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CLIMATE-CHANGE/JAPAN-SUSHI
RTS9HGUP 
May 16, 2022 
Taichi Takeuchi, 36, managing director of katsuobushi factory Takeuchi Ltd, displays dried katsuobushi,... 
TOSA, Japan 
The Wider Image: Fatty 'katsuo' fish may foreshadow climate change, threat to Japan's sushi 
Taichi Takeuchi, 36, managing director of katsuobushi factory Takeuchi Ltd, displays dried katsuobushi, in Usa Town, Tosa, Kochi Prefecture, Japan, May 16, 2022. Katsuobushi (smoke-dried katsuo) is essential to Japanese cuisine, but the number of its manufacturers in Kochi has plunged in forty years from dozens to only a few. "I'm really unsure if we can continue this," said Takeuchi. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON JAPAN SUSHI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/JAPAN-SUSHI
RTS9HGUB 
May 16, 2022 
A worker carries baskets containing boiled fillets of katsuo (skipjack tuna) to make katsuobushi, at... 
TOSA, Japan 
The Wider Image: Fatty 'katsuo' fish may foreshadow climate change, threat to Japan's sushi 
A worker carries baskets containing boiled fillets of katsuo (skipjack tuna) to make katsuobushi, at the Takeuchi Ltd katsuobushi factory in Usa Town, Tosa, Kochi Prefecture, Japan, May 16, 2022. Katsuobushi (smoke-dried katsuo) is essential to Japanese cuisine, but the number of its manufacturers in Kochi has plunged in forty years from dozens to only a few. "I'm really unsure if we can continue this," said managing director Taichi Takeuchi, 36. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON JAPAN SUSHI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/JAPAN-SUSHI
RTS9HGU4 
May 16, 2022 
A worker holds katsuobushi dried flakes, at the Takeuchi Ltd katsuobushi factory in Usa Town, Tosa, Kochi... 
TOSA, Japan 
The Wider Image: Fatty 'katsuo' fish may foreshadow climate change, threat to Japan's sushi 
A worker holds katsuobushi dried flakes, at the Takeuchi Ltd katsuobushi factory in Usa Town, Tosa, Kochi Prefecture, Japan, May 16, 2022. Katsuobushi (smoke-dried katsuo) is essential to Japanese cuisine, but the number of its manufacturers in Kochi has plunged in forty years from dozens to only a few. "I'm really unsure if we can continue this," said managing director Taichi Takeuchi, 36. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON JAPAN SUSHI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/JAPAN-SUSHI
RTS9HGUD 
May 15, 2022 
A group of workers make fillets of katsuo (skipjack tuna) for katsuobushi, at the Takeuchi Ltd katsuobushi... 
TOSA, Japan 
The Wider Image: Fatty 'katsuo' fish may foreshadow climate change, threat to Japan's sushi 
A group of workers make fillets of katsuo (skipjack tuna) for katsuobushi, at the Takeuchi Ltd katsuobushi factory in Usa Town, Tosa, Kochi Prefecture, Japan, May 16, 2022. Katsuobushi (smoke-dried katsuo) is essential to Japanese cuisine, but the number of its manufacturers in Kochi has plunged in forty years from dozens to only a few. "I'm really unsure if we can continue this," said managing director Taichi Takeuchi, 36. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON JAPAN SUSHI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
CLIMATE-CHANGE/JAPAN-SUSHI
RTS9HGUA 
May 12, 2022 
A worker uses firewood in a furnace to smoke the boiled fillets of katsuo (skipjack tuna), at the Takeuchi... 
TOSA, Japan 
The Wider Image: Fatty 'katsuo' fish may foreshadow climate change, threat to Japan's sushi 
A worker uses firewood in a furnace to smoke the boiled fillets of katsuo (skipjack tuna), at the Takeuchi Ltd katsuobushi factory in Usa Town, Tosa, Kochi Prefecture, Japan, May 12, 2022. Katsuobushi (smoke-dried katsuo) is essential to Japanese cuisine, but the number of its manufacturers in Kochi has plunged in forty years from dozens to only a few. "I'm really unsure if we can continue this," said managing director Taichi Takeuchi, 36. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON JAPAN SUSHI" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES 
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2021
RTXKVT14 
November 30, 2021 
A man is detained by police after a fight broke out during a Loudoun County School Board meeting which... 
