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Search results for: Sugar-companies

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS36WY8
March 22, 2020
REFILE - CORRECTING INFORMATION Vice President of Production Drew Kellerman displays a 750ml bottle of...
GIG HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Gig Harbor
REFILE - CORRECTING INFORMATION Vice President of Production Drew Kellerman displays a 750ml bottle of their hand and surface sanitizer the company is making in place of its Brown Sugar Bourbon, which will be sold to the public for $15 each and to groups like healthcare providers at a large discount at Heritage Distilling during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Gig Harbor, Washington, U.S. March 22, 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS36WY3
March 22, 2020
Angie Brooks works on hand-labelling hand and surface sanitizer in 750ml bottles that would normally...
GIG HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Gig Harbor
Angie Brooks works on hand-labelling hand and surface sanitizer in 750ml bottles that would normally contain the company's Brown Sugar Bourbon at Heritage Distilling during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Gig Harbor, Washington, U.S. March 22, 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS36WY2
March 22, 2020
Tina Fries works on hand-labelling 750ml bottles of hand and surface sanitizer that would normally contain...
GIG HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Gig Harbor
Tina Fries works on hand-labelling 750ml bottles of hand and surface sanitizer that would normally contain the company's Brown Sugar Bourbon at Heritage Distilling during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Gig Harbor, Washington, U.S. March 22, 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA
RTS36WXV
March 22, 2020
Scott Terra monitors a blending tank as the company works on a 1250-gallon batch of hand and surface...
GIG HARBOR, UNITED STATES
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Gig Harbor
Scott Terra monitors a blending tank as the company works on a 1250-gallon batch of hand and surface sanitizer they have begun to make instead of their Brown Sugar Bourbon at Heritage Distilling during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Gig Harbor, Washington, U.S. March 22, 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson
UBER-IPO/
RTX6V710
May 10, 2019
Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, (C) Chairman Ronald Sugar (L) and Board Member John Thain...
New York, UNITED STATES
Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, Chairman Ronald Sugar and board member John Thain on trading...
Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, (C) Chairman Ronald Sugar (L) and Board Member John Thain (R) stand together on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) during the company's IPO in New York, U.S., May 10, 2019. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
UBER-IPO/
RTX6V6YT
May 10, 2019
Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, (C) Chairman Ronald Sugar (L) and Board Member John Thain...
New York, UNITED STATES
Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, Chairman Ronald Sugar and board member John Thain on trading...
Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, (C) Chairman Ronald Sugar (L) and Board Member John Thain (R) stand together on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) during the company's IPO in New York, U.S., May 10, 2019. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
UBER-IPO/
RTX6V6WR
May 10, 2019
Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi (C) and Chairman Ronald Sugar (front-L) stand on the trading...
New York, UNITED STATES
Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi and Chairman Ronald Sugar on trading floor of NYSE during...
Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi (C) and Chairman Ronald Sugar (front-L) stand on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) during the company's IPO in New York, U.S., May 10, 2019. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
UBER-IPO/
RTX6V6PG
May 10, 2019
Uber Technologies Inc. Chairman Ronald Sugar (L) speaks with Chief Legal Officer Tony West (R) on the...
New York, UNITED STATES
Uber Technologies Inc. Chairman Ronald Sugar and Chief Legal Officer Tony West on trading floor of NYSE...
Uber Technologies Inc. Chairman Ronald Sugar (L) speaks with Chief Legal Officer Tony West (R) on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) during the company's IPO in New York, U.S., May 10, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
UBER-IPO/
RTX6V6OH
May 10, 2019
Uber Technologies Inc. Ronald Sugar stands on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)...
New York, UNITED STATES
Uber Technologies Inc. Chairman Ronald Sugar on trading floor of NYSE during the company's IPO in New...
Uber Technologies Inc. Ronald Sugar stands on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) during the company's IPO in New York, U.S., May 10, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
EUROPE-SUGAR/PLANTING
RTX5EZ6Z
March 29, 2018
French farmer Jean Vierling holds sugar beet seeds at his farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg, France,...
