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Search results for: To-Let

SOCCER-ARGENTINA/MARADONA-NAPLES
RTX8C5CI
November 26, 2020
Soccer Football - People mourn the death of Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona, Stadio San Paolo,...
Naples, Italy
People mourn the death of Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona, in Naples
Soccer Football - People mourn the death of Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona, Stadio San Paolo, Naples, Italy - November 26, 2020 A man lets off a flare as people gather to mourn the death of Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona outside the Stadio San Paolo in Naples REUTERS/Yara Nardi
WOMEN-ANTIVIOLENCE/TURKEY
RTX8BWVN
November 25, 2020
Demonstrators gather to protest against gender-based violence on the International Day for the Elimination...
Istanbul, Turkey
Turkish activists mark International Day for Violence Against Women, in Istanbul
Demonstrators gather to protest against gender-based violence on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women in Istanbul, Turkey, November 25, 2020. Banner in front reads, "Let our voice be heard." REUTERS/Umit Bektas
WOMEN-ANTIVIOLENCE/TURKEY
RTX8BWVF
November 25, 2020
Demonstrators gather to protest against gender-based violence on the International Day for the Elimination...
Istanbul, Turkey
Turkish activists mark International Day for Violence Against Women, in Istanbul
Demonstrators gather to protest against gender-based violence on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women in Istanbul, Turkey, November 25, 2020. Banner in front reads, "Let our voice be heard. We are rebelling on the streets for each other and against men-government violence." REUTERS/Umit Bektas
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE-PROTEST
RTX8BLV2
November 24, 2020
Restaurants and hotels owners attend a demonstration to protest against the sanitary measures by the...
Cannes, France
Retaurants and hotels owners protest against sanitary measures in France
Restaurants and hotels owners attend a demonstration to protest against the sanitary measures by the French government to stop a second wave of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Cannes, France, November 24, 2020. The slogan reads "Let us work". REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE-PROTEST
RTX8BLV1
November 24, 2020
Restaurants and hotels owners attend a demonstration to protest against the sanitary measures by the...
Cannes, France
Retaurants and hotels owners protest against sanitary measures in France
Restaurants and hotels owners attend a demonstration to protest against the sanitary measures by the French government to stop a second wave of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Cannes, France, November 24, 2020. The slogan reads "Let us work". REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUQ
November 23, 2020
A leukaemia patient and her mother coming from Hubei province cross a checkpoint at the Jiujiang Yangtze...
Jiujiang, China
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
A leukaemia patient and her mother coming from Hubei province cross a checkpoint at the Jiujiang Yangtze River Bridge in Jiujiang, Jiangxi province, China, as the country is hit by an outbreak of a new coronavirus, February 1, 2020. Reuters photographer Thomas Peter: "The clock was running out on farmer Lu Yuejin, desperate to get her 26-year-old daughter Hu Ping to chemotherapy for her leukaemia. But Hubei was under coronavirus lockdown and she struggled to pass a checkpoint to get to the hospital in the neighbouring province.'She needs to have her treatment. But they won't let us through,' she said when we met her at the police cordon. In February, the coronavirus had not yet become a global scourge, but for people in China, the epidemic was already a new reality. The authorities had closed off the city of Wuhan, where the virus was first discovered, and put the surrounding Hubei province under a virtual lockdown. Checkpoints had sprung up along its borders to prevent residents from leaving. People were scarred. Many stayed home and only ducked out to get food. Clad in full PPE, we travelled along the edge of the exclusion zone to report on how life was changing. Navigating the police and local government officials was the hardest part of our reporting as our presence was often not welcome. We found Lu Yuejin crying and pleading with the police. At one point she dropped to the ground, wailing. About an hour after she spoke with us, an ambulance arrived that took them to the hospital. I felt relieved to see them go. That morning they eventually got lucky, but this incident made me think of all the other untold tragedies during this pandemic, which has turned routine journeys into an obstacle course. For some, overcoming those hurdles is a question of life or death." REUTERS/Thomas Peter/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/UKRAINE-LOCKDOWN
RTX8A333
November 17, 2020
Entrepreneurs and representatives of small businesses take part in a demonstration in front of the parliament...
KYIV, Ukraine
Entrepreneurs take part in a demonstration amid the coronavirus disease outbreak in Kyiv
Entrepreneurs and representatives of small businesses take part in a demonstration in front of the parliament building amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Kyiv, Ukraine November 17, 2020. Entrepreneurs gathered to demand governmental support and the cancellation of weekend lockdowns introduced to curb the spread of the coronavirus. Placards read: "Right to work" and "Let's preserve micro business". REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko
BAHRAIN/JEWISH
RTX88F7K
November 09, 2020
The caretaker of the synagogue, Jacob John closes the Bahrain Synagogue leaving the lights on, to participate...
