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Search results for: Superstition

PAKISTAN-RELIGION/
RTS17GKM
June 17, 2017
Shiite Muslims reach out to touch the gold-ornamentation of sword and shield, placed on a symbolic sacred...
Karachi, Pakistan
Shiite Muslims reach out to touch the gold-ornamentation of sword and shield, placed on a symbolic sacred...
Shiite Muslims reach out to touch the gold-ornamentation of sword and shield, placed on a symbolic sacred horse, for good luck, during the Youm Ali procession in Karachi, Pakistan June 17, 2017. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Wider Image
Wider Image
Tanzanian child victims of witchcraft attacks get new limbs
22 PICTURES
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTX39WLP
June 09, 2017
Four Tanzanian children with albinism who lost limbs, fingers, teeth and part of a tongue in superstition-driven...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Tanzanian child victims of witchcraft attacks get new limbs
Four Tanzanian children with albinism who lost limbs, fingers, teeth and part of a tongue in superstition-driven attacks made their way home this week after receiving prosthetics - and a dose of confidence - in the United States. The children, ages 7, 14, 15 and 16, were treated free of charge at Shriners Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. The children are able to attach and adjust prosthetic arms to their bodies, wash their laundry by hand and hang it to dry and make dinner. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri SEARCH "ALLEGRI ALBINISM" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTX38AOD
May 31, 2017
Baraka Lusambo, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Baraka Lusambo, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Baraka Lusambo, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack, waits after his new prosthetic arm was attached at the Shriners Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. May 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTX38AI0
May 30, 2017
A worker helps Emmanuel Rutema, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
A worker helps Emmanuel Rutema, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven...
A worker helps Emmanuel Rutema, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack, put on a new prosthetic arm at the Shriners Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. May 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTX38AHZ
May 30, 2017
Emmanuel Rutema, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Emmanuel Rutema, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Emmanuel Rutema, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack, tries to put on a new prosthetic arm at the Shriners Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. May 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTX38AHY
May 30, 2017
Emmanuel Rutema, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Emmanuel Rutema, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Emmanuel Rutema, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack, waits for his new prosthetic arm at the Shriners Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. May 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTX38AHX
May 30, 2017
Baraka Lusambo, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Baraka Lusambo, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Baraka Lusambo, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack, waits after his new prosthetic arm was attached at the Shriners Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. May 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTX38AHW
May 30, 2017
Baraka Lusambo, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Baraka Lusambo, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack,...
Baraka Lusambo, a Tanzanian with Albinism who had his arm chopped off in a superstition-driven attack, waits for his new prosthetic arm at the Shriners Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. May 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HAITI-DEAF/
RTX2NWG4
September 02, 2016
A triple murder has shaken the village of Leveque in rural Haiti, testing the community and sense of...
Leveque, Haiti
The Wider Image: A community of deaf people in rural Haiti
A triple murder has shaken the village of Leveque in rural Haiti, testing the community and sense of security nurtured by its large population of deaf families who were relocated there after the devastating earthquake six years ago. The murders of three deaf women, Vanessa Previl, Monique Vincent and Jesula Gelin as they tried to get home from the capital Port-au-Prince in March seemed a chilling reminder of the prejudices and superstition that many in the village grew up with, even in their own homes. Built after the earthquake by Mission of Hope, a U.S. religious charity, and housing a high proportion of deaf families among its 615 households, Leveque's modest tin-roofed homes and unpaved streets have become a place of tolerance in an often hostile outside world. Some residents who remember being mistreated by their parents and kept apart from other children when they were young are free to be themselves here. A total of 115 homes were assigned to deaf families after the quake destroyed their homes in Port-au-Prince and elsewhere in the Caribbean nation. REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares SEARCH "DEAF HAITI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching text: HAITI-DEAF/
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7K
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (R) from Tanzania holds hands with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania holds hands with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in the...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (R) from Tanzania holds hands with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7J
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania talks with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania talks with Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in his bedroom in...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania talks with Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in his bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7I
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania looks at a book as he does homework in the Staten Island...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania looks at a book as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania looks at a book as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7H
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania looks out the window in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania looks out the window in the Staten Island borough of New York
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania looks out the window in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7G
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (R) from Tanzania sits on the lap of Elissa Montanati of the Global...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania sits on the lap of Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in the Staten Island...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (R) from Tanzania sits on the lap of Elissa Montanati of the Global Medical Relief Fund in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7F
September 30, 2015
Children from Tanzania sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino...