SCHNERSHEIM, France
French farmer Vierling holds sugar beet seeds at his farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg
French farmer Jean Vierling holds sugar beet seeds at his farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg, France, March 29, 2018. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler
EUROPE-SUGAR/PLANTING
RTX5EZ6U
March 29, 2018
Sugar beet seeds are seen at a farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg, France, March 29, 2018. REUTERS/Vincent...
SCHNERSHEIM, France
Sugar beet seeds are seen at a farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg
Sugar beet seeds are seen at a farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg, France, March 29, 2018. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler
EUROPE-SUGAR/PLANTING
RTX5EZ6P
March 29, 2018
French farmer Jean Vierling holds sugar beet seeds at his farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg, France,...
SCHNERSHEIM, France
French farmer Vierling holds sugar beet seeds at his farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg
French farmer Jean Vierling holds sugar beet seeds at his farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg, France, March 29, 2018. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler
EUROPE-SUGAR/PLANTING
RTX5EZ5I
March 29, 2018
French farmer Jean Vierling holds sugar beet seeds in his hands at his farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg,...
SCHNERSHEIM, France
French farmer Vierling holds sugar beet seeds in his hands at his farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg...
French farmer Jean Vierling holds sugar beet seeds in his hands at his farm in Schnersheim, near Strasbourg, France, March 29, 2018. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler
NESTLE-MILKYBAR/
RTX5DDKL
March 26, 2018
Chris Hughes, a Senior Specialist for Nestle, looks at the company's newly manufactured sugar structure...
York, United Kingdom
Chris Hughes, a Senior Specialist for Nestle, looks at the company's newly manufactured sugar structure...
Chris Hughes, a Senior Specialist for Nestle, looks at the company's newly manufactured sugar structure in a laboratory inside their Product Technology Centre in York, Britain, March 21, 2018. Picture taken March 21, 2018. REUTERS/Phil Noble
EGYPT-ECONOMY/INFLATION
RTX34YNN
April 10, 2017
Smoke billows from a chimney of the Nile Sugar Company factory along the Cairo–Alexandria highway, near...
Alexandria, Egypt
Smoke billows from a chimney of the Nile Sugar Company factory along the Cairo–Alexandria highway, near...
Smoke billows from a chimney of the Nile Sugar Company factory along the Cairo–Alexandria highway, near the city of Alexandria, Egypt April 10, 2017. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
EGYPT-ECONOMY/INFLATION
RTX34YMU
April 10, 2017
Workers are seen at the Nile Sugar Company factory along the Cairo–Alexandria highway, near the city...
Alexandria, Egypt
Workers are seen at the Nile Sugar Company factory along the Cairo–Alexandria highway near the city of...
Workers are seen at the Nile Sugar Company factory along the Cairo–Alexandria highway, near the city of Alexandria, Egypt April 10, 2017. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
BRITAIN-EU/TATELYLESUGARS
RTX2PW03
October 21, 2016
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds raw cane sugar at the company's refinery...
London, United Kingdom
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds raw cane sugar at the company's refinery...
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds raw cane sugar at the company's refinery in east London, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
BRITAIN-EU/TATELYLESUGARS
RTX2PVZP
October 21, 2016
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds sugar products at the company's refinery...
London, United Kingdom
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds sugar products at the company's refinery...
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds sugar products at the company's refinery in east London, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
BRITAIN-EU/TATELYLESUGARS
RTX2PVZJ
October 21, 2016
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds a jar of golden syrup at the company's...
London, United Kingdom
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds a jar of golden syrup at the company's...
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds a jar of golden syrup at the company's refinery in east London, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
BRITAIN-EU/TATELYLESUGARS
RTX2PVXO
October 21, 2016
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds a bag of sugar at the company's refinery...
London, United Kingdom
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds a bag of sugar at the company's refinery...
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, holds a bag of sugar at the company's refinery in east London, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
BRITAIN-EU/TATELYLESUGARS
RTX2PVC7
October 21, 2016
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait at the company's refinery...
London, United Kingdom
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait at the company's refinery...
