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Search results for: Tax-free

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AIRLINES-AIRPORTS
RTS38RYC
May 18, 2020
Tax-free shop assistants arrange goods as flights resume during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak...
Riga, Latvia
Flights resume during coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Riga international airport
Tax-free shop assistants arrange goods as flights resume during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Riga international airport, Latvia May 18, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
Pictures Report
Pictures Report
Where the top 2020 candidates stand on jobs, taxes and the economy
14 PICTURES
BRITAIN-EU/IRELAND-HORSERACING
RTX3CYTI
July 26, 2017
Irish racehorse trainers and breeders fear a Brexit that impedes the free movement of animals could threaten...
RATOATH, Ireland
The Wider Image: Brexit: all bets off for Irish horse racing industry
Irish racehorse trainers and breeders fear a Brexit that impedes the free movement of animals could threaten its success on the track and position as Europe's largest producer of thoroughbreds. Ireland is widely considered the European Union member most at risk from next door Britain's exit from the bloc, potentially cutting its land route to mainland Europe for exports and hindering trade with its key UK market. Few sectors are as integrated as the two islands' racing and breeding industries that, according to Horse Racing Ireland, the national authority for thoroughbred racing, contribute over 1 billion euros a year to Ireland's 189-billion-euro economy. "Our fears are that if there any trade barriers or any tax or tariffs on movement of horses between Ireland and England, that could have a detrimental effect," said Henry Beeby, chief Executive of Goffs, Ireland's leading bloodstock sales company. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne SEARCH "KILCOYNE RACING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: BRITAIN-EU/IRELAND-HORSERACING
PEOPLE-COSBY/
RTS1789M
June 15, 2017
A man and woman stand with signs reading "Free Mr. Cosby" and "Stop wasting tax payer money" on the fourth...
NORRISTOWN, UNITED STATES
People stand with signs on the fourth day of jury deliberation in Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial at...
A man and woman stand with signs reading "Free Mr. Cosby" and "Stop wasting tax payer money" on the fourth day of jury deliberation in Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pennsylvania, U.S. June 15, 2017. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
EUROZONE-GREECE/PROTESTS-FARMERS
RTSYMAH
February 14, 2017
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Athens, Greece
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration to demand tax reductions and compensation, in Athens, Greece February 14, 2017. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
EUROZONE-GREECE/PROTESTS-FARMERS
RTSYMAF
February 14, 2017
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Athens, Greece
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration to demand tax reductions and compensation, in Athens, Greece February 14, 2017. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
EUROZONE-GREECE/PROTESTS-FARMERS
RTSYMAC
February 14, 2017
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Athens, Greece
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration to demand tax reductions and compensation, in Athens, Greece February 14, 2017. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
EUROZONE-GREECE/PROTESTS-FARMERS
RTSYMAB
February 14, 2017
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Athens, Greece
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration to demand tax reductions and compensation, in Athens, Greece February 14, 2017. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
EUROZONE-GREECE/PROTESTS-FARMERS
RTSYMA3
February 14, 2017
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Athens, Greece
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration...
Greek farmers distribute cabbage for free in front of the parliament building during a demonstration to demand tax reductions and compensation, in Athens, Greece February 14, 2017. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis
JAPAN-TOURISM/CHINA
RTX284F0
February 23, 2016
People cross a street outside a tax free department store popular among Chinese tourists in Tokyo, Japan,...
Tokyo, Japan
People cross a street outside a tax free department store popular among Chinese tourists in Tokyo
People cross a street outside a tax free department store popular among Chinese tourists in Tokyo, Japan, February 11, 2016. Chinese tourists spent less in Tokyo shops during the Lunar New Year holidays compared with a year earlier, retailers said, as a stronger yen and slower economic growth at home discouraged the kind of "explosive buying" that became a buzzword in 2015. Picture taken February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
JAPAN-ECONOMY/
RTX26L1J
February 12, 2016
Chinese tourists look at a brochure of a tax free department store in Tokyo, Japan, February 4, 2016....
Tokyo, Japan
Chinese tourists look at a brochure of a tax free department store in Tokyo
Chinese tourists look at a brochure of a tax free department store in Tokyo, Japan, February 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
JAPAN-TOURISM/CHINA
RTX26L13
February 12, 2016
Chinese tourists stand outside a tax free department store in Tokyo, Japan, February 4, 2016. Chinese...
Tokyo, Japan
Chinese tourists stand outside a tax free department store in Tokyo, Japan
Chinese tourists stand outside a tax free department store in Tokyo, Japan, February 4, 2016. Chinese tourists spent less in Tokyo shops during the Lunar New Year holidays compared with a year earlier, retailers said, as a stronger yen and slower economic growth at home discouraged the kind of "explosive buying" that became a buzzword in 2015. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
JAPAN-ECONOMY/
RTX26L11
February 12, 2016
People cross a street outside a tax free department store popular among Chinese tourists in Tokyo, Japan,...