Ashburn, UNITED STATES 
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story 
A man is detained by police after a fight broke out during a Loudoun County School Board meeting which included a discussion of Critical Race Theory and transgender students, in Ashburn, Virginia, U.S. June 22, 2021. Reuters photographer Evelyn Hockstein: "U.S. classrooms have become a political battleground as several Republican-led states enact rules to limit what can be taught in public schools about America's troubled legacy of race relations. I covered local news in Virginia and expected an upcoming school board meeting in Ashburn on this topic could become heated. But I did not imagine that police would haul two people away in handcuffs. A crowd of hundreds flooded the hearing and quickly became unruly, prompting the school board to shut it down and walk out. Pandemonium erupted. I noticed a commotion at the opposite side of the room and a group of police officers. I worked my way towards the disturbance, but my view was blocked. I jumped onto an empty chair and climbed several rows across the seats to get closer to the action. I looked down and saw police restraining a man with a bloody mouth. A man behind me grabbed my sleeve and shouted at me to move. I was unsure if he was trying to take pictures with his cell phone or was attempting to stop me photographing the scene, but I ignored him and kept taking photos. Though I was surprised how the night devolved, the chaos and rage that I photographed ultimately felt like another reflection of the tensions that have been playing out across the country for years." REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein/File Photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2021" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY 
Wider Image
Wider Image 
U.S. dairy farmers get little help from Canada trade deal 
19 PICTURES 
VENEZUELA-BUS/
RTX50VRH 
March 02, 2018 
Alejandra Rodriguez (R) talks to her sister Natacha Rodriguez (2nd L), while she, her son David Vargas... 
SUPE PUERTO, Peru 
The Wider Image: A journey on a caravan of misery 
Alejandra Rodriguez (R) talks to her sister Natacha Rodriguez (2nd L), while she, her son David Vargas (L) and Adrian Naveda, have a meal with the food they brought from Caracas route to Chile, at a restaurant in Supe Puerto, Peru, November 12, 2017. Most of the migrants were very short of money and unsure how much they would need to settle in their new homes, so they tried to save as much as possible. At rest stops some could afford to buy hot food but others had to continue eating the sandwiches and canned food they brought from Caracas. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins SEARCH "RAWLINS BUS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. 
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES
RTX3PB1L 
December 11, 2017 
A woman assists an injured person after an incident on Westminster Bridge in London, Britain, March 22,... 
London, United Kingdom 
Pictures of the Year: A picture and its story 
A woman assists an injured person after an incident on Westminster Bridge in London, Britain, March 22, 2017. Toby Melville: "I was on the footpath below the southeast end of the bridge, shooting pictures for the on-going Brexit story. I saw in my peripheral vision a large dark shape around 3-5 metres away come over the parapet and hit the ground approximately 10 metres below. I thought it was a terrible but isolated accident. I immediately called for an ambulance and ran to the top of the steps to try to get help at St Thomas's, the nearby hospital. While on the phone, I saw a couple more people lying on the pavement amongst debris, covered in blood or unconscious. There were other people scattered along the bridge and pavement in various states of injury and distress. I realised this was not an accident but something premeditated. As the emergency services were on the scene now, I started taking photos along the bridge. I was unsure if danger was still present. I didn't know a car had been driven into these people. I hadn't heard any screams, loud engine noises or the gunshots of the armed police shooting and killing the perpetrator of the attack, Khalid Masood. I thought the injured or dead might also have been shot and a gunman might still be on the loose. Armed police arrived and cleared the bridge. I called the office and started filing photographs from the back of the camera, transmitting most of the frames I had shot for the office to choose, edit and crop. A week later I walked back over the bridge, everything was 'back to normal', in a way. But the sight of the first victim falling and the sickening thud as he hit the pavement still goes through my mind. I wonder whether I should have transmitted all the frames I shot. The sequence of pictures is hard to look at. I remind myself I was lucky. I had walked over the bridge about a minute before the attack. Others weren't so fortunate." REUTERS/Toby Melville/File photo SEARCH "POY STORY" FOR THIS STORY. 
SOCCER-SPAIN/REAL-DEGEA
RTX1QNC2 
September 01, 2015 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near... 
Las Rozas, Spain 
Manchester United's goalkeeper De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid... 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid, September 1, 2015. De Gea was facing an uncertain future on Tuesday after his expected move to Real Madrid was apparently scuppered when the paperwork did not arrive at the Spanish league on time. REUTERS/Susana Vera
SOCCER-SPAIN/REAL-DEGEA
RTX1QNBV 
September 01, 2015 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near... 
Las Rozas, Spain 
Manchester United's goalkeeper De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid... 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid, September 1, 2015. De Gea was facing an uncertain future on Tuesday after his expected move to Real Madrid was apparently scuppered when the paperwork did not arrive at the Spanish league on time. REUTERS/Susana Vera
SOCCER-SPAIN/REAL-DEGEA
RTX1QNBU 
September 01, 2015 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near... 
Las Rozas, Spain 
Manchester United's goalkeeper De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid, September 1, 2015. De Gea was facing an uncertain future on Tuesday after his expected move to Real Madrid was apparently scuppered when the paperwork did not arrive at the Spanish league on time. REUTERS/Susana Vera
SOCCER-SPAIN/REAL-DEGEA
RTX1QNBT 
September 01, 2015 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near... 
