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Search results for: Swanky

INDIA-FEMALEBOUNCER/
RTX3BDTR
July 14, 2017
Joking with clients and colleagues, Mehrunnisha Shokat Ali might be mistaken for any other patron of...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: New Delhi woman bouncer pulls no punches
Joking with clients and colleagues, Mehrunnisha Shokat Ali might be mistaken for any other patron of the Social watering hole in the Indian capital's swanky Hauz Khas neighbourhood. But the intent gaze of her kohl-rimmed eyes, as she stands with arms folded on the edge of the dance floor in an all-black outfit, watching couples bob and twirl to the music, gives away her real occupation. She is Social's famous female bouncer. Mehrunnisha has been a bouncer for nearly a decade, and for the last three years, has done 10-hour night shifts at Social, which functions as a restaurant and co-working space seating 220 people by day, but morphs into a packed club at night. Now Mehrunnisha is expert in breaking up bar fights, frisking female customers, and uncovering illegal drugs. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "DELHI BOUNCER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: INDIA-FEMALEBOUNCER/
GLOBAL-RETAIL/
RTX36VHG
May 21, 2017
The logo of U.S. jeweller Tiffany & Co. is seen in Mexico City's swanky Polanco, Mexico May 20, 2017....
Mexico City, Mexico
The logo of U.S. jeweller Tiffany & Co. is seen in Mexico City's swanky Polanco
The logo of U.S. jeweller Tiffany & Co. is seen in Mexico City's swanky Polanco, Mexico May 20, 2017. Picture taken May 20, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero
GLOBAL-RETAIL/
RTX36SB3
May 21, 2017
Salvatore Ferragamo shop is seen in Mexico City's swanky Polanco, Mexico May 20, 2017. Picture taken...
Mexico City, Mexico
Salvatore Ferragamo shop is seen in Mexico City's swanky Polanco
Salvatore Ferragamo shop is seen in Mexico City's swanky Polanco, Mexico May 20, 2017. Picture taken May 20, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero
CHINA-MARKETS/EGGFUTURES
RTX1MPIV
August 02, 2015
Zhang Xiongjie looks at a computer screen as he works at his office in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, July...
Hangzhou, China
Zhang Xiongjie looks at a computer screen as he works at his office in Hangzhou
Zhang Xiongjie looks at a computer screen as he works at his office in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, July 27, 2015. A decade ago Zhang was a teenage infantryman patrolling China's bleak border with North Korea. Now he stays in swanky hotels and drives a Mercedes Benz CLS - a remarkable rags-to-riches journey achieved in part by dominating one of the most obscure corners of China's unruly financial markets: egg futures. Picture taken July 27, 2015. To match Feature CHINA-MARKETS/EGGFUTURES REUTERS/Chance Chan
CHINA-MARKETS/EGGFUTURES
RTX1MPIU
August 02, 2015
Zhang Xiongjie looks at a computer screen as he works at his office in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, July...
Hangzhou, China
Zhang Xiongjie looks at a computer screen as he works at his office in Hangzhou
Zhang Xiongjie looks at a computer screen as he works at his office in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, July 27, 2015. A decade ago Zhang was a teenage infantryman patrolling China's bleak border with North Korea. Now he stays in swanky hotels and drives a Mercedes Benz CLS - a remarkable rags-to-riches journey achieved in part by dominating one of the most obscure corners of China's unruly financial markets: egg futures. Picture taken July 27, 2015. To match Feature CHINA-MARKETS/EGGFUTURES REUTERS/Chance Chan
PRADA-STRATEGY/
RTR4P5ML
February 11, 2015
People stroll past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury goods...
Milan, Italy
People stroll past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan
People stroll past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury goods is to drum up same store sales by curbing expansion and wowing customers with new products, yet Prada continues to pay over the odds to open swanky new shops and stock them with handbags little changed from previous bestsellers. Prada, say analysts, now urgently needs to focus less on new stores and more on new handbags. Picture taken February 4. To match Analysis PRADA-STRATEGY/ REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini (ITALY - Tags: BUSINESS FASHION)
PRADA-STRATEGY/
RTR4P5M9
February 11, 2015
People walk past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury goods...
