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CHINA-COAL/
RTX7Z3VH
September 30, 2020
Red coal trucks zip up and down narrow dirt tracks, churning up clouds of dust in China's remote Gansu...
HUATING, China
The Wider Image: Energy security and economic fears drive China's return to coal
Red coal trucks zip up and down narrow dirt tracks, churning up clouds of dust in China's remote Gansu province. Nearby, the towering stanchions of a new railway bridge rise out of a muddy river winding through the hills. The Huaneng Group, one of five big Chinese state utilities, is building a $1.9 billion 4 gigawatt coal and power project in the northwestern region near the city of Qingyang, with the aim of delivering its electricity to the east of the country. The Zhengning Power Plant Project, which was revived in July four years after it was put on ice, encapsulates the competing pressures that lie behind China's economic and climate policies. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "PETER COAL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: CHINA-COAL/
USA-WILDFIRES/INMATES
RTX7YQL8
September 29, 2020
In the flames, they are finding redemption. The 10 Oregon prisoners carry chainsaws, axes, shovels and...
Paisley, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Oregon inmates find redemption in fighting wildfires
In the flames, they are finding redemption. The 10 Oregon prisoners carry chainsaws, axes, shovels and hoes into the biggest wildfires the state has seen in a century. Banding together, they form lines in the forest and trudge up the steep ashen slopes of the Cascade Mountains, hunting embers that could reignite flames. The men are part of a seven-decade-old state-run program that aims to do two basic things: Rehabilitate prisoners by teaching them a trade, and provide extra boots on the ground for intense wildfire seasons. The men in a crew working the forested mountains near Paisley, Oregon, last week were mostly young and fit. They had to be to scale the punishing terrain. Ankle-deep ash slicked hills and meant the men slipped two steps back for each stride forward. REUTERS/Adrees Latif SEARCH "INMATES WILDFIRES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES Matching text: USA-WILDFIRES/INMATES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
MEXICO-TOURISM/TEOTIHUACAN
RTX7X414
September 22, 2020
A wide angle view of the Plaza of the Glyphs, a patio with 42 painted signs and symbols on the floor...
San Juan Teotihuacan, Mexico
Beyond public view, scholars unravel mystery of writing in ancient Mexican city
A wide angle view of the Plaza of the Glyphs, a patio with 42 painted signs and symbols on the floor marking the longest Teotihuacan text found so far, dated to probably between 300-400 A.D., at La Ventilla, an extensively excavated neighborhood in the ancient ruins of Teotihuacan, in San Juan Teotihuacan, northeast of Mexico City, Mexico November 7, 2019. Picture taken November 7, 2019. REUTERS/Gustavo Graf
CLIMATE-CHANGE/TAIWAN-PLANTS
RTX7X0X8
September 21, 2020
In the forests and on remote offshore islands of Taiwan, a group of conservationists are racing to collect...
Pingtung, Taiwan
The Wider Image: Taiwan plant hunters race to collect rare species before they are gone
In the forests and on remote offshore islands of Taiwan, a group of conservationists are racing to collect as many rare plant species as they can before they are lost to climate change and human encroachment. Overseen by the Dr. Cecilia Koo Botanic Conservation Centre, the plant hunters are scouring sub-tropical Taiwan for as many rare plant samples as they can find, from the rugged eastern coast around Taitung to Dongyin, in the Matsu archipelago. REUTERS/Ann Wang SEARCH "WANG RARE PLANTS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: CLIMATE-CHANGE/TAIWAN-PLANTS
IRAQ-DISABILITIES/MECHANIC
RTX7WWU7
September 21, 2020
Mustafa Aziz, An Iraqi blind mechanic, reads Braille text at home in Baghdad, Iraq September 14, 2020....
Baghdad, Iraq
Blind Iraqi realizes dream of becoming car mechanic
Mustafa Aziz, An Iraqi blind mechanic, reads Braille text at home in Baghdad, Iraq September 14, 2020. Picture taken September 14, 2020. REUTERS/Saba Kareem
CLIMATE-CHANGE/TAIWAN-PLANTS
RTX7WVMB
September 21, 2020
In the forests and on remote offshore islands of Taiwan, a group of conservationists are racing to collect...
Pingtung, Taiwan
The Wider Image: Taiwan plant hunters race to collect rare species before they are gone
In the forests and on remote offshore islands of Taiwan, a group of conservationists are racing to collect as many rare plant species as they can before they are lost to climate change and human encroachment. Overseen by the Dr. Cecilia Koo Botanic Conservation Centre, the plant hunters are scouring sub-tropical Taiwan for as many rare plant samples as they can find, from the rugged eastern coast around Taitung to Dongyin, in the Matsu archipelago. REUTERS/Ann Wang SEARCH "WANG RARE PLANTS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: CLIMATE-CHANGE/TAIWAN-PLANTS
HAITI-WEDDINGS/
RTX7W372
September 17, 2020
Marriage is not as widespread in Haiti as in other Western countries, given the long-standing creole...
BAIE DE HENNE, Haiti
The Wider Image: Haiti's brides beat hurricanes, power cuts and protests to wed in style
Marriage is not as widespread in Haiti as in other Western countries, given the long-standing creole tradition of 'plasaj,' an informal marital relationship that is common in rural areas but not legally recognized. Yet marriage has greater prestige and is particularly favored by Haiti's wealthier, cosmopolitan urbanites, according to Haitian sociologist Tamas Jean Pierre - not least because it is recognized abroad. Still, in a country where more than half the population lives under the poverty line of $2.41 per day, only the wealthiest of Haitian couples can afford the full shebang of a wedding ceremony, lavish dinner reception, and honeymoon. Most have to get creative. Sometimes multiple couples get married at the same time to save on church fees. They might skip the reception or, in the countryside, offer a simple meal of bread, fried plantains, rice and coffee. Sometimes, the whole village might provide food. Disputes can occur when there is not enough for all those who turn up, or when guests try to take home dishes or drinks. Despite tight purse strings, the showiness of the ceremony is the one element of the Haitian wedding that never lacks. REUTERS/Valerie Baeriswyl TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "HAITIAN WEDDINGS BAERISWYL" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES Matching Text: HAITI-WEDDINGS/
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-PANTANAL
RTX7VGLD
September 14, 2020
A fire has been burning since mid-July in the remote wetlands of west-central Brazil, leaving in its...
POCONE, Brazil
The Wider Image: In Brazil, it's not just the Amazon that's burning. The world's largest wetland is on...
