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Search results for: Tunisian-uprising-2011

TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOPG 
May 24, 2016 
Men play soccer at a pitch in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created... 
REMADA, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Men play soccer at a pitch in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOP7 
May 24, 2016 
People inspect a burnt room inside their house, which was damaged by fighting between Islamic State jihadists... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
People inspect a burnt room inside their house, which was damaged by fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government forces in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 12, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOP5 
May 24, 2016 
A sign is seen at the edge of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile... 
REMADA, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
A sign is seen at the edge of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOP3 
May 24, 2016 
Yahya, father of Bechar Zongya, gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in the town of... 
REMADA, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Yahya, father of Bechar Zongya, gestures during an interview with Reuters journalists in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOP0 
May 24, 2016 
A woman sits outside her house, which was damaged in fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
A woman sits outside her house, which was damaged in fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government forces, in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 12, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOW 
May 24, 2016 
A woman walks past a truck loaded with containers in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's... 
REMADA, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
A woman walks past a truck loaded with containers in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOU 
May 24, 2016 
Yarusi Kadi, 21 (C), an unemployed graduate, smiles as he poses for a photograph with his grandmother... 
REMADA, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Yarusi Kadi, 21 (C), an unemployed graduate, smiles as he poses for a photograph with his grandmother at his house in the town of Remada, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOK 
May 24, 2016 
Photographs of Rahma (L), the wife of Noureddine Chouchane, a jihadist who was killed during a U.S strike... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Photographs of Rahma (L), the wife of Noureddine Chouchane, a jihadist who was killed during a U.S strike in Libya, and her sister Gofran (R), are seen in a newspaper in Tunis, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOJ 
May 24, 2016 
Mohamed Slimi, whose son Tarak Slimi is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, sits at his... 
EL KEF, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Mohamed Slimi, whose son Tarak Slimi is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, sits at his house in El Kef, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOH 
May 24, 2016 
Fethiya Charni, weeps as she holds a photograph and the passport of her son Tarak Slimi, who is suspected... 
EL KEF, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Fethiya Charni, weeps as she holds a photograph and the passport of her son Tarak Slimi, who is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, at her house in El Kef, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOE 
May 24, 2016 
Fethiya Charni holds a photograph and the passport of her son Tarak Slimi, who is suspected to have joined... 
EL KEF, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Fethiya Charni holds a photograph and the passport of her son Tarak Slimi, who is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, at her house in El Kef, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOC 
May 24, 2016 
A man who's brother,Tarak Slimi, is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, shows how the family... 
EL KEF, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
A man who's brother,Tarak Slimi, is suspected to have joined Islamic State in Libya, shows how the family managed to board up a door after it was damaged during a police raid in El Kef, Tunisia April 14, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOOB 
May 24, 2016 
People are seen at a Radio Web studio during training at a youth centre in Ben Guerdane, Tunisia April... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
People are seen at a Radio Web studio during training at a youth centre in Ben Guerdane, Tunisia April 12, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOO9 
May 24, 2016 
Hamid Ishi stands in his house, which was squatted by Islamic State jihadists and damaged during fighting... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Hamid Ishi stands in his house, which was squatted by Islamic State jihadists and damaged during fighting with government forces, in Ben Guerdane, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOO8 
May 24, 2016 
A municipal worker adds the finishing touches in Martyr's Square to a memorial to those recently killed... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
A municipal worker adds the finishing touches in Martyr's Square to a memorial to those recently killed by Islamic State's fighters in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 12, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOO6 
May 24, 2016 
The father and son of Abdel Atti Abdelkabir, a policeman who was killed by Islamic State jihadists, pose... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
The father and son of Abdel Atti Abdelkabir, a policeman who was killed by Islamic State jihadists, pose for a picture in Ben Guerdane, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONZ 
May 24, 2016 
A road sign shows the direction of Libya near the border crossing at Dhiba, Tunisia April 11, 2016. ... 
DHIBA, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
A road sign shows the direction of Libya near the border crossing at Dhiba, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONY 
May 24, 2016 
A house which was damaged during fighting with government forces stands in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
A house which was damaged during fighting with government forces stands in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONS 
May 24, 2016 
A Tunisian security forces tank is seen through a car window at Dhiba by the Tunisian and Libyan border... 
