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Search results for: Unemployment-welfare

DENMARK-IMMIGRATION/
RTX66R1J
May 29, 2018
In urban areas of Denmark officially designated as "ghettos", some residents feel stigmatised and excluded...
Copenhagen, Denmark
The Wider Image: In Danish 'ghettos', immigrants feel stigmatised
In urban areas of Denmark officially designated as "ghettos", some residents feel stigmatised and excluded from mainstream society. Denmark is the only country to formally classify certain residential zones as ghettos. An area fits into the category if more than half of its inhabitants originate from non-Western countries and it also matches certain other criteria, such as unemployment exceeding 40 percent. Denmark has struggled for decades with how to integrate immigrants into its welfare state. The public debate intensified in 2015 with the arrival of large groups of refugees from conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa. The anti-immigrant Danish People's Party became the second-largest party in parliament in an election that year. In March this year, Prime Minister Lars Lokke Rasmussen of the Liberal Party announced a plan aimed at boosting the integration of immigrants and eliminating ghettos - a word that is the same in Danish - by 2030. Measures include banning criminals from moving into the areas, giving double punishment for crimes committed in ghettos, and demolishing then rebuilding parts of the zones. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly SEARCH "DENMARK GHETTO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES Matching text: DENMARK-IMMIGRATION/
DENMARK-IMMIGRATION/
RTX66NT0
May 29, 2018
In urban areas of Denmark officially designated as "ghettos", some residents feel stigmatised and excluded...
Copenhagen, Denmark
The Wider Image: In Danish 'ghettos', immigrants feel stigmatised
In urban areas of Denmark officially designated as "ghettos", some residents feel stigmatised and excluded from mainstream society. Denmark is the only country to formally classify certain residential zones as ghettos. An area fits into the category if more than half of its inhabitants originate from non-Western countries and it also matches certain other criteria, such as unemployment exceeding 40 percent. Denmark has struggled for decades with how to integrate immigrants into its welfare state. The public debate intensified in 2015 with the arrival of large groups of refugees from conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa. The anti-immigrant Danish People's Party became the second-largest party in parliament in an election that year. In March this year, Prime Minister Lars Lokke Rasmussen of the Liberal Party announced a plan aimed at boosting the integration of immigrants and eliminating ghettos - a word that is the same in Danish - by 2030. Measures include banning criminals from moving into the areas, giving double punishment for crimes committed in ghettos, and demolishing then rebuilding parts of the zones. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly SEARCH "DENMARK GHETTO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. THE IMAGES SHOULD ONLY BE USED TOGETHER WITH THE STORY - NO STAND-ALONE USES Matching text: DENMARK-IMMIGRATION/
SWEDEN-IMMIGRATION/
RTR44IG0
September 01, 2014
An asylum seeker walks outside the Bergby Gard hotel and conference centre, which houses asylum seekers,...
Stockholm, Sweden
An asylum seeker walks outside the Bergby Gard hotel and conference centre, which houses asylum seekers,...
An asylum seeker walks outside the Bergby Gard hotel and conference centre, which houses asylum seekers, north of Stockholm June 6, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 6, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 15 OF 19 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFX
September 01, 2014
Goran Larsson, 56, owner and manager of the Bergby Gard hotel and conference centre, which houses asylum...
Stockholm, Sweden
Goran Larsson, owner and manager of the Bergby Gard hotel and conference centre, which houses asylum...
Goran Larsson, 56, owner and manager of the Bergby Gard hotel and conference centre, which houses asylum seekers, poses for a photograph north of Stockholm June 6, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 6, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 14 OF 19 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFU
September 01, 2014
A sapling stands in front of blocks of flats in the Taby suburb of Stockholm June 10, 2014. Sweden has...
Stockholm, Sweden
A sapling stands in front of blocks of flats in the Taby suburb of Stockholm
A sapling stands in front of blocks of flats in the Taby suburb of Stockholm June 10, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 10, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 16 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFK
September 01, 2014
Edrisa Ssali, 20, from Uganda, is seen outside a one-room accommodation, which he shares with two others...
Stockholm, Sweden
Edrisa Ssali, from Uganda, is seen outside the one room accommodation, which he shares with two others...
Edrisa Ssali, 20, from Uganda, is seen outside a one-room accommodation, which he shares with two others in Sollentuna, a suburb of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 13 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFJ
September 01, 2014
Edrisa Ssali (L-R) , 20, Katerega Musa, 19, and Malik Douglas Darnba, 20, from Uganda, are seen in the...