Las Rozas, Spain 
Manchester United's goalkeeper De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid... 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid, September 1, 2015. De Gea was facing an uncertain future on Tuesday after his expected move to Real Madrid was apparently scuppered when the paperwork did not arrive at the Spanish league on time. REUTERS/Susana Vera
SOCCER-SPAIN/REAL-DEGEA
RTX1QNBO 
September 01, 2015 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near... 
Las Rozas, Spain 
Manchester United's goalkeeper De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid... 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid, September 1, 2015. De Gea was facing an uncertain future on Tuesday after his expected move to Real Madrid was apparently scuppered when the paperwork did not arrive at the Spanish league on time. REUTERS/Susana Vera
SOCCER-SPAIN/REAL-DEGEA
RTX1QNBN 
September 01, 2015 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near... 
Las Rozas, Spain 
Manchester United's goalkeeper De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid... 
Manchester United's goalkeeper David De Gea of Spain arrives at Soccer City grounds in Las Rozas, near Madrid, September 1, 2015. De Gea was facing an uncertain future on Tuesday after his expected move to Real Madrid was apparently scuppered when the paperwork did not arrive at the Spanish league on time. REUTERS/Susana Vera
CHILE-ADVERTISING/
RTX1PRGE 
August 26, 2015 
Actor Adan Jodorowsky performs naked during the filming of a movie in Santiago, Chile, August 25, 2015.... 
Santiago, Chile 
Actor Adan Jodorowsky performs naked during the filming of a movie in Santiago, Chile 
Actor Adan Jodorowsky performs naked during the filming of a movie in Santiago, Chile, August 25, 2015. When the creators of an elaborate 2013 Cadillac commercial began to scout for shooting locations three years ago, they began in Argentina, where varied landscapes and creative talent had long attracted ad producers. But when it came time to import the equipment needed for the three-minute spot, they collided head-on with the country's byzantine import regulations. Argentina demanded hefty deposits on all vehicles, cameras, and lights, and producers were unsure when - or even if - their imports would make it through customs. The solution? Move to Chile. Picture taken August 25, 2015. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado 
CHILE-ADVERTISING/
RTX1PREF 
August 26, 2015 
A digital film camera is used during filming of a movie in Santiago, Chile, August 25, 2015. When the... 
Santiago, Chile 
Digital film camera is used during filming of a movie in Santiago, Chile 
A digital film camera is used during filming of a movie in Santiago, Chile, August 25, 2015. When the creators of an elaborate 2013 Cadillac commercial began to scout for shooting locations three years ago, they began in Argentina, where varied landscapes and creative talent had long attracted ad producers. But when it came time to import the equipment needed for the three-minute spot, they collided head-on with the country's byzantine import regulations. Argentina demanded hefty deposits on all vehicles, cameras, and lights, and producers were unsure when - or even if - their imports would make it through customs. The solution? Move to Chile. Picture taken August 25, 2015. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado 
CHILE-ADVERTISING/
RTX1PRDV 
August 26, 2015 
Members of a film crew work on a set during a break in shooting, in Santiago, Chile, August 25, 2015.... 
Santiago, Chile 
Members of a film crew work on a set during a break in shooting, in Santiago, Chile 
Members of a film crew work on a set during a break in shooting, in Santiago, Chile, August 25, 2015. When the creators of an elaborate 2013 Cadillac commercial began to scout for shooting locations three years ago, they began in Argentina, where varied landscapes and creative talent had long attracted ad producers. But when it came time to import the equipment needed for the three-minute spot, they collided head-on with the country's byzantine import regulations. Argentina demanded hefty deposits on all vehicles, cameras, and lights, and producers were unsure when - or even if - their imports would make it through customs. The solution? Move to Chile. Picture taken August 25, 2015. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado 
CHILE-ADVERTISING/
RTX1PRD3 
August 26, 2015 
A cameraman works with a digital film camera during a shoot in Santiago, Chile, August 25, 2015. When... 
Santiago, Chile 
Cameraman works with a digital film camera during a shoot in Santiago, Chile 
A cameraman works with a digital film camera during a shoot in Santiago, Chile, August 25, 2015. When the creators of an elaborate 2013 Cadillac commercial began to scout for shooting locations three years ago, they began in Argentina, where varied landscapes and creative talent had long attracted ad producers. But when it came time to import the equipment needed for the three-minute spot, they collided head-on with the country's byzantine import regulations. Argentina demanded hefty deposits on all vehicles, cameras, and lights, and producers were unsure when - or even if - their imports would make it through customs. The solution? Move to Chile. Picture taken August 25, 2015. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado 
CHILE-ADVERTISING/
RTX1PRCL 
August 26, 2015 
Felipe Noguiera, a Santiago-based production head for Argentina's Jacaranda Films, talks next to a storyboard... 