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait at the company's refinery in east London, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
BRITAIN-EU/TATELYLESUGARS
RTX2PVC5
October 21, 2016
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait on raw cane sugar at...
London, United Kingdom
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait on raw cane sugar at...
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait on raw cane sugar at the company's refinery in east London, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
BRITAIN-EU/TATELYLESUGARS
RTX2PVC4
October 21, 2016
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait at the company's refinery...
London, United Kingdom
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait at the company's refinery...
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait at the company's refinery in east London, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
BRITAIN-EU/TATELYLESUGARS
RTX2PVC3
October 21, 2016
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait on raw cane sugar at...
London, United Kingdom
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait on raw cane sugar at...
Tate & Lyle senior vice-president of sugars, Gerald Mason, poses for a portrait on raw cane sugar at the company's refinery in east London, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
EGYPT-CURRENCY/IMPORTS
RTS9V9M
March 08, 2016
Smoke billows from a chimney of the Nile Sugar Company factory along a highway of the Mediterranean city...
Cairo, Egypt
Smoke billows from a chimney of the Nile Sugar Company factory along a highway of the Mediterranean city...
Smoke billows from a chimney of the Nile Sugar Company factory along a highway of the Mediterranean city of Alexandria, north of Cairo, Egypt, February 10, 2016. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh
BRAZIL-PETROBRAS/SUGAR
RTX1VLHI
November 24, 2015
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November...
Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November 24, 2015. Brazilian prosecutors said on Tuesday they were looking at suspect loans involving the sugar and ethanol industry, including bankrupt Sao Fernando Açucar e Alcool, in the latest phase of a corruption investigation focused on state-run oil firm Petroleo Brasileiro SA. Police earlier arrested rancher José Carlos Bumlai, a friend of former president Luíz Inácio Lula da Silva, and said they are investigating millions of reais of loans benefiting his companies and also President Dilma Rousseff's Workers' Party. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-PETROBRAS/SUGAR
RTX1VLHD
November 24, 2015
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November...
Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November 24, 2015. Brazilian prosecutors said on Tuesday they were looking at suspect loans involving the sugar and ethanol industry, including bankrupt Sao Fernando Açucar e Alcool, in the latest phase of a corruption investigation focused on state-run oil firm Petroleo Brasileiro SA. Police earlier arrested rancher José Carlos Bumlai, a friend of former president Luíz Inácio Lula da Silva, and said they are investigating millions of reais of loans benefiting his companies and also President Dilma Rousseff's Workers' Party. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-PETROBRAS/SUGAR
RTX1VLHC
November 24, 2015
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November...
Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November 24, 2015. Brazilian prosecutors said on Tuesday they were looking at suspect loans involving the sugar and ethanol industry, including bankrupt Sao Fernando Açucar e Alcool, in the latest phase of a corruption investigation focused on state-run oil firm Petroleo Brasileiro SA. Police earlier arrested rancher José Carlos Bumlai, a friend of former president Luíz Inácio Lula da Silva, and said they are investigating millions of reais of loans benefiting his companies and also President Dilma Rousseff's Workers' Party. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-PETROBRAS/SUGAR
RTX1VLHA
November 24, 2015
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November 24,...
Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November 24, 2015. Brazilian prosecutors said on Tuesday they were looking at suspect loans involving the sugar and ethanol industry, including bankrupt Sao Fernando Açucar e Alcool, in the latest phase of a corruption investigation focused on state-run oil firm Petroleo Brasileiro SA. Police earlier arrested rancher José Carlos Bumlai, a friend of former president Luíz Inácio Lula da Silva, and said they are investigating millions of reais of loans benefiting his companies and also President Dilma Rousseff's Workers' Party. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-PETROBRAS/SUGAR
RTX1VLH8
November 24, 2015
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November...
Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November 24, 2015. Brazilian prosecutors said on Tuesday they were looking at suspect loans involving the sugar and ethanol industry, including bankrupt Sao Fernando Açucar e Alcool, in the latest phase of a corruption investigation focused on state-run oil firm Petroleo Brasileiro SA. Police earlier arrested rancher José Carlos Bumlai, a friend of former president Luíz Inácio Lula da Silva, and said they are investigating millions of reais of loans benefiting his companies and also President Dilma Rousseff's Workers' Party. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
BRAZIL-PETROBRAS/SUGAR
RTX1VLH7
November 24, 2015
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November...
Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil
Brazilian businessman Jose Carlos Bumlai (L) boards a plane at an airport in Brasilia, Brazil November 24, 2015. Brazilian prosecutors said on Tuesday they were looking at suspect loans involving the sugar and ethanol industry, including bankrupt Sao Fernando Açucar e Alcool, in the latest phase of a corruption investigation focused on state-run oil firm Petroleo Brasileiro SA. Police earlier arrested rancher José Carlos Bumlai, a friend of former president Luíz Inácio Lula da Silva, and said they are investigating millions of reais of loans benefiting his companies and also President Dilma Rousseff's Workers' Party. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
RUSSIA-RUSAGRO/
RTS2AN8
September 29, 2015
Maxim Basov, CEO of Russian agricultural group Rusagro, speaks during an interview at the Reuters Russia...
Moscow, Russia
Rusargo CEO Basov speaks during interview at Reuters Russia Investment summit in Moscow
Maxim Basov, CEO of Russian agricultural group Rusagro, speaks during an interview at the Reuters Russia Investment summit in Moscow, Russia, September 29, 2015. While others are scrabbling for cash and struggling to restructure large debts, farming conglomerate Rusagro is grappling with an unusual challenge in today's Russia - where else to invest money to capitalise on a weak rouble. Basov said he had been tasked with finding investment projects for 100 billion roubles ($1.52 billion) for the next three years and the company, which produces pork, sugar, oils, corn, and soy, would diversify its business further. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov
RUSSIA-RUSAGRO/
RTS2AN7
September 29, 2015
Maxim Basov, CEO of Russian agricultural group Rusagro, speaks during an interview at the Reuters Russia...
Moscow, Russia
Rusargo CEO Basov speaks during interview at Reuters Russia Investment summit in Moscow
Maxim Basov, CEO of Russian agricultural group Rusagro, speaks during an interview at the Reuters Russia Investment summit in Moscow, Russia, September 29, 2015. While others are scrabbling for cash and struggling to restructure large debts, farming conglomerate Rusagro is grappling with an unusual challenge in today's Russia - where else to invest money to capitalise on a weak rouble. Basov said he had been tasked with finding investment projects for 100 billion roubles ($1.52 billion) for the next three years and the company, which produces pork, sugar, oils, corn, and soy, would diversify its business further. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov
CUBA-USA/TRADE
RTS1S36
September 18, 2015
A photograph of Cuba's President Raul Castro hangs next to samples of basic products like rice, sugar...
Havana, Cuba
A photograph of Cuba's President Raul Castro hangs next to samples of basic products like rice, sugar...
A photograph of Cuba's President Raul Castro hangs next to samples of basic products like rice, sugar and oil that are on sale at a subsidised state store, or "bodega", where Cubans can buy with a ration book they receive annually from the government in Havana September 18, 2015. The United States on Friday issued regulations easing restrictions on American companies seeking to do business in Cuba and opening up travel in the latest action to weaken the U.S. trade embargo amid warming relations with the Communist country. The rules, which take effect on Monday, September 21, target travel, telecommunications, Internet-based services, business operations and banking, and allow U.S. companies to establish a presence in Cuba. They also eliminate limits on the amount of money people can send back to the Caribbean nation. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
AUSTRALIA-AGRICULTURE/DELICATESSEN
RTX1OUTX
August 19, 2015
A customer holds chia seeds from the Chia Co company, owned by Australian farmer John Foss, at a suburban...
Sydney, Australia
A customer holds chia seeds from the Chia Co company, owned by Australian farmer John Foss, at a suburban...
