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Search results for: Three-Gorges-Dam

CHINA-LAKE/
RTS2VKUM
December 20, 2019
On Jan. 1 2020, China will ban fishing in environmentally sensitive regions along the Yangtze, China's...
Jiujiang, China
The Wider Image: Fishermen cry foul as China bids to fix drought-hit lake
On Jan. 1 2020, China will ban fishing in environmentally sensitive regions along the Yangtze, China's longest river, and by the start of 2021, fishing throughout the Poyang itself will be prohibited for at least 10 years. Fan, who has worked half his life on the lake, said he and as many as 100,000 other fishermen were being unfairly blamed for mounting local environmental problems and must now find other ways to make a living. "Our sources of income have been cut off. We don't have anything else," he said. "To be honest, we shouldn't be collecting the coins at all because they are owned by the state, but it is only a tiny amount." The government says excessive fishing has brought stocks down to perilously low levels and put endangered species under threat, including China's last surviving river mammal, the Yangtze finless porpoise. But the Poyang, described by President Xi Jinping as a vital "kidney" filtering the water supplies of 40% of China's population, has also been hurt by intensive sand mining, untreated wastewater and the impact of the giant Three Gorges Dam some 560km (350 miles) upstream. Water in the Poyang, which spills off from the middle reaches of the Yangtze River in Jiangxi province, routinely declines in winter. But the lake is now at its lowest in 60 years. With little rain since July, hundreds of shrivelled anchovies and tiny shellfish have been baked into the exposed shoreline flats. REUTERS/Aly Song SEARCH "POYANG LAKE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching Text: CHINA-LAKE/ TEMPLATE OUT
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715Q
August 22, 2012
Ships sail on the Yangtze River near Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province...
Badong, China
Ships sail on the Yangtze River near Badong
Ships sail on the Yangtze River near Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY MARITIME)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715P
August 22, 2012
A view from the Three Gorges dam over the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The...
Yichang, China
A view from the Three Gorges dam over the Yangtze River in Yichang
A view from the Three Gorges dam over the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715O
August 22, 2012
A fisherman walks with his catch on the banks of the Yangtze River, near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang,...
Yichang, China
A fisherman walks with his catch on the banks of the Yangtze River, near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang...
A fisherman walks with his catch on the banks of the Yangtze River, near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 8, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715K
August 22, 2012
A woman looks at the Yangtze River as she stands onboard a boat near Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the...
Badong, China
A woman looks at the Yangtze River as she stands onboard a boat near Badong,
A woman looks at the Yangtze River as she stands onboard a boat near Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715J
August 22, 2012
A man walks down the stairs to the ferry dock in Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62...
Badong, China
A man walks down the stairs to the ferry dock in Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River
A man walks down the stairs to the ferry dock in Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY MARITIME)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715I
August 22, 2012
People look at the Yangtze River as they stand on a bridge in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the...
Badong, China
People look at the Yangtze River as they stand on a bridge in Badong city
People look at the Yangtze River as they stand on a bridge in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715H
August 22, 2012
A view of the outskirts of Badong city, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the...
Badong, China
A view of the outskirts of Badong city, on the banks of the Yangtze River
A view of the outskirts of Badong city, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715G
August 22, 2012
Ma Tianxin stands next to a cracked wall in his house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of...
Badong, China
A man stands next to a cracked wall in his house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze...
Ma Tianxin stands next to a cracked wall in his house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA/
RTR3715F
August 22, 2012
A woman stands near a poster of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong at her gas station office near Badong,...
Badong, China
A woman stands near a poster of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong at her gas station office near Badong...
A woman stands near a poster of former Chinese leader Mao Zedong at her gas station office near Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 6, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 6, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715E
August 22, 2012
A view of the Yangtze river from a building under demotion at a residential area which will be relocated,...
Badong, China
A view of the Yangtze river from a building under demotion at a residential area which will be relocated,...
A view of the Yangtze river from a building under demotion at a residential area which will be relocated, in Huangtupo, Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715D
August 22, 2012
A man stands on the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems...
Yichang, China
A man stands on the Three Gorges dam in Yichang
A man stands on the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715C
August 22, 2012
A man stands next to the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental...
Yichang, China
A man stands next to the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province
A man stands next to the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR37159
August 22, 2012
A view of Badong city on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in...
Badong, China
A view of Badong city on the banks of the Yangtze River
A view of Badong city on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY CITYSPACE)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR37158
August 22, 2012
A man fishes at the Yangtze River near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012....
Yichang, China
A man fishes at the Yangtze River near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang
A man fishes at the Yangtze River near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR37157
August 22, 2012
A farmer stands under high voltage power lines at a suburban area of Shanghai August 19, 2012. The environmental...