Santiago, Chile 
Noguiera, a Santiago-based production head for Argentina's Jacaranda Films, talks next to a storyboard... 
Felipe Noguiera, a Santiago-based production head for Argentina's Jacaranda Films, talks next to a storyboard for an advertisement at their office in a Santiago neighborhood, Chile, August 25, 2015. When the creators of an elaborate 2013 Cadillac commercial began to scout for shooting locations three years ago, they began in Argentina, where varied landscapes and creative talent had long attracted ad producers. But when it came time to import the equipment needed for the three-minute spot, they collided head-on with the country's byzantine import regulations. Argentina demanded hefty deposits on all vehicles, cameras, and lights, and producers were unsure when - or even if - their imports would make it through customs. The solution? Move to Chile. Picture taken August 25, 2015. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado 
CHILE-ADVERTISING/
RTX1PRCC 
August 26, 2015 
Film equipment contractor chief Mauricio Martinez inspects a digital film camera at their storehouse... 
Santiago, Chile 
Film equipment contractor chief Mauricio Martinez inspects a digital film camera at their storehouse... 
Film equipment contractor chief Mauricio Martinez inspects a digital film camera at their storehouse in Santiago, Chile, August 25, 2015. When the creators of an elaborate 2013 Cadillac commercial began to scout for shooting locations three years ago, they began in Argentina, where varied landscapes and creative talent had long attracted ad producers. But when it came time to import the equipment needed for the three-minute spot, they collided head-on with the country's byzantine import regulations. Argentina demanded hefty deposits on all vehicles, cameras, and lights, and producers were unsure when - or even if - their imports would make it through customs. The solution? Move to Chile. Picture taken August 25, 2015. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado 
CHILE-ADVERTISING/
RTX1PRB2 
August 26, 2015 
A digital film camera is seen inside its case at a storehouse of a major film equipment contractor in... 
Santiago, Chile 
Digital film camera is seen inside its case at a storehouse of a major film equipment contractor in a... 
A digital film camera is seen inside its case at a storehouse of a major film equipment contractor in a Santiago neighbourhood, Chile, August 25, 2015. When the creators of an elaborate 2013 Cadillac commercial began to scout for shooting locations three years ago, they began in Argentina, where varied landscapes and creative talent had long attracted ad producers. But when it came time to import the equipment needed for the three-minute spot, they collided head-on with the country's byzantine import regulations. Argentina demanded hefty deposits on all vehicles, cameras, and lights, and producers were unsure when - or even if - their imports would make it through customs. The solution? Move to Chile. Picture taken August 25, 2015. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado 
THAILAND-BLAST/
RTX1PKFE 
August 25, 2015 
People line up as they leave their slippers near a wanted poster for the main suspect of a deadly bomb... 
Yangon, Myanmar 
People line up near wanted poster for main suspect of deadly bomb blast in Bangkok, put up by local authorities... 
People line up as they leave their slippers near a wanted poster for the main suspect of a deadly bomb blast in Bangkok, Thailand, put up by local authorities at Shwedagon pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar August 25, 2015. Police on Tuesday questioned a taxi driver who may have driven the main suspect away from the area of last week's deadly attack in Bangkok, as forensic experts struggle to unearth vital evidence in Thailand's worst ever bombing. Broken security cameras along the chief suspect's getaway route and a lack of sophisticated equipment has hampered the investigation into the Aug. 17 blast that killed 20 people, more than half of them foreigners. On Monday police said the trail had gone cold in the hunt for the bomber, and they were unsure if the main suspect was still in Thailand. Poster reads: "Suspect wanted in Bangkok bomb blast. Please contact this number if found." RETUERS/Soe Zeya Tun
THAILAND-BLAST/
RTX1PFZG 
August 24, 2015 
People hold candles for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, at the Erawan shrine in Bangkok, Thailand,... 
Bangkok, Thailand 
People hold candles for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, at the Erawan shrine in Bangkok 
People hold candles for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, at the Erawan shrine in Bangkok, Thailand, August 24, 2015. Police said on Monday the trail had gone cold in the hunt for a bomber a week after 20 people were killed in Thailand's worst ever bomb attack, and they were unsure if the chief suspect was still in the country. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
THAILAND-BLAST/
RTX1PFZ5 
August 24, 2015 
People hold a giant Thai national flag for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, near the Erawan shrine... 
Bangkok, Thailand 
People hold a giant Thai national flag for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, near the Erawan shrine... 