Milan, Italy
People walk past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan
People walk past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury goods is to drum up same store sales by curbing expansion and wowing customers with new products, yet Prada continues to pay over the odds to open swanky new shops and stock them with handbags little changed from previous bestsellers. Prada, say analysts, now urgently needs to focus less on new stores and more on new handbags. Picture taken February 4. To match Analysis PRADA-STRATEGY/ REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini (ITALY - Tags: BUSINESS FASHION)
PRADA-STRATEGY/
RTR4P5M4
February 11, 2015
A girl looks at a window of a Prada fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury...
Milan, Italy
Girl looks at a window of a Prada fashion store in downtown Milan
A girl looks at a window of a Prada fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury goods is to drum up same store sales by curbing expansion and wowing customers with new products, yet Prada continues to pay over the odds to open swanky new shops and stock them with handbags little changed from previous bestsellers. Prada, say analysts, now urgently needs to focus less on new stores and more on new handbags. Picture taken February 4. To match Analysis PRADA-STRATEGY/ REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini (ITALY - Tags: BUSINESS FASHION)
PRADA-STRATEGY/
RTR4P5LV
February 11, 2015
People walk past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury goods...
Milan, Italy
People walk past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan
People walk past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury goods is to drum up same store sales by curbing expansion and wowing customers with new products, yet Prada continues to pay over the odds to open swanky new shops and stock them with handbags little changed from previous bestsellers. Prada, say analysts, now urgently needs to focus less on new stores and more on new handbags. Picture taken February 4. To match Analysis PRADA-STRATEGY/ REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini (ITALY - Tags: BUSINESS FASHION)
PRADA-STRATEGY/
RTR4P5LJ
February 11, 2015
People walk past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury goods...
Milan, Italy
People walk past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan
People walk past Prada's fashion store in downtown Milan February 4, 2015. The trend in luxury goods is to drum up same store sales by curbing expansion and wowing customers with new products, yet Prada continues to pay over the odds to open swanky new shops and stock them with handbags little changed from previous bestsellers. Prada, say analysts, now urgently needs to focus less on new stores and more on new handbags. Picture taken February 4. To match Analysis PRADA-STRATEGY/ REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini (ITALY - Tags: BUSINESS FASHION)
TRAVEL-MEXICOCITY/
RTR3Y3D3
July 11, 2014
Tables are set for customers at Pujol, one of the world's 50 best restaurants, near Polanco's swanky...
Mexico City, Mexico
Tables stand ready for customers at Pujol in Mexico City
Tables are set for customers at Pujol, one of the world's 50 best restaurants, near Polanco's swanky hotel district in Mexico City May 15, 2014. An ancient megalopolis built in a drained lake rimmed by mountains, Mexico City consistently flies under the radar. Despite lacking the samba-steeped allure of Rio de Janeiro or the chic intellectualism of Buenos Aires, Mexico City also feels like a city on the up, benefiting from more than a decade of progressive city administrations who cleaned up the atmosphere, legalized gay marriage, introduced a successful bike-sharing scheme and spruced up the austere historic center. From high-end molecular gastronomy to endless street stalls selling insect-stuffed quesadillas, you're never likely to go hungry in Mexico City. Picture taken May 15, 2014. REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY TRAVEL)
TRAVEL-MEXICOCITY/
RTR3Y3BU
July 11, 2014
Tables are set for customers at Pujol, one of the world's 50 best restaurants, near Polanco's swanky...
Mexico City, Mexico
Tables are set for customers at Pujol, one of the world's 50 best restaurants, in Mexico City
Tables are set for customers at Pujol, one of the world's 50 best restaurants, near Polanco's swanky hotel district in Mexico City May 15, 2014. An ancient megalopolis built in a drained lake rimmed by mountains, Mexico City consistently flies under the radar. Despite lacking the samba-steeped allure of Rio de Janeiro or the chic intellectualism of Buenos Aires, Mexico City also feels like a city on the up, benefiting from more than a decade of progressive city administrations who cleaned up the atmosphere, legalized gay marriage, introduced a successful bike-sharing scheme and spruced up the austere historic center. From high-end molecular gastronomy to endless street stalls selling insect-stuffed quesadillas, you're never likely to go hungry in Mexico City. Picture taken May 15, 2014.
REUTERS/Tomas Bravo (MEXICO - Tags: FOOD SOCIETY TRAVEL)
Society
Society
Venezuela's 'Skyscraper Slum' - 02 Apr 2014
35 PICTURES
VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLNU
April 02, 2014
A man sits with his family in his apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February...
