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Search results for: Tree-frog

NICARAGUA/
RTR2B53L
March 02, 2010
A Mexican Treefrog (Smilisca Baudinii) is seen at the Montibell wildlife reserve, located 21 km (18 miles)...
Managua, Nicaragua
A Mexican Treefrog is seen at the Montibell wildlife reserve in Nicaragua
A Mexican Treefrog (Smilisca Baudinii) is seen at the Montibell wildlife reserve, located 21 km (18 miles) south of Managua March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: ANIMALS)
NICARAGUA/
RTR2B53K
March 02, 2010
A Mexican Treefrog (Smilisca Baudinii) is seen at the Montibell wildlife reserve, located 21 km (18 miles)...
Managua, Nicaragua
A Mexican Treefrog is seen at the Montibell wildlife reserve in Nicaragua.
A Mexican Treefrog (Smilisca Baudinii) is seen at the Montibell wildlife reserve, located 21 km (18 miles) south of Managua, March 2, 2010. REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas (NICARAGUA - Tags: ANIMALS)
COSTARICA-BIODIVERSITY-FROGS
RTR1PZDB
May 22, 2007
A Hourglass Treefrog, Hyla ebraccata, is seen at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, in this January...
Sarapiqui, Costa Rica
File photo of a Hourglass Treefrog at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, Costa Rica
A Hourglass Treefrog, Hyla ebraccata, is seen at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, in this January 12, 2006 file picture. Global warming is the top suspect for the disappearance of 17 amphibian species from Costa Rican jungles, scientists said on May 22, 2007, warning monkey and reptile populations were also plummeting. About a third of the 5,743 known species of frogs, toads and other amphibians are classified as threatened, according to the Global Amphibian Assessment survey. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate/Files (COSTA RICA)
TREEFROGS
RTXO5P4
January 19, 2006
- PHOTO TAKEN 11JAN06 - A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a trunk at La Selva biological...
San Jose, Costa Rica
- PHOTO TAKEN 11JAN06 - A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a trunk at La Selva biologica.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 11JAN06 - A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a trunk at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, 80 miles (129 km) north of San Jose, Costa Rica January 11, 2006. The Selva is one of the world's most important sites for tropical ecosystem research. [La Selva has about 73% of its area under primary tropical rain forest. Each year, more than 250 scientists from some 25 countries and international students come to La Selva to study tropical ecology. Species diversity include more than, 330 species of trees, and 43 species of birds. Picture taken January 11.]
TREEFROGS
RTXO5P2
January 19, 2006
- PHOTO TAKEN 11JAN06 - A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological...
San Jose, Costa Rica
- PHOTO TAKEN 11JAN06 - A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 11JAN06 - A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, 80 miles (129 km) north of San Jose, Costa Rica January 11, 2006. The Selva is one of the world's most important sites for tropical ecosystem research. [La Selva has about 73% of its area under primary tropical rain forest. Each year, more than 250 scientists from some 25 countries and international students come to La Selva to study tropical ecology. Species diversity include more than, 330 species of trees, and 43 species of birds. Picture taken January 11.]
TREEFROGS
RTXO4PZ
January 18, 2006
- PHOTO TAKEN 12JAN06 - A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological...
San Jose
- PHOTO TAKEN 12JAN06 - A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 12JAN06 - A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, 80 miles (129 km) north of San Jose, Costa Rica in this picture taken January 12, 2006. The Selva is one of the world's most important sites for tropical ecosystem research. La Selva has about 73% of its area under primary tropical rain forest. Each year, more than 250 scientists from some 25 countries and international students come to La [Selva to study tropical ecology. Species diversity include more than, 330 species of trees, and 43 species of birds. Picture taken January 12.]
COSTA RICA
RTR18ECY
January 12, 2006
A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, 80...
San Jose, Costa Rica
A Hourglass Treefrog rests on a leaf at La Selva biological station in Costa Rica
A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, 80 miles (129 km) north of San Jose, Costa Rica in this picture taken January 12, 2006. The Selva is one of the world's most important sites for tropical ecosystem research. La Selva has about 73% of its area under primary tropical rain forest. Each year, more than 250 scientists from some 25 countries and international students come to La Selva to study tropical ecology. Species diversity include more than, 330 species of trees, and 43 species of birds. Picture taken January 12. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate PP06010215
COSTA RICA NATURAL WORLD
RTR18H1Z
January 11, 2006
A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a trunk at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, 80...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Hourglass Treefrog rests on a trunk at La Selva biological station in Costa Rica
A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a trunk at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, 80 miles (129 km) north of San Jose, Costa Rica January 11, 2006. The Selva is one of the world's most important sites for tropical ecosystem research. La Selva has about 73% of its area under primary tropical rain forest. Each year, more than 250 scientists from some 25 countries and international students come to La Selva to study tropical ecology. Species diversity include more than, 330 species of trees, and 43 species of birds. Picture taken January 11. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
COSTA RICA NATURAL WORLD
RTR18FXS
January 11, 2006
A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, 80...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Hourglass Treefrog rests on a leaf at La Selva biological station in Costa Rica
A Hourglass Treefrog (Hyla ebraccata) rests on a leaf at La Selva biological station in Sarapiqui, 80 miles (129 km) north of San Jose, Costa Rica January 11, 2006. The Selva is one of the world's most important sites for tropical ecosystem research. La Selva has about 73% of its area under primary tropical rain forest. Each year, more than 250 scientists from some 25 countries and international students come to La Selva to study tropical ecology. Species diversity include more than, 330 species of trees, and 43 species of birds. Picture taken January 11. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate
Nd23.JPG
RTRG6VR
August 07, 1998
UNDATED FILE PHOTO - A deformed Pacific Treefrog, Hyla regilla, found near Portland, Oregon in 1997,...
Washington
FILE PHOTO OF DEFORMED TREE FROG SPECIMEN.
UNDATED FILE PHOTO - A deformed Pacific Treefrog, Hyla regilla, found near Portland, Oregon in 1997, is one of many deformed frogs that have been discovered around the world. A common chemical derived from vitamin A and key to the development of all animals, from fish to humans, may be causing gross deformities in frogs, biologists said August 5. This specimen is loaded with trematode cysts, shown as tiny black dots, in and around the base of the deformed doubled left hind leg, but are absent from the right hind limb. This specimen was preserved and then the tissues were treated with an enzyme that makes them transparent, then the bones are stained red and the cartilage (joints) are stained blue.

RC/HB/AA
FROGS
RTXI46U
August 06, 1998
- UNDATED FILE PHOTO - A deformed Pacific Treefrog, Hyla regilla, found near Portland, Oregon in 1997,...
Washington, UNITED STATES
- UNDATED FILE PHOTO - A deformed Pacific Treefrog, Hyla regilla, found near Portland, Oregon in 19.....
- UNDATED FILE PHOTO - A deformed Pacific Treefrog, Hyla regilla, found near Portland, Oregon in 1997, is one of many deformed frogs that have been discovered around the world. A common chemical derived from vitamin A and key to the development of all animals, from fish to humans, may be causing gross deformities in frogs, biologists said August 5. This specimen is loaded with trematode cysts, shown as tiny black dots, in and around the base of the deformed doubled left hind leg, but are absent from the right hind limb. This specimen was preserved and then the tissues were treated with an enzyme that makes them transparent, then the bones are stained red and the cartilage (joints) are stained blue.
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