A fire has been burning since mid-July in the remote wetlands of west-central Brazil, leaving in its wake a vast charred desolation bigger than New York City. A team of veterinarians, biologists and local guides arrived in late August to prowl the bumpy dirt road known as the Trans-Pantanal Highway in pickup trucks, looking to save what injured animals they could. Jaguars were wandering the blackened wasteland, they said, starving or going thirsty, with paws burnt to the bone, lungs blackened by smoke. They saw bodies of alligator-like caiman, jaws frozen in silent screams, the last act of creatures desperate to cool off before being consumed by flames. This massive fire is one of thousands of blazes sweeping the Brazilian Pantanal - the world's largest wetland - this year in what climate scientists fear could become a new normal, echoing the rise in climate-driven fires from California to Australia. The Pantanal is smaller and less-known than its famous cousin, the Amazon jungle. But the region's normally abundant waters and strategic location - sandwiched between the rainforest, Brazil's vast grasslands and Paraguay's dry forests - make it a magnet for animals. The fires are now threatening one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on the planet, biologists say. The Pantanal is home to roughly 1,200 vertebrate animal species, including 36 that are threatened with extinction. Across this usually lush landscape of 150,000 square kilometers (57,915 square miles) in Brazil, rare birds flutter and the world's densest population of jaguars roam. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "PANTANAL PEROBELLI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES Matching text: CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-PANTANAL
CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-ANIMALS
RTX7TXNN
September 07, 2020
Xita, a tiny monkey with sad brown eyes, clutches her newborn tight. Both are fighting for their lives....
Porto Velho, Brazil
The Wider Image: The mission to save the Amazon's animals
Xita, a tiny monkey with sad brown eyes, clutches her newborn tight. Both are fighting for their lives. Vets working at the Clinidog clinic in the Amazon city of Porto Velho believe the mother and baby were run over by a car as they fled fires raging across the world's largest rainforest. "She arrived stressed, screaming and smeared with blood," said Carlos Henrique Tiburcio, the owner of the clinic, as he wrapped the pair in a small, white cloth. Creatures of the Amazon, one of the earth's most biodiverse habitats, face an ever-growing threat as loggers and farms advance further and further into the rainforest. In the dry season ranchers and land speculators set fires to clear deforested woodland for pasture. Blazes can rage out of control, fueled by the swirling wind and dry foliage. Wildlife flee from the smoke and flames. Weak and dying animals arrive at Tiburcio's clinic where four volunteers work tirelessly to save them. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "BRAZIL ANIMALS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: CLIMATE-CHANGE/BRAZIL-ANIMALS
USA-SERBIA-KOSOVO/
RTX7TI68
September 04, 2020
A woman walks with a dog in front of a mural depicting U.S. President Donald Trump and text reading "Kosovo...
Belgrade, Serbia
Woman walks with a dog in front of a mural depicting U.S. President Trump in Belgrade
A woman walks with a dog in front of a mural depicting U.S. President Donald Trump and text reading "Kosovo is Serbia" in Belgrade, Serbia, September 4, 2020. REUTERS/Marko Djurica
SENEGAL-WOMEN/SURFING
RTX7S2UI
August 27, 2020
Growing up in the coastal capital of Dakar, Khadjou Sambe never saw a Black woman surfing the Atlantic...
Dakar, Senegal
Wider Image: Meet Senegal's first female pro surfer inspiring girls to take to the waves
Growing up in the coastal capital of Dakar, Khadjou Sambe never saw a Black woman surfing the Atlantic swells. As Senegal's first female professional surfer, Sambe is now inspiring the next generation to defy cultural norms and take to the waves. Undeterred by the postponement of the Olympic Games, Sambe trains whenever conditions allow in the powerful surf break near her home in the hardscrabble district of Ngor - the westernmost point of the African continent. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "SENEGALESE WOMEN SURFER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching text: SENEGAL-WOMEN/SURFING
SENEGAL-WOMEN/SURFING
RTX7RXOE
August 27, 2020
Growing up in the coastal capital of Dakar, Khadjou Sambe never saw a Black woman surfing the Atlantic...
Dakar, Senegal
Wider Image: Meet Senegal's first female pro surfer inspiring girls to take to the waves
Growing up in the coastal capital of Dakar, Khadjou Sambe never saw a Black woman surfing the Atlantic swells. As Senegal's first female professional surfer, Sambe is now inspiring the next generation to defy cultural norms and take to the waves. Undeterred by the postponement of the Olympic Games, Sambe trains whenever conditions allow in the powerful surf break near her home in the hardscrabble district of Ngor - the westernmost point of the African continent. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "SENEGALESE WOMEN SURFER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching text: SENEGAL-WOMEN/SURFING
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-FAMILY
RTX7QPUP
August 20, 2020
Beirut's catastrophic port explosion has demolished Rita Faraj Oghlo's house, left her family stranded...
Beirut, Lebanon
The Wider Image: Stranded and injured, Lebanese family reels from blast
Beirut's catastrophic port explosion has demolished Rita Faraj Oghlo's house, left her family stranded and may cost her husband Adel his leg. Like many Lebanese, they have endured multi-layered suffering since the Aug. 4 blast, which killed 179 people, injured 6,000 and triggered protests against an elite blamed for political turmoil and economic collapse. Homes and businesses were razed in the country's commercial heart, uprooting nearly a quarter of a million people. Many of them are now crammed into relatives' tiny apartments, unable to imagine how they will ever be able to afford their own. "It's very difficult for us right now," said Rita, who, along with her injured husband Adel and their children Christy, 2 and Saymen, 8, has moved in with her mother, stepfather and sister. The cost of the operation Adel needs looms large. When the blast sent a mushroom cloud over Beirut, he lay on a road pleading for help in the chaos. One person used a belt as tourniquet. Another, a waiter, wrapped an apron around his crushed leg. "A lot of people saw me and they were in shock, looked and just left," he said. He was already struggling to find work during the economic meltdown. He sits in agony, and worries that doctors may have to amputate his leg, held together by metal screws. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "FAMILY HOME LEBANON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-FAMILY
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-NEIGHBOURHOOD
RTX7PODK
August 15, 2020
In one of Beirut's poorest neighbourhoods, Karantina near the port, people are still reeling from the...