Caracas, Venezuela
A man sits with his family in his apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
A man sits with his family in his apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 35 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'VENEZUELA'S SKYSCRAPER SLUM'
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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLNR
April 02, 2014
A girl rides a bicycle on a balcony in the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 5, 2014. It...
Caracas, Venezuela
A girl rides a bicycle on a balcony in the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
A girl rides a bicycle on a balcony in the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 5, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 5, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 32 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'VENEZUELA'S SKYSCRAPER SLUM'
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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLNP
April 02, 2014
Paola Medina, 29, packs as she prepare to leave her apartment after living in the "Tower of David" skyscraper...
Caracas, Venezuela
Medina packs as she prepare to leave her apartment in the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Paola Medina, 29, packs as she prepare to leave her apartment after living in the "Tower of David" skyscraper for almost a year in Caracas March 25, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY POVERTY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 33 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'VENEZUELA'S SKYSCRAPER SLUM'
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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLNK
April 02, 2014
A woman uses her mobile phone during a blackout at the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas March 25,...
Caracas, Venezuela
A woman uses her mobile phone during a blackout at the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
A woman uses her mobile phone during a blackout at the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas March 25, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken March 25, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 34 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'VENEZUELA'S SKYSCRAPER SLUM'
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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLNJ
April 02, 2014
Men salvage metal on the 30th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It...
Caracas, Venezuela
Men salvage metal on the 30th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Men salvage metal on the 30th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 21 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'VENEZUELA'S SKYSCRAPER SLUM'
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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLNE
April 02, 2014
Men rest after salvaging metal on the 30th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February...
Caracas, Venezuela
Men rest after salvaging metal on the 30th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Men rest after salvaging metal on the 30th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLNB
April 02, 2014
Gabriel Rivas, 30, lifts weights on a balcony on the 28th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in...
Caracas, Venezuela
Rivas lifts weights on a balcony on the 28th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Gabriel Rivas, 30, lifts weights on a balcony on the 28th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 9, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 9, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY BUSINESS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 17 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'VENEZUELA'S SKYSCRAPER SLUM'
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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLN8
April 02, 2014
Adriana Gutierrez and her son Carlos Adrian watch TV as they sit on their bed in their 24th floor apartment...
Caracas, Venezuela
Gutierrez and her son watch TV as they sit on their bed in their 24th floor apartment inside the "Tower...
Adriana Gutierrez and her son Carlos Adrian watch TV as they sit on their bed in their 24th floor apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 28 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'VENEZUELA'S SKYSCRAPER SLUM'
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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLN6
April 02, 2014
A view of the lobby from the top of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts...
Caracas, Venezuela
A view of the lobby from the top of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
A view of the lobby from the top of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 31 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'VENEZUELA'S SKYSCRAPER SLUM'
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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLN4
April 02, 2014
Children ride bicycles on one of the top inhabited floors of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas...
Caracas, Venezuela
Children ride bicycles on one of the top inhabited floors of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas...
Children ride bicycles on one of the top inhabited floors of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 9, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 9, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLN0
April 02, 2014
A woman walks on a roof of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter...
Caracas, Venezuela
A woman walks on a roof of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
A woman walks on a roof of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLMW
April 02, 2014
Men salvage metal on the 30th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It...
Caracas, Venezuela
Men salvage metal on the 30th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Men salvage metal on the 30th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLMS
April 02, 2014
Maria works in a sewing workshop in her apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February...
Caracas, Venezuela
Maria works in a sewing workshop in her apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Maria works in a sewing workshop in her apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 6, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 6, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLMP
April 02, 2014
A shop is seen through a doorway, at an apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February...
Caracas, Venezuela
A shop is seen through a doorway inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
A shop is seen through a doorway, at an apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 6, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 6, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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VENEZUELA-SLUM/
RTR3JLMN
April 02, 2014
The city is seen from the 44th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 9, 2014....
Caracas, Venezuela
The city is seen from the 44th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
The city is seen from the 44th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 9, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 9, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY CITYSCAPE)

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April 02, 2014
A woman looks out of a window at her shop in a corridor inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas...
Caracas, Venezuela
A woman looks out of a window at her shop in a corridor inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas...
