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Search results for: Tailor

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BAHRAIN
RTX8600C
October 30, 2020
A tailor stiches Bahraini traditional wedding dresses in a traditional market "Local Souq", following...
Manama, Bahrain
A tailor stiches Bahraini traditional wedding dresses in a traditional market "Local Souq", following...
A tailor stiches Bahraini traditional wedding dresses in a traditional market "Local Souq", following the outbreak of the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Manama, Bahrain, October 30, 2020. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9A
October 15, 2020
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E99
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E98
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E96
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E95
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E94
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E92
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E91
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E90
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Z
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Y
October 15, 2020
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8X
October 15, 2020
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8W
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S
October 15, 2020
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R
October 15, 2020
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8P
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8M
October 15, 2020
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8L
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E
October 15, 2020
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C
October 15, 2020
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY
RTX81538
October 09, 2020
A mannequin wearing a protective mask is pictured at a tailoring shop, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
HALLE, Germany
A mannequin wearing a protective mask is pictured at a tailoring shop, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
A mannequin wearing a protective mask is pictured at a tailoring shop, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Halle, Germany, October 9, 2020. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY
RTX81531
October 09, 2020
Protective masks are pictured on the window of a tailoring shop, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
HALLE, Germany
Protective masks are pictured on the window of a tailoring shop, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Protective masks are pictured on the window of a tailoring shop, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Halle, Germany, October 9, 2020. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch
CHINA-ANNIVERSARY/
RTX7YWQ6
September 30, 2020
Tailor Wu irons clothes as a television broadcasts live Chinese President Xi Jinping attending the wreath...
Beijing, China
Tailor Wu irons clothes as a television broadcasts live Chinese President Xi Jinping attending the wreath...
Tailor Wu irons clothes as a television broadcasts live Chinese President Xi Jinping attending the wreath laying ceremony at the Monument to the People's Heroes in Tiananmen Square on Martyrs' Day, at his laundry and tailor shop in Beijing, China September 30, 2020. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang
CHINA-ANNIVERSARY/
RTX7YWQ5
September 30, 2020
Tailor Wu irons clothes as a television broadcasts live the wreath laying ceremony at the Monument to...
Beijing, China
Tailor Wu irons clothes as a television broadcasts live the wreath laying ceremony at the Monument to...
Tailor Wu irons clothes as a television broadcasts live the wreath laying ceremony at the Monument to the People's Heroes in Tiananmen Square on Martyrs' Day, at his laundry and tailor shop in Beijing, China September 30, 2020. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang
CHINA-ANNIVERSARY/
RTX7YWQ7
September 30, 2020
A resident speaks to Tailor Wu as a television broadcasts live the Monument to the People's Heroes in...
Beijing, China
Resident speaks to Tailor Wu as a television broadcasts live the Monument to the People's Heroes in...
A resident speaks to Tailor Wu as a television broadcasts live the Monument to the People's Heroes in Tiananmen Square before the wreath laying ceremony on Martyrs' Day, at his laundry and tailor shop in Beijing, China September 30, 2020. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3E9
September 17, 2020
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3E7
September 17, 2020
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors...
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3E6
September 17, 2020
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, sits inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, sits inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors...
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, sits inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3E5
September 17, 2020
Michaela Boskova, Head Tailor at The Deck, works at the new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Michaela Boskova, Head Tailor at The Deck, works at the new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
Michaela Boskova, Head Tailor at The Deck, works at the new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3E4
September 17, 2020
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3E2
September 17, 2020
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3E1
September 17, 2020
Michaela Boskova, Head Tailor at The Deck, works at the new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Michaela Boskova, Head Tailor at The Deck, works at the new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
Michaela Boskova, Head Tailor at The Deck, works at the new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3E0
September 17, 2020
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors...
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3DY
September 17, 2020
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, sits inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, sits inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors...
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, sits inside her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3DO
September 17, 2020
Signage is seen outside The Deck, at the new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively...
London, United Kingdom
Signage is seen outside The Deck, at the new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively...
Signage is seen outside The Deck, at the new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3DN
September 17, 2020
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
London, United Kingdom
Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront...
Daisy Knatchbull, Founder of The Deck, stands outside of her new premises on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3DM
September 17, 2020
Branded clothes hangers are seen at The Deck, on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively...
London, United Kingdom
Branded clothes hangers are seen at The Deck, on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively...
Branded clothes hangers are seen at The Deck, on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3DP
September 17, 2020
A general interior view of the new premises of The Deck, on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively...
London, United Kingdom
A general interior view of the new premises of The Deck, on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively...
A general interior view of the new premises of The Deck, on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, is seen in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3DB
September 17, 2020
A mannequin is seen at The Deck, on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to...
London, United Kingdom
A mannequin is seen at The Deck, on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to...
A mannequin is seen at The Deck, on Savile Row, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women to open on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
BRITAIN-SAVILE ROW/THE DECK
RTX7W3DD
September 17, 2020
A street sign for Savile Row is seen as The Deck, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women on...
London, United Kingdom
A street sign for Savile Row is seen as The Deck, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women on...
A street sign for Savile Row is seen as The Deck, the first shopfront tailors exclusively for women on the world famous street, renowned for its bespoke clothes making, opens in London, Britain, September 16, 2020. Picture taken September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GLOBAL-FASHION
RTX7UPTE
September 10, 2020
A vendor prepares a dress suit at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak...
Mexico City, Mexico
A vendor prepares a dress suit at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak...
A vendor prepares a dress suit at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Mexico City, Mexico September 9, 2020. Picture taken, September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GLOBAL-FASHION
RTX7UPTD
September 10, 2020
A tailor measures a jacket at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues...
Mexico City, Mexico
A tailor measures a jacket at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues...
A tailor measures a jacket at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Mexico City, Mexico September 9, 2020. Picture taken, September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GLOBAL-FASHION
RTX7UPTC
September 10, 2020
A tailor makes a mold for a dress suit at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Mexico City, Mexico
A tailor makes a mold for a dress suit at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
A tailor makes a mold for a dress suit at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Mexico City, Mexico September 9, 2020. Picture taken, September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GLOBAL-FASHION
RTX7UPTB
September 10, 2020
A vendor adjusts a tie on a mannequin at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak...
Mexico City, Mexico
A vendor adjusts a tie on a mannequin at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak...
A vendor adjusts a tie on a mannequin at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Mexico City, Mexico September 9, 2020. Picture taken, September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GLOBAL-FASHION
RTX7UPT9
September 10, 2020
A tailor measures a jacket at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues...
Mexico City, Mexico
A tailor measures a jacket at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues...
A tailor measures a jacket at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Mexico City, Mexico September 9, 2020. Picture taken, September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GLOBAL-FASHION
RTX7UPT7
September 10, 2020
A vendor adjusts a tie on a mannequin at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak...
Mexico City, Mexico
A vendor adjusts a tie on a mannequin at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak...
A vendor adjusts a tie on a mannequin at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Mexico City, Mexico September 9, 2020. Picture taken, September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GLOBAL-FASHION
RTX7UPT8
September 10, 2020
A tailor makes a mold for a dress suit at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Mexico City, Mexico
A tailor makes a mold for a dress suit at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
A tailor makes a mold for a dress suit at Santana tailor shop, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Mexico City, Mexico September 9, 2020. Picture taken, September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
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