DHIBA, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
A Tunisian security forces tank is seen through a car window at Dhiba by the Tunisian and Libyan border crossing, Tunisia April 11, 2016. Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONQ 
May 24, 2016 
People stand where their neighbour Abdel Atti Abdelkabir, a policeman, was killed by Islamic State jihadists... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
People stand where their neighbour Abdel Atti Abdelkabir, a policeman, was killed by Islamic State jihadists in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFOND 
May 24, 2016 
Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants... 
EL KEF, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Tunisia's 2011 uprising created fertile ground for jihadist recruiters. Hundreds of Islamist militants were freed from prison as part of an amnesty for those detained under Ben Ali. Ultra-conservative salafists began to flex their muscle, seizing control of mosques and clashing with secularists. As Tunisia's politics have stabilised, the government has reasserted control, taking back mosques, banning the local al Qaeda affiliate Ansar al Sharia, and forcing many militants to flee. At first the jihadists mostly headed to Syria. But now Libya is more popular with them - many Tunisians have become key figures in Islamic State there. In all, officials estimate that between 4,000-6,000 Tunisians have left to fight for Islamic State and other groups, among them university graduates and professionals recruited online. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching text TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONC 
May 24, 2016 
Household items lie on the ground at a house that was squatted by Islamic State jihadists and damaged... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
Household items lie on the ground at a house that was squatted by Islamic State jihadists and damaged during fighting with government forces in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
TUNISIA-SECURITY/LIBYA
RTSFONA 
May 24, 2016 
A minaret, that was damaged during fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government forces, is... 
BEN GUERDANE, Tunisia 
The Wider Image: As fighters return, Tunisia faces growing challenge 
A minaret, that was damaged during fighting between Islamic State jihadists and government forces, is seen in Ben Guerdane, near the Libyan border, Tunisia April 10, 2016. After a U.S. air strike killed a Tunisian jihadist commander in western Libya in late February, dozens of Islamic State fighters sneaked across the border into Tunisia and attacked an army barracks and police bases in the town of Ben Guerdane. In the battle that followed, Islamic State militants shot dead local Tunisian anti-terrorism chief Colonel Abdel Atti Abdelkabir metres from his home. Residents including the colonel's brother say they recognised some of the attackers as former neighbours and classmates who had left to train with Islamic State in Libya. In all, more than 50 militants died in the assault. The battle was further evidence of how Libya’s chaos has spilled over into its more stable neighbour. Tunisia, one of the most secular countries in the Arab world, is trying to nurture the nascent democracy that grew out of its 2011 uprising against Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali. But it also faces an intensifying battle against Islamist militants – not least Tunisian fighters now based just across the border. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra SEARCH "ZOHRA REMADA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
News
News 
Tunisians March after Bardo Attack - 30 Mar 2015 
11 PICTURES 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VD6K 
March 29, 2015 
(L-R) Turkey's Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmus, Spanish Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Garcia-Margallo... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Turkey's Deputy PM Numan Kurtulmus, Spanish Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Garcia-Margallo and Polish President... 
(L-R) Turkey's Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmus, Spanish Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Garcia-Margallo and Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski join a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. World leaders joined tens of thousands of Tunisians on Sunday to march in solidarity against Islamist militants, a day after security forces killed members of a group blamed for a deadly museum attack. The March 18 attack on the Bardo national museum in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Anis Mili 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VD6A 
March 29, 2015 
(L-R) Tunisia's Interior Minister Najem Gharsalli, Turkey's Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmus, Spanish... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Tunisia's Interior Minister Najem Gharsalli, Turkey's Deputy PM Numan Kurtulmus, Spanish Foreign Minister... 
