Ajax loader
By using our website, you agree to our use of cookies as described in Cookie Policy.

Can't find what you're looking for?

 

Be sure to Sign in to see all available content.

 

If you don't have an account, Register here.

Search results for: Value-Added-Tax

LEBANON-ECONOMY/
RTS1DNSH
September 25, 2017
The Value-Added Tax (VAT) Building is pictured in Beirut, Lebanon September 25, 2017. REUTERS/ Aziz Taher...
Beirut, Lebanon
The Value-Added Tax (VAT) Building is pictured in Beirut
The Value-Added Tax (VAT) Building is pictured in Beirut, Lebanon September 25, 2017. REUTERS/ Aziz Taher
LEBANON-ECONOMY/
RTX3DXKB
August 30, 2017
Value-Added Tax (VAT) Building in Beirut, Lebanon August 28, 2017. Picture taken August 28, 2017. REUTERS/...
Beirut, Lebanon
Value-Added Tax (VAT) Building in Beirut
Value-Added Tax (VAT) Building in Beirut, Lebanon August 28, 2017. Picture taken August 28, 2017. REUTERS/ Mohamed Azakir
LEBANON-ECONOMY/
RTX3DXK7
August 30, 2017
Value-Added Tax (VAT) Building in Beirut, Lebanon August 28, 2017. Picture taken August 28, 2017. REUTERS/...
Beirut, Lebanon
Value-Added Tax (VAT) Building in Beirut
Value-Added Tax (VAT) Building in Beirut, Lebanon August 28, 2017. Picture taken August 28, 2017. REUTERS/ Mohamed Azakir
SRI LANKA-TAX/
RTS9Z9A
March 09, 2016
A labourer works at a construction site of an apartment complex in Colombo March 8, 2016. Sri Lankan...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
A labourer works at a construction site of an apartment complex in Colombo
A labourer works at a construction site of an apartment complex in Colombo March 8, 2016. Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, saying his country must break out of a debt trap, on Tuesday announced a rise in value added tax (VAT) and said the government will impose a capital gains tax. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte
SRI LANKA-TAX/
RTS9Z97
March 09, 2016
Labourers work at a construction site of an apartment complex in Colombo March 8, 2016. Sri Lankan Prime...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Labourers work at a construction site of an apartment complex in Colombo
Labourers work at a construction site of an apartment complex in Colombo March 8, 2016. Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, saying his country must break out of a debt trap, on Tuesday announced a rise in value added tax (VAT) and said the government will impose a capital gains tax. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte
PARAGUAY-PROTEST/
RTS54W6
October 19, 2015
People march during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19,...
Asuncion, Paraguay
People march during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion
People march during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19, 2015. The protesters, who are owners and employees from about 300 cooperative businesses, said that they are demonstrating against a new law that establishes a value-added tax of 10 per cent to their services. The placard (C) reads, "No, tax cooperatives". REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
PARAGUAY-PROTEST/
RTS54V9
October 19, 2015
People hold a large Paraguayan flag during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion,...
Asuncion, Paraguay
People hold a large Paraguayan flag during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion...
People hold a large Paraguayan flag during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19, 2015. The protesters, who are owners and employees from about 300 cooperative businesses, said that they are demonstrating against a new law that establishes a value-added tax of 10 per cent to their services. REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
PARAGUAY-PROTEST/
RTS54RD
October 19, 2015
People march during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19,...
Asuncion, Paraguay
People march during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion
People march during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19, 2015. The protesters, who are owners and employees from about 300 cooperative businesses, said that they are demonstrating against a new law that establishes a value-added tax of 10 per cent to their services. The banner reads, "These are the heads of corruption to pay salaries and secretaries scorekeepers". REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
PARAGUAY-PROTEST/
RTS54R6
October 19, 2015
A protester, seen wearing a mask depicting Paraguay's President Horacio Cartes, takes part in a demonstration...
Asuncion, Paraguay
A protester takes part in a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion
A protester, seen wearing a mask depicting Paraguay's President Horacio Cartes, takes part in a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19, 2015. The protesters, who are owners and employees from about 300 cooperative businesses, said that they are demonstrating against a new law that establishes a value-added tax of 10 per cent to their services. The sign above reads, "Thanks for collaborating with secretaries" REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
PARAGUAY-PROTEST/
RTS54R4
October 19, 2015
People march during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19,...