Stockholm, Sweden
Edrisa Ssali, Katerega Musa, and Malik Douglas Darnba, from Uganda, are seen in the room they share in...
Edrisa Ssali (L-R) , 20, Katerega Musa, 19, and Malik Douglas Darnba, 20, from Uganda, are seen in the room they share in Sollentuna, a suburb of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 12 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFH
September 01, 2014
Bob Azar, 48, cleans his car in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden...
SODERTALJE, Sweden
Bob Azar cleans his car in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm
Bob Azar, 48, cleans his car in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 5, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 06 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFD
September 01, 2014
Stefan Jacobsson, 31, chairman of Svenskarnas Parti (SVP), a far-right leaning party, poses for a photograph...
SJOBO, Sweden
Stefan Jacobsson chairman of Svenskarnas Parti (SVP) a far-right leaning party, poses for a photograph...
Stefan Jacobsson, 31, chairman of Svenskarnas Parti (SVP), a far-right leaning party, poses for a photograph in the town of Sjobo, in southern Sweden June 9, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 9, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 09 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFB
September 01, 2014
Yusef Kaspo, 73, a retired mechanic poses for a photograph at the St. Jacob of Nsibin Syriac Orthodox...
SODERTALJE, Sweden
Yusef Kaspo, a retired mechanic poses for a photograph at the St. Jacob of Nsibin Syriac Orthodox Cathedral...
Yusef Kaspo, 73, a retired mechanic poses for a photograph at the St. Jacob of Nsibin Syriac Orthodox Cathedral in the city of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 07 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IFA
September 01, 2014
Pedestrians walk in the evening light in the centre of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades...
Stockholm, Sweden
Pedestrians walk in the evening light in the centre of Stockholm
Pedestrians walk in the evening light in the centre of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 5, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 11 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IF7
September 01, 2014
A pedestrian makes his way past posters in the centre of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades...
Stockholm, Sweden
A pedestrian makes his way past posters in the centre of Stockholm
A pedestrian makes his way past posters in the centre of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 5, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 10 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IF6
September 01, 2014
Student Gabriella Edo, 15, originally from Aleppo in Syria poses for a photograph in a classroom at the...
SODERTALJE, Sweden
Student Gabriella Edo originally from Aleppo in Syria poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna...
Student Gabriella Edo, 15, originally from Aleppo in Syria poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna School in the city of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 04 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IF5
September 01, 2014
Acting Principal Par Olsson, 39, poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna School in the city...
SODERTALJE, Sweden
Acting Principal Par Olsson poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna School in the city of...
Acting Principal Par Olsson, 39, poses for a photograph in a classroom at the Ronna School in the city of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 05 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IF3
September 01, 2014
Afram Yakoub, chairman of the Assyrian Federation of Sweden poses for a photograph in his office in the...
SODERTALJE, Sweden
Afram Yakoub, chairman of the Assyrian Federation of Sweden poses for a photograph in his office in the...
Afram Yakoub, chairman of the Assyrian Federation of Sweden poses for a photograph in his office in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 08 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IEZ
September 01, 2014
The Swedish national flag flies in front of a house near the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm...
SODERTALJE, Sweden
The Swedish national flag flies in front of a house near the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm...
The Swedish national flag flies in front of a house near the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 5, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 01 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IEW
September 01, 2014
A man waves a Syrian flag during graduation celebrations in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm...
SODERTALJE, Sweden
A man waves a Syrian flag during graduation celebrations in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm...
A man waves a Syrian flag during graduation celebrations in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 5, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 5, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 02 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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SWEDEN-ELECTION/IMMIGRATION
RTR44IEU
September 01, 2014
Student Alexandra Hannon, 20, poses for a photograph at a graduation party in the town of Sodertalje,...
SODERTALJE, Sweden
Student Alexandra Hannon poses for a photograph at a graduation party in the town of Sodertalje, south...