(L-R) Tunisia's Interior Minister Najem Gharsalli, Turkey's Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmus, Spanish Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Garcia-Margallo, Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski join a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. World leaders joined tens of thousands of Tunisians on Sunday to march in solidarity against Islamist militants, a day after security forces killed members of a group blamed for a deadly museum attack. The March 18 attack on the Bardo national museum in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Anis Mili 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VCPA 
March 29, 2015 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (2nd R), French President Francois Hollande (C) and Palestine's... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Essebsi, Hollande and Abbas lead a march in Tunis 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (2nd R), French President Francois Hollande (C) and Palestine's President Mahmoud Abbas (4th R, front) lead a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VCP1 
March 29, 2015 
(L-R) Tunisia's Prime Minister Habib Essid, French President Francois Hollande, Tunisian President Beji... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Essid, Hollande, Essebsi, Abbas and Ennaceur pose for a photo prior to a march in Tunis
(L-R) Tunisia's Prime Minister Habib Essid, French President Francois Hollande, Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and Mohamed Ennaceur of the Tunisian Assembly, pose for a photo prior to a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VCON 
March 29, 2015 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (2nd R) and French President Francois Hollande (3rd R) lead a march... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Essebsi and Hollande lead a march in Tunis 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (2nd R) and French President Francois Hollande (3rd R) lead a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool 
TUNISIA-ATTACKS-TOURISM-MARCH
RTR4VCOL 
March 29, 2015 
French President Francois Hollande (C) joins a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
French President Francois Hollande joins a march in Tunis 
French President Francois Hollande (C) joins a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VCOJ 
March 29, 2015 
French President Francois Hollande (R) is welcomed by his Tunisian counterpart Beji Caid Essebsi prior... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Hollande is welcomed by Essebsi in Tunis 
French President Francois Hollande (R) is welcomed by his Tunisian counterpart Beji Caid Essebsi prior to taking part in a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VCOI 
March 29, 2015 
French President Francois Hollande (C) joins a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
French President Francois Hollande leads a march in Tunis 
French President Francois Hollande (C) joins a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VCOE 
March 29, 2015 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (R) and French President Francois Hollande (L) lead a march in Tunis... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi and French President Francois Hollande (L) lead a march in Tunis... 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (R) and French President Francois Hollande (L) lead a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool 
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VCOC 
March 29, 2015 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (C-R) and French President Francois Hollande (C-L) lead a march... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Essebsi and Hollande lead a march in Tunis
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (C-R) and French President Francois Hollande (C-L) lead a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VCND 
March 29, 2015 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (C-R) and French President Francois Hollande (C-L) lead a march... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Essebsi and Hollande lead a march in Tunis March
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (C-R) and French President Francois Hollande (C-L) lead a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool
TUNISIA-SECURITY/
RTR4VCN0 
March 29, 2015 
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (R), French President Francois Hollande (C) and Palestine's President... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Essebsi, Hollande and Abbas lead a march in Tunis
Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi (R), French President Francois Hollande (C) and Palestine's President Mahmoud Abbas (C L) lead a march in Tunis March 29, 2015. Tens of thousands of Tunisians marched through the capital in a show of solidarity against Islamist militants on Sunday, hours after the government said its forces had killed nine members of a group suspected of carrying out this month's deadly Bardo Museum attack. The March 18 attack in Tunis killed 21 foreign tourists and a policeman, shaking a country that has been praised as a peaceful democratic model since leading the first of the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011. REUTERS/Emmanuel Dunand/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
TUNISIA-LIBYA/
RTR4SPY9 
March 10, 2015 
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops... 
Medenine, Tunisia 
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine 
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops have captured a second large arms cache near the border with Libya, including Kalashnikov rifles and rockets, a security source said on Monday. Tunisia is waging a campaign against hardline Islamist groups who emerged after a 2011 uprising against autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali that put the North African country on track to democracy. Picture taken March 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY) 
TUNISIA-LIBYA/
RTR4SPY8 
March 10, 2015 
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops... 
Medenine, Tunisia 
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine 
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops have captured a second large arms cache near the border with Libya, including Kalashnikov rifles and rockets, a security source said on Monday. Tunisia is waging a campaign against hardline Islamist groups who emerged after a 2011 uprising against autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali that put the North African country on track to democracy. Picture taken March 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY) 
TUNISIA-LIBYA/
RTR4SPY7 
March 10, 2015 
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops... 
Medenine, Tunisia 
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine 
A seized arms cache is displayed at a National Guard post in Medenine March 9, 2015. Tunisian troops have captured a second large arms cache near the border with Libya, including Kalashnikov rifles and rockets, a security source said on Monday. Tunisia is waging a campaign against hardline Islamist groups who emerged after a 2011 uprising against autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali that put the North African country on track to democracy. Picture taken March 9, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY) 
TUNISIA-POLITICS/
RTR4LGEG 
January 14, 2015 
A person holds up a Tunisian flag and shouts slogans during celebrations marking the fourth anniversary... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
A person holds up a Tunisian flag and shouts slogans during celebrations marking the fourth anniversary... 