Beirut, Lebanon
The Wider Image: 'We lost everything:' Grieving Beirut neighbourhood struggles to rebuild
In one of Beirut's poorest neighbourhoods, Karantina near the port, people are still reeling from the explosion that flattened homes and killed many neighbours who felt like family. Everyone knows everyone. Everyone cried when they recalled the explosion. A week later, the neighbours are struggling to find the money to rebuild, without help from the state in a city that was already deep in economic collapse. The warehouse explosion killed at least 172 people, wounded thousands and ravaged entire districts. It shattered walls and ripped out balconies in Karantina, a neglected part of the capital. The cluster of streets, with a slaughterhouse and a waste plant, saw one of the bloodiest massacres of Lebanon's 1975-1990 civil war. Many said the blast did more damage in a few seconds than 15 years of war. With the wreckage at their doorstep once more, families who have spent decades in Karantina have camped out in their apartments. They sleep on the floor or on ripped couches, without doors or windows, not sure how to go on. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "KARANTINA NEIGHBOURHOOD" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-NEIGHBOURHOOD
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-EXAMS
RTX7NI4C
August 04, 2020
A pupil at Stonelaw High School receives a text message with her exam results on her mobile phon in Rutherglen,...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
Deputy First Minister of Scotland and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills John Swinney visits...
A pupil at Stonelaw High School receives a text message with her exam results on her mobile phon in Rutherglen, Glasgow, Scotland, Britain, August 4, 2020. Exams were cancelled in Scotland due to the coronavirus pandemic and pupils have been awarded grades based on assessment. Andy Buchanan/Pool via REUTERS
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-EXAMS
RTX7NI4B
August 04, 2020
A pupil at Stonelaw High School receives a text message with her exam results on her mobile phon in Rutherglen,...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
Deputy First Minister of Scotland and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills John Swinney visits...
A pupil at Stonelaw High School receives a text message with her exam results on her mobile phon in Rutherglen, Glasgow, Scotland, Britain, August 4, 2020. Exams were cancelled in Scotland due to the coronavirus pandemic and pupils have been awarded grades based on assessment. Andy Buchanan/Pool via REUTERS
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-EXAMS
RTX7NI4A
August 04, 2020
A pupil at Stonelaw High School receives a text message with her exam results on her mobile phon in Rutherglen,...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
Deputy First Minister of Scotland and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills John Swinney visits...
A pupil at Stonelaw High School receives a text message with her exam results on her mobile phon in Rutherglen, Glasgow, Scotland, Britain, August 4, 2020. Exams were cancelled in Scotland due to the coronavirus pandemic and pupils have been awarded grades based on assessment. Andy Buchanan/Pool via REUTERS
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-EXAMS
RTX7NI32
August 04, 2020
A pupil at Stonelaw High School receives a text message with her exam results on her mobile phon in Rutherglen,...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
Deputy First Minister of Scotland and Cabinet Secretary for Education and Skills John Swinney visits...
A pupil at Stonelaw High School receives a text message with her exam results on her mobile phon in Rutherglen, Glasgow, Scotland, Britain, August 4, 2020. Exams were cancelled in Scotland due to the coronavirus pandemic and pupils have been awarded grades based on assessment. Andy Buchanan/Pool via REUTERS
ITALY-OLDEST STUDENT/
RTX7MSWV
July 31, 2020
Giuseppe Paterno, 96, Italy's oldest student, celebrates with his family after graduating from his undergraduate...
Palermo, Italy
The Wider Image: Meet Italy's oldest student, surviving WW2 and a pandemic to graduate at 96
Giuseppe Paterno, 96, Italy's oldest student, celebrates with his family after graduating from his undergraduate degree in history and philosophy, during his graduation at the University of Palermo, in Palermo, Italy, July 29, 2020. "My project for the future is to devote myself to writing; I want to revisit all the texts I didn't have a chance to explore further. This is my goal," said Paterno. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane SEARCH "ITALY'S OLDEST STUDENT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ITALY-OLDEST STUDENT/
RTX7MSWI
July 31, 2020
At 96, Giuseppe Paterno has faced many tests in life - childhood poverty, war and more recently, the...
Palermo, Italy
The Wider Image: Meet Italy's oldest student, surviving WW2 and a pandemic to graduate at 96
At 96, Giuseppe Paterno has faced many tests in life - childhood poverty, war and more recently, the coronavirus pandemic. Now he has sailed through an exam that makes him Italy's oldest university graduate. This week, the former railway worker stepped forward to receive his diploma and the traditional laurel wreath awarded to Italian students when they graduate, applauded by his family, teachers and fellow students more than 70 years his junior. "I am a normal person, like many others," he said, when asked what it felt like to be graduating so late. "In terms of age I have surpassed all the others but I didn't do it for this." Already in his 90s when he enrolled for a degree in History and Philosophy at the University of Palermo, Paterno grew up loving books, but he never had the chance to study. "I said, 'that's it, now or never,' and so in 2017, I decided to enrol," he told Reuters in his apartment in the Sicilian city of Palermo, which he rarely leaves nowadays due to his frailty. "I understood that it was a little late to get a three-year degree but I said to myself 'let's see if I can do it'." On Wednesday, he graduated first in his class with top honours, receiving congratulations from the university chancellor Fabrizio Micari. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "ITALY'S OLDEST STUDENT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: ITALY-OLDEST STUDENT/
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TEXAS
RTX7MFZU
July 29, 2020
The scene inside United Memorial Medical Center in Houston has become all too familiar: Overwhelmed medical...
Houston, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: 'I cannot save everybody': Houston doctor fights newest COVID-19 surge
The scene inside United Memorial Medical Center in Houston has become all too familiar: Overwhelmed medical staff fighting to curb the wave of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients that come through the hospital's doors every day. While in earlier pandemic hot spots like New York the medical emergency has subsided, Texas is among the many U.S. states battling a resurgence of the virus that is straining their healthcare systems. Dr. Joseph Varon, the chief medical officer of United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC,) said he is afraid he will soon face a dilemma many doctors elsewhere said they confronted earlier in the pandemic: Deciding who to save. "I'm afraid that at some point in time I'm going have to make some very serious decisions," he told Reuters in an interview. "I'm starting to get the idea that I cannot save everybody." Varon, 58, is overseeing the hospital's unit dedicated to COVID-19 patients, where he said he tends to an average of 40 people a day. He said he signed more death certificates in the last week than at any point in his career. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "COVID-19 HOUSTON VARON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TEXAS
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TEXAS
RTX7MFZP
July 29, 2020
Hector Ortiz-Garcia, 63, who has been hospitalised with COVID-19, texts members of his family from his...