Student Alexandra Hannon, 20, poses for a photograph at a graduation party in the town of Sodertalje, south west of Stockholm June 4, 2014. Sweden has for decades prided itself on offering a refuge for those fleeing oppression in other parts of the world. While the vast majority of Swedes continue to support traditional, open-door immigration policies, a populist, anti-immigrant party, the Sweden Democrats, has struck a chord with voters by tying worries that welfare services are declining and schools are slipping behind international peers with the cost of accepting asylum seekers. Around 16 percent of Swedes were born abroad and the country has maintained an open-door policy to refugees for decades, but Sweden has struggled to integrate many of the new arrivals and unemployment among immigrant groups is much higher than the national average leaving many, particularly young people, feeling marginalised. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (Sweden - Tags: SOCIETY IMMIGRATION POLITICS)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 03 OF 16 FOR PACKAGE 'TOLERANCE AND TENSION IN SWEDEN'
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EUROPE-UNEMPLOYMENT/SUMMIT
RTX11AV2
July 03, 2013
German Labour Minister Ursula von der Leyen (R) talks with Italian Minister for Labour and Welfare Giovannini...
Berlin, Germany
German Labour Minister von der Leyen talks with Italian Minister for Labour and Welfare Giovannini before...
German Labour Minister Ursula von der Leyen (R) talks with Italian Minister for Labour and Welfare Giovannini before a EU conference on Youth Unemployment in Berlin, July 3, 2013. Germany's Angela Merkel will discuss with EU leaders in Berlin on Wednesday how to tackle chronic youth unemployment at a summit critics say is a pre-election public relations exercise. REUTERS/Thomas Peter (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7QK
February 21, 2012
A carnival reveller with an image of a Portuguese national flag printed on her face, whistles at the...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
A carnival reveller with an image of a Portuguese national flag printed on her face, whistles at the...
A carnival reveller with an image of a Portuguese national flag printed on her face, whistles at the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7PU
February 21, 2012
Carnival revellers wearing costumes of bowling pins bearing the words "job" (R) and "pension" participate...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
Carnival revellers wearing costumes of bowling pins bearing the words "job" and "pension" participate...
Carnival revellers wearing costumes of bowling pins bearing the words "job" (R) and "pension" participate in the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7PQ
February 21, 2012
A carnival reveller poses in front of a float depicting European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
A carnival reveller poses in front of a float depicting European Commission President Barroso, Portuguese...
A carnival reveller poses in front of a float depicting European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso (L) giving water to Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho (R), alongside Foreign Minister Paulo Portas and IMF delegation chief Paul Thomson (back), at the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far.
The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7PK
February 21, 2012
A carnival reveller reacts between Euro bank notes and a float depicting Portuguese Prime Minister Passos...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
A carnival reveller reacts between Euro bank notes and a float depicting Portuguese PM Coelho at the...
A carnival reveller reacts between Euro bank notes and a float depicting Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho at the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7P6
February 21, 2012
Carnival revellers pose for a photo in their bowling pin costumes bearing the word "taxes" at the Torres...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
Carnival revellers pose for a photo in their bowling pin costumes bearing the word "taxes" at the Torres...
Carnival revellers pose for a photo in their bowling pin costumes bearing the word "taxes" at the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7OZ
February 21, 2012
A carnival reveller participates in the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
A carnival reveller participates in the Torres Vedras parade
A carnival reveller participates in the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7OW
February 21, 2012
A carnival reveller poses for a photo in his bowling ball costume bearing the last name of German Chancellor...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
A carnival reveller poses for a photo in his bowling ball costume bearing the last name of German Chancellor...
A carnival reveller poses for a photo in his bowling ball costume bearing the last name of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, at the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7OK
February 21, 2012
Carnival revellers carry caricatures of German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) and French President Nicolas...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
Carnival revellers carry caricatures of German Chancellor Merkel and French President Sarkozy at the...
Carnival revellers carry caricatures of German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) and French President Nicolas Sarkozy at the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7OB
February 21, 2012
Carnival revellers wear targets with portraits of Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho (R) and Madeira...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
Carnival revellers wear targets with portraits of Portuguese PM Coelho and Madeira Island Regional President...
Carnival revellers wear targets with portraits of Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho (R) and Madeira Island Regional President Alberto Joao Jardim at the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far. The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
PORTUGAL-BAILOUT/
RTR2Y7O6
February 21, 2012
A man takes a photo of a carnival float depicting European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso (L)...
Torres Vedras, Portugal
A man takes a photo of a carnival float depicting European Commission President Barroso, Portuguese PM...