Manama, Bahrain
Bahrain Jewish community takes part in the March of the Living "Let There Be Light" Campaign
The caretaker of the synagogue, Jacob John closes the Bahrain Synagogue leaving the lights on, to participate in the March of the Living's "Let There Be Light" Campaign with Hampton Synagogue, where the two synagogues will keep their lights on during the evening as a symbol of mutual commitment against anti-Semitism, racism, hatred and intolerance, in Manama, Bahrain, November 9, 2020. REUTERS/ Hamad I Mohammed
BAHRAIN/JEWISH
RTX88F76
November 09, 2020
Head of Bahrain's Jewish community, Ebrahim Dawood Ebrahim Nonoo performs prayers after lighting a candle...
Manama, Bahrain
Bahrain Jewish community takes part in the March of the Living "Let There Be Light" Campaign
Head of Bahrain's Jewish community, Ebrahim Dawood Ebrahim Nonoo performs prayers after lighting a candle in Bahrain Synagogue, next to the caretaker of the synagogue, Jacob John, to participate in the March of the Living's "Let There Be Light" Campaign with Hampton Synagogue, where the two synagogues will keep their lights on during the evening as a symbol of mutual commitment against anti-Semitism, racism, hatred and intolerance, in Manama, Bahrain, November 9, 2020. REUTERS/ Hamad I Mohammed
BAHRAIN/JEWISH
RTX88F6J
November 09, 2020
Head of Bahrain's Jewish community, Ebrahim Dawood Ebrahim Nonoo performs prayers after lighting a candle...
Manama, Bahrain
Bahrain Jewish community takes part in the March of the Living "Let There Be Light" Campaign
Head of Bahrain's Jewish community, Ebrahim Dawood Ebrahim Nonoo performs prayers after lighting a candle in Bahrain Synagogue, next to the caretaker of the synagogue, Jacob John, to participate in the March of the Living's "Let There Be Light" Campaign with Hampton Synagogue, where the two synagogues will keep their lights on during the evening as a symbol of mutual commitment against anti-Semitism, racism, hatred and intolerance, in Manama, Bahrain, November 9, 2020. REUTERS/ Hamad I Mohammed
BAHRAIN/JEWISH
RTX88F58
November 09, 2020
Head of Bahrain's Jewish community, Ebrahim Dawood Ebrahim Nonoo performs prayers after lighting a candle...
Manama, Bahrain
Bahrain Jewish community takes part in the March of the Living "Let There Be Light" Campaign
Head of Bahrain's Jewish community, Ebrahim Dawood Ebrahim Nonoo performs prayers after lighting a candle in Bahrain Synagogue, to participate in the March of the Living's "Let There Be Light" Campaign with Hampton Synagogue, where the two synagogues will keep their lights on during the evening as a symbol of mutual commitment against anti-Semitism, racism, hatred and intolerance, in Manama, Bahrain, November 9, 2020. REUTERS/ Hamad I Mohammed
BAHRAIN/JEWISH
RTX88F4V
November 09, 2020
Head of Bahrain's Jewish community, Ebrahim Dawood Ebrahim Nonoo lights a candle in Bahrain Synagogue...