People hold a giant Thai national flag for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, near the Erawan shrine in Bangkok, Thailand, August 24, 2015. Police said on Monday the trail had gone cold in the hunt for a bomber a week after 20 people were killed in Thailand's worst ever bomb attack, and they were unsure if the chief suspect was still in the country. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
THAILAND-BLAST/
RTX1PFXQ 
August 24, 2015 
People hold a giant Thai national flag for victims of last Monday's deadly blast near the Erawan shrine... 
Bangkok, Thailand 
People hold a giant Thai national flag for victims of last Monday's deadly blast near the Erawan shrine... 
People hold a giant Thai national flag for victims of last Monday's deadly blast near the Erawan shrine in Bangkok, Thailand, August 24, 2015. Police said on Monday the trail had gone cold in the hunt for a bomber a week after 20 people were killed in Thailand's worst ever bomb attack, and they were unsure if the chief suspect was still in the country. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
THAILAND-BLAST/
RTX1PFXM 
August 24, 2015 
People hold a giant Thai national flag for victims of last Monday's deadly blast near the Erawan shrine... 
Bangkok, Thailand 
People hold a giant Thai national flag for victims of last Monday's deadly blast near the Erawan shrine... 
People hold a giant Thai national flag for victims of last Monday's deadly blast near the Erawan shrine in Bangkok, Thailand, August 24, 2015. Police said on Monday the trail had gone cold in the hunt for a bomber a week after 20 people were killed in Thailand's worst ever bomb attack, and they were unsure if the chief suspect was still in the country. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
THAILAND-BLAST/
RTX1PFXF 
August 24, 2015 
Buddhist monks pray for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, as they walk at the Erawan shrine in Bangkok,... 
Bangkok, Thailand 
Buddhist monks pray for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, as they walk at the Erawan shrine in Bangkok... 
Buddhist monks pray for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, as they walk at the Erawan shrine in Bangkok, Thailand, August 24, 2015. Police said on Monday the trail had gone cold in the hunt for a bomber a week after 20 people were killed in Thailand's worst ever bomb attack, and they were unsure if the chief suspect was still in the country. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
THAILAND-BLAST/
RTX1PFWV 
August 24, 2015 
A woman prays at the Erawan shrine, the site of last Monday's deadly blast, in Bangkok, Thailand, August... 
Bangkok, Thailand 
A woman prays at the Erawan shrine, the site of last Monday's deadly blast, in Bangkok, Thailand 
A woman prays at the Erawan shrine, the site of last Monday's deadly blast, in Bangkok, Thailand, August 24, 2015. Police said on Monday the trail had gone cold in the hunt for a bomber a week after 20 people were killed in Thailand's worst ever bomb attack, and they were unsure if the chief suspect was still in the country. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
THAILAND-BLAST/
RTX1PFWP 
August 24, 2015 
People light candles for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, as they stand at the Erawan shrine in... 
Bangkok, Thailand 
People light candles for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, as they stand at the Erawan shrine in... 
People light candles for victims of last Monday's deadly blast, as they stand at the Erawan shrine in Bangkok, Thailand, August 24, 2015. Police said on Monday the trail had gone cold in the hunt for a bomber a week after 20 people were killed in Thailand's worst ever bomb attack, and they were unsure if the chief suspect was still in the country. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom
THAILAND-BLAST/
RTX1PFWK 
August 24, 2015 
People light candles for victims during a march to the Erawan shrine, the site of last Monday's deadly... 
Bangkok, Thailand 
People light candles for victims during a march to the Erawan shrine, the site of last Monday's deadly... 
People light candles for victims during a march to the Erawan shrine, the site of last Monday's deadly blast, in Bangkok, Thailand, August 24, 2015. Police said on Monday the trail had gone cold in the hunt for a bomber a week after 20 people were killed in Thailand's worst ever bomb attack, and they were unsure if the chief suspect was still in the country. REUTERS/Chaiwat Subprasom TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GLA9 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (R) and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (L) talk to reporters as they depart the U.S. Supreme... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young and her attorney Sharon Gustafson talk to reporters as they depart the U.S. Supreme Court... 
Peggy Young (R) and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (L) talk to reporters as they depart the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide the case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH CRIME LAW BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GLA0 
December 03, 2014 
Sharon Gustafson, attorney for Peggy Young, talks to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Sharon Gustafson, attorney for Peggy Young, talks to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court... 
Sharon Gustafson, attorney for Peggy Young, talks to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide the case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH CRIME LAW BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL9L 
December 03, 2014 
University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos (C), attorney Sharon Gustafson (2nd R) and plaintiff... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Law professor Sam Bagenstos, attorney Sharon Gustafson and plaintiff Peggy Young talk to reporters as... 
University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos (C), attorney Sharon Gustafson (2nd R) and plaintiff Peggy Young (R) talk to reporters as they depart the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide the case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL9I 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (L) holds flowers given to her as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young holds flowers given to her as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington 
Peggy Young (L) holds flowers given to her as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide the case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL9B 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (C) and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (R) talk to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young and her attorney Sharon Gustafson talk to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court... 
