GMT with muted celebrations of a deal Washington dismisses as an economic straitjacket. Supporters of the 141-nation pact say it is a tiny step to slow global warming by imposing legally binding caps on greenhouse gas emissions in 35 developed nations, mainly from burning fossil fuels in power plants, factories and cars. REUTERS/Jamil Bittar
INDIA
RTRNIJ8
February 16, 2005
Birds fly past a thermal power station at sunset in New Delhi, February 16, 2005. After years of delays,...
New Delhi, India
Birds fly past a thermal power station at sunset in New Delhi.
Birds fly past a thermal power station at sunset in New Delhi, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kamal Kishore KK/LD/LA
KM
RTRNIGY
February 16, 2005
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro speaks on an Internet live broadcasting programme from his official...
Kyoto, Japan
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro speaks on an Internet live broadcasting programme from his official...
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro speaks on an Internet live broadcasting programme from his official residence in Tokyo. Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro speaks on an Internet live broadcasting programme from his official residence in Tokyo during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally took effect on Wednesday and a ceremony in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto, where the pact was signed in 1997, is set for later in the day. Japanese Environment Minister Yuriko Koike (L), Kenyan 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai (2nd L) and Argentine Environment and Health Minister Gines Gonzalez Garcia (C) are seen on the podium. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama
JAPAN
RTRNI98
February 16, 2005
Japan's Prime Minister Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's Prime Minister Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the entry into force of the Kyoto ......
Japan's Prime Minister Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Tokyo. Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol, at his official residence in Tokyo broadcast live to the ceremony in Kyoto, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN
RTRNI8S
February 16, 2005
Japan's Prime Minister Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's Prime Minister Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the entry into force of the Kyoto ......
Japan's Prime Minister Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Tokyo. Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol, at his official residence in Tokyo broadcast live to the ceremony in Kyoto, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN
RTRNI76
February 16, 2005
Japan's Prime Minister Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the mark the entry into force of the...
Tokyo, Japan
Japan's Prime Minister Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the mark the entry into force of the...
Japan's Prime Minister Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Tokyo. Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi delivers a speech to commemorate the force of the Kyoto Protocol, at his official residence in Tokyo, broadcast live to the ceremony in Kyoto, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN
RTRNI4I
February 16, 2005
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai (2nd L)speaks during...
Kyoto, Japan
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai (2nd L)speaks during...
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai (2nd L)speaks during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto. Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai (2nd L) speaks during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. Japanese Environment Minister Yuriko Koike (L), Kenyan 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai (2nd L) and Argentine Environment and Health Minister Gines Gonzalez Garcia (C) are seen at the podium. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama
JAPAN
RTRNI3Z
February 16, 2005
Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations, speaks via a videotaped message during the ceremony...
Kyoto, Japan
Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations, speaks via a videotaped message during the ...
Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations, speaks via a videotaped message during the ceremony to mark the entry of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto. Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations, speaks via a videotaped message recorded at the U.N. headquarters in New York, during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. Japanese Environment Minister Yuriko Koike (L), Kenyan 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai (2nd L) and Argentine Environment and Health Minister Gines Gonzalez Garcia (C) are seen on the podium. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama
JAPAN
RTRNI3B
February 16, 2005
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi speaks via a live internet broadcast from his official residence...
Kyoto, Japan
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi speaks via a live internet broadcast from his official ...
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi speaks via a live internet broadcast from his official residence in Tokyo. Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi speaks via a live Internet broadcast from his official residence in Tokyo during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. Japanese Environment Minister Yuriko Koike (L), Kenyan 2004 Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai (2nd L) and Argentine Environment and Health Minister Gines Gonzalez Garcia (C) are seen on the podium. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama
KYOTO
RTRNHWA
February 16, 2005
Smoke pours from a paper factor in Durango, northern Spain February 16, 2005. After years of delays,...
Durango, Spain
Smoke is released from a paper factory in Durango, northern Spain.
Smoke pours from a paper factor in Durango, northern Spain February 16, 2005. After years of delays, the Kyoto Protocol, a world plan to fight global warming, went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Vincent West PH/MA
KYOTO
RTRNHVV
February 16, 2005
Smoke pours from a paper factor in Durango, northern Spain, February 16, 2005. After years of delays,...