New York, UNITED STATES
Children from Tanzania sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York
Children from Tanzania sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7D
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania looks out of the window in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania looks out of the window in the Staten Island borough of New York
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania looks out of the window in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7B
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania walks into his bedroom in the Staten Island borough...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania walks into his bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania walks into his bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I7A
September 30, 2015
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L), Pendo Sengerema Noni (C) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) sit on a sofa in...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa, Noni and Rutema sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L), Pendo Sengerema Noni (C) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) sit on a sofa in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I79
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I78
September 30, 2015
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania eats an orange as he does homework in the Staten Island...
New York, UNITED STATES
Rutema from Tanzania eats an orange as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York in the...
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania eats an orange as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I75
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania dances along as a video plays on a computer in the Staten...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania dances along as a video plays on a computer in the Staten Island borough...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania dances along as a video plays on a computer in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I74
September 30, 2015
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) put on their prosthetic arms as Baraka Cosmas...
New York, UNITED STATES
Matonage and Festo put on their prosthetic arms as Cosmas looks on in their bedroom in the Staten Island...
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) put on their prosthetic arms as Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (C) looks on in their bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I73
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York in the...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania eats an apple as he does homework in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6X
September 30, 2015
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania puts on her prosthetic arm in her bedroom in the Staten...
New York, UNITED STATES
Sengerema Noni from Tanzania puts on her prosthetic arm in her bedroom in the Staten Island borough of...
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania puts on her prosthetic arm in her bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6W
September 30, 2015
Children from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York, September...
New York, UNITED STATES
Children from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York
Children from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6V
September 30, 2015
Children from Tanzania play cards in the living room in the Staten Island borough of New York, September...
New York, UNITED STATES
Children from Tanzania play cards in the living room in the Staten Island borough of New York,
Children from Tanzania play cards in the living room in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6U
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal that he...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal that he says makes him feel safe at night...
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6S
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6R
September 30, 2015
5-year old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (L) and 12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania play soccer...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas and Matonage from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York...
5-year old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo (L) and 12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania play soccer in the backyard in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6Q
September 30, 2015
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island...
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6P
September 30, 2015
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal she says she...
New York, UNITED STATES
Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal she says she sleeps with at night to make...
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a stuffed animal she says she sleeps with at night to make her feel safe in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6N
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6L
September 30, 2015
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island...
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6H
September 30, 2015
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York
12-year-old Mwigulu Matonage Magesa from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6G
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush heart that he says makes...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush heart that he says makes him feel safe...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush heart that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6F
September 30, 2015
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I6C
September 30, 2015
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York
15-year-old Pendo Sengerema Noni from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-TANZANIA-ALBINISM
RTS2I6A
September 30, 2015
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten...
5-year-old Baraka Cosmas Lusambo from Tanzania poses for a portrait in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
USA-TANZANIA-ALBINISM
RTS2I69
September 30, 2015
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes...
New York, UNITED STATES
Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes him feel safe at...
13-year-old Emmanuel Festo Rutema from Tanzania poses for a portrait with a plush toy that he says makes him feel safe at night and that he sleeps with, in the Staten Island borough of New York in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-TANZANIA/ALBINISM
RTS2I68
September 30, 2015
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) put on their prosthetic arms as Baraka Cosmas...
New York, UNITED STATES
Magesa and Rutema put on their prosthetic arms as Cosmas looks on in their bedroom in the Staten Island...
Mwigulu Matonage Magesa (L) and Emmanuel Festo Rutema (R) put on their prosthetic arms as Baraka Cosmas (C) looks on in their bedroom in the Staten Island borough of New York, September 21, 2015. Albino body parts are highly valued in witchcraft and can fetch a high price. Superstition leads many to believe albino children are ghosts who bring bad luck. Some believe the limbs are more potent if the victims scream during amputation, according to a 2013 United Nations report. Albinism is a congenital disorder affecting about one in 20,000 people worldwide who lack pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. It is more common in sub-Saharan Africa and affects about one Tanzanian in 1,400. United Nations officials estimate about 75 albinos have been killed in the east African nation since 2000 and have voiced fears of rising attacks ahead of this year's election, as politicians seek good luck charms from witch doctors. Picture taken September 21, 2015. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
POPE-CUBA/SANTERIA
RTS18MY
September 15, 2015
A cactus, believed by Santeria followers to give protection for the house, hangs on the door of a house...
Havana, Cuba
A cactus, believed by Santeria followers to give protection for the house, hangs on the door of a house...
A cactus, believed by Santeria followers to give protection for the house, hangs on the door of a house in downtown Havana, August 28, 2015. Santeria adherents can only hope the upcoming visit from Pope Francis will somehow nudge the Church toward recognizing the millions of Cubans who identify with both religious traditions. Picture taken on August 28, 2015. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini
PAKISTAN-DAILYLIFE/
RTX1LRPZ
July 25, 2015
A man holds a bucket of lentils while feeding pigeons in front of a mosque in Karachi, Pakistan, July...