Badong, China
A farmer stands under high voltage power lines at a suburban area of Shanghai
A farmer stands under high voltage power lines at a suburban area of Shanghai August 19, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. The dam produces electricity for more that half a doze of provinces including Shanghai. Picture taken August 19, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR37156
August 22, 2012
Residents dance at a square next to the Yangtze River in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three...
Badong, China
Residents dance at a square next to the Yangtze River in Badong city, away from the Three Gorges dam...
Residents dance at a square next to the Yangtze River in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 8, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 8, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR37155
August 22, 2012
A woman sits on a bridge over the Yangtze River in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges...
Badong, China
A woman sits on a bridge over the Yangtze River in Badong city
A woman sits on a bridge over the Yangtze River in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 8, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 8, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR37151
August 22, 2012
A man washes his hands next to a ship in Fengjie, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 170km (105 miles)...
Fengjie, China
A man washes his hands next to a ship in Fengjie, on the banks of the Yangtze River
A man washes his hands next to a ship in Fengjie, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 170km (105 miles) from the Three Gorges dam, Chongqing province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY MARITIME)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714Z
August 22, 2012
A building under demotion is seen at an residential area which will be relocated, in Huangtupo, Badong...
Badong, China
A building under demotion is seen at an residential area which will be relocated, in Huangtupo, Badong...
A building under demotion is seen at an residential area which will be relocated, in Huangtupo, Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714Y
August 22, 2012
A man walks with his son on a bridge over the Yangtze River in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the...
Badong, China
A man walks with his son on a bridge over the Yangtze River in Badong city, away from the Three Gorges...
A man walks with his son on a bridge over the Yangtze River in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 8, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 8, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714W
August 22, 2012
A ship sails on the Yangtze River near Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province...
Badong, China
A ship sails on the Yangtze River near Badong, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province
A ship sails on the Yangtze River near Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY MARITIME)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714V
August 22, 2012
Ducks are seen at a shipyard area on the Yangtze River in Fengjie, Chongqing province, 170km (105 miles)...
Fengjie, China
Ducks are seen at a shipyard area on the Yangtze River in Fengjie, Chongqing province
Ducks are seen at a shipyard area on the Yangtze River in Fengjie, Chongqing province, 170km (105 miles) from the Three Gorges dam, Chongqing province in this August 7, 2012 file photo. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria/Files (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY ANIMALS)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714U
August 22, 2012
A family sits near a shipyard in Fengjie, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 170km (105 miles) from the...
Fengjie, China
A family sits near a shipyard in Fengjie, on the banks of the Yangtze River
A family sits near a shipyard in Fengjie, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 170km (105 miles) from the Three Gorges dam, Chongqing province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714T
August 22, 2012
Ships sail on the Yangtze River in Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province...
Badong, China
Ships sail on the Yangtze River in Badong, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province
Ships sail on the Yangtze River in Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY MARITIME)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714S
August 22, 2012
Twisted reinforcing bars from a building under demotion are seen at a residential area which will be...
Badong, China
Twisted reinforcing bars from a building under demotion are seen at a residential area which will be...
Twisted reinforcing bars from a building under demotion are seen at a residential area which will be relocated, in Huangtupo, Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714O
August 22, 2012
A woman walks pass a building under demolition at a residential area which will be relocated, in Huangtupo,...
Badong, China
A woman walks pass a building under demolition at a residential area which will be relocated, in Huangtupo,...
A woman walks pass a building under demolition at a residential area which will be relocated, in Huangtupo, Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714N
August 22, 2012
Ma Tianxin looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the bank of the...
Badong, China
A man looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the bank of the Yangtze...
Ma Tianxin looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the bank of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714M
August 22, 2012
Residents wait for a ferry on the docks of Badong city, on the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the...
Badong, China
Residents wait for a ferry on the docks of Badong city, on the Yangtze River
Residents wait for a ferry on the docks of Badong city, on the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714L
August 22, 2012
Ma Tianxin looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the...
Badong, China
A man looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze...
Ma Tianxin looks at the cracked walls of his house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714K
August 22, 2012
A man uses his mobile phone as he sits near a shipyard in Fengjie, on the banks of the Yangtze River,...
Fengjie, China
A man uses his mobile phone as he sits near a shipyard in Fengjie, on the banks of the Yangtze River...
A man uses his mobile phone as he sits near a shipyard in Fengjie, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 170km (105 miles) from the Three Gorges dam, in Chongqing province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714J
August 22, 2012
People stand on the banks of the Yangtze River in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges...
Badong, China
People stand on the banks of the Yangtze River in Badong city, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei...