Durango, Spain
Smoke is released from a paper factory in Durango, northern Spain.
Smoke pours from a paper factor in Durango, northern Spain, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, the Kyoto Protocol, a world plan to fight global warming, went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Vincent West PH/MA
JAPAN
RTRNHRM
February 16, 2005
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai makes a keynote speech...
Kyoto, Japan
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech....
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/LD
JAPAN
RTRNHQZ
February 16, 2005
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai makes a keynote speech...
Kyoto, Japan
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech....
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/LD
JAPAN
RTRNHQT
February 16, 2005
Joke Waller-Hunter Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes...
Kyoto, Japan
Joke Waller-Hunter Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change ......
Joke Waller-Hunter Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes a keynote speech in Japan. Joke Waller-Hunter Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama
JAPAN
RTRNHPO
February 16, 2005
Joke Waller-Hunter, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change...
Kyoto, Japan
Joke Waller-Hunter, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change...
Joke Waller-Hunter, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes a keynote speech. Joke Waller-Hunter Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama
JAPAN
RTRNHMD
February 16, 2005
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech...
Kyoto, Japan
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech....
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/LD/LA
JAPAN
RTRNHHM
February 16, 2005
Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Joke Waller-Hunter...
Kyoto, Japan
Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes a keynote speech....
Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Joke Waller-Hunter makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/LD
JAPAN
RTRNHHE
February 16, 2005
An audience listens to Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai...
Kyoto, Japan
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech....
An audience listens to Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai making a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/LA
JAPAN
RTRNHGY
February 16, 2005
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech...
Kyoto, Japan
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech....
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM
JAPAN
RTRNHGQ
February 16, 2005
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech...
Kyoto, Japan
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech....
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/LA
JAPAN
RTRNHGA
February 16, 2005
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech...
Kyoto, Japan
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech....
Kenyan environmentalist and the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Wangari Maathai gives a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/LD/LA
JAPAN
RTRNHD8
February 16, 2005
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)/COP10 and Argentine Health...
Kyoto, Japan
Keynote speaker Gines Gonzalez Garcia makes a speech in Kyoto.
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)/COP10 and Argentine Health and Environment Minister Gines Gonzalez Garcia makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/LD
JAPAN
RTRNH6K
February 16, 2005
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes a keynote speech during the...
Kyoto, Japan
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes a keynote speech during the...
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto. President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)/COP10 and Argentine Health Minister Gines Gonzalez Garcia makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally took effect on Wednesday and a ceremony in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto, where the pact was signed in 1997, is set for later in the day. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama
JAPAN
RTRNH62
February 16, 2005
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes a keynote speech during the...
Kyoto, Japan
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes a keynote speech during the...
President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto. President of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)/COP10 and Argentine Health Minister Gines Gonzalez Garcia makes a keynote speech during the commemorative ceremony to mark the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming has gone into force, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally took effect on Wednesday and a ceremony in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto, where the pact was signed in 1997, is set for later in the day. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama
JAPAN
RTRNH37
February 16, 2005
Japan's opposition Democratic Party member Naoto Kan (L), Takashi Kosugi, Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic...
Tokyo, Japan
Japanese lawmakers receive a huge globe from NGO members celebrating the Kyoto Protocol in Tokyo.
Japan's opposition Democratic Party member Naoto Kan (L), Takashi Kosugi, Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party member, and other lawmakers receive a huge handmade globe from NGO members in front of the parliament building in Tokyo, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Issei Kato IK/LD
JAPAN
RTRNH04
February 16, 2005
Japanese NGO members hand over a huge handmade globe, to lawmakers in front of the parliament building...
Tokyo, Japan
NGO members hand over a huge globe to lawmakers celebrating the force of Kyoto Protocol in Tokyo.
Japanese NGO members hand over a huge handmade globe, to lawmakers in front of the parliament building in Tokyo, February 16, 2005, celebrating the enforcement of the Kyoto Protocol. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Issei Kato
JAPAN
RTRNGZV
February 16, 2005
Japanese wear polar bear costumes on a street in Tokyo to rejoice that the Kyoto Protocol has come into...