Asuncion, Paraguay
People march during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion
People march during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19, 2015. The protesters, who are owners and employees from about 300 cooperative businesses, said that they are demonstrating against a new law that establishes a value-added tax of 10 per cent to their services. The placard (C, top) reads, "No, plus tax for corruption." REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
PARAGUAY-PROTEST/
RTS54OP
October 19, 2015
A woman holds a sign during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October...
Asuncion, Paraguay
A woman holds a sign during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion
A woman holds a sign during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19, 2015. The protesters, who are owners and employees from about 300 cooperative businesses, said that they are demonstrating against a new law that establishes a value-added tax of 10 per cent to their services. The sign reads, "No, the tax cooperatives" REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
PARAGUAY-PROTEST/
RTS54ON
October 19, 2015
A protester is seen holding a placard during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion,...
Asuncion, Paraguay
A protester is seen holding a placard during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion...
A protester is seen holding a placard during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19, 2015. The protesters, who are owners and employees from about 300 cooperative businesses, said that they are demonstrating against a new law that establishes a value-added tax of 10 per cent to their services. The placard reads, "People in the first place? Cartes you're a liar". REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
POL BIZ VIO
RTS54OJ
October 19, 2015
A woman holds a placard during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay,...
Asuncion, Paraguay
A woman holds a placard during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion
A woman holds a placard during a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19, 2015. The protesters, who are owners and employees from about 300 cooperative businesses, said that they are demonstrating against a new law that establishes a value-added tax of 10 per cent to their services. The placard (top) reads, "Paraguay do not be silent. No, plus tax for corruption". REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
PARAGUAY-PROTEST/
RTS54LH
October 19, 2015
People take part in a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19,...
Asuncion, Paraguay
People take part in a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion
People take part in a demonstration against a new tax law, in downtown Asuncion, Paraguay, October 19, 2015. The protesters, who are owners and employees from about 300 cooperative businesses, said that they are demonstrating against a new law that establishes a value-added tax of 10 per cent to their services. The placard reads, "No, plus tax for corruption" REUTERS/Jorge Adorno
ISRAEL-ECONOMY-TAXATION/
RTX1QYJA
September 03, 2015
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks at a security guard before he begins speaking during...
Jerusalem, Israel
Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu looks at a security guard before he begins speaking during a joint news...
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks at a security guard before he begins speaking during a joint news conference with Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (not pictured) in Jerusalem September 3, 2015. Israel will lower corporate and value added taxes (VAT) to help boost economic growth following higher than expected tax collection in recent months, Netanyahu said on Thursday. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
ISRAEL-ECONOMY-TAXATION/
RTX1QYHW
September 03, 2015
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) listens to his Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (L) speaking...
Jerusalem, Israel
Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu listens to his Finance Minister Kahlon speaking during their joint news...
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) listens to his Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (L) speaking during their joint news conference in Jerusalem September 3, 2015. Israel will lower corporate and value added taxes (VAT) to help boost economic growth following higher than expected tax collection in recent months, Netanyahu said on Thursday. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
ISRAEL-ECONOMY-TAXATION/
RTX1QYH5
September 03, 2015
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (front) congratulates his Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon during...
Jerusalem, Israel
Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu congratulates his Finance Minister Kahlon during their joint news conference...
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (front) congratulates his Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon during their joint news conference in Jerusalem September 3, 2015. Israel will lower corporate and value added taxes (VAT) to help boost economic growth following higher than expected tax collection in recent months, Netanyahu said on Thursday. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
ISRAEL-ECONOMY-TAXATION/
RTX1QYGS
September 03, 2015
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shakes hands with Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (L) during...
Jerusalem, Israel
Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu shakes hands with Finance Minister Kahlon during their joint news conference...
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shakes hands with Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (L) during their joint news conference in Jerusalem September 3, 2015. Israel will lower corporate and value added taxes (VAT) to help boost economic growth following higher than expected tax collection in recent months, Netanyahu said on Thursday. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
ISRAEL-ECONOMY-TAXATION/
RTX1QYGR
September 03, 2015
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu listens to his Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (not pictured)...
Jerusalem, Israel
Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu listens to his Finance Minister Kahlon speaking during their joint news...
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu listens to his Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (not pictured) speaking during their joint news conference in Jerusalem September 3, 2015. Israel will lower corporate and value added taxes (VAT) to help boost economic growth following higher than expected tax collection in recent months, Netanyahu said on Thursday. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
ISRAEL-ECONOMY-TAXATION
RTX1QYFY
September 03, 2015
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu listens to his Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (not pictured)...