A woman looks out of a window at her shop in a corridor inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 6, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 6, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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April 02, 2014
Teenagers chat on the 10th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts...
Caracas, Venezuela
Teenagers chat on the 10th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Teenagers chat on the 10th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

Teenagers chat on the 10th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
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April 02, 2014
Children stand along the corridors at the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It...
Caracas, Venezuela
Children stand along the corridors at the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Children stand along the corridors at the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Thais Ruiz, 36, talks on the telephone and drinks coffee as she sits under a crack in the roof of her...
Caracas, Venezuela
Ruiz sits under a crack in the roof of her living room on the 27th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper...
Thais Ruiz, 36, talks on the telephone and drinks coffee as she sits under a crack in the roof of her living room on the 27th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 6, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 6, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Nicolas Alvarez speaks on the telephone in his apartment on the 27th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper...
Caracas, Venezuela
Nicolas Alvarez speaks on the telephone in his apartment on the 27th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper...
Nicolas Alvarez speaks on the telephone in his apartment on the 27th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 5, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 5, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Francisco, 18, cooks in his apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 9, 2014....
Caracas, Venezuela
Francisco cooks in his apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Francisco, 18, cooks in his apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 9, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 9, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Genesis opens a balcony door in an apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February...
Caracas, Venezuela
Genesis opens a balcony door in an apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Genesis opens a balcony door in an apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 6, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 6, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Men sit and look down at a basketball court inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February...
Caracas, Venezuela
Men sit and look down at a basketball court inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Men sit and look down at a basketball court inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY BUSINESS)

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April 02, 2014
Reyes smokes a cigar outside his shop inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014....
Caracas, Venezuela
Reyes smokes a cigar outside his shop inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Reyes smokes a cigar outside his shop inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Adriana Gutierrez sits in the living of her 24th floor apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper...
Caracas, Venezuela
Adriana Gutierrez sits in the living of her 24th floor apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper...
Adriana Gutierrez sits in the living of her 24th floor apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Jose Aular poses next to a portrait of Venezuela's late President Hugo Chavez in his apartment inside...
Caracas, Venezuela
Aular poses next to a portrait of Venezuela's late President Chavez in his apartment inside the "Tower...
Jose Aular poses next to a portrait of Venezuela's late President Hugo Chavez in his apartment inside the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 6, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 6, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Beatriz fills out a crossword while taking care of her grandchildren outside their apartment, inside...
Caracas, Venezuela
Beatriz fills out a crossword while taking care of her grandchildren at the "Tower of David" skyscraper...
Beatriz fills out a crossword while taking care of her grandchildren outside their apartment, inside of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)


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April 02, 2014
People walk along a corridor on the 10th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February...
Caracas, Venezuela
People walk along a corridor on the 10th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
People walk along a corridor on the 10th floor of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 6, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 6, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Children play in the lobby of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas January 29, 2014. It boasts...
Caracas, Venezuela
Children play in the lobby of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Children play in the lobby of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas January 29, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken January 29, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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April 02, 2014
Boys play basketball in a garage at the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts...
Caracas, Venezuela
Boys play basketball in a garage at the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Boys play basketball in a garage at the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
A skyscraper known as the "Tower of David" is seen in Caracas February 5, 2014. It boasts a helicopter...
Caracas, Venezuela
A skyscraper known as the "Tower of David" is seen in Caracas
A skyscraper known as the "Tower of David" is seen in Caracas February 5, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 5, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
Clothes hang to dry at the top of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts...
Caracas, Venezuela
Clothes hang to dry at the top of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
Clothes hang to dry at the top of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 3, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 3, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
A man, who is on his way to work, walks through the lobby of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas...
Caracas, Venezuela
A man walks through the lobby of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas
A man, who is on his way to work, walks through the lobby of the "Tower of David" skyscraper in Caracas February 5, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken February 5, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)

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April 02, 2014
A skyscraper known as the "Tower of David" is seen in Caracas January 31, 2014. It boasts a helicopter...
Caracas, Venezuela
A skyscraper known as the "Tower of David" is seen in Caracas
A skyscraper known as the "Tower of David" is seen in Caracas January 31, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken January 31, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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April 02, 2014
A skyscraper known as the "Tower of David" is seen in Caracas January 22, 2014. It boasts a helicopter...