People stand on the banks of the Yangtze River in Badong city, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 8, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 8, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714I
August 22, 2012
A boy stands inside a cracked house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River,...
Badong, China
A boy stands inside a cracked house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River,...
A boy stands inside a cracked house after a landslide near Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715B
August 21, 2012
A man stands at the window of a high rise apartment in downtown Shanghai August 19, 2012. The environmental...
Badong, China
A man stands at the window of a high rise apartment in downtown Shanghai
A man stands at the window of a high rise apartment in downtown Shanghai August 19, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. The dam produces electricity for more that half a doze of provinces including Shanghai. Picture taken August 19, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR37150
August 21, 2012
A labourer works at a construction site to raise houses for people who will be relocated in Badong, on...
Badong, China
A labourer works at a construction site to raise houses for people who will be relocated in Badong, on...
A labourer works at a construction site to raise houses for people who will be relocated in Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY EMPLOYMENT)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714X
August 21, 2012
A labourer walks at a construction site where houses will be raised for people who will be relocated...
Badong, China
A labourer walks at a construction site where houses will be raised for people who will be relocated...
A labourer walks at a construction site where houses will be raised for people who will be relocated in Badong, on the banks of the Yangtze River, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY EMPLOYMENT)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3714P
August 21, 2012
A cruise ship sails on the Yangtze River near Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei...
Badong, China
A cruise ship sails on the Yangtze River near Badong, away from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province...
A cruise ship sails on the Yangtze River near Badong, 100km (62 miles) from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province August 7, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 7, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY MARITIME)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GLIO
July 21, 2010
Cars that were affected by the flood are parked in a row as they await maintenance works at a park in...
Jiangxi, China
Cars that were affected by the flood are parked in a row as they await maintenance works at a park in...
Cars that were affected by the flood are parked in a row as they await maintenance works at a park in Jingdezheng, Jiangxi province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT TRANSPORT)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GLHG
July 21, 2010
A resident checks the height of the water on the bank of the flooded Yangtze River in Dongliu county,...
Anhui, China
A resident checks the height of the water on the bank of the flooded Yangtze River in Dongliu county
A resident checks the height of the water on the bank of the flooded Yangtze River in Dongliu county, Anhui province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GLH0
July 21, 2010
A man stands on a flooded street in Dongliu county, Anhui province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that...
Anhui, China
A man stands on a flooded street in Dongliu county
A man stands on a flooded street in Dongliu county, Anhui province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. Sign reads " Pedestrian pavement." REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GLGU
July 21, 2010
A resident fills buckets of water along a flooded street next to the flooded Yangtze River in Dongliu...
Anhui, China
A resident fills buckets of water along a flooded street next to the flooded Yangtze River in Dongliu...
A resident fills buckets of water along a flooded street next to the flooded Yangtze River in Dongliu county, Anhui province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GLGS
July 21, 2010
A resident fills a bucket of water along the flooded Yangtze river as a ship passes in Dongliu county,...
Anhui, China
A resident fills a bucket of water along the flooded Yangtze river as a ship passes in Dongliu county...
A resident fills a bucket of water along the flooded Yangtze river as a ship passes in Dongliu county, Anhui province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GLGH
July 21, 2010
A factory is partially submerged by the flooded Yangtze River in Dongliu county, Anhui province July...
Anhui, China
A factory is partially submerged by the flooded Yangtze River in Dongliu county
A factory is partially submerged by the flooded Yangtze River in Dongliu county, Anhui province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GLGB
July 21, 2010
A resident rows a boat on a flooded street in Dongliu county, Anhui province July 21, 2010. Torrential...
Anhui, China
A resident rows a boat on a flooded street in Dongliu county
A resident rows a boat on a flooded street in Dongliu county, Anhui province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GL10
July 21, 2010
Residents walk along a bridge covered with water in the flooded area of Poyang, Jiangxi province July...
Jiangxi, China
Residents walk along a bridge covered with water in the flooded area of Poyang, Jiangxi province
Residents walk along a bridge covered with water in the flooded area of Poyang, Jiangxi province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GL0Z
July 21, 2010
Residents walk across a bridge covered with water in the flooded area of Poyang, Jiangxi province July...
Jiangxi, China
Residents walk across a bridge covered with water in the flooded area of Poyang, Jiangxi province
Residents walk across a bridge covered with water in the flooded area of Poyang, Jiangxi province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GL0V
July 21, 2010
A resident pushes his bicycle along a bridge in the flooded area of Poyang, Jiangxi province July 21,...