Jerusalem, Israel
Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu listens to his Finance Minister Kahlon speaking during their joint news...
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu listens to his Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (not pictured) speaking during their joint news conference in Jerusalem September 3, 2015. Israel will lower corporate and value added taxes (VAT) to help boost economic growth following higher than expected tax collection in recent months, Netanyahu said on Thursday. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
EUROZONE-GREECE
RTX1L0TD
July 20, 2015
A taxi driver waits for customers in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks...
Athens, Greece
A taxi driver waits for customers in central Athens
A taxi driver waits for customers in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks and started the process of paying off billions of euros owed to international creditors on Monday in the first signs of a return to normal after a deal to agree a new package of bailout reforms. Increases in value added tax agreed under the bailout terms also took effect, with VAT on food and public transport jumping to 23 percent from 13 percent. The stock market remained closed until further notice.REUTERS/Yiannis Kourtoglou
EUROZONE-GREECE/
RTX1L0BN
July 20, 2015
An employee prepares a rotisserie to cook a traditional Greek pork-based dish called a "gyros" in central...
Athens, Greece
An employee prepares a rotisserie to cook a traditional Greek pork-based dish called a "gyros" in central...
An employee prepares a rotisserie to cook a traditional Greek pork-based dish called a "gyros" in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks and started the process of paying off billions of euros owed to international creditors on Monday in the first signs of a return to normal after a deal to agree a new package of bailout reforms. Increases in value added tax agreed under the bailout terms also took effect, with VAT on food and public transport jumping to 23 percent from 13 percent. The stock market remained closed until further notice. REUTERS/Yiannis Kourtoglou
EUROZONE-GREECE/
RTX1L0B7
July 20, 2015
Goods for sale are displayed inside a grocery shop in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened...
Athens, Greece
Goods for sale are displayed inside a grocery shop in central Athens
Goods for sale are displayed inside a grocery shop in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks and started the process of paying off billions of euros owed to international creditors on Monday in the first signs of a return to normal after a deal to agree a new package of bailout reforms. Increases in value added tax agreed under the bailout terms also took effect, with VAT on food and public transport jumping to 23 percent from 13 percent. The stock market remained closed until further notice. REUTERS/Yiannis Kourtoglou
EUROZONE-GREECE/
RTX1L0AN
July 20, 2015
A man stands next to Greek national flag at a kiosk in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece...
Athens, Greece
A man stands next to Greek national flag at a kiosk in central Athens
A man stands next to Greek national flag at a kiosk in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks and started the process of paying off billions of euros owed to international creditors on Monday in the first signs of a return to normal after a deal to agree a new package of bailout reforms. Increases in value added tax agreed under the bailout terms also took effect, with VAT on food and public transport jumping to 23 percent from 13 percent. The stock market remained closed until further notice. REUTERS/Yiannis Kourtoglou
EUROZONE-GREECE/
RTX1L0AE
July 20, 2015
People sit outside a coffee shop in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks...
Athens, Greece
People sit outside a coffee shop in central Athens
People sit outside a coffee shop in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks and started the process of paying off billions of euros owed to international creditors on Monday in the first signs of a return to normal after a deal to agree a new package of bailout reforms. Increases in value added tax agreed under the bailout terms also took effect, with VAT on food and public transport jumping to 23 percent from 13 percent. The stock market remained closed until further notice. REUTERS/Yiannis Kourtoglou
EUROZONE-GREECE/
RTX1L0A6
July 20, 2015
A fishmonger waits for customers in a local market in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened...
Athens, Greece
A fishmonger waits for customers in a local market in central Athens
A fishmonger waits for customers in a local market in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks and started the process of paying off billions of euros owed to international creditors on Monday in the first signs of a return to normal after a deal to agree a new package of bailout reforms. Increases in value added tax agreed under the bailout terms also took effect, with VAT on food and public transport jumping to 23 percent from 13 percent. The stock market remained closed until further notice. REUTERS/Yiannis Kourtoglou
EUROZONE-GREECE/
RTX1L0A3
July 20, 2015
A man exits a butcher shop at the main food market in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened...