Peggy Young (C) and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (R) talk to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide the case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL93 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (front L-R), attorney Sharon Gustafson and University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young, attorney Sharon Gustafson and law professor Sam Bagenstos talk to reporters as they depart... 
Peggy Young (front L-R), attorney Sharon Gustafson and University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos talk to reporters as they depart the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide the case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL8L 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (C) listens as University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos (L) and attorney Sharon... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young listens as law professor Sam Bagenstos and attorney Sharon Gustafson talk to reporters as... 
Peggy Young (C) listens as University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos (L) and attorney Sharon Gustafson (R) talk to reporters as they depart the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide the case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL6M 
December 03, 2014 
Attorneys and elected officials talk to reporters about the Young v UPS case outside the U.S. Supreme... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Attorneys and elected officials talk to reporters about the Young v UPS case outside the U.S. Supreme... 
Attorneys and elected officials talk to reporters about the Young v UPS case outside the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide the case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Peggy Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL6G 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (C), attorney Sharon Gustafson (2nd R) and University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young, attorney Sharon Gustafson and Uni of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos talk to reporters... 
Peggy Young (C), attorney Sharon Gustafson (2nd R) and University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos (R, obscured) talk to reporters as they depart the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide a case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL65 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (center R) smiles as she and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (center L) talk to reporters as... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young smiles as she and her attorney Sharon Gustafson talk to reporters as she departs the U.S.... 
Peggy Young (center R) smiles as she and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (center L) talk to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide a case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL61 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (R) talks to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young talks to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington 
Peggy Young (R) talks to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide a case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL5Q 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young talks to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young talks to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington 
Peggy Young talks to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide a case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL5K 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (C), attorney Sharon Gustafson (2nd L) and University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young, attorney Sharon Gustafson and Uni of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos talk to reporters... 
Peggy Young (C), attorney Sharon Gustafson (2nd L) and University of Michigan law professor Sam Bagenstos (R) talk to reporters as they depart the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide a case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL45 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (2nd L) and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (L) depart the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young and her attorney Sharon Gustafson depart the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington 
Peggy Young (2nd L) and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (L) depart the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide a case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL3L 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (3rd R) and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (4th R) wave to supporters as she departs the U.S.... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young and her attorney Sharon Gustafson wave to supporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court... 
Peggy Young (3rd R) and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (4th R) wave to supporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide a case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/PREGNANCY
RTR4GL2Y 
December 03, 2014 
Peggy Young (R) smiles as she and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (L) talk to reporters as she departs... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Peggy Young smiles as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington 
Peggy Young (R) smiles as she and her attorney Sharon Gustafson (L) talk to reporters as she departs the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington December 3, 2014. U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared unsure on Wednesday how to decide a case that could determine whether employers must provide accommodations for pregnant workers who may have physical limitations on the duties they can perform. The case concerns whether UPS violated a federal law called the Pregnancy Discrimination Act by denying Young her request for temporary changes in her work duties after she became pregnant in 2006. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) 
USA-COURT/VOTINGRIGHTS/
RTR4DX1B 
November 12, 2014 
Attorney Eric Schnapper talks outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court appeared unsure how to resolve... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Attorney Schnapper talks outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington 
Attorney Eric Schnapper talks outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court appeared unsure how to resolve a legislature redistricting plan in Alabama that packed black voters into certain districts in a way that critics say diminishes their influence at the polls, in Washington November 12, 2014. Justices heard a 70-minute oral argument on two cases brought by the Alabama Democratic Conference and the Alabama Legislative Black Caucus against the redistricting by the Republican-controlled state legislature in 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS CRIME LAW) 
USA-COURT/VOTINGRIGHTS/
RTR4DX18 
November 12, 2014 
Attorney Eric Schnapper talks outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court appeared unsure how to resolve... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Attorney Schnapper talks outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington 
