Ajax loader

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Tableland

AFGHANISTAN/
RTR3HR85 
March 19, 2014 
A man walks in a desert during an election campaign in Kunduz province, northern Afghanistan March 19,... 
Kunduz, Afghanistan 
A man walks in a desert during an election campaign in Kunduz province 
A man walks in a desert during an election campaign in Kunduz province, northern Afghanistan March 19, 2014. The Afghan presidential elections will be held on April 5. REUTERS/Ahmad Masood (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) 
CONGO-DEMOCRATIC/
RTX128MH 
August 02, 2013 
Congolese M23 rebel leader Bisimwa Bertrand speaks to the media in Bunagana August 2, 2013, after the... 
BUNAGANA, Congo, the Democratic Republic of the 
Congolese M23 rebel leader Bisimwa Bertrand speaks to the media in Bunagana 
Congolese M23 rebel leader Bisimwa Bertrand speaks to the media in Bunagana August 2, 2013, after the deadline set by UN peacekeepers for rebels in the volatile eastern Democratic Republic of Congo to lay down their weapons passed on Thursday. Bertrand dismissed the UN ultimatum and said the path to peace in the country is through the ongoing peace talks in Kampala. The UN peacekeeping mission's mandate is to disarm the rebel groups, such as the M23, if necessary by force. REUTERS/James Akena (DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC CONGO - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
KAZAKHSTAN/
RTX128DC 
August 02, 2013 
Sheep graze near yurts, traditional nomad felt tents, on the mountainous Assy plateau, about 2,500 meters... 
Almaty, Kazakhstan 
Sheep graze near yurts on the mountainous Assy plateau 
Sheep graze near yurts, traditional nomad felt tents, on the mountainous Assy plateau, about 2,500 meters (8,202 feet) above sea level, some 90 kilometres (56 miles) east of Almaty August 1, 2013. Modern farmers follow the centuries old nomadic tradition of relocating from settlements to the plateau to tend to their livestock for a summer season. Picture taken August 1, 2013. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov (KAZAKHSTAN - Tags: SOCIETY AGRICULTURE ANIMALS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
BOLIVIA/
RTR34UID 
July 11, 2012 
Women trample on cold potatoes during a process to make "Chuno" (dehydrated black potato) in La Cumbre... 
La Paz, Bolivia 
Women trample on cold potatoes during the process to make ÒChunoÓ (dehydrated black potato) in La Cumbre... 
Women trample on cold potatoes during a process to make "Chuno" (dehydrated black potato) in La Cumbre over 4000 metres above sea level on the outskirts of La Paz,July 5, 2012. Potatoes and tubers of the same family are dehydrated during the winter time in the colder regions, exposing the products to very low temperatures for several days, in order to be able to store them for several years. Picture taken in July 5, 2012. (BOLIVIA - Tags: AGRICULTURE FOOD SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
INDIA/
RTR2UUSV 
December 05, 2011 
A group of men walk across the Panchgani Tableland at sunrise, about 260km (161 miles) south of Mumbai,... 
Mumbai, India 
A group of men walk across the Panchgani Tableland at sunrise 
A group of men walk across the Panchgani Tableland at sunrise, about 260km (161 miles) south of Mumbai, December 5, 2011. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
INDIA/
RTR2UUSS 
December 05, 2011 
A man leads his horse in front of parked horse-drawn carriages on the Panchgani Tableland, about 260km... 
Mumbai, India 
A man leads his horse in front of parked horse-drawn carriages on the Panchgani Tableland 
A man leads his horse in front of parked horse-drawn carriages on the Panchgani Tableland, about 260km (161 miles) south of Mumbai, December 5, 2011. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (INDIA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) 
FRANCE-APOCALYPSE/BUGARACH
RTR2O4VL 
June 26, 2011 
The village and Peak of Bugarach, the highest point of the Corbieres massif, in southwestern France,... 
BUGARACH, France 
The peak of Bugarach, surrounded in legend for centuries, has become a focal point for many Apocalypse... 
The village and Peak of Bugarach, the highest point of the Corbieres massif, in southwestern France, is seen June 24, 2011. Surrounded in legend for centuries, Bugarach has become a focal point for many Apocalypse believers as rumours have circulated that its mountain contains doors into other worlds, or that extraterrestrials will return here on Judgment day to take refuge at their base. Residents of the tiny southern French hamlet, population 194, are witness to a rising influx of Doomsday believers convinced it is the only place that will survive judgment day, December 21, 2012. Picture taken June 24, 2011 REUTERS/Jean-Philippe Arles (FRANCE - Tags: SOCIETY TRAVEL) 
CHINA/
RTR2N5JQ 
June 01, 2011 
Children dance during a ceremony celebrating International Children's Day at a rural primary school in... 