A person holds up a Tunisian flag and shouts slogans during celebrations marking the fourth anniversary of Tunisia's 2011 revolution, in Habib Bourguiba Avenue in Tunis January 14, 2015. REUTERS/Anis Mili (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS ANNIVERSARY CIVIL UNREST) 
TUNISIA-ELECTION/
RTR4F8IW 
November 23, 2014 
Election workers count ballots at the end of voting for the presidential elections in Tunis November... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Election workers count ballots at the end of voting for the presidential elections in Tunis 
Election workers count ballots at the end of voting for the presidential elections in Tunis November 23, 2014. Tunisian presidential candidate Beji Caid Essebsi's campaign manager told reporters he was ahead in Sunday's election by at least 10 points, according to his own party's initial results. Official results have yet to be released by electoral authorities. But Essebsi and rival Moncef Markouzi, the incumbent, were expected to be frontrunners in the first free presidential election since Tunisia's 2011 uprising. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTION
RTR4BTE2 
October 27, 2014 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, waves after giving a speech outside Ennahda's... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, waves after giving a speech outside Ennahda's... 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, waves after giving a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters in Tunis October 27, 2014.Tunisia's Ennahda party, the first Islamist movement to secure power after the 2011 "Arab Spring" revolts, conceded defeat on Monday in elections that are set to make its main secular rival the strongest force in parliament. Official results from Sunday's elections - the second parliamentary vote since Tunisians set off uprisings across much of the Arab World by overthrowing autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali - were still to be announced. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTION
RTR4BTE1 
October 27, 2014 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, waves the party flag outside Ennahda's headquarters... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, waves the party flag outside Ennahda's headquarters... 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, waves the party flag outside Ennahda's headquarters in Tunis October 27, 2014.Tunisia's Ennahda party, the first Islamist movement to secure power after the 2011 "Arab Spring" revolts, conceded defeat on Monday in elections that are set to make its main secular rival the strongest force in parliament. Official results from Sunday's elections - the second parliamentary vote since Tunisians set off uprisings across much of the Arab World by overthrowing autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali - were still to be announced. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTION
RTR4BTE0 
October 27, 2014 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, gives a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, gives a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters... 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, gives a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters in Tunis October 27, 2014.Tunisia's Ennahda party, the first Islamist movement to secure power after the 2011 "Arab Spring" revolts, conceded defeat on Monday in elections that are set to make its main secular rival the strongest force in parliament. Official results from Sunday's elections - the second parliamentary vote since Tunisians set off uprisings across much of the Arab World by overthrowing autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali - were still to be announced. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTION
RTR4BTDZ 
October 27, 2014 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, gives a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, gives a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters... 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, gives a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters in Tunis October 27, 2014.Tunisia's Ennahda party, the first Islamist movement to secure power after the 2011 "Arab Spring" revolts, conceded defeat on Monday in elections that are set to make its main secular rival the strongest force in parliament. Official results from Sunday's elections - the second parliamentary vote since Tunisians set off uprisings across much of the Arab World by overthrowing autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali - were still to be announced. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTION
RTR4BTDW 
October 27, 2014 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, gives a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, gives a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters... 
Rached Ghannouchi, leader of the Islamist party Ennahda, gives a speech outside Ennahda's headquarters in Tunis October 27, 2014.Tunisia's Ennahda party, the first Islamist movement to secure power after the 2011 "Arab Spring" revolts, conceded defeat on Monday in elections that are set to make its main secular rival the strongest force in parliament. Official results from Sunday's elections - the second parliamentary vote since Tunisians set off uprisings across much of the Arab World by overthrowing autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali - were still to be announced. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTIONS/
RTR4BTDO 
October 27, 2014 
Chafik Sarsar (C), head of the Independent Election Commission (ISIE), addresses a news conference in... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Chafik Sarsar, head of the Independent Election Commission (ISIE), addresses a news conference in Tunis... 