Tokyo, Japan
Japanese wear polar bear costumes to rejoice that the Kyoto Protocol is taking effect in Tokyo.
Japanese wear polar bear costumes on a street in Tokyo to rejoice that the Kyoto Protocol has come into effect,February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
CHINA KYOTO
RTRNGZ0
February 16, 2005
A Chinese cyclist passes a power plant in Beijing February 16, 2005. After years of delays, the Kyoto...
Beijing, China
A Chinese cyclist passes a power plant in Beijing.
A Chinese cyclist passes a power plant in Beijing February 16, 2005. After years of delays, the Kyoto Protocol, a world plan to fight global warming, went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/Jason Lee RKR/CN
KOREA
RTRNGLK
February 16, 2005
A South Korean activist dressed as U.S. President George W. Bush participates in a rally criticising...
Seoul, Korea
A South Korean activist dressed as US President George W. Bush participates in a rally in Seoul.
A South Korean activist dressed as U.S. President George W. Bush participates in a rally criticising the U.S withdrawal of support for the Kyoto Protocol in Seoul February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/You Sung-Ho KKH/DH
ENVIRONMENT KYOTO AUSTRALIA
RTRNGH7
February 16, 2005
A view of traffic on a freeway out of the Sydney central business district February 16, 2005. After years...
Sydney, Australia
A view of traffic on a freeway out of the Sydney central business district.
A view of traffic on a freeway out of the Sydney central business district February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/David Gray DG/DH
ENVIRONMENT KYOTO
RTRNGG6
February 16, 2005
Japanese wearing polar bear costumes 'growl' on a street corner in Tokyo's posh Ginza shopping district...
Tokyo, Japan
Japanese wearing polar bear costumes 'growl' on a street corner in Tokyo's posh Ginza shopping district....
Japanese wearing polar bear costumes 'growl' on a street corner in Tokyo's posh Ginza shopping district February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The Kyoto Protocol formally took effect at 0500 GMT. REUTERS/Eriko Sugita ES/JJ
ENVIRONMENT KYOTO AUSTRALIA
RTRNGF9
February 16, 2005
A view of traffic on a freeway out of the Sydney central business district February 16, 2005 After years...
Sydney, Australia
A view of traffic on a freeway out of the Sydney central business district.
A view of traffic on a freeway out of the Sydney central business district February 16, 2005 After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. REUTERS/David Gray DG/DH
ENVIRONMENT JAPAN KYOTO
RTRNGBB
February 16, 2005
Japanese citizens march in a parade from Kyoto City Hall in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After...
Kyoto, Japan
Japanese citizens march in a parade from Kyoto City Hall in Kyoto.
Japanese citizens march in a parade from Kyoto City Hall in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally took effect at 0500 GMT and a ceremony in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto, where the pact was signed in 1997, is set for later in the day. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/JJ
ENVIRONMENT JAPAN KYOTO
RTRNGB3
February 16, 2005
A tricycle taxi driver peddles past the Yasaka Shrine in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After...
Kyoto, Japan
A tricycle taxi driver peddles past the Yasaka Shrine in Kyoto.
A tricycle taxi driver peddles past the Yasaka Shrine in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally took effect at 0500 GMT and a ceremony in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto, where the pact was signed in 1997, is set for later in the day. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/JJ
ENVIRONMENT JAPAN KYOTO
RTRNGAU
February 16, 2005
Japanese citizens hold a banner in front of the Yasaka Shrine in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005....
Kyoto, Japan
Japanese citizens hold a banner in front of the Yasaka Shrine in Kyoto.
Japanese citizens hold a banner in front of the Yasaka Shrine in Kyoto, western Japan February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally took effect at 0500 GMT and a ceremony in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto, where the pact was signed in 1997, is set for later in the day. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/JJ
ENVIRONMENT JAPAN KYOTO
RTRNGAN
February 16, 2005
Greenpeace activists display a banner celebrating the enforcement of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western...
Kyoto, Japan
Greenpeace activists display a banner celebrating the enforcement of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto.