A man takes a photo of a carnival float depicting European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso (L) giving water to Portuguese Prime Minister Passos Coelho (R), alongside Foreign Minister Paulo Portas and IMF delegation chief Paul Thomson (back), at the Torres Vedras parade February 21, 2012. The Portuguese have mostly quietly accepted reforms in the labour market, soaring unemployment and cuts to welfare to rein in their debt mountain - but calls to cancel the centuries-old tradition of carnival went a step too far.
The government tried, in the name of austerity imposed by international lenders, to force the end of Tuesday's public holiday but the country effectively shut down all the same as the Portuguese refused to go without their pre-Lent festival.
REUTERS/Jose Manuel Ribeiro (PORTUGAL - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS POLITICS)
ROMANIA/
RTR2VG3I
December 19, 2011
A man holds a banner as he sits on a bench in Bucharest December 19, 2011. The government of Romania...
Bucharest, Romania
A man holds a banner as he sits on a bench in Bucharest
A man holds a banner as he sits on a bench in Bucharest December 19, 2011. The government of Romania - the EU's second-poorest member state, where the average wage is less than 400 euros ($530) a month - cut salaries and raised tax to plug its budget gap. The debt crisis now ravaging the euro zone has seen governments cut spending, including to welfare programmes, and raise taxes. Unemployment is rising and many Europeans are planning for a bleaker future. The banner reads "I am looking for work I beg you to help me with something to eat or give me something to work I thank you from all my heart God bless you and protect you from all bad things" REUTERS/Radu Sigheti (ROMANIA - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY)
ROMANIA
RTR2V1BA
December 09, 2011
A woman walks away after she scavenged through a garbage dump in the outskirts of Bucharest, December...
Bucharest, Romania
A woman walks away after she scavenged through a garbage dump in the outskirts of Bucharest
A woman walks away after she scavenged through a garbage dump in the outskirts of Bucharest, December 9, 2011. The government of Romania - the EU's second-poorest member state, where the average wage is less than 400 euros ($530) a month - cut salaries and raised tax to plug its budget gap. The debt crisis now ravaging the euro zone has seen governments cut spending, including to welfare programmes, and raise taxes. Unemployment is rising and many Europeans are planning for a bleaker future. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti (ROMANIA - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY)
ROMANIA
RTR2V1B7
December 09, 2011
A woman walks away after she scavenged through a garbage dump in the outskirts of Bucharest, December...
Bucharest, Romania
A woman walks away after she scavenged through a garbage dump in the outskirts of Bucharest
A woman walks away after she scavenged through a garbage dump in the outskirts of Bucharest, December 9, 2011. The government of Romania - the EU's second-poorest member state, where the average wage is less than 400 euros ($530) a month - cut salaries and raised tax to plug its budget gap. The debt crisis now ravaging the euro zone has seen governments cut spending, including to welfare programmes, and raise taxes. Unemployment is rising and many Europeans are planning for a bleaker future. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti (ROMANIA - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY)
FRANCE-WELFARE/
RTR2RKSR
September 20, 2011
A man identified as Georges poses with a daily newspaper in a Paris park, September 19, 2011. Georges...
Paris, France
To match INSIGHT - On welfare reform, French resistance
A man identified as Georges poses with a daily newspaper in a Paris park, September 19, 2011. Georges works up to four months a year earning 3,000-4,000 euros per month, gets laid off, then pockets unemployment benefits worth 54 percent of his pay and makes up the difference by working, off the books, for bars and restaurants. To match Insight FRANCE-WELFARE/ REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY BUSINESS)
FRANCE-WELFARE/
RTR2RKRI
September 20, 2011
A man identified as Georges poses on a street as a sanitation worker sprays the sidewalk September 19,...
Paris, France
INSIGHT - On welfare reform, French resistance
A man identified as Georges poses on a street as a sanitation worker sprays the sidewalk September 19, 2011. For up to four months every year -- the time required to become eligible for unemployment benefits -- Georges works as a waiter or bartender, earning 3-4,000 euros ($4,000-5,500) a month. Then he arranges to be laid off, amicably if possible. For the rest of the year he pockets unemployment benefits worth 54 percent of his pay and makes up the difference by working -- off the books -- in bars and restaurants. Picture taken September 19, 2011. To match FRANCE-WELFARE/ REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY BUSINESS)
FRANCE-WELFARE/
RTR2RKRH
September 20, 2011
A man identified as Georges poses with a daily newspaper in a Paris park September 19, 2011. For up to...