Tokyo, Japan
People cross a street outside a tax free department store popular among Chinese tourists in Tokyo
People cross a street outside a tax free department store popular among Chinese tourists in Tokyo, Japan, February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
ARGENTINA-ECONOMY/
RTX200JV
December 24, 2015
A woman walks past a supermarket as other two women push their trolleys in Buenos Aires, Argentina, December...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A woman walks past a supermarket as other two women push their trolleys in Buenos Aires
A woman walks past a supermarket as other two women push their trolleys in Buenos Aires, Argentina, December 24, 2015. Days into his presidency, Mauricio Macri faces his first big threats as he seeks to fix Argentina's ailing economy: inflation and recession. In his first policy moves since taking office on December 10, the free markets advocate made good on his promises to eliminate capital controls and cut hefty export taxes. To match story ARGENTINA-ECONOMY/ REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ECONOMY/
RTX200JQ
December 24, 2015
Argentina's President Mauricio Macri waves as he leaves Buenos Aires' cathedral December 11, 2015. Days...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President Mauricio Macri waves as he leaves Buenos Aires' cathedral
Argentina's President Mauricio Macri waves as he leaves Buenos Aires' cathedral December 11, 2015. Days into his presidency, Macri faces his first big threats as he seeks to fix Argentina's ailing economy: inflation and recession. In his first policy moves since taking office on December 10, the free markets advocate made good on his promises to eliminate capital controls and cut hefty export taxes. Picture taken December 11, 2015. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ECONOMY/
RTX200JM
December 24, 2015
A woman carries her bags as she leaves a supermarket in Buenos Aires, Argentina, December 24, 2015. Days...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A woman carries her bags as she leaves a supermarket in Buenos Aires
A woman carries her bags as she leaves a supermarket in Buenos Aires, Argentina, December 24, 2015. Days into his presidency, Mauricio Macri faces his first big threats as he seeks to fix Argentina's ailing economy: inflation and recession. In his first policy moves since taking office on December 10, the free markets advocate made good on his promises to eliminate capital controls and cut hefty export taxes. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ECONOMY/
RTX200JL
December 24, 2015
A woman carries her bags as she leaves a supermarket in Buenos Aires, Argentina, December 24, 2015. Days...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
A woman carries her bags as she leaves a supermarket in Buenos Aires
A woman carries her bags as she leaves a supermarket in Buenos Aires, Argentina, December 24, 2015. Days into his presidency, Mauricio Macri faces his first big threats as he seeks to fix Argentina's ailing economy: inflation and recession. In his first policy moves since taking office on December 10, the free markets advocate made good on his promises to eliminate capital controls and cut hefty export taxes. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
TAIWAN-CHINA/
RTS3H25
October 07, 2015
Chinese tourists shop in the Everrich duty free shopping mall in Kinmen county, Taiwan, September 8,...
Kinmen, Taiwan
Chinese tourists shop in the Everrich duty free shopping mall in Kinmen county
Chinese tourists shop in the Everrich duty free shopping mall in Kinmen county, Taiwan, September 8, 2015. Rustic Kinmen, with a population of less than 129,000, is a half-hour ferry ride to China, but it takes an hour to fly to major Taiwan cities. Just off its shores, glass-walled high-rises wink seductively from the booming mainland port of Xiamen in one of China's most prosperous provinces. Kinmen is eyeing closer commercial ties with China. It wants to pipe water from Xiamen and has plans to build a bridge and set up a glittering free trade zone with the city. China is seeking unification with Taiwan under its "one country, two systems" formula by which Hong Kong, a former British colony, returned to Chinese rule in 1997. And Kinmen, or "Golden Gate", is a test for China's ambitions to recover Taiwan through soft power. Picture taken September 8, 2015. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang
Society
Society
Free Sex Offered in Protest - 17 Jun 2015
7 PICTURES
AUSTRIA-BROTHEL/
RTX1GVUR
June 17, 2015
A woman waits in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers...
Salzburg, Austria
A woman waits in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg
A woman waits in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers free sex in a summer-long protest over what its owner sees as punitive tax payments. "We are not paying taxes any more. Effective immediately: Free Entrance! Free Drinks! Free Sex!" the Pascha establishment in Salzburg posted on its website. Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller told Reuters he would compensate from his own pocket money that prostitutes working at the club will forego. Picture taken June 16, 2015. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
AUSTRIA-BROTHEL/
RTX1GVTO
June 17, 2015
Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller gestures in his nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub...
Salzburg, Austria
Owner "Pascha" Mueller gestures in his nightclub in Salzburg
Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller gestures in his nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers free sex in a summer-long protest over what its owner sees as punitive tax payments. "We are not paying taxes any more. Effective immediately: Free Entrance! Free Drinks! Free Sex!" the Pascha establishment in Salzburg posted on its website. Mueller told Reuters he would compensate from his own pocket money that prostitutes working at the club will forego. Picture taken June 16, 2015. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
AUSTRIA-BROTHEL/
RTX1GVTJ
June 17, 2015
A women waits in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers...