Caracas, Venezuela
A skyscraper known as the "Tower of David" is seen in Caracas
A skyscraper known as the "Tower of David" is seen in Caracas January 22, 2014. It boasts a helicopter landing pad, glorious views of the Avila mountain range, and large balconies for weekend barbecues. Yet a 45-storey skyscraper in the center of Venezuela's capital Caracas is no five-star hotel or swanky apartment block: it is a slum, probably the highest in the world. Dubbed the "Tower of David", the building was intended to be a shining new financial center but was abandoned around 1994 after the death of its developer - banker and horse-breeder David Brillembourg - and the collapse of the financial sector. Squatters invaded the huge concrete skeleton in 2007, then-president Hugo Chavez's socialist government turned a blind eye, and now about 3,000 people call the tower their home. Picture taken January 22, 2014. REUTERS/Jorge Silva (VENEZUELA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POVERTY)


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Cannes Film Festival
Cannes Film Festival
Candid Moments - 26 May 2013
35 PICTURES
DETROIT/PUGH
RTR2X1S4
January 29, 2012
The three-story condominium belonging to Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh is seen on Adelaide...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH
The three-story condominium belonging to Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh is seen on Adelaide Street in the Brush Park area of Detroit, Michigan January 20, 2012. Reportedly the Bank of America has started foreclosure proceedings on the downtown condo that Pugh purchased for $331.370 in 2005. An ex-television broadcaster known for a swanky wardrobe and outspoken presence, Pugh was solidly voted in as president of Detroit's city council two years ago, carrying a mandate to clean up corruption and undo decades of mismanagement. But battles over strip-club legislation, water bills and inflated budgets defined his early days in office. Picture taken January 20, 2012. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS REAL ESTATE)
DETROIT/PUGH
RTR2X1S1
January 29, 2012
The three-story condominium belonging to Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh is seen on Adelaide...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH
The three-story condominium belonging to Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh is seen on Adelaide Street in the Brush Park area of Detroit, Michigan January 20, 2012. Reportedly the Bank of America has started foreclosure proceedings on the downtown condo that Pugh purchased for $331.370 in 2005. An ex-television broadcaster known for a swanky wardrobe and outspoken presence, Pugh was solidly voted in as president of Detroit's city council two years ago, carrying a mandate to clean up corruption and undo decades of mismanagement. But battles over strip-club legislation, water bills and inflated budgets defined his early days in office. Picture taken January 20, 2012. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS REAL ESTATE)
DETROIT/PUGH
RTR2X1RS
January 29, 2012
Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh listens to a council member speak during a City Council meeting...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH
Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh listens to a council member speak during a City Council meeting in Detroit, Michigan January 20, 2012. An ex-television broadcaster known for a swanky wardrobe and outspoken presence, Pugh was solidly voted in as president of Detroit's city council two years ago, carrying a mandate to clean up corruption and undo decades of mismanagement. But battles over strip-club legislation, water bills and inflated budgets defined his early days in office. Picture taken January 20, 2012. To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS PROFILE POLITICS)
DETROIT/PUGH
RTR2X1RO
January 29, 2012
Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh listens to a council member speak during a City Council meeting...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH
Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh listens to a council member speak during a City Council meeting in Detroit, Michigan January 20, 2012. An ex-television broadcaster known for a swanky wardrobe and outspoken presence, Pugh was solidly voted in as president of Detroit's city council two years ago, carrying a mandate to clean up corruption and undo decades of mismanagement. But battles over strip-club legislation, water bills and inflated budgets defined his early days in office. Picture taken January 20, 2012. To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS PROFILE POLITICS)
DETROIT/PUGH
RTR2X1RM
January 29, 2012
Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh listens to a council member speak during a City Council meeting...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH
Detroit City Council president Charles Pugh listens to a council member speak during a City Council meeting in Detroit, Michigan January 20, 2012. An ex-television broadcaster known for a swanky wardrobe and outspoken presence, Pugh was solidly voted in as president of Detroit's city council two years ago, carrying a mandate to clean up corruption and undo decades of mismanagement. But battles over strip-club legislation, water bills and inflated budgets defined his early days in office. Picture taken January 20, 2012. To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS PROFILE POLITICS)
DETROIT/PUGH
RTR2X1RC
January 29, 2012
Detroit City Council President Charles Pugh (L) listens to a council member speak during a City Council...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH
Detroit City Council President Charles Pugh (L) listens to a council member speak during a City Council meeting in Detroit, Michigan January 20, 2012. An ex-television broadcaster known for a swanky wardrobe and outspoken presence, Pugh was solidly voted in as president of Detroit's city council two years ago, carrying a mandate to clean up corruption and undo decades of mismanagement. But battles over strip-club legislation, water bills and inflated budgets defined his early days in office. Picture taken January 20, 2012. To match Feature DETROIT/PUGH REUTERS/Rebecca Cook (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
NFL-REDSKINS/HAYNESWORTH
RTR2LMZR
April 26, 2011
Tennessee Titans' Albert Haynesworth holds a spoon as he gets ready to eat fruit cobbler after a Thanksgiving...