Greenpeace activists display a banner celebrating the enforcement of the Kyoto Protocol in Kyoto, western Japan, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The banner reads "Congratulations, enforcement of the Kyoto protocol". REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/CN
ENVIRONMENT JAPAN KYOTO
RTRNGAE
February 16, 2005
A Japanese woman holds a placard during a parade in Kyoto, western Japan, February 16, 2005. After years...
Kyoto, Japan
A Japanese woman holds a placard during a parade in Kyoto.
A Japanese woman holds a placard during a parade in Kyoto, western Japan, February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming went into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally took effect at 0500 GMT and a ceremony in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto, where the pact was signed in 1997, is set for later in the day. REUTERS/Kimimasa Mayama KM/JJ
CHINA KYOTO
RTRNG5I
February 16, 2005
A Chinese Greenpeace activist dressed as a polar bear carries a child at an information stand to promote...
Beijing, China
A Chinese Greenpeace activist dressed as a polar bear carries a child at an information stand in Beijing....
A Chinese Greenpeace activist dressed as a polar bear carries a child at an information stand to promote the Kyoto protocol in Beijing February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming goes into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally takes effect at 0500 GMT with celebrations in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto where it was signed in 1997. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause RKR/JJ
CHINA KYOTO
RTRNG59
February 16, 2005
A Chinese man looks at the chimney of a power plant in Beijing February 16, 2005. After years of delays,...
Beijing, China
A Chinese man looks at the chimney of a power plant in Beijing.
A Chinese man looks at the chimney of a power plant in Beijing February 16, 2005. After years of delays, a world plan to fight global warming goes into force on Wednesday, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States and Australia. The 141-nation Kyoto Protocol formally takes effect at 0500 GMT with celebrations in the ancient Japanese city of Kyoto where it was signed in 1997. REUTERS/Jason Lee
RUSSIA
RTR15DZL
January 16, 2005
Smoke rises into the sky, as a cathedral is silhouetted against the sunset in St.Petersburg, February...
multiple cities
Smoke rises into sky, as a cathedral is silhouetted against the sunset in St.Petersburg.
Smoke rises into the sky, as a cathedral is silhouetted against the sunset in St.Petersburg, February 20, 2005. A world plan to fight global warming went into force on January 16, 2005, feted by its backers as a lifeline for the planet but rejected as an economic straitjacket by the United States, the world's top polluter. REUTERS/Alexander Demianchuk AS/acm
AGNIVESH
RTXN2X3
December 09, 2004
Swami Agnivesh, a Hindu human rights activist from India holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood...
Stockholm, Sweden
Swami Agnivesh, a Hindu human rights activist from India holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelih.....
Swami Agnivesh, a Hindu human rights activist from India holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood Award' commonly known as the 'Alternative Nobel Prize' following the prize giving ceremony in Stockholm December 9, 2004. [Swami Agnivesh on Thursday received one of this year's 'Right Livelihood Awards' that have existed since 1980 to honour and encourage people who have dared to throw off the straitjacket of conventional ideas.]
MONTENEGRO
RTXN2X2
December 09, 2004
Raul Montenegro, environmental activist from Argentina holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood...
Stockholm, Sweden
Raul Montenegro, environmental activist from Argentina holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihoo.....
Raul Montenegro, environmental activist from Argentina holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood Award' commonly known as the 'Alternative Nobel Prize' following the prize giving ceremony in Stockholm December 9, 2004. [Montenegro on Thursday received one of this year's 'Right Livelihood Awards' that has existed since 1980 to honour and encourage people who have dared to throw off the straitjacket of conventional ideas.]
JAGGER
RTXN2X1
December 09, 2004
Bianca Jagger of Nicaragua, human rights activist and [ex-wife of Rolling Stones' lead singer Mick Jagger],...
Stockholm, Sweden
Bianca Jagger of Nicaragua, human rights activist and [ex-wife of Rolling Stones' lead singer Mick J.....
Bianca Jagger of Nicaragua, human rights activist and [ex-wife of Rolling Stones' lead singer Mick Jagger], holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood Award' commonly known as the 'Alternative Nobel Prize' following the prize giving ceremony in Stockholm December 9, 2004. [Bianca Jagger on Thursday received one of this year's 'Right Livelihood Awards' that has existed since 1980 to honour and encourage people who have dared to throw off the straitjacket of conventional ideas.]