Salzburg, Austria
A woman waits in a nightclub in Salzburg
A women waits in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers free sex in a summer-long protest over what its owner sees as punitive tax payments. "We are not paying taxes any more. Effective immediately: Free Entrance! Free Drinks! Free Sex!" the Pascha establishment in Salzburg posted on its website. Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller told Reuters he would compensate from his own pocket money that prostitutes working at the club will forego. Picture taken June 16, 2015. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
AUSTRIA-BROTHEL/
RTX1GVTC
June 17, 2015
A woman walks up the stairs in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is...
Salzburg, Austria
A woman walks up the stairs in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg
A woman walks up the stairs in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers free sex in a summer-long protest over what its owner sees as punitive tax payments. "We are not paying taxes any more. Effective immediately: Free Entrance! Free Drinks! Free Sex!" the Pascha establishment in Salzburg posted on its website. Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller told Reuters he would compensate from his own pocket money that prostitutes working at the club will forego. Picture taken June 16, 2015. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
AUSTRIA-BROTHEL/
RTX1GVSV
June 17, 2015
Two women wait in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers...
Salzburg, Austria
Two women wait in a nightclub in Salzburg
Two women wait in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers free sex in a summer-long protest over what its owner sees as punitive tax payments. "We are not paying taxes any more. Effective immediately: Free Entrance! Free Drinks! Free Sex!" the Pascha establishment in Salzburg posted on its website. Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller told Reuters he would compensate from his own pocket money that prostitutes working at the club will forego. Picture taken June 16, 2015. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
AUSTRIA-BROTHEL/
RTX1GVSH
June 17, 2015
A woman stands in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers...
Salzburg, Austria
A woman stands in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg
A woman stands in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers free sex in a summer-long protest over what its owner sees as punitive tax payments. "We are not paying taxes any more. Effective immediately: Free Entrance! Free Drinks! Free Sex!" the Pascha establishment in Salzburg posted on its website. Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller told Reuters he would compensate from his own pocket money that prostitutes working at the club will forego. Picture taken June 16, 2015. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
AUSTRIA-BROTHEL/
RTX1GVPR
June 17, 2015
Two women wait in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers...
Salzburg, Austria
Two women wait in a nightclub in Salzburg
Two women wait in Pascha nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers free sex in a summer-long protest over what its owner sees as punitive tax payments. "We are not paying taxes any more. Effective immediately: Free Entrance! Free Drinks! Free Sex!" the Pascha establishment in Salzburg posted on its website. Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller told Reuters he would compensate from his own pocket money that prostitutes working at the club will forego. Picture taken June 16, 2015. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
AUSTRIA-BROTHEL/
RTX1GVNG
June 17, 2015
Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller sits next to a woman in his nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015....
Salzburg, Austria
Owner "Pascha" Mueller sits next to a woman in his nightclub in Salzburg
Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller sits next to a woman in his nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers free sex in a summer-long protest over what its owner sees as punitive tax payments. "We are not paying taxes any more. Effective immediately: Free Entrance! Free Drinks! Free Sex!" the Pascha establishment in Salzburg posted on its website. Mueller told Reuters he would compensate from his own pocket money that prostitutes working at the club will forego. Picture taken June 16, 2015. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
AUSTRIA-BROTHEL/
RTX1GVNE
June 17, 2015
Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller lights a cigarette in his nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015....
Salzburg, Austria
Owner "Pascha" Mueller lights a cigarette in his nightclub in Salzburg
Owner Hermann "Pascha" Mueller lights a cigarette in his nightclub in Salzburg, Austria, June 16, 2015. The nightclub is offering customers free sex in a summer-long protest over what its owner sees as punitive tax payments. "We are not paying taxes any more. Effective immediately: Free Entrance! Free Drinks! Free Sex!" the Pascha establishment in Salzburg posted on its website. Mueller told Reuters he would compensate from his own pocket money that prostitutes working at the club will forego. Picture taken June 16, 2015. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
USA-ELECTION/SANDERS
RTX1DNVO
May 19, 2015
Robin Hood Tax campaigners holds signs as Presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) holds a news...
Washington, USA
Campaigners hold signs in Washington
Robin Hood Tax campaigners holds signs as Presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) holds a news conference to discuss legislation “to provide tuition-free higher education for students at 4-year colleges and universities in the United States" at the U.S. Capitol in Washington May 19, 2015. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
USA-ELECTION/SANDERS
RTX1DNVI
May 19, 2015
Robin Hood Tax campaigners holds signs as Presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) holds a news...
Washington, USA
Campaigners hold signs in Washington
Robin Hood Tax campaigners holds signs as Presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) holds a news conference to discuss legislation “to provide tuition-free higher education for students at 4-year colleges and universities in the United States" at the U.S. Capitol in Washington May 19, 2015. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
USA-ELECTION/SANDERS
RTX1DNTP
May 19, 2015
A Robin Hood Tax campaigner holds up a sign as Presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) holds...