Manama, Bahrain
Bahrain Jewish community takes part in the March of the Living "Let There Be Light" Campaign
Head of Bahrain's Jewish community, Ebrahim Dawood Ebrahim Nonoo lights a candle in Bahrain Synagogue next to the caretaker of the synagogue, Jacob John, to participate in the March of the Living's "Let There Be Light" Campaign with Hampton Synagogue, where the two synagogues will keep their lights on during the evening as a symbol of mutual commitment against anti-Semitism, racism, hatred and intolerance, in Manama, Bahrain, November 9, 2020. REUTERS/ Hamad I Mohammed
USA-ELECTION/PENNSYLVANIA
RTX86NYM
November 02, 2020
Phyllis Davis, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Union Members Canvas for Biden in Philadelphia
Phyllis Davis, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 2, 2020. Davis was let go from her service industry job due to COVID-19 and has been canvassing eight hours a day, six days a week since October 1. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
USA-ELECTION/PENNSYLVANIA
RTX86NXH
November 02, 2020
Phyllis Davis, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Union Members Canvas for Biden in Philadelphia
Phyllis Davis, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 2, 2020. Davis was let go from her service industry job due to COVID-19 and has been canvassing eight hours a day, six days a week since October 1. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
USA-ELECTION/PENNSYLVANIA
RTX86NS4
November 02, 2020
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Union Members Canvas for Biden in Philadelphia
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 2, 2020. Wilson was let go from her service industry job due to COVID-19 and has been canvassing eight hours a day, six days a week since October 1. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
USA-ELECTION/PENNSYLVANIA
RTX86NP8
November 02, 2020
(From left) Renee Wilson and Phyllis Davis, members of service industry union Unite Here, canvas for...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Union Members Canvas for Biden in Philadelphia
(From left) Renee Wilson and Phyllis Davis, members of service industry union Unite Here, canvas for Joe Biden in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 2, 2020. Wilson and Davis were both let go from their service industry jobs due to COVID-19 and have been canvassing eight hours a day, six days a week since October 1. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
USA-ELECTION/PENNSYLVANIA
RTX86NOX
November 02, 2020
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Union Members Canvas for Biden in Philadelphia
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 2, 2020. Wilson was let go from her service industry job due to COVID-19 and has been canvassing eight hours a day, six days a week since October 1. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
USA-ELECTION/PENNSYLVANIA
RTX86NOR
November 02, 2020
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Union Members Canvas for Biden in Philadelphia
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 2, 2020. Wilson was let go from her service industry job due to COVID-19 and has been canvassing eight hours a day, six days a week since October 1. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
USA-ELECTION/PENNSYLVANIA
RTX86NOP
November 02, 2020
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Union Members Canvas for Biden in Philadelphia
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 2, 2020. Wilson was let go from her service industry job due to COVID-19 and has been canvassing eight hours a day, six days a week since October 1. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
USA-ELECTION/PENNSYLVANIA
RTX86NOD
November 02, 2020
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia,...
Philadelphia, UNITED STATES
Union Members Canvas for Biden in Philadelphia
Renee Wilson, a member of service industry union Unite Here, canvases for Joe Biden in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 2, 2020. Wilson was let go from her service industry job due to COVID-19 and has been canvassing eight hours a day, six days a week since October 1. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski
LATVIA-LIGHTS/
RTX84RVJ
October 24, 2020
People enjoy the laser show "Let the light rise from the darkness" during the "Illuminated Liepaja" light...
Liepaja, Latvia
"Illuminated Liepaja" light festival in Liepaja
People enjoy the laser show "Let the light rise from the darkness" during the "Illuminated Liepaja" light festival, which was cancelled in March due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and postponed to the end of October, in Liepaja, Latvia October 24, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
LATVIA-LIGHTS/
RTX84RV9
October 24, 2020
People enjoy the laser show "Let the light rise from the darkness" during the "Illuminated Liepaja" light...
Liepaja, Latvia
"Illuminated Liepaja" light festival in Liepaja
People enjoy the laser show "Let the light rise from the darkness" during the "Illuminated Liepaja" light festival, which was cancelled in March due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and postponed to the end of October, in Liepaja, Latvia October 24, 2020. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9A
October 15, 2020
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E99
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E98
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E96
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E95
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E94
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E92
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E91
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E90
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Z
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Y
October 15, 2020
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8X
October 15, 2020
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8W
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8P
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8M
October 15, 2020
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8L
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
MEXICO-WOMEN/VIOLENCE
RTX7ZM8O
October 03, 2020
A demonstrator holds a banner reading "Let Coahuila burn, femicide land" during a march to demand justice...
SALTILLO, Mexico
A demonstrator holds a banner reading "Let Coahuila burn, femicide land" during a march to demand justice...
A demonstrator holds a banner reading "Let Coahuila burn, femicide land" during a march to demand justice for the murder of Alondra Gallegos in Saltillo, Mexico October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRAZIL
RTX7ZJF7
October 02, 2020
Nurse Elissandra da Silva Lima and volunteer Priscila Helena Carlos speak with Isabel Cristina Moraes...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Sao Paulo
Nurse Elissandra da Silva Lima and volunteer Priscila Helena Carlos speak with Isabel Cristina Moraes da Silva to look for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) symptoms during a 'Bora Testar' (Let's Get Tested) campaign at Heliopolis slum in Sao Paulo, Brazil October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
USA-WILDFIRES/
RTX7YMZS
September 28, 2020
Cindi Frediani ties yellow tape on a post, to let officials know they have been told to leave, as smoke...
CALISTOGA, UNITED STATES
Cindi Frediani ties yellow tape on a post, to let officials know they have been told to leave, in Calistoga...
Cindi Frediani ties yellow tape on a post, to let officials know they have been told to leave, as smoke from fire is seen coming over the hillside across the valley, in Calistoga, California, U.S., September 28, 2020. REUTERS/Fred Greaves
COLOMBIA-ABORTION/
RTX7YMZH
September 28, 2020
Demonstrators and activists take part in a rally in support of legal and safe abortion during a march...