Paris, France
To match INSIGHT - On welfare reform, French resistance
A man identified as Georges poses with a daily newspaper in a Paris park September 19, 2011. For up to four months every year -- the time required to become eligible for unemployment benefits -- Georges works as a waiter or bartender, earning 3-4,000 euros ($4,000-5,500) a month. Then he arranges to be laid off, amicably if possible. For the rest of the year he pockets unemployment benefits worth 54 percent of his pay and makes up the difference by working -- off the books -- in bars and restaurants. Picture taken September 19, 2011. To match Insight FRANCE-WELFARE/ REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY BUSINESS)
FRANCE-WELFARE/
RTR2RKRG
September 20, 2011
A man identified as Georges poses with a daily newspaper at a cafe in Paris September 19, 2011. For up...
Paris, France
To match INSIGHT - On welfare reform, French resistance
A man identified as Georges poses with a daily newspaper at a cafe in Paris September 19, 2011. For up to four months every year -- the time required to become eligible for unemployment benefits -- Georges works as a waiter or bartender, earning 3-4,000 euros ($4,000-5,500) a month. Then he arranges to be laid off, amicably if possible. For the rest of the year he pockets unemployment benefits worth 54 percent of his pay and makes up the difference by working -- off the books -- in bars and restaurants. Picture taken September 19, 2011. To match Insight FRANCE-WELFARE/ REUTERS/Benoit Tessier (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY BUSINESS)
USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
RTR2OL87
July 07, 2011
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne picks up some yard debris at her residence in Sewell, New...
SEWELL, UNITED STATES
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne picks up some yard debris at her residence in Sewell, New Jersey, July 7, 2011. Coyne is one of millions of Americans whose unemployment benefits have expired - after 99 weeks in many states - as the United States suffers its highest level of long-term unemployment since 1948. Unlike in much of Europe, the safety net of the U.S. welfare system times out for the long-term unemployed. The federal government and many states have provided extra help for those caught up in the worst labor market in decades but the U.S. debt crisis rules out further extension of the programs.
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS POLITICS)
USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
RTR2OL85
July 07, 2011
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne looks at an employment website at her residence in Sewell,...
SEWELL, UNITED STATES
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne looks at an employment website at her residence in Sewell, New Jersey, July 7, 2011. Coyne is one of millions of Americans whose unemployment benefits have expired - after 99 weeks in many states - as the United States suffers its highest level of long-term unemployment since 1948. Unlike in much of Europe, the safety net of the U.S. welfare system times out for the long-term unemployed. The federal government and many states have provided extra help for those caught up in the worst labor market in decades but the U.S. debt crisis rules out further extension of the programs.
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS POLITICS)
USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
RTR2OL84
July 07, 2011
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne unfurls a U.S. flag on the front porch of her residence...
SEWELL, UNITED STATES
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne unfurls a U.S. flag on the front porch of her residence in Sewell, New Jersey, July 7, 2011. Coyne is one of millions of Americans whose unemployment benefits have expired - after 99 weeks in many states - as the United States suffers its highest level of long-term unemployment since 1948. Unlike in much of Europe, the safety net of the U.S. welfare system times out for the long-term unemployed. The federal government and many states have provided extra help for those caught up in the worst labor market in decades but the U.S. debt crisis rules out further extension of the programs.
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS POLITICS)
USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
RTR2OL83
July 07, 2011
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne prepares a cup of coffee at her residence in Sewell, New...
SEWELL, UNITED STATES
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne prepares a cup of coffee at her residence in Sewell, New Jersey, July 7, 2011. Coyne is one of millions of Americans whose unemployment benefits have expired - after 99 weeks in many states - as the United States suffers its highest level of long-term unemployment since 1948. Unlike in much of Europe, the safety net of the U.S. welfare system times out for the long-term unemployed. The federal government and many states have provided extra help for those caught up in the worst labor market in decades but the U.S. debt crisis rules out further extension of the programs.
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS POLITICS)
USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
RTR2OL82
July 07, 2011
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne gestures while speaking about her long term unemployment...