Houston, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: 'I cannot save everybody': Houston doctor fights newest COVID-19 surge
Hector Ortiz-Garcia, 63, who has been hospitalised with COVID-19, texts members of his family from his hospital bed at United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC), during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Houston, Texas, U.S., July 25, 2020. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare SEARCH "COVID-19 HOUSTON VARON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TEXAS
RTX7MFZO
July 29, 2020
The scene inside United Memorial Medical Center in Houston has become all too familiar: Overwhelmed medical...
Houston, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: 'I cannot save everybody': Houston doctor fights newest COVID-19 surge
The scene inside United Memorial Medical Center in Houston has become all too familiar: Overwhelmed medical staff fighting to curb the wave of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients that come through the hospital's doors every day. While in earlier pandemic hot spots like New York the medical emergency has subsided, Texas is among the many U.S. states battling a resurgence of the virus that is straining their healthcare systems. Dr. Joseph Varon, the chief medical officer of United Memorial Medical Center (UMMC,) said he is afraid he will soon face a dilemma many doctors elsewhere said they confronted earlier in the pandemic: Deciding who to save. "I'm afraid that at some point in time I'm going have to make some very serious decisions," he told Reuters in an interview. "I'm starting to get the idea that I cannot save everybody." Varon, 58, is overseeing the hospital's unit dedicated to COVID-19 patients, where he said he tends to an average of 40 people a day. He said he signed more death certificates in the last week than at any point in his career. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "COVID-19 HOUSTON VARON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-TEXAS
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SERBIA-PROTESTS
RTS3J7YW
July 11, 2020
A man waves a flag depicting the map of Kosovo in Serbian national colours with a text reading "No surrender",...
Belgrade, Serbia
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Belgrade
A man waves a flag depicting the map of Kosovo in Serbian national colours with a text reading "No surrender", during an anti-government rally, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in front of the parliament building in Belgrade, Serbia, July 11, 2020. REUTERS/Marko Djurica
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SERBIA-PROTESTS
RTS3J7YP
July 11, 2020
A man waves a flag depicting the map of Kosovo in Serbian national colours with a text reading "No surrender",...
Belgrade, Serbia
Spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Belgrade
A man waves a flag depicting the map of Kosovo in Serbian national colours with a text reading "No surrender", during an anti-government rally, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in front of the parliament building in Belgrade, Serbia, July 11, 2020. REUTERS/Marko Djurica
NILE-CONVERGENCE/
RTS3IP7U
July 09, 2020
At an open-air, riverbank factory where the Blue Nile and White Nile meet in Sudan, Mohamed Ahmed al...
Khartoum, Sudan
The Wider Image: Fears at Nile's convergence in Sudan that new dam will sap river's strength
At an open-air, riverbank factory where the Blue Nile and White Nile meet in Sudan, Mohamed Ahmed al Ameen and his colleagues mould thousands of bricks every day from mud deposited by summer floods. "I consider the Nile something I have not parted with since I was born," Ameen said, as workers around him shaped bricks with blistered hands and laid them out to dry in the sun. "I eat from it, I farm with it. And I extract these bricks from it." But the labourers on Tuti Island in Sudan's capital Khartoum fear a giant dam Ethiopia is building close to the border between the two countries could endanger their livelihood. They worry the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam upstream could weaken the Blue Nile's force, putting at risk an industry that locals say provided bricks for some of Khartoum's first modern public buildings around a century ago. Pottery makers, farmers and fishermen around the Nile's convergence share similar concerns, though other residents displaced by flooding last summer see benefit in a dam that will regulate the powerful river's waters. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra. SEARCH "BENSEMRA NILE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: NILE-CONVERGENCE/ TEMPLATE OUT
MYANMAR-MARBLE/
RTS3H7Z6
July 02, 2020
The fine white dust that shrouds much of his northern Myanmar village also covers sculptor Chin Win as...
SAGYIN, Myanmar
The Wider Image: From statues to toothpaste, the Myanmar village 'blessed' with marble bounty
The fine white dust that shrouds much of his northern Myanmar village also covers sculptor Chin Win as he leans over a half-finished Buddha statue. "We are blessed to carve Buddha," he said at his stone workshop surrounded by the seven white hills that give Sagyin village its name, which means "marble" in Burmese. For generations, artisans in this part of Buddhist-majority Myanmar have carved out a living from the marble, fashioning mostly colossal Buddha statues to be sold in the nearby city of Mandalay or exported to neighbouring China and Thailand. Many of the several thousand villagers here earn a modest living from the marble mines, hauling the slabs down the hill, carving them into statues, or exporting them overseas. Burmese marble, which ranges from pure white to bluish grey, is prized for its hardness and texture. A 45-tonne slab can sell for $40,000. In Sagyin, specks of the stone are used for everything from brushing teeth to washing clothes. REUTERS/Ann Wang TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "SAGYIN MARBLE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. MATCHING TEXT: MYANMAR-MARBLE/ TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/LUFTHANSA-RESCUE
RTS3FQ81
June 25, 2020
An employee of Lufthansa attends a protest against planned job cuts of Germany's flagship carrier hit...
Frankfurt, Germany
Employees of Lufthansa protest against planned job cuts in Frankfurt
An employee of Lufthansa attends a protest against planned job cuts of Germany's flagship carrier hit hard by the coronavirus (COVID-19)-induced travel slump during a demonstration of pilots union Cockpit at the Lufthansa Aviation Center in Frankfurt, Germany June 25, 2020. The text reads: "Hope gives wings". REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach
MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/PROTESTS-BRITAIN-IMAGE
RTS3DG2T
June 15, 2020
Reuters photographer Dylan Martinez heard the words ring out during chaotic scenes in London on Saturday,...
London, United Kingdom
A Picture and its Story: Black man carries suspected far-right protester to safety
Reuters photographer Dylan Martinez heard the words ring out during chaotic scenes in London on Saturday, when mostly peaceful anti-racist demonstrations turned into violent scuffles after far-right counter-protesters arrived on the scene. Then he saw the man who had uttered them - a black protester emerging from the melee carrying an injured white man in a 'fireman's lift' over his shoulder. The picture he took has gone viral on social media and featured in news bulletins, capturing a moment of high drama that jars with the broader narrative - of anti-racist and far-right protesters fighting each other. "I saw a skirmish and someone falling to the ground," Martinez recalled of the moment near Waterloo Bridge, in central London, as he covered Black Lives Matter anti-racism protests that have flared up in the city. Martinez recalled that, after hearing someone say "That's not what we do!", he suddenly saw a white man being carried on a black person's shoulders through the crowd. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "INJURED COUNTER-PROTESTER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/PROTESTS-BRITAIN-IMAGE TEMPLATE OUT
MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/SHOOTER-IMAGE
RTS3C5UF
June 10, 2020
Stunned protesters surround a car that has driven into their ranks. A man is lying on the ground nearby....