A customer holds chia seeds from the Chia Co company, owned by Australian farmer John Foss, at a suburban supermarket in Sydney, Australia, July 7, 2015. While Australia's main agricultural products like wheat, rice, sugar and beef have traditionally fed Asia, there is now a wave of farmers moving to premium crops as Australia pushes to become Asia's delicatessen. After being fed up with being subjected to the market volatility that had long plagued his Australian family wheat farm, John Foss abandoned tradition and took a risk on a little known crop. His decision to ditch wheat in favour of chia seeds in 2003 left his family bemused. More than a decade on, Foss is the one smiling. Demand for chia is soaring and Foss, now overseeing the global expansion of his Chia Co business from a New York office, has little trouble selling the crop's prospects to other growers. Picture taken July 7, 2015. To match AUSTRALIA-AGRICULTURE/DELICATESSEN REUTERS/David Gray
AUSTRALIA-AGRICULTURE/DELICATESSEN
RTX1OUTV
August 19, 2015
Chia seeds from the Chia Co company, owned by Australian farmer John Foss, sit on shelves at a suburban...
Sydney, Australia
Chia seeds from the Chia Co company, owned by Australian farmer John Foss, sit on shelves at a suburban...
Chia seeds from the Chia Co company, owned by Australian farmer John Foss, sit on shelves at a suburban supermarket in Sydney, Australia, July 7, 2015. While Australia's main agricultural products like wheat, rice, sugar and beef have traditionally fed Asia, there is now a wave of farmers moving to premium crops as Australia pushes to become Asia's delicatessen. After being fed up with being subjected to the market volatility that had long plagued his Australian family wheat farm, John Foss abandoned tradition and took a risk on a little known crop. His decision to ditch wheat in favour of chia seeds in 2003 left his family bemused. More than a decade on, Foss is the one smiling. Demand for chia is soaring and Foss, now overseeing the global expansion of his Chia Co business from a New York office, has little trouble selling the crop's prospects to other growers. Picture taken July 7, 2015. To match AUSTRALIA-AGRICULTURE/DELICATESSEN REUTERS/David Gray
BRAZIL-ENERGY/
RTR4GKKB
December 03, 2014
Workers are seen at a factory of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles...
Valparaiso, Brazil
File photo of workers at a factory of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso
Workers are seen at a factory of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles northwest of Sao Paulo in this September 18, 2014 file photo. In a sign of the distortions plaguing Brazil's stagnant economy, a wide range of companies are sharply cutting back output of their main products to instead sell electricity back into the national grid because it is more profitable. The trend includes sugar, ethanol, steel, aluminum and chemical companies, a Reuters analysis of company earnings statements and other guidance shows.Tax incentives and historically high electricity costs mean Brazilian factories are more likely than their peers in many other countries to produce their own energy. They sometimes burn biomass or use gas or even privately built hydroelectric dams. Picture taken September 18, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files (BRAZIL - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT COMMODITIES ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
BRAZIL-ENERGY/
RTR4GKK2
December 03, 2014
A truck pushes mounds of sugar cane bagasse which are used to produce energy at a mill of Da Mata, the...
Valparaiso, Brazil
File photo of a truck pushing mounds of sugar cane bagasse which are used to produce energy at a mill...
A truck pushes mounds of sugar cane bagasse which are used to produce energy at a mill of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles northwest of Sao Paulo in this September 18, 2014 file photo. In a sign of the distortions plaguing Brazil's stagnant economy, a wide range of companies are sharply cutting back output of their main products to instead sell electricity back into the national grid because it is more profitable. The trend includes sugar, ethanol, steel, aluminum and chemical companies, a Reuters analysis of company earnings statements and other guidance shows.Tax incentives and historically high electricity costs mean Brazilian factories are more likely than their peers in many other countries to produce their own energy. They sometimes burn biomass or use gas or even privately built hydroelectric dams. Picture taken September 18, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files (BRAZIL - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT COMMODITIES ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
BRAZIL-FACTORY/
RTR4GKJB
December 03, 2014
General view of factory Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles northwest...