Chafik Sarsar (C), head of the Independent Election Commission (ISIE), addresses a news conference in Tunis October 27, 2014. Tunisia's Ennahda party, the first Islamist movement to secure power after the 2011 "Arab Spring" revolts, conceded defeat on Monday in elections that are set to make its main secular rival the strongest force in parliament. Official results from Sunday's elections - the second parliamentary vote since Tunisians set off uprisings across much of the Arab World by overthrowing autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali - were still to be announced. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTIONS/
RTR4BTDJ 
October 27, 2014 
Chafik Sarsar, head of the Independent Election Commission (ISIE), addresses a news conference in Tunis... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Chafik Sarsar, head of the Independent Election Commission (ISIE), addresses a news conference in Tunis... 
Chafik Sarsar, head of the Independent Election Commission (ISIE), addresses a news conference in Tunis October 27, 2014. Tunisia's Ennahda party, the first Islamist movement to secure power after the 2011 "Arab Spring" revolts, conceded defeat on Monday in elections that are set to make its main secular rival the strongest force in parliament. Official results from Sunday's elections - the second parliamentary vote since Tunisians set off uprisings across much of the Arab World by overthrowing autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali - were still to be announced. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTIONS/
RTR4BTDF 
October 27, 2014 
Chafik Sarsar, head of the Independent Election Commission (ISIE), addresses a news conference in Tunis... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Chafik Sarsar, head of the Independent Election Commission (ISIE), addresses a news conference in Tunis... 
Chafik Sarsar, head of the Independent Election Commission (ISIE), addresses a news conference in Tunis October 27, 2014. Tunisia's Ennahda party, the first Islamist movement to secure power after the 2011 "Arab Spring" revolts, conceded defeat on Monday in elections that are set to make its main secular rival the strongest force in parliament. Official results from Sunday's elections - the second parliamentary vote since Tunisians set off uprisings across much of the Arab World by overthrowing autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali - were still to be announced. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) 
TUNIS-ELECTIONS/
RTR4957E 
October 06, 2014 
Ali Larayedh (C), former Tunisian prime minister and leader of the Ennahda Movement Party, talks to a... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Ali Larayedh former Tunisian prime minister and leader of the Ennahda Movement Party talks to a citizen... 
Ali Larayedh (C), former Tunisian prime minister and leader of the Ennahda Movement Party, talks to a citizen as she campaigns on the street in Tunis October 6, 2014. Tunisia's main Islamist party began campaigning on Monday preparing to face off with secular opponents and former regime officials in the second free elections since the North African state's 2011 uprising. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTIONS/
RTR49574 
October 06, 2014 
Ali Larayedh (C), former Tunisian prime minister and leader of the Ennahda Movement Party, gestures and... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Ali Larayedh, former Tunisian prime minister and leader of the Ennahda Movement Party, gestures and stands... 
Ali Larayedh (C), former Tunisian prime minister and leader of the Ennahda Movement Party, gestures and stands among supporters waving national flags, in Tunis October 6, 2014. Tunisia's main Islamist party began campaigning on Monday preparing to face off with secular opponents and former regime officials in the second free elections since the North African state's 2011 uprising. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) 
TUNISIA-ELECTIONS/
RTR4956W 
October 06, 2014 
Ali Larayedh (C), former Tunisian prime minister and leader of the Ennahda Movement Party, gestures and... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Ali Larayedh, former Tunisian prime minister and leader of the Ennahda Movement Party, gestures and stands... 
Ali Larayedh (C), former Tunisian prime minister and leader of the Ennahda Movement Party, gestures and stands among supporters waving national flags, in Tunis October 6, 2014. Tunisia's main Islamist party began campaigning on Monday preparing to face off with secular opponents and former regime officials in the second free elections since the North African state's 2011 uprising.REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS) 
TUNISIA/
RTR3P5MI 
May 14, 2014 
Men look at cars that once belonged to former Tunisian President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali and his family... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Men look at cars that once belonged to former Tunisian President Ben Ali and his family during a public... 