Washington, USA
A campaigner holds a sign in Washington
A Robin Hood Tax campaigner holds up a sign as Presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) holds a news conference to discuss legislation “to provide tuition-free higher education for students at 4-year colleges and universities in the United States" at the U.S. Capitol in Washington May 19, 2015. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
LME-MALAYSIA/TAX
RTR4UFZ4
March 23, 2015
Aluminium ingots are seen outside a warehouse that stores London Metal Exchange stocks in Port Klang...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Aluminium ingots are seen outside a warehouse that stores London Metal Exchange stocks in Port Klang...
Aluminium ingots are seen outside a warehouse that stores London Metal Exchange stocks in Port Klang Free Zone, outside Kuala Lumpur, March 23, 2015. Malaysia's customs agency hopes to reach an agreement soon with the London Metal Exchange, after the LME threatened to stop registering new metal in the country if the new Malaysian Goods and Services tax, due to take effect next month, was levied in two bonded zones there, a customs official said. Malaysia is a major storage point for LME metals, holding more than 430,000 tonnes, including nearly half of the LME's nickel stocks, 85 percent of its tin, a third of its lead and almost a fifth of its copper inventories. REUTERS/Olivia Harris
LME-MALAYSIA/TAX
RTR4UFYE
March 23, 2015
Aluminium ingots are seen outside a warehouse that stores London Metal Exchange stocks in Port Klang...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Aluminium ingots are seen outside a warehouse that stores London Metal Exchange stocks in Port Klang...
Aluminium ingots are seen outside a warehouse that stores London Metal Exchange stocks in Port Klang Free Zone, outside Kuala Lumpur, March 23, 2015. Malaysia's customs agency hopes to reach an agreement soon with the London Metal Exchange, after the LME threatened to stop registering new metal in the country if the new Malaysian Goods and Services tax, due to take effect next month, was levied in two bonded zones there, a customs official said. Malaysia is a major storage point for LME metals, holding more than 430,000 tonnes, including nearly half of the LME's nickel stocks, 85 percent of its tin, a third of its lead and almost a fifth of its copper inventories. REUTERS/Olivia Harris
USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS
RTR4OK4W
February 06, 2015
Men walk off dimensions on a field on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah, California January...
UKIAH, UNITED STATES
Men walk off dimensions on a field on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah
Men walk off dimensions on a field on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah, California January 23, 2015. An initial, 10,000-square-foot state-of-the art greenhouse is due to be erected within weeks on the land in Ukiah owned by Pinoleville Pomo Nation. It's the initial phase of a joint marijuana production and processing venture believed to be the first of its kind in the nation. The endeavor is expected to trigger similar ventures to bring cannabis cash to Native Americans, like the windfalls from tribal casinos and tax-free cigarettes sales. But the new opportunity has sparked controversy as tribes struggle with concerns about historically high rates of substance abuse. Picture taken January 23. To match Feature USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY DRUGS)
USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS
RTR4OK4U
February 06, 2015
A sign is shown near a greenhouse on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah, California January...
UKIAH, UNITED STATES
A sign is shown near a greenhouse on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah
A sign is shown near a greenhouse on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah, California January 23, 2015. An initial, 10,000-square-foot state-of-the art greenhouse is due to be erected within weeks on the land in Ukiah owned by Pinoleville Pomo Nation. It's the initial phase of a joint marijuana production and processing venture believed to be the first of its kind in the nation. The endeavor is expected to trigger similar ventures to bring cannabis cash to Native Americans, like the windfalls from tribal casinos and tax-free cigarettes sales. But the new opportunity has sparked controversy as tribes struggle with concerns about historically high rates of substance abuse. Picture taken January 23. To match Feature USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY DRUGS)
USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS
RTR4OK4Q
February 06, 2015
Barry Brautman (2nd L), president of FoxBarry Farms, stands with marijuana cultivators on the 250-member...
UKIAH, UNITED STATES
Barry Brautman, president of FoxBarry Farms, stands with marijuana cultivators on the 250-member Pinoleville...
Barry Brautman (2nd L), president of FoxBarry Farms, stands with marijuana cultivators on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah, California January 23, 2015. An initial, 10,000-square-foot state-of-the art greenhouse is due to be erected within weeks on the land in Ukiah owned by Pinoleville Pomo Nation. It's the initial phase of a joint marijuana production and processing venture believed to be the first of its kind in the nation. The endeavor is expected to trigger similar ventures to bring cannabis cash to Native Americans, like the windfalls from tribal casinos and tax-free cigarettes sales. But the new opportunity has sparked controversy as tribes struggle with concerns about historically high rates of substance abuse. Picture taken January 23. To match Feature USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY DRUGS)
USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS
RTR4OK3D
February 06, 2015
Angela James, vice chairperson of the tribal council on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation, is seen...