Valparaiso, Brazil
File photo of factory Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso
General view of factory Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles northwest of Sao Paulo in this September 18, 2014 file photo. In a sign of the distortions plaguing Brazil's stagnant economy, a wide range of companies are sharply cutting back output of their main products to instead sell electricity back into the national grid because it is more profitable. The trend includes sugar, ethanol, steel, aluminum and chemical companies, a Reuters analysis of company earnings statements and other guidance shows.Tax incentives and historically high electricity costs mean Brazilian factories are more likely than their peers in many other countries to produce their own energy. They sometimes burn biomass or use gas or even privately built hydroelectric dams. Picture taken September 18, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files (BRAZIL - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT COMMODITIES ENERGY ENVIRONMENT)
BRAZIL-ENERGY/
RTR4GKIB
December 03, 2014
A truck pushes mounds of sugar cane bagasse which are used to produce energy at a mill of Da Mata, the...
Valparaiso, Brazil
File photo of a truck pushing mounds of sugar cane bagasse which are used to produce energy at a mill...
A truck pushes mounds of sugar cane bagasse which are used to produce energy at a mill of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles northwest of Sao Paulo in this September 18, 2014 file photo. In a sign of the distortions plaguing Brazil's stagnant economy, a wide range of companies are sharply cutting back output of their main products to instead sell electricity back into the national grid because it is more profitable. The trend includes sugar, ethanol, steel, aluminum and chemical companies, a Reuters analysis of company earnings statements and other guidance shows.Tax incentives and historically high electricity costs mean Brazilian factories are more likely than their peers in many other countries to produce their own energy. They sometimes burn biomass or use gas or even privately built hydroelectric dams. Picture taken September 18, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files (BRAZIL - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT COMMODITIES ENERGY)
BRAZIL-ENERGY/
RTR4GKI4
December 03, 2014
Workers are seen at a factory of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles...
Valparaiso, Brazil
File photo of workers at a factory of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso
Workers are seen at a factory of Da Mata, the Brazilian sugar cane processor, in Valparaiso, 355 miles northwest of Sao Paulo in this September 18, 2014 file photo. In a sign of the distortions plaguing Brazil's stagnant economy, a wide range of companies are sharply cutting back output of their main products to instead sell electricity back into the national grid because it is more profitable. The trend includes sugar, ethanol, steel, aluminum and chemical companies, a Reuters analysis of company earnings statements and other guidance shows.Tax incentives and historically high electricity costs mean Brazilian factories are more likely than their peers in many other countries to produce their own energy. They sometimes burn biomass or use gas or even privately built hydroelectric dams. Picture taken September 18, 2014. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/Files (BRAZIL - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT COMMODITIES ENERGY EMPLOYMENT)
INDIA-SUGAR/MILLS C
RTR49HX7
October 09, 2014
INDIA-SUGAR/MILLS - Chart showing cash to short-term debt ratio for 14 reporting sugar companies since...
India
INDIA-SUGAR/MILLS C
INDIA-SUGAR/MILLS - Chart showing cash to short-term debt ratio for 14 reporting sugar companies since 2004. Includes New York sugar prices. (SIN02)
USA/
RTR3MUAA
April 27, 2014
Pastry chefs John Kraus (L) and Scott Green place flowers made from sugar on the 15,000-slice, 4,000-pound...
Beverly Hills, UNITED STATES
Pastry chefs Kraus and Green place flowers made from sugar on the birthday cake replica of the Beverly...
Pastry chefs John Kraus (L) and Scott Green place flowers made from sugar on the 15,000-slice, 4,000-pound birthday cake replica of the Beverly Hills city hall tower and Rodeo Drive in front of Luxe Rodeo Drive Hotel in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the City of Beverly Hills, in Beverly Hills, California April 27, 2014. The cake was made by Guittard Chocolate Company's Corporate Pastry Chef Donald Wressell with the help of 15 pastry chefs from across the United States. REUTERS/Kevork Djansezian (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY FOOD ANNIVERSARY)
USA-PUERTORICO/UNDERGROUND-ECONOMY
RTR3KHUW
April 09, 2014
Mattress repairman and fruit vendor Angelo Lopez holds a coconut and a sugar-apple in the shed which...