Bogota, Colombia
Rally in support of legal and safe abortion in Bogota
Demonstrators and activists take part in a rally in support of legal and safe abortion during a march to mark the International Safe Abortion Day in Bogota, Colombia September 28, 2020. Placard reads "let's abort this violent homeland". REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez
COLOMBIA-ABORTION/
RTX7YMXL
September 28, 2020
Demonstrators and activists take part in a rally in support of legal and safe abortion during a march...
Bogota, Colombia
Rally in support of legal and safe abortion in Bogota
Demonstrators and activists take part in a rally in support of legal and safe abortion during a march to mark the International Safe Abortion Day in Bogota, Colombia September 28, 2020. Placard reads "let's abort this violent homeland". REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez
COLOMBIA-ABORTION/
RTX7YMXE
September 28, 2020
Demonstrators and activists take part in a rally in support of legal and safe abortion during a march...
Bogota, Colombia
Rally in support of legal and safe abortion in Bogota
Demonstrators and activists take part in a rally in support of legal and safe abortion during a march to mark the International Safe Abortion Day in Bogota, Colombia September 28, 2020. Placard reads "let's abort this violent homeland". REUTERS/Luisa Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BRITAIN-EDUCATION
RTX7VX1E
September 16, 2020
A man walks next to a Student Lettings sign, ahead of students' return to universities in coming weeks...
Durham, United Kingdom
A man walks next to a Student Lettings sign, ahead of students' return to universities in coming weeks,...
A man walks next to a Student Lettings sign, ahead of students' return to universities in coming weeks amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Durham, Britain, September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Lee Smith
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PROPERTY-ONEVANDERBILT
RTX7VGW9
September 14, 2020
The Let Life Tower (L) and Chrysler Building are seen out the windows from the 54th floor of the 77 story...
New York, UNITED STATES
One Vanderbilt, the latest skyscraper to grace New York's iconic skyline is set to open
The Let Life Tower (L) and Chrysler Building are seen out the windows from the 54th floor of the 77 story One Vanderbilt office tower, the latest super-tall skyscraper to grace New York's iconic skyline which is set to open while the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) keeps the largest and richest U.S. office market almost empty, in midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S., September 9, 2020. Picture taken September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Segar REFILE - CORRECTING NUMBER OF STORIES
Spotlight
Spotlight
Mexico City's ancient lake reclaims scrapped airport
32 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/BELGIUM
RTX7PVP2
August 16, 2020
A demonstrator wearing a face mask holds a placard reading "The King, the Law, the Freedom! Let us breathe!...
Brussels, Belgium
Protest against the measures of the government to avoid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
A demonstrator wearing a face mask holds a placard reading "The King, the Law, the Freedom! Let us breathe! Finally covid19 will kill more businesses than people" as she protests against the measures of the government to avoid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), amid its outbreak, near to the Finance Tower in Brussels, Belgium, August 16, 2020. REUTERS/Johanna Geron
WW2-ANNIVERSARY/JAPAN-SHRINE
RTX7PPG0
August 15, 2020
Anti-war and anti-imperialist protesters march to mark the 75th anniversary of Japan's surrender in World...
Tokyo, Japan
Anti-war and anti-imperialist protesters march to mark the 75th anniversary of Japan's surrender in World...
Anti-war and anti-imperialist protesters march to mark the 75th anniversary of Japan's surrender in World War Two, as police officers control them near the Yasukuni Shrine, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan August 15, 2020. The banner reads: "Let's end the Emperor System!". REUTERS/Issei Kato
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE-MASKS
RTX7OOCX
August 10, 2020
Tourists in protective masks stand by a masked statue that reads, "Let's protect ourselves" in Nice as...
Nice, France
France requires masks inside public places
Tourists in protective masks stand by a masked statue that reads, "Let's protect ourselves" in Nice as France reinforces mask-wearing as part of efforts to curb a resurgence of COVID-19 across the country, August 10, 2020. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard
ITALY-OLDEST STUDENT/
RTX7MSWU
July 31, 2020
Giuseppe Paterno, 96, Italy's oldest student, wears a traditional laurel wreath awarded to Italian students...