UKIAH, UNITED STATES
Angela James, vice chairperson of the tribal council on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation, is seen...
Angela James, vice chairperson of the tribal council on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation, is seen in Ukiah, California January 23, 2015. An initial, 10,000-square-foot state-of-the art greenhouse is due to be erected within weeks on the land in Ukiah owned by Pinoleville Pomo Nation. It's the initial phase of a joint marijuana production and processing venture believed to be the first of its kind in the nation. The endeavor is expected to trigger similar ventures to bring cannabis cash to Native Americans, like the windfalls from tribal casinos and tax-free cigarettes sales. But the new opportunity has sparked controversy as tribes struggle with concerns about historically high rates of substance abuse. Picture taken January 23. To match Feature USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT HEALTH BUSINESS SOCIETY DRUGS)
USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS
RTR4OK3A
February 06, 2015
Leona L. Williams, chairperson of the tribal council at the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation, is seen...
UKIAH, UNITED STATES
Leona L. Williams, chairperson of the tribal council at the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation, is seen...
Leona L. Williams, chairperson of the tribal council at the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation, is seen in Ukiah, California January 23, 2015. An initial, 10,000-square-foot state-of-the art greenhouse is due to be erected within weeks on the land in Ukiah owned by Pinoleville Pomo Nation. It's the initial phase of a joint marijuana production and processing venture believed to be the first of its kind in the nation. The endeavor is expected to trigger similar ventures to bring cannabis cash to Native Americans, like the windfalls from tribal casinos and tax-free cigarettes sales. But the new opportunity has sparked controversy as tribes struggle with concerns about historically high rates of substance abuse. Picture taken January 23. To match Feature USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT HEALTH DRUGS SOCIETY HEADSHOT BUSINESS)
USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS
RTR4OK37
February 06, 2015
Wood is stacked in a field on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah, California January 23,...
UKIAH, UNITED STATES
Wood is stacked in a field on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah, California
Wood is stacked in a field on the 250-member Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah, California January 23, 2015. An initial, 10,000-square-foot state-of-the art greenhouse is due to be erected within weeks on the land in Ukiah owned by Pinoleville Pomo Nation. It's the initial phase of a joint marijuana production and processing venture believed to be the first of its kind in the nation. The endeavor is expected to trigger similar ventures to bring cannabis cash to Native Americans, like the windfalls from tribal casinos and tax-free cigarettes sales. But the new opportunity has sparked controversy as tribes struggle with concerns about historically high rates of substance abuse. Picture taken January 23. To match Feature USA-MARIJUANA/NATIVEAMERICANS REUTERS/Robert Galbraith (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DRUGS SOCIETY BUSINESS HEALTH)
GERMANY-COURT/TAX
RTR4ICBG
December 17, 2014
Judges Michael Eichberger, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court Ferdinand Kirchhof and Reinhard...
Karlsruhe, Germany
Judges Eichberger, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court Kirchhof and Gaier take off their...
Judges Michael Eichberger, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court Ferdinand Kirchhof and Reinhard Gaier (L-R) take off their hats after the announcement of the verdict on an inheritance law file at Germany's Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) in Karlsruhe, December 17, 2014. Germany's Constitutional Court ruled on Wednesday that inheritance tax breaks granted to family-run companies were illegal in their current form, a verdict which could hurt many "Mittelstand" firms that form the backbone of the economy. The court gave lawmakers until mid-2016 to come up with a new law that ensures companies and individuals are treated equally. Until that time existing rules will apply, giving families who own firms time to resolve inheritance issues under the old regime. The case was brought by the Federal Fiscal Court, which challenged a 2009 law that allows ownership of family-run firms to be passed from one generation to the next tax free, provided the heirs keep it going for seven years and preserve jobs. Around 90 percent of German companies are family-run, employing more than half of the country's workforce and producing half of Germany's economic output. REUTERS/Ralf Stockhoff (GERMANY - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
GERMANY-COURT/TAX
RTR4ICB7
December 17, 2014
Ferdinand Kirchhof (4R), vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, announces the verdict on an...
Karlsruhe, Germany
Kirchhof, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, announces the verdict on an inheritance law...
Ferdinand Kirchhof (4R), vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, announces the verdict on an inheritance law file at Germany's Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) in Karlsruhe, December 17, 2014. Germany's Constitutional Court ruled on Wednesday that inheritance tax breaks granted to family-run companies were illegal in their current form, a verdict which could hurt many "Mittelstand" firms that form the backbone of the economy. The court gave lawmakers until mid-2016 to come up with a new law that ensures companies and individuals are treated equally. Until that time existing rules will apply, giving families who own firms time to resolve inheritance issues under the old regime. The case was brought by the Federal Fiscal Court, which challenged a 2009 law that allows ownership of family-run firms to be passed from one generation to the next tax free, provided the heirs keep it going for seven years and preserve jobs. Around 90 percent of German companies are family-run, employing more than half of the country's workforce and producing half of Germany's economic output. REUTERS/Ralf Stockhoff (GERMANY - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
GERMANY-COURT/TAX
RTR4ICAM
December 17, 2014
Ferdinand Kirchhof (C), vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, arrives with judges before...