Seattle, UNITED STATES
A Picture and its Story: A shooting in Seattle
Stunned protesters surround a car that has driven into their ranks. A man is lying on the ground nearby. Another man exits the driver's side of the vehicle brandishing a gun. The protesters back away from him and he runs off and melts into the crowd as medics rush to help the wounded man. The dramatic scenes of the drive-by shooting on the streets of Seattle were captured by Reuters photographer Lindsey Wasson during protests against police brutality and racism that have rocked the city - and many other places across the United States - in recent days. Wasson, a Seattle native, has been covering the protests in Washington state's largest city since May 31. She took the series of pictures on Sunday evening from the window of a local newspaper that has offices overlooking a street that became a flashpoint. "I had maybe just stepped to the main window, and I was looking over the crowd and seeing what was going on. I heard a scream and commotion and rushed to the dirty side window to photograph what was happening in a side street," she said. "The whole sequence probably took a minute, it happened very quickly." REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "WASSON MAN SHOT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/SHOOTER-IMAGE TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-SUICIDE
RTS3AXP2
June 05, 2020
In the weeks before she took her own life, Thai server Nitiwadee Sae-Tia felt growing financial pressure...
Bangkok, Thailand
The Wider Image: Calls to suicide helpline show Thais' stress in downturn
In the weeks before she took her own life, Thai server Nitiwadee Sae-Tia felt growing financial pressure after she lost her job, a member of the family said. She was one of millions of Thais who lost their jobs after lockdown restrictions to combat the spread of the coronavirus forced malls and other public venues to close in March. That included the Japanese restaurant where Nitiwadee worked, said the aunt who found her lifeless body when she visited her home in May. "When I opened the door, I was shocked," said Praphai Yodpradit. She said Nitiwadee, 50, had grown increasingly stressed and withdrawn after losing her job. Although Thai figures show the average rate of suicide fell in the first four months of the year, the charity group Samaritans of Thailand said it had received between three and five times the normal volume of daily calls to its suicide helpline since the lockdown in late March. Most related to concerns about financial problems, said Panomporn Phoomchan, the director. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "THAILAND SUICIDE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: HELATH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-SUICIDE TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-SUICIDE
RTS3ATLT
June 04, 2020
In the weeks before she took her own life, Thai server Nitiwadee Sae-Tia felt growing financial pressure...
Bangkok, Thailand
The Wider Image: Calls to suicide helpline show Thais' stress in downturn
In the weeks before she took her own life, Thai server Nitiwadee Sae-Tia felt growing financial pressure after she lost her job, a member of the family said. She was one of millions of Thais who lost their jobs after lockdown restrictions to combat the spread of the coronavirus forced malls and other public venues to close in March. That included the Japanese restaurant where Nitiwadee worked, said the aunt who found her lifeless body when she visited her home in May. "When I opened the door, I was shocked," said Praphai Yodpradit. She said Nitiwadee, 50, had grown increasingly stressed and withdrawn after losing her job. Although Thai figures show the average rate of suicide fell in the first four months of the year, the charity group Samaritans of Thailand said it had received between three and five times the normal volume of daily calls to its suicide helpline since the lockdown in late March. Most related to concerns about financial problems, said Panomporn Phoomchan, the director. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "THAILAND SUICIDE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: HELATH-CORONAVIRUS/THAILAND-SUICIDE TEMPLATE OUT
CLIMATE-CHANGE/INDONESIA-SUMBA
RTS3A7GO
June 02, 2020
On Indonesia's Sumba island, the motifs displayed on traditional textiles produced by its weavers often...
EAST SUMBA, Indonesia
The Wider Image: As crops fail, Indonesia's Sumba seeks lifeline in weaving, fishing
On Indonesia's Sumba island, the motifs displayed on traditional textiles produced by its weavers often depict animals, including the area's famed Sandalwood breed of horses. But in the village of Hamba Praing in East Sumba, scores of horses and cattle have died in recent years as extreme drought withered the grass, leaving behind bones and carcasses scattered over the scrubby landscape. East Sumba, about 2,000 km (1,200 miles) east of Jakarta, last year reportedly had 249 days in a row without rain, with some experts blaming climate change for more frequent drought-inducing weather patterns, forcing people to adapt to survive. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan SEARCH "EAST SUMBA FARMERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: CLIMATE-CHANGE/INDONESIA-SUMBA TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/DOCTOR-PREGNANT
RTS38ZZL
May 26, 2020
After putting a coronavirus patient onto a ventilator to help him to breathe, Dr. Zafia Anklesaria noted...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: A pregnant doctor navigates COVID-19 fight in low income LA
After putting a coronavirus patient onto a ventilator to help him to breathe, Dr. Zafia Anklesaria noted to herself that her baby never kicked during emergency procedures. It was not until she was back in her office and had removed most of her protective equipment that he made his presence known. Anklesaria is seven months pregnant with her first child. The 35-year works as a co-director of the intensive care unit at CommonSpirit's Dignity Health California Hospital Medical Center, a downtown Los Angeles hospital that mostly serves lower-income Hispanic and African-American populations. The hospital's 22-bed COVID-19 intensive care unit has been at or close to capacity since the end of March. Some nurses are pulling 24-hour shifts due to the high volume of patients in critical condition, she said. "The socio-economic class that we serve, people tend to live in close quarters, they don't really have the privilege of good social distancing, and they are tending to get more infected as a result," Anklesaria said. People living in the highest poverty areas of Los Angeles county are dying of COVID-19 at more than twice the rate of those in the wealthiest areas, according to data from the county's department for public health. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "PREGNANT DOCTOR COVID-19" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/DOCTOR-PREGNANT TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PALESTINIANS-STUDENT
RTX7JJL9
May 19, 2020
A girl reads out a text as Palestinian student Fajr Hmaid, 13, teaches her neighbours' children an Arabic...
Gaza, Palestinian Territories
Gaza girl, 13, teaches neighbourhood children during school closure in Gaza
A girl reads out a text as Palestinian student Fajr Hmaid, 13, teaches her neighbours' children an Arabic language lesson as schools are shut due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) restrictions, at Hmaid's family house in Gaza, May 19, 2020. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRIA-PROTEST
RTX7IXQG
May 14, 2020
A demonstrator wears protective face masks during a protest against the anti-coronavirus measures taken...