MIN, China 
Children dance during a ceremony celebrating International Children's Day at a rural primary school in... 
Children dance during a ceremony celebrating International Children's Day at a rural primary school in Min county, Gansu province June 1, 2011. The school, consisting of five teachers and 102 pupils, is located on a mountain measuring more than 2,000 meters (6,562 ft) high. REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA - Tags: EDUCATION SOCIETY) 
PERU-CRASH/
RTR2AWMU 
February 25, 2010 
An aerial view shows the Humming Bird Nazca Lines in the Nazca desert in this October 5, 2005, file photo.... 
Nazca, Peru 
File photo shows an aerial view of the Humming Bird Nazca Lines in the Nazca desert 
An aerial view shows the Humming Bird Nazca Lines in the Nazca desert in this October 5, 2005, file photo. At least seven people died on Thursday as a small plane carrying tourists over Peru's famed Nazca lines crashed into the desert, officials said after the latest mishap in the country's tourism industry. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo (PERU - Tags: TRANSPORT DISASTER TRAVEL) 
USA/
RTXR3TU 
November 25, 2009 
New Mexico Highway 117 is pictured near the "El Malpais" National Monument near Grants, New Mexico November... 
GRANTS, UNITED STATES 
New Mexico Highway 117 is pictured near the "El Malpais" National Monument near Grants, New Mexico 
New Mexico Highway 117 is pictured near the "El Malpais" National Monument near Grants, New Mexico November 24, 2009. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENT TRAVEL) 
NEPAL/
RTXAG2T 
November 10, 2008 
The Himalayan range is seen in this aerial view taken from a passenger aircraft flying over Nepal at... 
Nepal, India 
The Himalayan range is seen in this aerial view in Nepal 
The Himalayan range is seen in this aerial view taken from a passenger aircraft flying over Nepal at a height of 9,144 meters (30,000 feet), November 9, 2008. In background is the Tibetan Plateau. Picture taken November 9, 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (NEPAL) 
NEPAL/
RTXAG2Q 
November 10, 2008 
Mount Everest, the highest peak in the world, with an altitude of 8,848 meters (29,028 feet), is seen... 
Nepal, Nepal 
Mount Everest with an altitude of 8,848 meters is seen in Nepal 
Mount Everest, the highest peak in the world, with an altitude of 8,848 meters (29,028 feet), is seen in this aerial view taken from a passenger aircraft flying over Nepal at a height of 9,144 meters (30,000 feet), November 9, 2008. Everest is part of the Himalayan mountain range along the border of Nepal and Tibet. In background is the Tibetan Plateau. Picture taken November 9, 2008. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan (NEPAL) 
CHINA-TIBET/
RTR1ZXYI 
April 27, 2008 
A Chinese policeman walks just off the road as he stands guard at the Lhatse Borderline pass near the... 
Shigatse, China 
A Chinese policeman walks just off the road as he stands guard at the Lhatse Borderline pass near the... 
A Chinese policeman walks just off the road as he stands guard at the Lhatse Borderline pass near the Tibetan city of Shigatse April 27, 2008, as part of security for the ascent by the Olympic torch of Mount Everest, also known as Qomolangma. A small group of foreign reporters have been allowed into the region to witness the Olympic torch's ascent of Everest. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA) 
KAZAKHSTAN/
RTR1WCRF 
January 27, 2008 
Camels are seen on the snow-covered Yshkonyr plateau, some 50 kilometers (31 miles) south-west Almaty,... 
YSHKONYR, Kazakhstan 
Camels are seen on the snow-covered Yshkonyr plateau outside Almaty 
Camels are seen on the snow-covered Yshkonyr plateau, some 50 kilometers (31 miles) south-west Almaty, January 27, 2008. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov (KAZAKHSTAN) 
SWITZERLAND/
RTR1R2D4 
June 23, 2007 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on a small way on the Engstligenalp... 
ENGSTLIGENALP, Switzerland 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on the Engstligenalp 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on a small way on the Engstligenalp to pasture during summer, June 23, 2007. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND) 
SWITZERLAND/
RTR1R2D3 
June 23, 2007 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on a small way on the Engstligenalp... 