Jiangxi, China
A resident pushes his bicycle along a bridge in the flooded area of Poyang, Jiangxi province
A resident pushes his bicycle along a bridge in the flooded area of Poyang, Jiangxi province July 21, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA-FLOODS/
RTR2GL03
July 20, 2010
A child sleeps on a couch on a flooded street in Chongqing municipality July 20, 2010. Torrential rain...
Chongqing, China
A child sleeps on a couch on a flooded street in Chongqing municipality
A child sleeps on a couch on a flooded street in Chongqing municipality July 20, 2010. Torrential rain that has lashed China for weeks has killed dozens more people in China's west and forced authorities to close shipping locks on the massive Three Gorges Dam, officials said on Tuesday. Picture taken July 20, 2010. REUTERS/Shi Tou (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)
CHINA/
RTR208I7
May 06, 2008
Workers demolish a building in Kaixian county, Chongqing municipality May 6, 2008. The county is to be...
Chongqing, China
Workers demolish a building in Kaixian county, Chongqing municipality
Workers demolish a building in Kaixian county, Chongqing municipality May 6, 2008. The county is to be inundated by the Three Gorges reservoir. A total of 1.35 million people and 1,500 enterprises in Hubei Province and Chongqing Municipality were required to relocate to make way for the project, Xinhua News Agency reported. REUTERS/Paul Zhang (CHINA)
SUNDANCE/
RTR1W6ZC
January 23, 2008
Canadian documentary director Yung Chang of Montreal poses during a photo session at the 2008 Sundance...
Park City, UNITED STATES
Canadian documentary director Yung Chang of Montreal poses during a photo session at the 2008 Sundance...
Canadian documentary director Yung Chang of Montreal poses during a photo session at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah January 23, 2008. Chang's film "Up The Yangtze" is about China's Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze and its impact on a million residents near the river. The film is competing at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. REUTERS/Fred Prouser (UNITED STATES)
SUNDANCE/
RTR1W6YT
January 23, 2008
Canadian documentary director Yung Chang of Montreal poses during a photo session at the 2008 Sundance...
Park City, UNITED STATES
Canadian documentary director Yung Chang of Montreal poses during a photo session at the 2008 Sundance...
Canadian documentary director Yung Chang of Montreal poses during a photo session at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah January 23, 2008. Chang's film "Up The Yangtze" is about China's Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze and its impact on a million residents near the river. The film is competing at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. REUTERS/Fred Prouser (UNITED STATES)
Environment
Environment
Three Gorges Dam Forces Mass Movement, Again - 23 Aug 2012
46 PICTURES
Environment
Environment
China's Rising Dam Brings Wrenching Exodus - 14 Nov 2007
14 PICTURES
CHINA-THREEGORGES
RTXB7B
November 14, 2007
An old lady eats her breakfast as she stands outside her home where large cracks have appeared in the...
Badong, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES
An old lady eats her breakfast as she stands outside her home where large cracks have appeared in the walls in Chenjialing Village in Hubei Province near the town of Badong in central China November 5, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 2, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTXB77
November 14, 2007
An old lady carries her breakfast bowl as she climbs down from her attic where large cracks have appeared...
Badong, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/
An old lady carries her breakfast bowl as she climbs down from her attic where large cracks have appeared in the walls in Chenjialing Village in Hubei Province near the town of Badong in central China November 5, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 5, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTXB76
November 14, 2007
An old lady eats her breakfast as she stands in her home where large cracks have appeared in the walls...
Badong, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/
An old lady eats her breakfast as she stands in her home where large cracks have appeared in the walls in Chenjialing Village in Hubei Province near the town of Badong in central China November 5, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 5, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTXB75
November 14, 2007
A man walks past homes where large cracks have appeared in their walls in Chenjialing Village in Hubei...
Badong, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/
A man walks past homes where large cracks have appeared in their walls in Chenjialing Village in Hubei Province near the town of Badong in central China November 5, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 5, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTXB74
November 14, 2007
A woman stands next to a home where large cracks have appeared in their walls in Chenjialing Village...
Badong, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/
A woman stands next to a home where large cracks have appeared in their walls in Chenjialing Village in Hubei Province near the town of Badong in central China November 5, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 5, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTXB73
November 14, 2007
A man carries potatoes from his fields in Chenjialing Village where cracks are appearing in most of the...
Badong, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/
A man carries potatoes from his fields in Chenjialing Village where cracks are appearing in most of the houses in Hubei Province near the town of Badong in central China November 5, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 5, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTXB72
November 14, 2007
A farmer reacts as he shows where cracks are appearing in the walls of his home in a small rural village...
WANZHOU, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/
A farmer reacts as he shows where cracks are appearing in the walls of his home in a small rural village near the city of Wanzhou in the Chongqing municipality in southwest China November 2, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 2, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
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