Vienna, Austria
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Vienna
A demonstrator wears protective face masks during a protest against the anti-coronavirus measures taken by the Austrian government, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues in Vienna, Austria, May 14, 2020. Texts on masks read "No protection from dictatorship" and "Future muzzle". REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/HONDURAS-PRISON
RTX7IWX9
May 14, 2020
La Esperanza is a low-security prison tucked into the pine and oak-lined mountains of central Honduras....
La Esperanza, Honduras
The Wider Image: Cut off by coronavirus: Hondurans in packed prison suffer mental toll
La Esperanza is a low-security prison tucked into the pine and oak-lined mountains of central Honduras. Its name, in Spanish, means hope. Behind the bars, the ultimate law is that which reigns in Central America, a mantra sprayed onto walls in gang-controlled neighborhoods: ver, oir, y callar. See, hear, and shut up. A whiteboard at the entrance keeps a daily tally. The top line never changes: "Prison Capacity: 70 inmates." But the rows below of the actual number of prisoners tick up and down. Today's count: 454. The roots of the problems at La Esperanza plague prisons throughout Latin America, said director Jose Lopez Cerrato: harsh sentences for small crimes, lack of proper police investigation, and many detainees held without charge, often for years. The only reprieve is visiting days, when children, grandparents and wives breathe life into the courtyard, taking over the kitchen, playing ball, and praying with the inmates at religious services. But as the coronavirus took hold in Honduras, authorities banned visits. And with prohibitively expensive rates for calls from the prison's three working phones, inmates are now all but cut off from the outside world. In addition to the health risks posed by overcrowding, staff worry about the pandemic's mental toll. Honduras has had over 2,000 reported coronavirus cases and 120 deaths, although most public health experts say those numbers are a likely underestimate. REUTERS/Adrees Latif SEARCH "HONDURAS PRISON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/HONDURAS-PRISON
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
RTX7HV10
May 08, 2020
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused...
Manaus, Brazil
The Wider Image: In the Amazon, an indigenous nurse volunteers in coronavirus fight
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused to leave his home on the outskirts of the Amazon rainforest's biggest city. It took a stern word from a trained nurse in his community to convince him he would die if he refused a ride with her to the emergency room. Vanderlecia Ortega dos Santos, or Vanda to her neighbors, has volunteered to provide the only frontline care protecting her indigenous community of 700 families from the COVID-19 outbreak ravaging the Brazilian city of Manaus. It is an uphill battle. The ramshackle settlement of descendants from 35 different tribes, called Parque das Tribos, lacks plumbing and electricity in most homes. Ambulances regularly refuse to pick up the seriously ill because there is no public health clinic nearby. As the coronavirus pandemic has begun spreading across Brazil, indigenous people who live in and around cities have been caught in a dangerous limbo. The country's indigenous health service, Sesai, focuses its resources on those living on tribal reservations. Sesai has reported 10 indigenous deaths from the pandemic on native lands, but indigenous umbrella organization APIB estimated this week it has taken the life of at least 18 indigenous Brazilians if fatalities in urban areas are counted. The real number of cases in often remote villages across Brazil's vast hinterland is difficult to ascertain. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS INDIGENOUS NURSE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
RTX7HRRY
May 07, 2020
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused...
Manaus, Brazil
The Wider Image: In the Amazon, an indigenous nurse volunteers in coronavirus fight
Vicente Piratapuia, 69, of the Piratapuia tribe had a high fever and could hardly breathe, but he refused to leave his home on the outskirts of the Amazon rainforest's biggest city. It took a stern word from a trained nurse in his community to convince him he would die if he refused a ride with her to the emergency room. Vanderlecia Ortega dos Santos, or Vanda to her neighbors, has volunteered to provide the only frontline care protecting her indigenous community of 700 families from the COVID-19 outbreak ravaging the Brazilian city of Manaus. It is an uphill battle. The ramshackle settlement of descendants from 35 different tribes, called Parque das Tribos, lacks plumbing and electricity in most homes. Ambulances regularly refuse to pick up the seriously ill because there is no public health clinic nearby. As the coronavirus pandemic has begun spreading across Brazil, indigenous people who live in and around cities have been caught in a dangerous limbo. The country's indigenous health service, Sesai, focuses its resources on those living on tribal reservations. Sesai has reported 10 indigenous deaths from the pandemic on native lands, but indigenous umbrella organization APIB estimated this week it has taken the life of at least 18 indigenous Brazilians if fatalities in urban areas are counted. The real number of cases in often remote villages across Brazil's vast hinterland is difficult to ascertain. REUTERS/Bruno Kelly SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS INDIGENOUS NURSE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL-INDIGENOUSNURSE
USA-PULITZER/
RTX7HDXG
May 05, 2020
The young woman is pressed to the ground next to a riot police shield. Detained by Hong Kong authorities,...
Hong Kong, China
Award Winner: Reuters Pulitzer team captures Hong Kong?s descent into chaos
The young woman is pressed to the ground next to a riot police shield. Detained by Hong Kong authorities, she screams her name out to friends so they can call a lawyer to help. The picture, taken on Sept. 2 last year in the midst of huge and violent protests that rocked Hong Kong for more than six months, was part of a series of images by a team of Reuters photographers that won a Pulitzer Prize this week for breaking news photography. The photographs range from sweeping bird's eye views of boulevards packed with tens of thousands of demonstrators to close-ups of pitched battles between anti-China protesters and police seeking to restore order. REUTERS/ SEARCH "PULITZER REUTERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: USA-PULITZER/
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/NETHERLANDS-MCDONALDS
RTX7GR9V
May 01, 2020
An employee handles table service numbers for clients inside a prototype location of fast food giant...
Arnhem, Netherlands
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Arnhem
An employee handles table service numbers for clients inside a prototype location of fast food giant McDonald's for restaurants which respect the 1.5m social distancing measure, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Arnhem, Netherlands, May 1, 2020. Text reads "1.5 metre distance". REUTERS/Piroschka van de Wouw
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES-CHURCH
RTX7GCON
April 29, 2020
Catholic priest Eduardo "Ponpon" Vasquez has worn a hazmat suit more than a vestment this past month....