Detroit, UNITED STATES
File photo shows Titans' Haynesworth holding a spoon as he gets ready to eat fruit cobbler after a Thanksgiving...
Tennessee Titans' Albert Haynesworth holds a spoon as he gets ready to eat fruit cobbler after a Thanksgiving Day NFL football game in Detroit, Michigan in this November 27, 2008 file photo. Washington Redskins football player Haynesworth was indicted by a grand jury on April 26, 2011 for allegedly fondling a server at a swanky hotel bar in the U.S. capital, U.S. prosecutors said. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook/Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT FOOTBALL CRIME LAW)
BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM
RTXCV45
March 17, 2009
A view of the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro March 5, 2009. 52-year-old entrepreneur Rolf Glaser, who...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
To match feature BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM
A view of the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro March 5, 2009. 52-year-old entrepreneur Rolf Glaser, who made his money in currency trading, plans to build around 10 well-appointed villas on top of Vidigal where tourists will be able to taste luxury and the gritty life of the slum at the same time. And then there is the view. In a city renowned for the jaw-dropping beauty of its beaches and forested mountains, the slum dwellers of Vidigal perched high at the end of the swanky Leblon beach area have a panoramic vista to make real-estate agents' eyes water. Picture taken on March 5, 2009. To match feature BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM
RTXCV43
March 17, 2009
German entrepreneur Rolf Glaser looks at the view from his house at the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
To match feature BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM
German entrepreneur Rolf Glaser looks at the view from his house at the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro March 5, 2009. The 52-year-old entrepreneur, who made his money in currency trading, plans to build around 10 well-appointed villas on top of Vidigal where tourists will be able to taste luxury and the gritty life of the slum at the same time. And then there is the view. In a city renowned for the jaw-dropping beauty of its beaches and forested mountains, the slum dwellers of Vidigal perched high at the end of the swanky Leblon beach area have a panoramic vista to make real-estate agents' eyes water. Picture taken on March 5, 2009. To match feature BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM
RTXCV40
March 17, 2009
A view of the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro March 5, 2009. 52-year-old entrepreneur Rolf Glaser, who...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
To match feature BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM
A view of the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro March 5, 2009. 52-year-old entrepreneur Rolf Glaser, who made his money in currency trading, plans to build around 10 well-appointed villas on top of Vidigal where tourists will be able to taste luxury and the gritty life of the slum at the same time. And then there is the view. In a city renowned for the jaw-dropping beauty of its beaches and forested mountains, the slum dwellers of Vidigal perched high at the end of the swanky Leblon beach area have a panoramic vista to make real-estate agents' eyes water. Picture taken on March 5, 2009. To match feature BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM
RTXCV3X
March 17, 2009
A view of the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro March 5, 2009. 52-year-old entrepreneur Rolf Glaser, who...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
To match feature BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM
A view of the Vidigal slum in Rio de Janeiro March 5, 2009. 52-year-old entrepreneur Rolf Glaser, who made his money in currency trading, plans to build around 10 well-appointed villas on top of Vidigal where tourists will be able to taste luxury and the gritty life of the slum at the same time. And then there is the view. In a city renowned for the jaw-dropping beauty of its beaches and forested mountains, the slum dwellers of Vidigal perched high at the end of the swanky Leblon beach area have a panoramic vista to make real-estate agents' eyes water. Picture taken on March 5, 2009. To match feature BRAZIL-SLUMS/TOURISM REUTERS/Sergio Moraes (BRAZIL BUSINESS SOCIETY TRAVEL)
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