NOBEL
RTRHVGS
December 09, 2004
Swami Agnivesh, a Hindu human rights activist from India holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood...
Stockholm
Indian human rights activist Swami Agnivesh holds the 'Right Livelihood Award' in Stockholm.
Swami Agnivesh, a Hindu human rights activist from India holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood Award' commonly known as the 'Alternative Nobel Prize' following the prize giving ceremony in Stockholm December 9, 2004. Swami Agnivesh on Thursday received one of this year's 'Right Livelihood Awards' that have existed since 1980 to honour and encourage people who have dared to throw off the straitjacket of conventional ideas. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay WR/MD
NOBEL
RTRHVGK
December 09, 2004
Raul Montenegro, environmental activist from Argentina holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood...
Stockholm
Argentine environmental activist Montenegro holds the 'Right Livelihood Award' in Stockholm.
Raul Montenegro, environmental activist from Argentina holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood Award' commonly known as the 'Alternative Nobel Prize' following the prize giving ceremony in Stockholm December 9, 2004. Montenegro on Thursday received one of this year's 'Right Livelihood Awards' that has existed since 1980 to honour and encourage people who have dared to throw off the straitjacket of conventional ideas. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay WR/MD
NOBEL
RTRHVG9
December 09, 2004
Bianca Jagger of Nicaragua, human rights activist and ex-wife of Rolling Stones' lead singer Mick Jagger,...
Stockholm
Human rights advocate Bianca Jagger holds the 'Right Livelihood Award' in Stockholm.
Bianca Jagger of Nicaragua, human rights activist and ex-wife of Rolling Stones' lead singer Mick Jagger, holds the certificate of the 'Right Livelihood Award' commonly known as the 'Alternative Nobel Prize' following the prize giving ceremony in Stockholm December 9, 2004. Bianca Jagger on Thursday received one of this year's 'Right Livelihood Awards' that has existed since 1980 to honour and encourage people who have dared to throw off the straitjacket of conventional ideas. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay WR/MD
NOBEL
RTRHQOU
December 08, 2004
Raul Montenegro, environmental activist from Argentina speaks to the media during a news conference of...
Stockholm
Environmental activist Raul Montenegro from Argentina speaks to the media in Stockholm.
Raul Montenegro, environmental activist from Argentina speaks to the media during a news conference of the 'Right Livelihood Award Foundation' in Stockholm December 8, 2004. Swami Agnivesh will receive one of this year's 'Right Livelihood Awards'. The award - commonly known as the Alternative Nobel Prize - was introduced in 1980 to honour and encourage people who have dared to throw off straitjacket of conventional ideas. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay WR/GB
NOBEL
RTRHQJF
December 08, 2004
Swami Agnivesh, a Hindu human rights activist from India speaks to the media during a news conference...
Stockholm
Human rights activist Swami Agnivesh from India speaks to the media in Stockholm.
Swami Agnivesh, a Hindu human rights activist from India speaks to the media during a news conference of the 'Right Livelihood Award Foundation' in Stockholm December 8, 2004. Swami Agnivesh will receive one of this year's 'Right Livelihood Awards'. The award - commonly known as the Alternative Nobel Prize - has existed since 1980 to honour and encourage people who have dared to throw off the straitjacket of conventional ideas. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay WR/JV
NOBEL
RTRHQJ7
December 08, 2004
Swami Agnivesh, a Hindu human rights activist from India speaks to the media during a news conference...
Stockholm
Human rights activist Swami Agnivesh from India speaks to the media in Stockholm.
Swami Agnivesh, a Hindu human rights activist from India speaks to the media during a news conference of the 'Right Livelihood Award Foundation' in Stockholm December 8, 2004. Swami Agnivesh will receive one of this year's 'Right Livelihood Awards'. The award - commonly known as the Alternative Nobel Prize - has existed since 1980 to honour and encourage people who have dared to throw off the straitjacket of conventional ideas. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay WR/JV
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