Caloocan, Philippines
The Wider Image: Hazmat suits and holy water: two priests bring faith to Philippines lockdown
Catholic priest Eduardo "Ponpon" Vasquez has worn a hazmat suit more than a vestment this past month. His parish in the populous Caloocan area of the Philippine capital Manila has been eerily quiet in the six weeks since the government put half of the country's population on a strict lockdown to try to curb coronavirus infections. Public gatherings, schools, transport services, and non-essential work has been halted, including that of the church. Priests in the predominantly Catholic nation have had to be creative in finding ways to keep the faithful engaged. Most have resorted to streaming online masses while others have set up pews outside churches. Some have printed pictures of parishioners and displayed them inside their closed chapels. But for Vasquez, the physical presence of the church is more important now than ever. These days, he wears his stole and oblate cross over a blue hazmat suit with a bottle of Holy Water in one hand and an alcohol spray in the other as he enters some of the poorest areas of his community to bring relief, both literal and spiritual. "The situation of many Filipinos these days is pitiful. Lockdown is not the same for everyone," said Vasquez. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS PRIESTS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES CHURCH
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN
RTX7FI8Q
April 24, 2020
An illustration of the text message from the UK Government's online coronavirus test application, in...
London, United Kingdom
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in London
An illustration of the text message from the UK Government's online coronavirus test application, in London, Britain, April 24, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville/Illustration
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN
RTX7FI8R
April 24, 2020
An illustration of the text message from the UK Government's online coronavirus test application, in...
London, United Kingdom
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in London
An illustration of the text message from the UK Government's online coronavirus test application, in London, Britain, April 24, 2020. REUTERS/Toby Melville/Illustration
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILDREN-DRAWING
RTX7F7AY
April 23, 2020
Children confined to their homes under lockdown are drawing what they miss most - friends at school,...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: Children's drawings from lockdown show the world what they miss most
Children confined to their homes under lockdown are drawing what they miss most - friends at school, grandparents, football and green open spaces. Regardless of where they are, the themes are often the same. From Tokyo to Buenos Aires, and from New York to Kathmandu, youngsters have taken to their balconies or front lawns to display and explain the drawings they have made to Reuters photographers. REUTERS/ SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS DRAWING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHILDREN-DRAWING
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MORTUARY
RTX7EO8L
April 21, 2020
There are 48 bodies in the basement of the funeral home in Harlem. Forty are in cardboard boxes, ready...
New York, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Dealing with the dead: the female undertakers of Harlem
There are 48 bodies in the basement of the funeral home in Harlem. Forty are in cardboard boxes, ready for cremation. The other eight are in the refrigerator, to be embalmed and buried. It will be weeks or months before they get either. As health officials began burying COVID-19 victims in a mass grave on Hart Island during New York's worst week of death, the four female undertakers at the International Funeral & Cremation Service started turning bodies away. This band of women morticians in heeled boots began to feel like they were failing. The way they see it, a person should get what they want in death, even if that was never possible in life. On the front lines of coronavirus pandemic, nurses and doctors are caring for the living. But there is another front line of those caring for the dead. They fear they can also get infected and die. Some of them have sent their own children to live with relatives. And because American cities like New York were never designed to dispose of so many dead, their call of duty will last much longer. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS FUNERAL HOMES SLUM" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MORTUARY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MORTUARY
RTX7EO7P
April 21, 2020
Jenny Adames, 36, a Funeral Service Coordinator at International Funeral & Cremation Services, a funeral...
New York, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Dealing with the dead: the female undertakers of Harlem
Jenny Adames, 36, a Funeral Service Coordinator at International Funeral & Cremation Services, a funeral home in Harlem, speaks on her phone that features an image of her daughter who is currently in quarantine at her grandmother's house, as Adames works during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S., April 16, 2020. Adames sent her daughter to live with her mother. She recently caught herself snapping at her in a text exchange. "Today kind of broke my heart," she said. "She needs her mom. She don't need Jenny the funeral director." REUTERS/Andrew Kelly SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS FUNERAL HOMES SLUM" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-SLUM
RTX7EDBG
April 19, 2020
In homes that are cramped, stuffy and increasingly low on food, residents of Mumbai's huge Dharavi slum...
Mumbai, India
The Wider Image: Indians build their own lockdown barricades in the country's slums
In homes that are cramped, stuffy and increasingly low on food, residents of Mumbai's huge Dharavi slum are struggling under India's nationwide lockdown. In Dharavi, where an estimated one million people live, residents are stretching out meals and relying on donations. But anxiety has been building since the lockdown began on March 25. Dharavi, believed to be Asia's largest slum, is a tough place to be confined, and also one of the most vulnerable to the new coronavirus because of the density of its population and poor sanitation. Hundreds of people sometimes share the same bathroom. Access to clean water is not guaranteed. Soap has become a luxury. Dharavi has 71 reported cases so far, but experts fear that number will accelerate higher.REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS MUMBAI SLUM" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching Text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-SLUM TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-SLUM
RTX7ED7J
April 19, 2020
In homes that are cramped, stuffy and increasingly low on food, residents of Mumbai's huge Dharavi slum...
Mumbai, India
The Wider Image: Indians build their own lockdown barricades in the country's slums
In homes that are cramped, stuffy and increasingly low on food, residents of Mumbai's huge Dharavi slum are struggling under India's nationwide lockdown. In Dharavi, where an estimated one million people live, residents are stretching out meals and relying on donations. But anxiety has been building since the lockdown began on March 25. Dharavi, believed to be Asia's largest slum, is a tough place to be confined, and also one of the most vulnerable to the new coronavirus because of the density of its population and poor sanitation. Hundreds of people sometimes share the same bathroom. Access to clean water is not guaranteed. Soap has become a luxury. Dharavi has 71 reported cases so far, but experts fear that number will accelerate higher.REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS MUMBAI SLUM" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching Text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-SLUM TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTX7DOT2
April 17, 2020
A medical worker texts on her break at Maimonides Medical Center during the outbreak of the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
A medical worker texts on her break at Maimonides Medical Center during the outbreak of the coronavirus...
A medical worker texts on her break at Maimonides Medical Center during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID19) in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., April 16, 2020. Picture taken April 16, 2020. REUTERS/Caitlin Ochs
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-BIRTHS
RTX7DHRE
April 16, 2020
As a first-time mother with no idea what to expect, Nancy Pedroza was convinced the hospital was the...
Fort Worth, UNITED STATES
Wider Image: From home to hospital: giving birth during the U.S. coronavirus outbreak
As a first-time mother with no idea what to expect, Nancy Pedroza was convinced the hospital was the safest place to have her baby. That conviction turned to doubt when in late March most U.S. states ordered residents to stay home and hospitals and doctors began taking new precautions to protect pregnant women and their babies against the novel coronavirus sweeping the nation. So, at 40 weeks pregnant, she turned to a midwife to help her have a home birth. She and her partner Ryan Morgan were about to become parents in the middle of a pandemic. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS PREGNANCY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching Text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-BIRTHS TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MEDICS
RTX7D3F0
April 15, 2020
The highly infectious COVID-19 disease caused by the novel coronavirus has infected more than 580,000...