ENGSTLIGENALP, Switzerland 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on the Engstligenalp 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on a small way on the Engstligenalp to pasture during summer, June 23, 2007. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND) 
SWITZERLAND/
RTR1R2D0 
June 23, 2007 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on a small way on the Engstligenalp... 
ENGSTLIGENALP, Switzerland 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on the Engstligenalp 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on a small way on the Engstligenalp to pasture during summer, June 23, 2007. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND) 
SWITZERLAND/
RTR1R2CZ 
June 23, 2007 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on a small way on the Engstligenalp... 
ENGSTLIGENALP, Switzerland 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on the Engstligenalp 
Swiss farmers bring more than 350 cows during the traditional "Alpaufzug" on a small way on the Engstligenalp to pasture during summer, June 23, 2007. REUTERS/Ruben Sprich (SWITZERLAND) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW6F 
February 02, 2007 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone inspects his cattle on his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Weatherstone inspects his cattle on his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone inspects his cattle on his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Sydney February 2, 2007. The U.N. climate panel issued its strongest warning yet on Friday that human activities are heating the planet, putting extra pressure on governments to do more to combat accelerating global warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the most authoritative group on warming which groups 2,500 scientists from more than 130 nations, predicted more severe rains, melting glaciers, droughts and heatwaves and a slow rise in sea levels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW6D 
February 02, 2007 
Sheep huddle together near a dam on a drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands city of... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Sheep huddle together near a dam on a drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of... 
Sheep huddle together near a dam on a drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 kilometres (120miles) south-west of Sydney February 2, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW6A 
February 02, 2007 
Sheep huddle together near a dam on a drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Sheep huddle together near a dam on a drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of... 
Sheep huddle together near a dam on a drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Sydney February 2, 2007. The U.N. climate panel issued its strongest warning yet on Friday that human activities are heating the planet, putting extra pressure on governments to do more to combat accelerating global warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the most authoritative group on warming which groups 2,500 scientists from more than 130 nations, predicted more severe rains, melting glaciers, droughts and heatwaves and a slow rise in sea levels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW68 
February 02, 2007 
Cars pass a sign regarding water restrictions on the outskirts of the drought-affected southern-tablelands... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Cars pass a sign regarding water restrictions on the outskirts of the drought-affected southern-tablelands... 
Cars pass a sign regarding water restrictions on the outskirts of the drought-affected southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Sydney February 2, 2007. The U.N. climate panel issued its strongest warning yet on Friday that human activities are heating the planet, putting extra pressure on governments to do more to combat accelerating global warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the most authoritative group on warming which groups 2,500 scientists from more than 130 nations, predicted more severe rains, melting glaciers, droughts and heatwaves and a slow rise in sea levels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW66 
February 02, 2007 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone walks out of his disused shearing shed on his drought-affected property... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Weatherstone walks out of his disused shearing shed on his drought-affected property... 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone walks out of his disused shearing shed on his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Sydney February 2, 2007. The U.N. climate panel issued its strongest warning yet on Friday that human activities are heating the planet, putting extra pressure on governments to do more to combat accelerating global warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the most authoritative group on warming which groups 2,500 scientists from more than 130 nations, predicted more severe rains, melting glaciers, droughts and heatwaves and a slow rise in sea levels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW65 
February 02, 2007 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone inspects a drinking trough on his drought-affected property near... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Weatherstone inspects a drinking trough on his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone inspects a drinking trough on his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Sydney February 2, 2007. The U.N. climate panel issued its strongest warning yet on Friday that human activities are heating the planet, putting extra pressure on governments to do more to combat accelerating global warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the most authoritative group on warming which groups 2,500 scientists from more than 130 nations, predicted more severe rains, melting glaciers, droughts and heatwaves and a slow rise in sea levels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW63 
February 02, 2007 
A windmill and dead tree are seen on a drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of... 
Goulburn, Australia 
A windmill and dead tree are seen on a drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of... 