Karachi, Pakistan
Man holds a bucket of lentils while feeding pigeons in front of a mosque in Karachi
A man holds a bucket of lentils while feeding pigeons in front of a mosque in Karachi, Pakistan, July 25, 2015. Many Pakistanis believe feeding pigeons brings good luck. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A6V1
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths" in Baghdad, October 11, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 11, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST MEDIA POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A6UQ
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths" in Baghdad, October 11, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 11, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST MEDIA POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A6TR
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths" in Baghdad, October 11, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 11, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST MEDIA POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A6D9
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths" in Baghdad, October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY MEDIA CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A6CF
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths" in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST MEDIA POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A6BT
October 14, 2014
A crew member helps an actor during filming on the set of the television series, whose title is loosely...
Baghdad, Iraq
A crew member helps an actor during filming on the set of the television series, whose title is loosely...
A crew member helps an actor during filming on the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths", in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST MEDIA POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A6BB
October 14, 2014
A crew members helps an actor during filming on the set of the television series, whose title is loosely...
Baghdad, Iraq
A crew members helps an actor during filming on the set of the television series, whose title is loosely...
A crew members helps an actor during filming on the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths", in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST POLITICS MEDIA)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A6A0
October 14, 2014
Director Ali al-Qassim (L) is seen during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title...
Baghdad, Iraq
Director Ali al-Qassim (L) is seen during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title...
Director Ali al-Qassim (L) is seen during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths", in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY MEDIA CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A69C
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths", in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST MEDIA POLITICS) )
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A68P
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths", in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY MEDIA CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A683
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths", in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST MEDIA POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A66F
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths", in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST MEDIA POLITICS)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A65W
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths", in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST POLITICS MEDIA)
MIDEAST-CRISIS/
RTR4A65E
October 14, 2014
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
Baghdad, Iraq
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated...
A view shows actors during the filming of the set of the television series, whose title is loosely translated as "State of Myths" in Baghdad October 10, 2014. Humour and silly puns are being used as the latest weapons in the fight against extreme militants who now control large swathes of Iraqi territories. Playing on the words Kalifa (Caliphate) and Kurafa (myths or superstitions), the new Iraqi comedy show 'Dawlat al-Khurafa' (State of Myths), began airing on Iraqi state television early this month. Picture taken October 10, 2014. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani (IRAQ - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST POLITICS)
BRAZIL/
RTR3K0GE
April 04, 2014
A crucifix on a rosary is pictured inside a taxi in Rio de Janeiro April 4, 2014. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
A crucifix on a rosary is pictured inside a taxi in Rio de Janeiro
A crucifix on a rosary is pictured inside a taxi in Rio de Janeiro April 4, 2014. REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL - Tags: SOCIETY RELIGION TRANSPORT)
CENTRALAFRICA-CRISIS/
RTX15VBT
November 27, 2013
A fighter from a self-defence militia known as anti-balaka wears charms for protection in Mbakate village,...
Mbakate, Central African Republic
A fighter from a self-defence militia known as anti-balaka wears charms for protection in Mbakate village...
A fighter from a self-defence militia known as anti-balaka wears charms for protection in Mbakate village, Central African Republic November 25, 2013. The anti-balaka group in Mbakate say they are protecting their village from Seleka fighters. With Central African Republic slipping deeper into chaos, former colonial power France plans to boost its force there to around 1,000 troops to restore law and order until a much bigger African Union force fully deploys. The land-locked country has been gripped by violence since the mainly Muslim rebels, many of them fighters from neighbouring Sudan and Chad, seized power in the majority Christian country in March. Some 460,000 people - around a tenth of the population - have fled the sectarian violence their takeover ignited. REUTERS/Joe Penney (CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC - Tags: CIVIL UNREST MILITARY POLITICS)
KOREA-EDUCATION/FORTUNES
RTX135KI
September 03, 2013
A mother bows before religious idols that Shaman Choi Kuing-hun believes in as he looks on at his house...
SEONGNAM, South Korea
A mother bows before religious idols that Shaman Choi Kuing-hun believes in as he looks on at his house...
A mother bows before religious idols that Shaman Choi Kuing-hun believes in as he looks on at his house in Seongnam, south of Seoul, August 16, 2013. Anxious parents have long sought hints from fortune-tellers about how well their children will do in school. The shamans, men and women who perform traditional religious rites, say parents asking about their children's academic and career prospects - at 50,000 to 100,000 won ($45 to $90) an hour - usually take the advice they get very seriously. Picture taken on August 16, 2013. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY)
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