Attorney Eric Schnapper talks outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court appeared unsure how to resolve a legislature redistricting plan in Alabama that packed black voters into certain districts in a way that critics say diminishes their influence at the polls, in Washington November 12, 2014. Justices heard a 70-minute oral argument on two cases brought by the Alabama Democratic Conference and the Alabama Legislative Black Caucus against the redistricting by the Republican-controlled state legislature in 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS CRIME LAW) 
USA-COURT/VOTINGRIGHTS/
RTR4DX0I 
November 12, 2014 
Alabama State Senator Quinton Ross (L) and Representative John Knight (R) talk outside the U.S. Supreme... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Alabama State legislators Ross and Knight talk outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington 
Alabama State Senator Quinton Ross (L) and Representative John Knight (R) talk outside the U.S. Supreme Court, where the court appeared unsure how to resolve a legislature redistricting plan in Alabama that packed black voters into certain districts in a way that critics say diminishes their influence at the polls, in Washington November 12, 2014. Justices heard oral arguments on two cases brought by the Alabama Democratic Conference and the Alabama Legislative Black Caucus against the redistricting by the Republican-controlled state legislature in 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS CRIME LAW) 
USA-COURT/VOTINGRIGHTS/
RTR4DWZQ 
November 12, 2014 
Alabama State Senator Quinton Ross (L), Representatives' John Knight (C) and Thad McClammy (R) talk outside... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Alabama State legislators talk outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington 
Alabama State Senator Quinton Ross (L), Representatives' John Knight (C) and Thad McClammy (R) talk outside the U.S. Supreme Court, where the court appeared unsure how to resolve a legislature redistricting plan in Alabama that packed black voters into certain districts in a way that critics say diminishes their influence at the polls, in Washington November 12, 2014. The nine justices heard oral arguments on two cases brought by the Alabama Democratic Conference and the Alabama Legislative Black Caucus against the redistricting by the Republican-controlled state legislature in 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS CRIME LAW) 
USA-COURT/VOTINGRIGHTS/
RTR4DWYE 
November 12, 2014 
Alabama State Senator Quinton Ross (L) smiles after walking out the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Alabama State Senator Ross smiles after walking out of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington 
Alabama State Senator Quinton Ross (L) smiles after walking out the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court appeared unsure how to resolve a legislature redistricting plan in Alabama that packed black voters into certain districts in a way that critics say diminishes their influence at the polls, in Washington November 12, 2014. The nine justices heard an 70-minute oral argument on two cases brought by the Alabama Democratic Conference and the Alabama Legislative Black Caucus against the redistricting by the Republican-controlled state legislature in 2012. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS CRIME LAW) 
CHINA-SHANGHAI/FTZ
RTR47HR6 
September 24, 2014 
A customs official talks to a woman at the Shanghai Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, part... 
Shanghai, China 
A customs official talks to a woman at the Shanghai Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, part... 
A customs official talks to a woman at the Shanghai Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, part of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone, during a government organized media tour in Shanghai, September 24, 2014. A disappointing first year for Shanghai's much-hyped free-trade zone, seen as a pet project of Premier Li Keqiang and billed as a reform laboratory, raises questions about China's commitment to opening up its markets as it wrestles with a slowing economy. The 29 square kilometre zone on the outskirts of China's commercial capital - hailed as Beijing's boldest reform in decades - was meant to test changes such as currency liberalisation, market-determined interest rates and free trade. But progress has been slow and policies vague as the political focus has turned from reform to shoring up growth, leaving foreign companies unsure of investing in the free-trade zone (FTZ). REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS) 
CHINA-SHANGHAI/FTZ
RTR47HR0 
September 24, 2014 
A guard stands at an empty logistics area of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone in Shanghai, September 24,... 
Shanghai, China 
A guard stands at an empty logistics area of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone in Shanghai 
A guard stands at an empty logistics area of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone in Shanghai, September 24, 2014. A disappointing first year for Shanghai's much-hyped free-trade zone, seen as a pet project of Premier Li Keqiang and billed as a reform laboratory, raises questions about China's commitment to opening up its markets as it wrestles with a slowing economy. The 29 square kilometre zone on the outskirts of China's commercial capital - hailed as Beijing's boldest reform in decades - was meant to test changes such as currency liberalisation, market-determined interest rates and free trade. But progress has been slow and policies vague as the political focus has turned from reform to shoring up growth, leaving foreign companies unsure of investing in the free-trade zone (FTZ). REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) 
CHINA-SHANGHAI/FTZ
RTR47HPO 
September 24, 2014 
A woman waits at the Shanghai Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, part of the Shanghai Free... 
Shanghai, China 
A woman waits at the Shanghai Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, part of the Shanghai Free... 
A woman waits at the Shanghai Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, part of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone in Shanghai, September 24, 2014. A disappointing first year for Shanghai's much-hyped free-trade zone, seen as a pet project of Premier Li Keqiang and billed as a reform laboratory, raises questions about China's commitment to opening up its markets as it wrestles with a slowing economy. The 29 square kilometre zone on the outskirts of China's commercial capital - hailed as Beijing's boldest reform in decades - was meant to test changes such as currency liberalisation, market-determined interest rates and free trade. But progress has been slow and policies vague as the political focus has turned from reform to shoring up growth, leaving foreign companies unsure of investing in the free-trade zone (FTZ). REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS) 
CHINA-SHANGHAI/FTZ
RTR47HPI 
September 24, 2014 
An employee of the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention company, part of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone, works... 