A windmill and dead tree are seen on a drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Sydney February 2, 2007. The U.N. climate panel issued its strongest warning yet on Friday that human activities are heating the planet, putting extra pressure on governments to do more to combat accelerating global warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the most authoritative group on warming which groups 2,500 scientists from more than 130 nations, predicted more severe rains, melting glaciers, droughts and heatwaves and a slow rise in sea levels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW61 
February 02, 2007 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone walks through a row of River She-ok trees on his drought-affected... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Weatherstone walks through a row of River She-ok trees on his drought-affected property... 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone walks through a row of River She-ok trees on his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Sydney February 2, 2007. The U.N. climate panel issued its strongest warning yet on Friday that human activities are heating the planet, putting extra pressure on governments to do more to combat accelerating global warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the most authoritative group on warming which groups 2,500 scientists from more than 130 nations, predicted more severe rains, melting glaciers, droughts and heatwaves and a slow rise in sea levels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW5W 
February 02, 2007 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone inspects his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Weatherstone inspects his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city... 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone inspects his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Sydney February 2, 2007. The U.N. climate panel issued its strongest warning yet on Friday that human activities are heating the planet, putting extra pressure on governments to do more to combat accelerating global warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the most authoritative group on warming which groups 2,500 scientists from more than 130 nations, predicted more severe rains, melting glaciers, droughts and heatwaves and a slow rise in sea levels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LW5R 
February 02, 2007 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone inspects a drinking trough on his drought-affected property near... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Weatherstone inspects a drinking trough on his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Australian farmer John Weatherstone inspects a drinking trough on his drought-affected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (124 miles) southwest of Sydney February 2, 2007. The U.N. climate panel issued its strongest warning yet on Friday that human activities are heating the planet, putting extra pressure on governments to do more to combat accelerating global warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the most authoritative group on warming which groups 2,500 scientists from more than 130 nations, predicted more severe rains, melting glaciers, droughts and heatwaves and a slow rise in sea levels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUWR 
February 01, 2007 
A dog stands guard as farmer John Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property... 
Goulburn, Australia 
A dog stands guard as farmer Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near... 
A dog stands guard as farmer John Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120 miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUWQ 
February 01, 2007 
A dead tree can be seen on a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city... 
Goulburn, Australia 
A dead tree can be seen on a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city... 
A dead tree can be seen on a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120 miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUWM 
February 01, 2007 
Australian farmer John Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Australian farmer John Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUWK 
February 01, 2007 
Sheep graze on a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn,... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Sheep graze on a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn,... 
Sheep graze on a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120 miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUWJ 
February 01, 2007 
Sheep graze on a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn,... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Sheep graze on a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn,... 
Sheep graze on a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUWE 
February 01, 2007 
Australian farmer John Christensen inspects his drought-effected property with his dogs near the southern-tablelands... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Christensen inspects his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands city... 
Australian farmer John Christensen inspects his drought-effected property with his dogs near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUWB 
February 01, 2007 
A sheep walks across a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn,... 
Goulburn, Australia 
A sheep walks across a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn,... 
A sheep walks across a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120 miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUWA 
February 01, 2007 
Farmer John Christensen poses with one of his newborn Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Farmer Christensen poses with one of his newborn Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Farmer John Christensen poses with one of his newborn Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120miles) south-west of Sydney, February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUW5 
February 01, 2007 
A cow walks across a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn,... 
Goulburn, Australia 
A cow walks across a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn,... 
A cow walks across a drought-effected paddock on a property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120miles) south-west of Sydney, February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUW3 
February 01, 2007 
Australian farmer John Christensen gets hay to hand-feed his Alpacas on his drought-effected property... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Christensen gets hay to hand-feed his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near... 
Australian farmer John Christensen gets hay to hand-feed his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 kilometres (120miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUW0 
February 01, 2007 
Australian farmer John Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Australian farmer Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Australian farmer John Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120 miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
GLOBALWARMING/
RTR1LUVZ 
February 01, 2007 
Australian farmer John Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Goulburn, Australia 
Farmer Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands... 
Australian farmer John Christensen hand-feeds his Alpacas on his drought-effected property near the southern-tablelands city of Goulburn, located 200 km (120 miles) south-west of Sydney February 1, 2007. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will release a long-awaited report assessing the human link to pollution, global warming and climate change in Paris on February 2, 2007. A draft of the report, which draws on research by 2,500 scientists from more than 130 countries, projects a big rise in temperatures this century and warns of more heatwaves, floods, droughts and rising sea levels linked to greenhouses gases released mainly by the use of fossil fuels. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA) 
SPAIN-SHIP/
RTR1LRU0 
January 29, 2007 
A helicopter flies over a refrigerator ship that ran aground near Algeciras, southern Spain, January... 
multiple cities, Spain 
Helicopter flies over refrigerator ship that ran aground near Algeciras 
A helicopter flies over a refrigerator ship that ran aground near Algeciras, southern Spain, January 29, 2007. The ship ran aground on a Spanish beach in stormy seas on Sunday, breaching the hull and spilling engine fuel over protected coasts near Gibraltar, Spanish media reported environmental groups as saying. REUTERS/Anton Meres (SPAIN) 
MONGOLIA
RTRCP4H 
May 26, 2005 
A Mongolian horseman tends wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192... 