SEWELL, UNITED STATES
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
Unemployed operations manager Mary Kay Coyne gestures while speaking about her long term unemployment at her residence in Sewell, New Jersey, July 7, 2011. Coyne is one of millions of Americans whose unemployment benefits have expired - after 99 weeks in many states - as the United States suffers its highest level of long-term unemployment since 1948. Unlike in much of Europe, the safety net of the U.S. welfare system times out for the long-term unemployed. The federal government and many states have provided extra help for those caught up in the worst labor market in decades but the U.S. debt crisis rules out further extension of the programs.
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS POLITICS)
USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
RTR2OL81
July 07, 2011
A woman points to a job listing on an employment website at her residence in Sewell, New Jersey, July...
SEWELL, UNITED STATES
To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED
A woman points to a job listing on an employment website at her residence in Sewell, New Jersey, July 7, 2011. Millions of Americans have had their unemployment benefits expire - after 99 weeks in many states - as the United States suffers its highest level of long-term unemployment since 1948. Unlike in much of Europe, the safety net of the U.S. welfare system times out for the long-term unemployed. The federal government and many states have provided extra help for those caught up in the worst labor market in decades but the U.S. debt crisis rules out further extension of the programs. To match Feature USA-ECONOMY/UNEMPLOYED REUTERS/Tim Shaffer (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS POLITICS)
USA-CAMPAIGN/STATES-ISSUES
RTR2OIHL
July 06, 2011
Katie Busker, 30, clips coupons as her son, Austin Spiker, 6, plays with Legos at the dinner table in...
Independence, UNITED STATES
Katie Busker clips coupons as her son, Austin Spiker, plays with Legos at the dinner table in Independence...
Katie Busker, 30, clips coupons as her son, Austin Spiker, 6, plays with Legos at the dinner table in Independence, Iowa July 5, 2011. Busker, who receives food stamps and is unemployed due to a disability, lives with her sister, brother-in-law, and niece. Busker stays home and watches the kids while her sister and brother-in-law are at work. The family says the unconventional living arrangements allow all of them to get by and keep food on the table. Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. Presidential race. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
USA-CAMPAIGN/STATES-ISSUES
RTR2OIH6
July 06, 2011
(L-R) Katie Busker, 30, and her son, Austin Spiker, 6, eat dinner as fourteen-month-old, Johnnalyn Gibbs,...
Independence, UNITED STATES
Katie Busker and her son, Austin Spiker, eat dinner as fourteen-month-old, Johnnalyn Gibbs, is propped...
(L-R) Katie Busker, 30, and her son, Austin Spiker, 6, eat dinner as fourteen-month-old, Johnnalyn Gibbs, is propped up by her father Dustin in Independence, Iowa July 5, 2011. Busker, who receives food stamps and is unemployed due to a disability, stays home and watches the kids while her sister and brother-in-law are at work. The family says the unconventional living arrangements allow all of them to get by and keep food on the table. Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. Presidential race. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
USA-CAMPAIGN/STATES-ISSUES
RTR2OIGV
July 06, 2011
(Clockwise, L-R) Katie Busker, 30, sits with her son, Austin Spiker, 6, at the home she shares with her...
Independence, UNITED STATES
Katie Busker sits with her son at the home she shares with her brother-in-law Dustin Gibbs, her sister,...
(Clockwise, L-R) Katie Busker, 30, sits with her son, Austin Spiker, 6, at the home she shares with her brother-in-law Dustin Gibbs, her sister, Lauren Gibbs, and the Gibbs' fourteen-month-old daughter, Johnnalyn, as the family shares dinner together in Independence, Iowa July 5, 2011. Busker, who receives food stamps and is unemployed due to a disability, stays home and watches the kids while her sister and brother-in-law are at work. The family says the unconventional living arrangements allow all of them to get by and keep food on the table. Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. Presidential race. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
USA-CAMPAIGN/STATES-ISSUES
RTR2OIGL
July 06, 2011
Katie Busker, 30, plays with her fourteen-month-old niece Jonnalyn Gibbs in the aisles of the Independence...
Independence, UNITED STATES
Katie Busker plays with her niece in the aisles of the Independence Food Pantry in Independence
Katie Busker, 30, plays with her fourteen-month-old niece Jonnalyn Gibbs in the aisles of the Independence Food Pantry in Independence, Iowa July 5, 2011. Busker, who utilizes the food pantry services in order to make up for what her food stamps do not cover, lives with her sister, Lauren Gibbs, who is a part-time employee at the Food Pantry, and says the living situation allows both families to get by. Voters in the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary will be the first to cast ballots in the upcoming U.S. Presidential race. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY FOOD)
BRITAIN-SPENDING/
RTXTML2
October 20, 2010
People wait for an unemployment centre to open in Stockport, northern England, October 20, 2010. Britain...