Shanghai, China 
An employee of the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention company, part of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone, works... 
An employee of the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention company, part of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone, works at the company's lab during a government organized media tour in Shanghai, September 24, 2014. A disappointing first year for Shanghai's much-hyped free-trade zone, seen as a pet project of Premier Li Keqiang and billed as a reform laboratory, raises questions about China's commitment to opening up its markets as it wrestles with a slowing economy. The 29 square kilometre zone on the outskirts of China's commercial capital - hailed as Beijing's boldest reform in decades - was meant to test changes such as currency liberalisation, market-determined interest rates and free trade.But progress has been slow and policies vague as the political focus has turned from reform to shoring up growth, leaving foreign companies unsure of investing in the free-trade zone (FTZ). REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) 
CHINA-SHANGHAI/FTZ
RTR47HP0 
September 24, 2014 
An employee of Mopar's Asia Pacific Regional Parts Distribution Center, operating at the Shanghai Free... 
Shanghai, China 
An employee of Mopar's Asia Pacific Regional Parts Distribution Center, operating at the Shanghai Free... 
An employee of Mopar's Asia Pacific Regional Parts Distribution Center, operating at the Shanghai Free Trade Zone, works during a government organized media tour, in Shanghai September 24, 2014. A disappointing first year for Shanghai's much-hyped free-trade zone, seen as a pet project of Premier Li Keqiang and billed as a reform laboratory, raises questions about China's commitment to opening up its markets as it wrestles with a slowing economy. The 29 square kilometre zone on the outskirts of China's commercial capital - hailed as Beijing's boldest reform in decades - was meant to test changes such as currency liberalisation, market-determined interest rates and free trade. But progress has been slow and policies vague as the political focus has turned from reform to shoring up growth, leaving foreign companies unsure of investing in the free-trade zone (FTZ). REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) 
CHINA-SHANGHAI/FTZ
RTR47HOE 
September 24, 2014 
An employee of Mopar's Asia Pacific Regional Parts Distribution Center, operating at the Shanghai Free... 
Shanghai, China 
An employee of Mopar's Asia Pacific Regional Parts Distribution Center, operating at the Shanghai Free... 
An employee of Mopar's Asia Pacific Regional Parts Distribution Center, operating at the Shanghai Free Trade Zone, works during a government organized media tour, in Shanghai September 24, 2014. A disappointing first year for Shanghai's much-hyped free-trade zone, seen as a pet project of Premier Li Keqiang and billed as a reform laboratory, raises questions about China's commitment to opening up its markets as it wrestles with a slowing economy. The 29 square kilometre zone on the outskirts of China's commercial capital - hailed as Beijing's boldest reform in decades - was meant to test changes such as currency liberalisation, market-determined interest rates and free trade. But progress has been slow and policies vague as the political focus has turned from reform to shoring up growth, leaving foreign companies unsure of investing in the free-trade zone (FTZ). REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) 
CHINA-SHANGHAI/FTZ
RTR47HNT 
September 24, 2014 
A truck driver talks to a customs official as he drives into a part of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone,... 
Shanghai, China 
A truck driver talks to a customs official as he drives into a part of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone,... 
A truck driver talks to a customs official as he drives into a part of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone, in Shanghai September 24, 2014. A disappointing first year for Shanghai's much-hyped free-trade zone, seen as a pet project of Premier Li Keqiang and billed as a reform laboratory, raises questions about China's commitment to opening up its markets as it wrestles with a slowing economy. The 29 square kilometre zone on the outskirts of China's commercial capital - hailed as Beijing's boldest reform in decades - was meant to test changes such as currency liberalisation, market-determined interest rates and free trade. But progress has been slow and policies vague as the political focus has turned from reform to shoring up growth, leaving foreign companies unsure of investing in the free-trade zone (FTZ). REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) 
CHINA-SHANGHAI/FTZ
RTR47HNP 
September 24, 2014 
Trucks carrying copper and other goods are seen waiting to enter an area of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone,... 
Shanghai, China 
Trucks carrying copper and other goods are seen waiting to enter an area of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone,... 
Trucks carrying copper and other goods are seen waiting to enter an area of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone, in Shanghai September 24, 2014. A disappointing first year for Shanghai's much-hyped free-trade zone, seen as a pet project of Premier Li Keqiang and billed as a reform laboratory, raises questions about China's commitment to opening up its markets as it wrestles with a slowing economy. The 29 square kilometre zone on the outskirts of China's commercial capital - hailed as Beijing's boldest reform in decades - was meant to test changes such as currency liberalisation, market-determined interest rates and free trade. But progress has been slow and policies vague as the political focus has turned from reform to shoring up growth, leaving foreign companies unsure of investing in the free-trade zone (FTZ). REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS TRANSPORT) 
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