UNITED STATES
Wider Image: A day fighting the coronavirus: US hospital staff share hardest moments on shift
The highly infectious COVID-19 disease caused by the novel coronavirus has infected more than 580,000 people across the United States and killed nearly 24,000. In Maryland, where residents have been ordered to stay at home since March 30 to stem the spread of the disease, around 9,000 have tested positive for the virus and more than 260 have died. After finishing what for many was a more than 12-hour shift, some nurses and doctors at one hospital shared with Reuters the hardest moments of their days. The hospital asked that it not be named. The medical workers agreed that one of the toughest parts of the job - more than the exhausting schedule or adjusting to work in a new unit - was witnessing the toll on patients and families. Because of the hospital's no-visitor policy, which was implemented to prevent further spread of the virus, the medical staff must care for the patients' physical needs and offer as much emotional support as they can muster in the absence of the patients' families. REUTERS/Rosem Morton SEARCH "MARYLAND COVID-19 HEALTH WORKERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MEDICS. TEMPLATE OUT
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/DEBT-MORATORIUM
RTX7CT6U
April 14, 2020
French Economy and Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire sends text messsages after a conference call with...
Paris, France
French Economy and Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire at the Bercy Finance Ministry in Paris
French Economy and Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire sends text messsages after a conference call with journalists at the Bercy Finance Ministry in Paris, France, April 14, 2020. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHINA-DIPLOMACY
RTX7CGYX
April 13, 2020
A man wearing a protective mask passes by a billboard depicting Chinese President Xi Jinping as the spread...
Belgrade, Serbia
Beijing exports China model of virus management
A man wearing a protective mask passes by a billboard depicting Chinese President Xi Jinping as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues in Belgrade, Serbia, April 1, 2020. The text on the billboard reads "Thanks, brother Xi". Picture taken April 1, 2020. REUTERS/Djordje Kojadinovic
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHINA-DIPLOMACY
RTX7CGZ1
April 13, 2020
Cars drive by a billboard depicting Chinese President Xi Jinping as the spread of the coronavirus disease...
Belgrade, Serbia
Beijing exports China model of virus management
Cars drive by a billboard depicting Chinese President Xi Jinping as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues in Belgrade, Serbia, April 1, 2020. The text on the billboard reads "Thanks, brother Xi". Picture taken April 1, 2020. REUTERS/Djordje Kojadinovic
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CHINA-DIPLOMACY
RTX7CGYN
April 13, 2020
A woman passes by a billboard depicting Chinese President Xi Jinping as the spread of the coronavirus...
Belgrade, Serbia
Beijing exports China model of virus management
A woman passes by a billboard depicting Chinese President Xi Jinping as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues in Belgrade, Serbia, April 1, 2020. The text on the billboard reads "Thanks, brother Xi". Picture taken April 1, 2020. REUTERS/Djordje Kojadinovic
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/WUHAN-AFTER
RTS38JOS
April 09, 2020
Tentative signs of normal life are returning to Wuhan, the Chinese city where the coronavirus epidemic...
Wuhan, China
The Wider Image: Before and After: life is slowly reemerging in Wuhan
Tentative signs of normal life are returning to Wuhan, the Chinese city where the coronavirus epidemic was first documented, after a 76-day lockdown that turned it into a virtual ghost town. Authorities in the city of 11 million on Wednesday lifted the draconian curbs they put in place in January, allowing residents to leave the city by car, rail and plane, taxis to resume operations and more non-essential businesses to re-open. Shoppers on Thursday streamed into Wuhan's main shopping belt, Chu River and Han Street, where international brands including Nike and Lego have stores and which was virtually deserted last month as the shops were shut. People also took advantage of warm weather to head to the banks of the freshwater East Lake, filling up its parking lots, while cars returned to the road leading to Wuhan's reopened Hankou Railway station. But traffic levels remained far below the close-to-gridlock levels that used to plague the city, as national government recommendations that people to refrain from going out unnecessarily remain in place. During the lockdown, public transport was shut down, roads were blocked and people ordered to stay at home to stay home to try and stem the spread of the coronavirus. Even so, more than 50,000 people became infected in Wuhan, and more than 2,500 of them died, about 80% of all fatalities in China, according to official figures. The tough restrictions are credited with helping to bring about a sharp drop in the numbers of locally transmitted cases in Wuhan and China at a time when the virus has evolved into a global pandemic. REUTERS/Aly Song SEARCH "WUHAN REEMERGING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/WUHAN-AFTER
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AZERBAIJAN
RTS388SQ
April 06, 2020
A man shows his mobile phone with a permission to leave home, received in a text message, after the authorities...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man shows his mobile phone with a permission to leave home received in a text message, in Baku
A man shows his mobile phone with a permission to leave home, received in a text message, after the authorities imposed restrictions on movement to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Baku, Azerbaijan April 6, 2020. According to the new restrictions, citizens have to obtain permission by sending a text message in order to leave home for essential trips, including visits to grocery stores, pharmacies, medical facilities, banks or post offices, or to attend funerals. REUTERS/Aziz Karimov
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AZERBAIJAN
RTS388SJ
April 06, 2020
An Azeri law enforcement officer holds a resident's mobile phone as he checks permission to leave home,...
Baku, Azerbaijan
An Azeri law enforcement officer holds a resident's mobile phone as he checks permission to leave home,...
An Azeri law enforcement officer holds a resident's mobile phone as he checks permission to leave home, received in a text message, after the authorities imposed restrictions on movement to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Baku, Azerbaijan April 6, 2020. According to the new restrictions, citizens have to obtain permission by sending a text message in order to leave home for essential trips, including visits to grocery stores, pharmacies, medical facilities, banks or post offices, or to attend funerals. REUTERS/Aziz Karimov
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AZERBAIJAN
RTS388RZ
April 06, 2020
A man shows his permission to leave home, received in a text message, to law enforcement officers, after...
Baku, Azerbaijan
A man shows his permission to leave home, received in a text message, to law enforcement officers in...
A man shows his permission to leave home, received in a text message, to law enforcement officers, after the authorities imposed restrictions on movement to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Baku, Azerbaijan April 6, 2020. According to the new restrictions, citizens have to obtain permission by sending a text message in order to leave home for essential trips, including visits to grocery stores, pharmacies, medical facilities, banks or post offices, or to attend funerals. REUTERS/Aziz Karimov
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