Karlsruhe, Germany
Kirchhof, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, arrives with judges before the announcement...
Ferdinand Kirchhof (C), vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, arrives with judges before the announcement of the verdict on an inheritance law file at Germany's Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) in Karlsruhe, December 17, 2014. Germany's Constitutional Court ruled on Wednesday that inheritance tax breaks granted to family-run companies were illegal in their current form, a verdict which could hurt many "Mittelstand" firms that form the backbone of the economy. The court gave lawmakers until mid-2016 to come up with a new law that ensures companies and individuals are treated equally. Until that time existing rules will apply, giving families who own firms time to resolve inheritance issues under the old regime. The case was brought by the Federal Fiscal Court, which challenged a 2009 law that allows ownership of family-run firms to be passed from one generation to the next tax free, provided the heirs keep it going for seven years and preserve jobs. Around 90 percent of German companies are family-run, employing more than half of the country's workforce and producing half of Germany's economic output. REUTERS/Ralf Stockhoff (GERMANY - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
GERMANY-COURT/TAX
RTR4ICAE
December 17, 2014
Ferdinand Kirchhof, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, announces the verdict on an inheritance...
Karlsruhe, Germany
Kirchhof, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, announces the verdict on an inheritance law...
Ferdinand Kirchhof, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, announces the verdict on an inheritance law file at Germany's Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) in Karlsruhe, December 17, 2014. Germany's Constitutional Court ruled on Wednesday that inheritance tax breaks granted to family-run companies were illegal in their current form, a verdict which could hurt many "Mittelstand" firms that form the backbone of the economy. The court gave lawmakers until mid-2016 to come up with a new law that ensures companies and individuals are treated equally. Until that time existing rules will apply, giving families who own firms time to resolve inheritance issues under the old regime. The case was brought by the Federal Fiscal Court, which challenged a 2009 law that allows ownership of family-run firms to be passed from one generation to the next tax free, provided the heirs keep it going for seven years and preserve jobs. Around 90 percent of German companies are family-run, employing more than half of the country's workforce and producing half of Germany's economic output. REUTERS/Ralf Stockhoff (GERMANY - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
GERMANY-COURT/TAX
RTR4IC9V
December 17, 2014
Ferdinand Kirchhof, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, takes off his hat before the announcement...
Karlsruhe, Germany
Kirchhof, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, takes off his hat before the announcement...
Ferdinand Kirchhof, vice-president of Germany's Constitutional Court, takes off his hat before the announcement of the verdict on an inheritance law file at Germany's Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) in Karlsruhe, December 17, 2014. Germany's Constitutional Court ruled on Wednesday that inheritance tax breaks granted to family-run companies were illegal in their current form, a verdict which could hurt many "Mittelstand" firms that form the backbone of the economy. The court gave lawmakers until mid-2016 to come up with a new law that ensures companies and individuals are treated equally. Until that time existing rules will apply, giving families who own firms time to resolve inheritance issues under the old regime. The case was brought by the Federal Fiscal Court, which challenged a 2009 law that allows ownership of family-run firms to be passed from one generation to the next tax free, provided the heirs keep it going for seven years and preserve jobs. Around 90 percent of German companies are family-run, employing more than half of the country's workforce and producing half of Germany's economic output. REUTERS/Ralf Stockhoff (GERMANY - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS BUSINESS)
USA-POLITCS/
RTR4GFDJ
December 02, 2014
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) wipes away tears during a news conference following a House Republican...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. House Speaker Boehner wipes away tears during a news conference following a House Republican caucus...
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) wipes away tears during a news conference following a House Republican caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington December 2, 2014. Boehner was moved while listening to remarks about the ABLE Act, proposed legislation to make tax-free savings accounts available to people with disabilities to cover certain expenses. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
US-IRELAND-BUDGET/
RTR4A5RM
October 14, 2014
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering...
Dublin, Ireland
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering...
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering the 2015 Budget in Dublin October 14, 2014. Ireland will phase out a tax loophole that multinationals use to save billions of dollars as part of sweeping changes to its corporate tax structure announced in Tuesday's first austerity-free budget in seven years. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (IRELAND - Tags: BUSINESS)
US-IRELAND-BUDGET/
RTR4A5RE
October 14, 2014
A man sits on barriers erected to keep demonstrators away from Leinster House during the announcement...
Dublin, Ireland
A man sits on barriers erected to keep demonstrators away from Leinster House during the announcement...
A man sits on barriers erected to keep demonstrators away from Leinster House during the announcement of the 2015 Budget in Dublin October 14, 2014. Ireland will phase out a tax loophole that multinationals use to save billions of dollars as part of sweeping changes to its corporate tax structure announced in Tuesday's first austerity-free budget in seven years. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (IRELAND - Tags: BUSINESS)
US-IRELAND-BUDGET/
RTR4A5QM
October 14, 2014
A man protests at the gates of Leinster House during the announcement of the 2015 Budget in Dublin October...