LARES, Puerto Rico
Mattress repairman and fruit vendor Angelo Lopez holds a coconut and a sugar-apple in the shed which...
Mattress repairman and fruit vendor Angelo Lopez holds a coconut and a sugar-apple in the shed which he calls his factory in Lares, western Puerto Rico April 7, 2014. Like Lopez, more than a quarter of Puerto Rico's economy is informal, some studies say, from large companies evading taxes to individuals selling items for cash at roadside stands. Officials are wrestling with how to bring the underground economy out of the shadows and onto the tax rolls without creating such an onerous financial burden that thousands of small and medium businesses can't survive. Picture taken April 7, 2014. To match Insight USA-PUERTORICO/UNDERGROUND-ECONOMY REUTERS/Ana Martinez (PUERTO RICO - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS EMPLOYMENT)
COLOMBIA-ELECTION/
RTR3HAWE
March 16, 2014
Men work on a crop of pineapples in Pradera February 5, 2014. About two hours down winding roads from...
Pradera, Colombia
Men work on a crop of pineapples in Pradera
Men work on a crop of pineapples in Pradera February 5, 2014. About two hours down winding roads from Toribio, sugar cane companies such as Bengala Agricola are waiting for the outcome of the talks before making million-dollar investments to switch to pineapple cultivation. Safety concerns are vital, says Bengala executive Mauricio Lopez, since pineapple requires more on-the-ground management. Picture taken on February 5, 2014. To match Feature COLOMBIA ELECTION/ REUTERS/Jaime Saldarriaga (COLOMBIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST DRUGS SOCIETY AGRICULTURE)
COLOMBIA-ELECTION/
RTR3HAW8
March 16, 2014
Men work on a crop of pineapples in Pradera February 5, 2014. About two hours down winding roads from...
Pradera, Colombia
Men work on a crop of pineapples in Pradera
Men work on a crop of pineapples in Pradera February 5, 2014. About two hours down winding roads from Toribio, sugar cane companies such as Bengala Agricola are waiting for the outcome of the talks before making million-dollar investments to switch to pineapple cultivation. Safety concerns are vital, says Bengala executive Mauricio Lopez, since pineapple requires more on-the-ground management. Picture taken on February 5, 2014. To match Feature COLOMBIA ELECTION/ REUTERS/Jaime Saldarriaga (COLOMBIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST DRUGS SOCIETY AGRICULTURE)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWI1
May 22, 2013
Engineers work inside the control room of the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant,...
KENANA, Sudan
Engineers work inside the control room of the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company's main plant, south...
Engineers work inside the control room of the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. "Ninety percent of our ethanol goes to the European Union, France, Holland," Ahmed Rabih, head of the ethanol business unit said. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES EMPLOYMENT ENERGY)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWI0
May 22, 2013
A worker fills a pickup truck's tank with blended fuel at the first blended fuel station at Kenana Sugar...
KENANA, Sudan
A worker fills a pickup truck's tank with blended fuel at the first blended fuel station at Kenana Sugar...
A worker fills a pickup truck's tank with blended fuel at the first blended fuel station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. "Ninety percent of our ethanol goes to the European Union, France, Holland," Ahmed Rabih, head of the ethanol business unit said. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENERGY)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHZ
May 22, 2013
A worker walks at the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles)...
KENANA, Sudan
A worker walks at the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company's main plant, south of Khartoum
A worker walks at the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. "Ninety percent of our ethanol goes to the European Union, France, Holland," Ahmed Rabih, head of the ethanol business unit said. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES EMPLOYMENT ENERGY)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHY
May 22, 2013
A worker walks at the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles)...
KENANA, Sudan
A worker walks at the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company's main plant, south of Khartoum
A worker walks at the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. "Ninety percent of our ethanol goes to the European Union, France, Holland," Ahmed Rabih, head of the ethanol business unit said. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES EMPLOYMENT ENERGY)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHX
May 22, 2013
A worker fills a pickup truck's tank with blended fuel at the first blended fuel station at Kenana Sugar...
KENANA, Sudan
A worker fills a pickup truck's tank with blended fuel at the first blended fuel station at Kenana Sugar...