Athens, Greece
A man exits a butcher shop at the main food market in central Athens
A man exits a butcher shop at the main food market in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks and started the process of paying off billions of euros owed to international creditors on Monday in the first signs of a return to normal after a deal to agree a new package of bailout reforms. Increases in value added tax agreed under the bailout terms also took effect, with VAT on food and public transport jumping to 23 percent from 13 percent. The stock market remained closed until further notice. REUTERS/Yiannis Kourtoglou TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
EUROZONE-GREECE/
RTX1L082
July 20, 2015
A woman sits in a bus in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks and started...
Athens, Greece
A woman sits in a bus in central Athens, Greece
A woman sits in a bus in central Athens, Greece, July 20, 2015. Greece reopened its banks and started the process of paying off billions of euros owed to international creditors on Monday in the first signs of a return to normal after a deal to agree a new package of bailout reforms. Increases in value added tax agreed under the bailout terms also took effect, with VAT on food and public transport jumping to 23 percent from 13 percent. The stock market remained closed until further notice. REUTERS/Yiannis Kourtoglou
EUROZONE-GREECE/DEAL
RTX19SXQ
April 22, 2015
A Greek national flag flutters atop Lycabetus hill in Athens, April 22, 2015. Greece will continue to...
Athens, Greece
Greek national flag flutters atop Lycabetus hill in Athens
A Greek national flag flutters atop Lycabetus hill in Athens, April 22, 2015. Greece will continue to reject creditors' demands for pension cuts and a hike in the value-added-tax (VAT) on islands frequented by tourists, State Minister Nikos Pappas said on Wednesday, in a setback for hopes that a deal could be struck soon. REUTERS/Kostas Tsironis
EUROZONE-GREECE/DEAL
RTX19SWR
April 22, 2015
A pedestrian counts money as he walks past shopping bags hanging for sale by a street vendor in Athens,...
Athens, Greece
Pedestrian counts money as he walks past shopping bags hanging for sale by a street vendor in Athens
A pedestrian counts money as he walks past shopping bags hanging for sale by a street vendor in Athens, April 22, 2015. Greece will continue to reject creditors' demands for pension cuts and a hike in the value-added-tax (VAT) on islands frequented by tourists, State Minister Nikos Pappas said on Wednesday, in a setback for hopes that a deal could be struck soon. REUTERS/Kostas Tsironis
EUROZONE-GREECE/DEAL
RTX19SN2
April 22, 2015
A tourist takes pictures as a Greek national flag flutters above the Orthodox church of Saint George,...
Athens, Greece
Tourist takes pictures as a Greek national flag flutters above the Orthodox church of Saint George, atop...
A tourist takes pictures as a Greek national flag flutters above the Orthodox church of Saint George, atop Lycabetus hill in Athens, April 22, 2015. Greece will continue to reject creditors' demands for pension cuts and a hike in the value-added-tax (VAT) on islands frequented by tourists, State Minister Nikos Pappas said on Wednesday, in a setback for hopes that a deal could be struck soon. REUTERS/Kostas Tsironis
EUROZONE-GREECE/DEAL
RTX19SM2
April 22, 2015
A pedestrian carrying shopping bags walks in Athens, April 22, 2015. Greece will continue to reject...
Athens, Greece
Pedestrian carrying shopping bags walks in Athens
A pedestrian carrying shopping bags walks in Athens, April 22, 2015. Greece will continue to reject creditors' demands for pension cuts and a hike in the value-added-tax (VAT) on islands frequented by tourists, State Minister Nikos Pappas said on Wednesday, in a setback for hopes that a deal could be struck soon. REUTERS/Kostas Tsironis
ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY
RTR4IUX3
December 21, 2014
"Milky" pudding are seen on shelves in a supermarket in the town of Sderot near the Israeli-Gaza border...
NIR OZ, Israel
"Milky" pudding are seen on shelves in a supermarket in Sderot
"Milky" pudding are seen on shelves in a supermarket in the town of Sderot near the Israeli-Gaza border in southern Israel December 18, 2014. Israel's high cost of living is set to dominate a March 17 election that could shake up Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition, with voter anger symbolised by an overpriced dessert. In a country where the influence of small parties makes elections notoriously hard to forecast, many experts still expect rightwing leader Netanyahu to keep power. But the focus on domestic policy and economics, rather than on security and Palestinian peacemaking, means the outcome is even more difficult to predict than usual. Netanyahu is making the economy a central theme. On December 21 he proposed raising the minimum wage for civil servants and marketing more lower cost apartments. He has promised to lift the 18 percent value added tax on milk, cheese, eggs and bread. To match Analysis ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Amir Cohen (ISRAEL - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS BUSINESS FOOD)
ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY
RTR4IUWJ
December 21, 2014
Cows walk to be milked at a dairy in the kibbutz of Nir Oz, near the Israeli-Gaza border in southern...