Dublin, Ireland
A man protests at the gates of Leinster House during the announcement of the 2015 Budget in Dublin
A man protests at the gates of Leinster House during the announcement of the 2015 Budget in Dublin October 14, 2014. Ireland will phase out a tax loophole that multinationals use to save billions of dollars as part of sweeping changes to its corporate tax structure announced in Tuesday's first austerity-free budget in seven years. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (IRELAND - Tags: BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
US-IRELAND-BUDGET/
RTR4A5OA
October 14, 2014
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan prepares to pose for the media on the steps of Leinster House before...
Dublin, Ireland
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan prepares to pose for the media on the steps of Leinster House before...
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan prepares to pose for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering the 2015 Budget in Dublin October 14, 2014. Ireland will phase out a tax loophole that multinationals use to save billions of dollars as part of sweeping changes to its corporate tax structure announced in Tuesday's first austerity-free budget in seven years. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (IRELAND - Tags: BUSINESS)
US-IRELAND-BUDGET/
RTR4A5O5
October 14, 2014
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering...
Dublin, Ireland
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering...
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering the 2015 Budget in Dublin October 14, 2014. Ireland will phase out a tax loophole that multinationals use to save billions of dollars as part of sweeping changes to its corporate tax structure announced in Tuesday's first austerity-free budget in seven years. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (IRELAND - Tags: BUSINESS)
US-IRELAND-BUDGET/
RTR4A5NR
October 14, 2014
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering...
Dublin, Ireland
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering...
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering the 2015 Budget in Dublin October 14, 2014. Ireland will phase out a tax loophole that multinationals use to save billions of dollars as part of sweeping changes to its corporate tax structure announced in Tuesday's first austerity-free budget in seven years. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (IRELAND - Tags: BUSINESS)
US-IRELAND-BUDGET/
RTR4A5NK
October 14, 2014
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering...
Dublin, Ireland
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering...
Minister for Finance Michael Noonan poses for the media on the steps of Leinster House before delivering the 2015 Budget in Dublin October 14, 2014. Ireland will phase out a tax loophole that multinationals use to save billions of dollars as part of sweeping changes to its corporate tax structure announced in Tuesday's first austerity-free budget in seven years. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (IRELAND - Tags: BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
JAPAN-ECONOMY/CHAMPAGNE
RTR3THLR
June 12, 2014
A bartender selects a bottle of champagne at Goss, a champagne bar, at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo...
Tokyo, Japan
A bartender serves a flute of champagne at Goss, a champagne bar, at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo...
A bartender selects a bottle of champagne at Goss, a champagne bar, at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo June 10, 2014. Watching a bevy of young professionals quaffing sparkling wine, there was little sign that an increase in Japan's sales tax in April caused anything more than a hiccup in the economy. Japan needs people spending with confidence if a radical strategy adopted by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is to succeed in breaking the economy free of two decades of deflation and sub-par growth. Government data covering the period after the tax was increased to 8 percent from 5 percent at the start of April has begun to trickle in. Household spending and retail sales in April dropped the most in three years. But policymakers need to wait until July or so for a fuller picture of the tax impact. For the time being, champagne sales and other untraditional measures may offer a good early read on consumption, which makes up 60 percent of the economy. Picture taken June 10, 2014. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS SOCIETY)
JAPAN-ECONOMY/CHAMPAGNE
RTR3THLP
June 12, 2014
A bartender serves a flute of champagne at Goss, a champagne bar, at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo...
Tokyo, Japan
A bartender serves a flute of champagne at Goss, a champagne bar, at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo...
A bartender serves a flute of champagne at Goss, a champagne bar, at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo June 10, 2014. Watching a bevy of young professionals quaffing sparkling wine, there was little sign that an increase in Japan's sales tax in April caused anything more than a hiccup in the economy. Japan needs people spending with confidence if a radical strategy adopted by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is to succeed in breaking the economy free of two decades of deflation and sub-par growth. Government data covering the period after the tax was increased to 8 percent from 5 percent at the start of April has begun to trickle in. Household spending and retail sales in April dropped the most in three years. But policymakers need to wait until July or so for a fuller picture of the tax impact. For the time being, champagne sales and other untraditional measures may offer a good early read on consumption, which makes up 60 percent of the economy. Picture taken June 10, 2014. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS SOCIETY)
JAPAN-ECONOMY/CHAMPAGNE
RTR3THLN
June 12, 2014
A bartender serves a flute of champagne at Goss, a champagne bar, at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo...
Tokyo, Japan
A bartender serves a flute of champagne at Goss, a champagne bar, at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo...