Stockport, United Kingdom
People wait for an unemployment centre to open in Stockport
People wait for an unemployment centre to open in Stockport, northern England, October 20, 2010. Britain will on Wednesday take an axe to its welfare state as part of an 80 billion-pound ($125 billion) cut in public spending that could seal the fate of both the economy and the coalition government. REUTERS/Phil Noble (BRITAIN - Tags: EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS POLITICS)
GERMANY-BENEFIT/
RTR29ZUR
February 09, 2010
President of the German Constitutional Court, Hans-Juergen Papier, puts on his cap before the pronouncement...
Karlsruhe, Germany
President of the German Constitutional Court Papier puts on cao before pronouncement of judgement in...
President of the German Constitutional Court, Hans-Juergen Papier, puts on his cap before the pronouncement of judgement about child allowances included in Hartz IV national unemployment benefits, in Karlsruhe February 9, 2010. German minimum jobless benefit payments Hartz IV are unconstitutional and must be reset by the end of 2010, the country's highest court ruled on Tuesday. The Federal Constitutional Court said the calculation of the payment level -- 359 euros per month for an adult -- was not transparent enough, but did not say if it ought to be raised. REUTERS/Johannes Eisele (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS IMAGES OF THE DAY)
GERMANY-BENEFIT/
RTR29ZUG
February 09, 2010
German Constitutional Court judges arrive for the pronouncement of judgement about child allowances included...
Karlsruhe, Germany
Constitutional Court judges arrive in court for pronouncement of judgement in Karlsruhe
German Constitutional Court judges arrive for the pronouncement of judgement about child allowances included in Hartz IV national unemployment benefits, at a court in Karlsruhe February 9, 2010. German minimum jobless benefit payments Hartz IV are unconstitutional and must be reset by the end of 2010, the country's highest court ruled on Tuesday. The Federal Constitutional Court said the calculation of the payment level -- 359 euros per month for an adult -- was not transparent enough, but did not say if it ought to be raised. REUTERS/Johannes Eisele (GERMANY - Tags: POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4LJ
September 30, 2009
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about...
Paris, France
France's Finance Minister Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget...
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4L5
September 30, 2009
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde (L) and Budget Minister Eric Woerth pose with copies of the...
Paris, France
France's Budget Minister Woerth and Finance Minister Lagarde attend a news conference at the ministry...
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde (L) and Budget Minister Eric Woerth pose with copies of the 2010 budget at the end of a news conference at the ministry in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4KP
September 30, 2009
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde (L) applauds near Budget Minister Eric Woerth (R) as they...
Paris, France
France's Budget Minister Woerth and Finance MinisterLagarde attend a news conference at the ministry...
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde (L) applauds near Budget Minister Eric Woerth (R) as they attend a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4KI
September 30, 2009
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about...
Paris, France
France's Finance Minister Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget...
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4KG
September 30, 2009
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about...
Paris, France
France's Finance Minister Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget...
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4IY
September 30, 2009
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about...
Paris, France
France's Finance Minister Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget...
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4IR
September 30, 2009
France's Budget Minister Eric Woerth (R) and Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attend a news conference...
Paris, France
France's Budget Minister Woerth and Finance MinisterLagarde attend a news conference at the ministry...
France's Budget Minister Eric Woerth (R) and Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attend a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4IK
September 30, 2009
France's Budget Minister Eric Woerth (R) and Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attend a news conference...
Paris, France
France's Budget Minister Woerth and Finance MinisterLagarde attend a news conference at the ministry...
France's Budget Minister Eric Woerth (R) and Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attend a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4I0
September 30, 2009
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about...
Paris, France
France's Finance Minister Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget...
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4HP
September 30, 2009
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about...
Paris, France
France's Finance Minister Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget...
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
FRANCE-BUDGET/
RTXP4H8
September 30, 2009
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about...
Paris, France
France's Finance Minister Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget...
France's Finance Minister Christine Lagarde attends a news conference at the ministry to speak about the 2010 budget in Paris on September 30, 2009. France's public deficit will scale record highs this year and next as debt levels soar on the back of higher welfare spending and rising unemployment, the government said in its 2010 budget unveiled on Wednesday. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer (FRANCE POLITICS)
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