Kharkhorin, Mongolia 
A Mongolian horseman tends wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin. 
A Mongolian horseman tends wild horses at a steppe in Orkhon Valley near Kharkorin, about 310 km (192 miles) west of capital Ulan Bator May 26, 2005. About one third of Mongolia's 2.5 million people are nomads rely on horses for their mobile and pastoral way of life Picture taken May 26, 2005. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV CC/KS 
AUSTRALIA
RTXMT1H 
July 25, 2004 
Sheep feed and drink from a small tank in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the... 
Cooma, Australia 
Sheep feed and drink from a small tank in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near th..... 
Sheep feed and drink from a small tank in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. [Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia.] 
AUSTRALIA
RTXMT1G 
July 25, 2004 
Sheep feed in front of barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands... 
Cooma, Australia 
Sheep feed in front of barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelan..... 
Sheep feed in front of barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. [Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia.] 
AUSTRALIA
RTXMT1F 
July 25, 2004 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe holds a single blade of grass in a dried-up dam on his property near the Southern... 
Cooma, Australia 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe holds a single blade of grass in a dried-up dam on his property near the Southe..... 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe holds a single blade of grass in a dried-up dam on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. [Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia.] 
ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA CLIMATE
RTRIOGU 
July 24, 2004 
File picture shows sheep eat grain on a farmer's drought-affected property near the Southern Tablelands... 
Canberra, Australia 
File picture shows sheep eat grain on a farmer's drought-affected property near the Southern ... 
File picture shows sheep eat grain on a farmer's drought-affected property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. Sheep on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property eats grain on his drought-affected property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma, located 100 km (62 miles) south of Canberra, in this file picture date July 24, 2004. Australia could be up to two degrees Celsius warmer by 2030 and face more bushfires, heatwaves and storms despite global efforts to reduce greenhouse gases, a climate change report showed on Tuesday. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray 
ENVIRONMENT AUSTRALIA CLIMATE
RTRIOF6 
July 24, 2004 
File picture shows a farmer chcking a paddock on his drought-affected property near the Southern Tablelands... 
Canberra, Australia 
File picture shows a farmer chcking a paddock on his drought-affected property near the Southern ... 
File picture shows a farmer chcking a paddock on his drought-affected property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. Farmer Stephen Rolfe checks a paddock on his drought-affected property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma, located 100 km (62 miles) south of Canberra, in this file picture dated July 24, 2004. Australia could be up to two degrees Celsius warmer by 2030 and face more bushfires, heatwaves and storms despite global efforts to reduce greenhouse gases, a climate change report showed on Tuesday. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray 
WEATHER AUSTRALIA FARMING
RTRFH6E 
July 24, 2004 
Sheep eat distributed feed in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands... 
Cooma, Australia 
To match feature Weather=Australia-Farms. 
Sheep eat distributed feed in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4,000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century. Australian farmers face a future climate that is drier, with more extremes of droughts and floods, and being able to adapt swiftly will be the key to the industry's survival, a senior Australian scientist has reported. Picture taken July 24, 2004. TO MATCH FEATURE WEATHER-AUSTRALIA-FARMS. . REUTERS/David Gray DG/FA 
WEATHER AUSTRALIA FARMING
RTRFH66 
July 24, 2004 
Sheep feed and drink from a small tank in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the... 
Cooma, Australia 
To match feature Weather-Australia-Farms. 
Sheep feed and drink from a small tank in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4,000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century. Australian farmers face a future climate that is drier, with more extremes of droughts and floods, and being able to adapt swiftly will be the key to the industry's survival, a senior Australian scientist has reported. Picture taken July 24, 2004. TO MATCH FEATURE WEATHER-AUSTRALIA-FARMS REUTERS/David Gray DG/FA 
WEATHER AUSTRALIA FARMING
RTRFH60 
July 24, 2004 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe drives his truck as he feeds his sheep flock on his property near the Southern Tablelands... 