Palermo, Italy
The Wider Image: Meet Italy's oldest student, surviving WW2 and a pandemic to graduate at 96
Giuseppe Paterno, 96, Italy's oldest student, wears a traditional laurel wreath awarded to Italian students when they graduate, as he attends his graduation day after completing his undergraduate degree in history and philosophy at the University of Palermo, in Palermo, Italy July 29, 2020. "I said, 'that's it, now or never,' and so in 2017, I decided to enrol," Paterno said. "I understood that it was a little late to get a three-year degree but I said to myself 'let's see if I can do it'." REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "ITALY'S OLDEST STUDENT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
ITALY-OLDEST STUDENT/
RTX7MSWI
July 31, 2020
At 96, Giuseppe Paterno has faced many tests in life - childhood poverty, war and more recently, the...
Palermo, Italy
The Wider Image: Meet Italy's oldest student, surviving WW2 and a pandemic to graduate at 96
At 96, Giuseppe Paterno has faced many tests in life - childhood poverty, war and more recently, the coronavirus pandemic. Now he has sailed through an exam that makes him Italy's oldest university graduate. This week, the former railway worker stepped forward to receive his diploma and the traditional laurel wreath awarded to Italian students when they graduate, applauded by his family, teachers and fellow students more than 70 years his junior. "I am a normal person, like many others," he said, when asked what it felt like to be graduating so late. "In terms of age I have surpassed all the others but I didn't do it for this." Already in his 90s when he enrolled for a degree in History and Philosophy at the University of Palermo, Paterno grew up loving books, but he never had the chance to study. "I said, 'that's it, now or never,' and so in 2017, I decided to enrol," he told Reuters in his apartment in the Sicilian city of Palermo, which he rarely leaves nowadays due to his frailty. "I understood that it was a little late to get a three-year degree but I said to myself 'let's see if I can do it'." On Wednesday, he graduated first in his class with top honours, receiving congratulations from the university chancellor Fabrizio Micari. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "ITALY'S OLDEST STUDENT" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. Matching Text: ITALY-OLDEST STUDENT/
MINNEAPOLIS-POLICE/PROTESTS-FRANCE
RTS3ENHR
June 20, 2020
Demonstrators hang a banner as they attend a demonstration to protest against police brutality, racial...
Paris, France
Demonstrators attend a protest against police brutality and racial inequality in Paris
Demonstrators hang a banner as they attend a demonstration to protest against police brutality, racial inequality and the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd in Paris, France, June 20, 2020. The banner reads: "Let us breathe!" REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/FRANCE-HEALTH-PROTEST
RTS3DM2K
June 16, 2020
French health workers hold a banner during a protest in Nantes as part of a nationwide day of actions...
Nantes, France
French health workers attend a protest in Nantes
French health workers hold a banner during a protest in Nantes as part of a nationwide day of actions to urge the French government to improve wages and invest in public hospitals, in the wake of the the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) crisis in France June 16, 2020. The slogan reads " Capitalism kills, let's unite in the struggle". REUTERS/Stephane Mahe
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES-RESTAURANTS
RTS3DLIC
June 16, 2020
Billboards of characters wearing masks and maintaining social distancing are placed in the middle of...
MANDALUYONG, Philippines
As economy slumps, Philippines lets eateries reopen to recoup job losses
Billboards of characters wearing masks and maintaining social distancing are placed in the middle of a shopping mall where extra dining tables are placed to maintain social distancing in restaurants, as the Philippine government allows dining-in following months of restrictions due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mandaluyong City, Metro Manila, Philippines, June 16, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES-RESTAURANTS
RTS3DLIA
June 16, 2020
Diners wait for their orders at a food court where only one customer per table is allowed, as the Philippine...
MANDALUYONG, Philippines
As economy slumps, Philippines lets eateries reopen to recoup job losses
Diners wait for their orders at a food court where only one customer per table is allowed, as the Philippine government allows dining-in following months of restrictions due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mandaluyong City, Metro Manila, Philippines, June 16, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES-RESTAURANTS
RTS3DLI2
June 16, 2020
A bottle of alcohol and a notice with a QR code for a customer health declaration are placed before the...
MANDALUYONG, Philippines
As economy slumps, Philippines lets eateries reopen to recoup job losses
A bottle of alcohol and a notice with a QR code for a customer health declaration are placed before the entrance of a restaurant as the Philippine government allows dining-in following months of restrictions due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mandaluyong City, Metro Manila, Philippines, June 16, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PHILIPPINES-RESTAURANTS
RTS3DLI0
June 16, 2020
Bottles of disinfectants and a thermal scanner are placed before the entrance of a restaurant as the...
MANDALUYONG, Philippines
As economy slumps, Philippines lets eateries reopen to recoup job losses
Bottles of disinfectants and a thermal scanner are placed before the entrance of a restaurant as the Philippine government allows dining-in following months of restrictions due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Mandaluyong City, Metro Manila, Philippines, June 16, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez
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