NIR OZ, Israel
Cows walk to be milked at a dairy in Nir Oz
Cows walk to be milked at a dairy in the kibbutz of Nir Oz, near the Israeli-Gaza border in southern Israel December 18, 2014. Israel's high cost of living is set to dominate a March 17 election that could shake up Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition, with voter anger symbolised by an overpriced dessert. In a country where the influence of small parties makes elections notoriously hard to forecast, many experts still expect rightwing leader Netanyahu to keep power. But the focus on domestic policy and economics, rather than on security and Palestinian peacemaking, means the outcome is even more difficult to predict than usual. Netanyahu is making the economy a central theme. On December 21 he proposed raising the minimum wage for civil servants and marketing more lower cost apartments. He has promised to lift the 18 percent value added tax on milk, cheese, eggs and bread. To match Analysis ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Amir Cohen (ISRAEL - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS BUSINESS FOOD)
ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY
RTR4IUWE
December 21, 2014
Worker work in a dairy in the kibbutz of Nir Oz, near the Israeli-Gaza border in southern Israel December...
NIR OZ, Israel
Workers work in a dairy in Nir Oz
Worker work in a dairy in the kibbutz of Nir Oz, near the Israeli-Gaza border in southern Israel December 18, 2014. Israel's high cost of living is set to dominate a March 17 election that could shake up Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition, with voter anger symbolised by an overpriced dessert. In a country where the influence of small parties makes elections notoriously hard to forecast, many experts still expect rightwing leader Netanyahu to keep power. But the focus on domestic policy and economics, rather than on security and Palestinian peacemaking, means the outcome is even more difficult to predict than usual. Netanyahu is making the economy a central theme. On December 21 he proposed raising the minimum wage for civil servants and marketing more lower cost apartments. He has promised to lift the 18 percent value added tax on milk, cheese, eggs and bread. To match Analysis ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Amir Cohen (ISRAEL - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS BUSINESS FOOD)
ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY
RTR4IUW7
December 21, 2014
A worker works next to cows at a dairy in the kibbutz of Nir Oz, near the Israeli-Gaza border in southern...
NIR OZ, Israel
A worker works next to cows at a dairy in Nir Oz
A worker works next to cows at a dairy in the kibbutz of Nir Oz, near the Israeli-Gaza border in southern Israel December 18, 2014. Israel's high cost of living is set to dominate a March 17 election that could shake up Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition, with voter anger symbolised by an overpriced dessert. In a country where the influence of small parties makes elections notoriously hard to forecast, many experts still expect rightwing leader Netanyahu to keep power. But the focus on domestic policy and economics, rather than on security and Palestinian peacemaking, means the outcome is even more difficult to predict than usual. Netanyahu is making the economy a central theme. On December 21 he proposed raising the minimum wage for civil servants and marketing more lower cost apartments. He has promised to lift the 18 percent value added tax on milk, cheese, eggs and bread. To match Analysis ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Amir Cohen (ISRAEL - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS BUSINESS FOOD)
ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY
RTR4IUVO
December 21, 2014
Cows are milked at a dairy in the kibbutz of Nir Oz, near the Israeli-Gaza border in southern Israel...
NIR OZ, Israel
Cows are milked at a dairy in Nir Oz
Cows are milked at a dairy in the kibbutz of Nir Oz, near the Israeli-Gaza border in southern Israel December 18, 2014. Israel's high cost of living is set to dominate a March 17 election that could shake up Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition, with voter anger symbolised by an overpriced dessert. In a country where the influence of small parties makes elections notoriously hard to forecast, many experts still expect rightwing leader Netanyahu to keep power. But the focus on domestic policy and economics, rather than on security and Palestinian peacemaking, means the outcome is even more difficult to predict than usual. Netanyahu is making the economy a central theme. On December 21 he proposed raising the minimum wage for civil servants and marketing more lower cost apartments. He has promised to lift the 18 percent value added tax on milk, cheese, eggs and bread. To match Analysis ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Amir Cohen (ISRAEL - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS BUSINESS FOOD)
ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY
RTR4IUUY
December 21, 2014
Loaves of bread are displayed for sale at a bakery in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon December...