Cooma, Australia 
To match feature Weather-Australia-Farms. 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe drives his truck as he feeds his sheep flock on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4,000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century. Australian farmers face a future climate that is drier, with more extremes of droughts and floods, and being able to adapt swiftly will be the key to the industry's survival, a senior Australian scientist has reported. Picture taken July 24, 2004. TO MATCH FEATURE WEATHER-AUSTRALIA-FARMS REUTERS/David Gray DG/FA 
WEATHER AUSTRALIA FARMING
RTRFH5M 
July 24, 2004 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe touches a dried-up dam on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma... 
Cooma, Australia 
To match feature Weather-Australia-Farms. 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe touches a dried-up dam on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4,000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century. Australian farmers face a future climate that is drier, with more extremes of droughts and floods, and being able to adapt swiftly will be the key to the industry's survival, a senior Australian scientist has reported. Picture taken July 24, 2004. TO MATCH FEATURE WEATHER-AUSTRALIA-FARMS. . NTRES REUTERS/David Gray DG/FA 
DG
RTR80S2 
July 24, 2004 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe feeds his sheep flock on his drought-effected property near the Southern Tablelands... 
Cooma, Australia 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe feeds his sheep flock on his drought-effected property near the Southern ... 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe feeds his sheep flock on his drought-effected property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. Farmer Stephen Rolfe feeds his sheep flock on his drought-effected property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma, located 100 kilometres south of Canberra. Severe rain deficiency has persisted along Australia's east coast and adjacent ranges according to a report released August 3 by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray 
DG
RTR79KW 
July 24, 2004 
Sheep feed and drink in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands... 
Cooma, Australia 
Sheep feed and drink in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern ... 
Sheep feed and drink in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. Sheep feed and drink from a small tank in barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray 
DG
RTR79KR 
July 24, 2004 
Sheep feed in front of barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands... 
Cooma, Australia 
Sheep feed in front of barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern ... 
Sheep feed in front of barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. Sheep feed in front of barren paddocks on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray 
DG
RTR79KK 
July 24, 2004 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe holfds a single blade of grass on his property near the Southern Tablelands town... 
Cooma, Australia 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe holfds a single blade of grass on his property near the Southern Tablelands ... 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe holfds a single blade of grass on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. Farmer Stephen Rolfe holds a single blade of grass in a dried-up dam on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray 
FOOD AUSTRALIA DROUGHT
RTR79KE 
July 24, 2004 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe checks a fence-line in a barren paddock on his property near the Southern Tablelands... 
Cooma, Australia 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe checks a fence-line on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe checks a fence-line in a barren paddock on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray DG 
FOOD AUSTRALIA DROUGHT
RTR79K8 
July 24, 2004 
Sheep wait to be fed on Farmer Stephan Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July... 
Cooma, Australia 
Sheep wait to be fed on farmer Stephen Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. 
Sheep wait to be fed on Farmer Stephan Rolfe's property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray DG 
DG
RTR79K3 
July 24, 2004 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe prepares to feed his sheep on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of... 
Cooma, Australia 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe prepares to feed his sheep on his property near the Southern Tablelands town ...... 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe prepares to feed his sheep on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. Farmer Stephen Rolfe prepares to feed his sheep flock on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray 
FOOD AUSTRALIA DROUGHT
RTR79JW 
July 24, 2004 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe feeds his sheep flock on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma... 
Cooma, Australia 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe his sheep flock near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma. 
Farmer Stephen Rolfe feeds his sheep flock on his property near the Southern Tablelands town of Cooma July 24, 2004. Rolfe's property of over 4000 acres remains in the grip of yet another dry year after being decimated in 2002 by Australia's worst drought in a century, with 87.3 percent of the state of New South Wales still drought-declared. Recent studies by Australian scientists have identified weather patterns that lead to restricted rainfall over a long period, with evidence in previous centuries that this long wet-dry-wet hydrological cycle has applied to large parts of Australia. Picture taken July 24, 2004. REUTERS/David Gray DG 
COLOMBIA
RTRBJCQ 
January 30, 2004 
A view of The Savanna of Bogota, January 30, 2004. With an altitude of about 2,600 meters above sea level,... 
El Rosal, Colombia - Republic of 
A VIEW THE SAVANNA OF BOGOTA DURING COLD SPELL. 
A view of The Savanna of Bogota, January 30, 2004. With an altitude of about 2,600 meters above sea level, low temperatures are threatening potato crops, vegetables and flowers, which are peasants' subsistence. Friday's temperatures dipped to four degrees Celsius, 40 degrees Fahrenheit, which is considered cold for the region. REUTERS/Eliana Aponte EA/GAC 
Sort by 
Display 
Items per page 
Page 
of 1