A worker fills a pickup truck's tank with blended fuel at the first blended fuel station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. "Ninety percent of our ethanol goes to the European Union, France, Holland," Ahmed Rabih, head of the ethanol business unit said. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENERGY)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHW
May 22, 2013
A worker irrigates a sugarcane plantation at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles)...
KENANA, Sudan
A worker irrigates a sugarcane plantation at Kenana Sugar Company's main plant, south of Khartoum
A worker irrigates a sugarcane plantation at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHV
May 22, 2013
Engineers work at the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles)...
KENANA, Sudan
Engineers work at the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company's main plant, south of Khartoum
Engineers work at the ethanol station at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. "Ninety percent of our ethanol goes to the European Union, France, Holland," Ahmed Rabih, head of the ethanol business unit said. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES ENERGY)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHU
May 22, 2013
A worker irrigates a sugarcane plantation at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles)...
KENANA, Sudan
A worker irrigates a sugarcane plantation at Kenana Sugar Company's main plant, south of Khartoum
A worker irrigates a sugarcane plantation at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: AGRICULTURE BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHT
May 22, 2013
Employees pack refined sugar at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of...
KENANA, Sudan
Employees pack refined sugar at Kenana Sugar Company, south of Khartoum
Employees pack refined sugar at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. In a hangar-shaped factory hall in central Sudan a dozen workers rush to pack refined white sugar gushing from a funnel into paper bags to be loaded on three trucks parked outside. Next year, the management at KSC hopes the plant will be even busier as it plans to boost its output as the African country seeks to increase sugar exports. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES EMPLOYMENT)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHS
May 22, 2013
An employee works at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May...
KENANA, Sudan
An employee works at Kenana Sugar Company's main plant, south of Khartoum
An employee works at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHR
May 22, 2013
Employees pack refined sugar at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of...
KENANA, Sudan
Employees pack refined sugar at Kenana Sugar Company, south of Khartoum
Employees pack refined sugar at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. In a hangar-shaped factory hall in central Sudan a dozen workers rush to pack refined white sugar gushing from a funnel into paper bags to be loaded on three trucks parked outside. Next year, the management at KSC hopes the plant will be even busier as it plans to boost its output as the African country seeks to increase sugar exports. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES EMPLOYMENT)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHQ
May 22, 2013
Employees pack refined sugar at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of...
KENANA, Sudan
Employees pack refined sugar at Kenana Sugar Company, south of Khartoum
Employees pack refined sugar at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. In a hangar-shaped factory hall in central Sudan a dozen workers rush to pack refined white sugar gushing from a funnel into paper bags to be loaded on three trucks parked outside. Next year, the management at KSC hopes the plant will be even busier as it plans to boost its output as the African country seeks to increase sugar exports. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES EMPLOYMENT)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHP
May 22, 2013
Workers load sacks of sugar onto a truck at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles)...
KENANA, Sudan
Workers load sacks of sugar onto a truck at Kenana Sugar Company's main plant, south of Khartoum
Workers load sacks of sugar onto a truck at Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES EMPLOYMENT)
SUDAN-SUGAR/
RTXZWHN
May 22, 2013
A worker rides a bicycle past a sugar cane plantation near the Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant,...
KENANA, Sudan
A worker rides a bicycle past a sugar cane plantation near the Kenana Sugar Company's main plant, south...
A worker rides a bicycle past a sugar cane plantation near the Kenana Sugar Company (KSC)'s main plant, 270 km (170 miles) south of Khartoum May 14, 2013. Faced with the loss of most oil production after South Sudan seceded in 2011, Sudan has been scrambling to find new sources for state revenues and dollars to pay for imports. Developing its sugar industry is a priority as is searching for gold. To diversify its products, Kenana also plans to more than triple the output of biofuels, a by-product of sugar production, to 200 million litres by 2015. Picture taken May 14, 2013. To match Feature SUDAN-SUGAR/ REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah (SUDAN - Tags: BUSINESS COMMODITIES AGRICULTURE EMPLOYMENT)
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