Ashkelon, Israel
Loaves of bread are displayed for sale at a bakery in Ashkelon
Loaves of bread are displayed for sale at a bakery in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon December 18, 2014. Israel's high cost of living is set to dominate a March 17 election that could shake up Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition, with voter anger symbolised by an overpriced dessert. In a country where the influence of small parties makes elections notoriously hard to forecast, many experts still expect rightwing leader Netanyahu to keep power. But the focus on domestic policy and economics, rather than on security and Palestinian peacemaking, means the outcome is even more difficult to predict than usual. Netanyahu is making the economy a central theme. On December 21 he proposed raising the minimum wage for civil servants and marketing more lower cost apartments. He has promised to lift the 18 percent value added tax on milk, cheese, eggs and bread. To match Analysis ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Amir Cohen (ISRAEL - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS BUSINESS FOOD)
ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY
RTR4IUUQ
December 21, 2014
A customer checks loaves of bread at a bakery in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon December 18, 2014....
Ashkelon, Israel
A customer checks loaves of bread at a bakery in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon
A customer checks loaves of bread at a bakery in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon December 18, 2014. Israel's high cost of living is set to dominate a March 17 election that could shake up Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition, with voter anger symbolised by an overpriced dessert. In a country where the influence of small parties makes elections notoriously hard to forecast, many experts still expect rightwing leader Netanyahu to keep power. But the focus on domestic policy and economics, rather than on security and Palestinian peacemaking, means the outcome is even more difficult to predict than usual. Netanyahu is making the economy a central theme. On December 21 he proposed raising the minimum wage for civil servants and marketing more lower cost apartments. He has promised to lift the 18 percent value added tax on milk, cheese, eggs and bread. To match Analysis ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Amir Cohen (ISRAEL - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS BUSINESS FOOD)
ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY
RTR4IUUC
December 21, 2014
A customer checks loaves of bread at a bakery in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon December 18, 2014....
Ashkelon, Israel
A customer checks loaves of bread at a bakery in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon
A customer checks loaves of bread at a bakery in the southern Israeli city of Ashkelon December 18, 2014. Israel's high cost of living is set to dominate a March 17 election that could shake up Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition, with voter anger symbolised by an overpriced dessert. In a country where the influence of small parties makes elections notoriously hard to forecast, many experts still expect rightwing leader Netanyahu to keep power. But the focus on domestic policy and economics, rather than on security and Palestinian peacemaking, means the outcome is even more difficult to predict than usual. Netanyahu is making the economy a central theme. On December 21 he proposed raising the minimum wage for civil servants and marketing more lower cost apartments. He has promised to lift the 18 percent value added tax on milk, cheese, eggs and bread. To match Analysis ISRAEL-ELECTION/ECONOMY Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Amir Cohen (ISRAEL - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS BUSINESS FOOD)
SRI LANKA-BUDGET/
RTR4BGKJ
October 24, 2014
A man holds his bag on his head as he walks through a market in Colombo October 24, 2014. Sri Lankan...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
A man holds his bag on his head as he walks through a market in Colombo
A man holds his bag on his head as he walks through a market in Colombo October 24, 2014. Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa, who is expected to soon seek a third six-year term, announced a 2015 budget on Friday that trims the value-added tax and reduces the budget deficit while providing a range of handouts, mainly to rural residents. The president also announced that employers' contribution to employees' provident funds will be raised to 14 percent of pay, from the current 12 percent, which would raise labour costs for the private sector. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POLITICS)
SRI LANKA-BUDGET/
RTR4BGKD
October 24, 2014
A man sleeps next to railway tracks on a side of a road in Colombo October 24, 2014. Sri Lankan President...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
A man sleeps next to railway tracks on a side of a road in Colombo
A man sleeps next to railway tracks on a side of a road in Colombo October 24, 2014. Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa, who is expected to soon seek a third six-year term, announced a 2015 budget on Friday that trims the value-added tax and reduces the budget deficit while providing a range of handouts, mainly to rural residents. The president also announced that employers' contribution to employees' provident funds will be raised to 14 percent of pay, from the current 12 percent, which would raise labour costs for the private sector. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POLITICS)
SRI LANKA-BUDGET/
RTR4BGJT
October 24, 2014
A man crosses a main road after work in Colombo October 24, 2014. Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa,...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
A man crosses a main road after work in Colombo
A man crosses a main road after work in Colombo October 24, 2014. Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa, who is expected to soon seek a third six-year term, announced a 2015 budget on Friday that trims the value-added tax and reduces the budget deficit while providing a range of handouts, mainly to rural residents. The president also announced that employers' contribution to employees' provident funds will be raised to 14 percent of pay, from the current 12 percent, which would raise labour costs for the private sector. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY POLITICS)
SINGAPORE-ECONOMY/
RTR47QMW
September 26, 2014
Broadcom's Asia operations headquarters office is seen at an industrial park in Singapore September 16,...