Men look at cars that once belonged to former Tunisian President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali and his family during a public auction in Tunis May 14, 2014. Cars once owned by Ben Ali, the veteran autocrat brought down in the first Arab Spring uprising in January 2011, have been put up on auction, according to local media. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: TRANSPORT POLITICS SOCIETY WEALTH) 
TUNISIA/
RTR3P5LP 
May 14, 2014 
Men look at a car that once belonged to former Tunisian President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali and his family... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Men look at a car that once belonged to former Tunisian President Ben Ali and his family during a public... 
Men look at a car that once belonged to former Tunisian President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali and his family during a public auction in Tunis May 14, 2014. Cars once owned by Ben Ali, the veteran autocrat brought down in the first Arab Spring uprising in January 2011, have been put up on auction, according to local media. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: TRANSPORT POLITICS SOCIETY WEALTH) 
TUNISIA/
RTR3P5KD 
May 14, 2014 
Men look at cars that once belonged to former Tunisian President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali and his family... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Men look at cars that once belonged to former Tunisian President Ben Ali and his family during a public... 
Men look at cars that once belonged to former Tunisian President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali and his family during a public auction in Tunis May 14, 2014. Cars once owned by Ben Ali, the veteran autocrat brought down in the first Arab Spring uprising in January 2011, have been put up on auction, according to local media. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: TRANSPORT POLITICS SOCIETY WEALTH) 
TUNISIA-ELECTION
RTR3KERE 
April 08, 2014 
A woman walks near a wall with graffiti which reads ''The elections now now" in central Tunis April 7,... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
A woman walks near a wall with graffiti in Tunis 
A woman walks near a wall with graffiti which reads ''The elections now now" in central Tunis April 7, 2014. Tunisian Islamist and secular parties have begun a parliamentary debate on an election law, the final step before setting a ballot date to complete a transition to democracy in the country that lit the fuse of Arab popular uprisings. The elections, expected later this year, will be only the second ballot since the 2011 revolt that ousted autocrat Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, and the first since the adoption of a new constitution praised internationally as a democratic model. Picture taken April 7, 2014. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: ELECTIONS POLITICS SOCIETY) 
TUNISIA-CONSTITUTION/
RTX17X51 
January 27, 2014 
A general view shows Tunisia's Constituent Assembly during the signing of the country's new constitution,... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
A general view shows Tunisia's Constituent Assembly during the signing of the country's new constitution,... 
A general view shows Tunisia's Constituent Assembly during the signing of the country's new constitution, in Tunis January 27, 2014. Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly Mustapha Ben Jaafar on Monday signed the country's new constitution, officially adopting a charter that is one of the country's last steps to full democracy after a 2011 uprising. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-CONSTITUTION/
RTX17WY0 
January 27, 2014 
Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki (bottom) gives a speech in Tunis, January 27, 2014. Marzouki and the... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Tunisian President Marzouki gives a speech in Tunis 
Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki (bottom) gives a speech in Tunis, January 27, 2014. Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly signed Tunisia's new constitution on Monday, enshrining one of its last steps toward full democracy after a 2011 uprising that inspired the Arab Spring. Pictured (top L-R) are: Tunisia's President of the Tunisian National Constituent Assembly (NCA) Mustapha Ben Jaafar and outgoing Islamist Prime Minister Ali Larayedh. REUTERS/Anis Mili (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-CONSTITUTION/
RTX17WXT 
January 27, 2014 
Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki flashes a victory sign after giving a speech in Tunis January 27,... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
Tunisian President Marzouki flashes a victory sign after giving a speech in Tunis 
Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki flashes a victory sign after giving a speech in Tunis January 27, 2014. Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly signed Tunisia's new constitution on Monday, enshrining one of its last steps toward full democracy after a 2011 uprising that inspired the Arab Spring. REUTERS/Anis Mili (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS) 
TUNISIA-CONSTITUTION/
RTX17WXI 
January 27, 2014 
President of the Tunisian National Constituent Assembly (NCA) Mustapha Ben Jaafar signs the country's... 
Tunis, Tunisia 
President of the Tunisian NCA Ben Jaafar signs the country's new constitution in Tunis 
President of the Tunisian National Constituent Assembly (NCA) Mustapha Ben Jaafar signs the country's new constitution in Tunis January 27, 2014. President Moncef Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly signed Tunisia's new constitution on Monday, enshrining one of its last steps toward full democracy after a 2011 uprising that inspired the Arab Spring. REUTERS/Anis Mili (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS) 
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