A bartender serves a flute of champagne at Goss, a champagne bar, at Ginza shopping district in Tokyo June 10, 2014. Watching a bevy of young professionals quaffing sparkling wine, there was little sign that an increase in Japan's sales tax in April caused anything more than a hiccup in the economy. Japan needs people spending with confidence if a radical strategy adopted by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is to succeed in breaking the economy free of two decades of deflation and sub-par growth. Government data covering the period after the tax was increased to 8 percent from 5 percent at the start of April has begun to trickle in. Household spending and retail sales in April dropped the most in three years. But policymakers need to wait until July or so for a fuller picture of the tax impact. For the time being, champagne sales and other untraditional measures may offer a good early read on consumption, which makes up 60 percent of the economy. Picture taken June 10, 2014. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS SOCIETY)
USA-PUERTORICO/BONDS
RTR3GONZ
March 12, 2014
A night view of the middle-upper class residential sector of Miramar in San Juan, March 11, 2014. Puerto...
San Juan, Puerto Rico
A night view of the middle-upper class residential sector of Miramar in San Juan
A night view of the middle-upper class residential sector of Miramar in San Juan, March 11, 2014. Puerto Rico on Tuesday sold $3.5 billion of junk-rated bonds at a surprisingly low tax-free interest rate under 9 percent, which was still high enough to tempt investors to snap up the bonds despite the Caribbean island's difficult cash position. Worries linger about Puerto Rico's economy, which has been shrinking nearly non-stop since 2006 and suffers from a dwindling population, high unemployment now topping 15 percent, and chronic government budget deficits. REUTERS/Ana Martinez (PUERTO RICO - Tags: BUSINESS CITYSCAPE POLITICS)
USA-PUERTORICO/BONDS
RTR3GONM
March 12, 2014
A night view of the middle-upper class residential sector of Miramar in San Juan, March 11, 2014. Puerto...
San Juan, Puerto Rico
A night view of the middle-upper class residential sector of Miramar in San Juan
A night view of the middle-upper class residential sector of Miramar in San Juan, March 11, 2014. Puerto Rico on Tuesday sold $3.5 billion of junk-rated bonds at a surprisingly low tax-free interest rate under 9 percent, which was still high enough to tempt investors to snap up the bonds despite the Caribbean island's difficult cash position. Worries linger about Puerto Rico's economy, which has been shrinking nearly non-stop since 2006 and suffers from a dwindling population, high unemployment now topping 15 percent, and chronic government budget deficits. REUTERS/Ana Martinez (PUERTO RICO - Tags: BUSINESS CITYSCAPE POLITICS)
USA/PUERTORICO/BONDS
RTR3GO80
March 11, 2014
A store remains closed in the Santurce sector in San Juan, March 11, 2014. Puerto Rico on Tuesday sold...
San Juan, Puerto Rico
A store remains closed in the Santurce sector in San Juan
A store remains closed in the Santurce sector in San Juan, March 11, 2014. Puerto Rico on Tuesday sold $3.5 billion of junk-rated bonds at a surprisingly low tax-free interest rate under 9 percent, which was still high enough to tempt investors to snap up the bonds despite the Caribbean island's difficult cash position. Worries linger about Puerto Rico's economy, which has been shrinking nearly non-stop since 2006 and suffers from a dwindling population, high unemployment now topping 15 percent, and chronic government budget deficits. REUTERS/Ana Martinez (PUERTO RICO - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
USA/PUERTORICO/BONDS
RTR3GO7U
March 11, 2014
A "For sale" sign is seen hanging outside a house whose construction was abandoned in the Ocean Park...
San Juan, Puerto Rico
A "For sale" sign is seen hanging outside a house whose construction was abandoned in the Ocean Park...
A "For sale" sign is seen hanging outside a house whose construction was abandoned in the Ocean Park sector in San Juan, March 11, 2014. Puerto Rico on Tuesday sold $3.5 billion of junk-rated bonds at a surprisingly low tax-free interest rate under 9 percent, which was still high enough to tempt investors to snap up the bonds despite the Caribbean island's difficult cash position. Worries linger about Puerto Rico's economy, which has been shrinking nearly non-stop since 2006 and suffers from a dwindling population, high unemployment now topping 15 percent, and chronic government budget deficits. REUTERS/Ana Martinez (PUERTO RICO - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
USA/PUERTORICO/BONDS
RTR3GO7R
March 11, 2014
A man walks in front of an abandoned house in the Ocean Park sector in San Juan, March 11, 2014. Puerto...
San Juan, Puerto Rico
A man walks in front of an abandoned house in the Ocean Park sector in San Juan
A man walks in front of an abandoned house in the Ocean Park sector in San Juan, March 11, 2014. Puerto Rico on Tuesday sold $3.5 billion of junk-rated bonds at a surprisingly low tax-free interest rate under 9 percent, which was still high enough to tempt investors to snap up the bonds despite the Caribbean island's difficult cash position. Worries linger about Puerto Rico's economy, which has been shrinking nearly non-stop since 2006 and suffers from a dwindling population, high unemployment now topping 15 percent, and chronic government budget deficits. REUTERS/Ana Martinez (PUERTO RICO - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
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