Singapore, Singapore
Broadcom's Asia operations headquarters office is seen at an industrial park in Singapore
Broadcom's Asia operations headquarters office is seen at an industrial park in Singapore September 16, 2014. As Singapore's prosperity leaves its manufacturing base vulnerable to cheaper neighbours, it is banking on a business-friendly environment, advanced infrastructure, and its status as an Asian hub to attract high-value investments and businesses. But the transition, which is getting added impetus from the government's push to increase the economy's productivity while reducing reliance on foreign workers, will not be smooth or immediate. In March, U.S. semiconductor company Broadcom shifted some of its operations from Singapore to Ireland as its tax incentives in the Southeast Asia nation expired. Asked about the move, Jennifer Baumgartner, a senior manager for corporate communications at Broadcom, said in an email that "Singapore remains an essential Broadcom location and we are not materially changing any production". Picture taken September 16. REUTERS/Edgar Su (SINGAPORE - Tags: BUSINESS)
SINGAPORE-ECONOMY/
RTR47QMT
September 26, 2014
A man passes Broadcom's Asia operations headquarters office at an industrial park in Singapore September...
Singapore, Singapore
Man passes Broadcom's Asia operations headquarters office at an industrial park in Singapore
A man passes Broadcom's Asia operations headquarters office at an industrial park in Singapore September 16, 2014. As Singapore's prosperity leaves its manufacturing base vulnerable to cheaper neighbours, it is banking on a business-friendly environment, advanced infrastructure, and its status as an Asian hub to attract high-value investments and businesses. But the transition, which is getting added impetus from the government's push to increase the economy's productivity while reducing reliance on foreign workers, will not be smooth or immediate. In March, U.S. semiconductor company Broadcom shifted some of its operations from Singapore to Ireland as its tax incentives in the Southeast Asia nation expired. Picture taken September 16. REUTERS/Edgar Su (SINGAPORE - Tags: BUSINESS)
ROMANIA-ECONOMY/INTERVIEW
RTR3K9OV
April 07, 2014
Romania's Finance Minister Ioana Petrescu gestures during an interview with Reuters in Bucharest April...
Bucharest, Romania
Romania's Finance Minister Petrescu gestures during an interview with Reuters in Bucharest
Romania's Finance Minister Ioana Petrescu gestures during an interview with Reuters in Bucharest April 7, 2014. Romania will scrap the tax on profits that companies reinvest in the country and cut some other levies to help create jobs and secure economic growth of around 3 percent this year, the finance minister said on Monday. The government will also reduce firms' social security payments by 5 percentage points, slash value-added tax on certain foods and, once it can afford to, introduce a lower income tax rate for low earners, Petrescu told Reuters in an interview. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: BUSINESS)
ROMANIA-ECONOMY/INTERVIEW
RTR3K9OB
April 07, 2014
Romania's Finance Minister Ioana Petrescu gestures during an interview with Reuters in Bucharest April...
Bucharest, Romania
Romania's Finance Minister Petrescu gestures during an interview with Reuters in Bucharest
Romania's Finance Minister Ioana Petrescu gestures during an interview with Reuters in Bucharest April 7, 2014. Romania will scrap the tax on profits that companies reinvest in the country and cut some other levies to help create jobs and secure economic growth of around 3 percent this year, the finance minister said on Monday. The government will also reduce firms' social security payments by 5 percentage points, slash value-added tax on certain foods and, once it can afford to, introduce a lower income tax rate for low earners, Petrescu told Reuters in an interview. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: BUSINESS)
ROMANIA-ECONOMY/INTERVIEW
RTR3K9O6
April 07, 2014
Romania's Finance Minister Ioana Petrescu gestures during an interview with Reuters in Bucharest April...
Bucharest, Romania
Romania's Finance Minister Petrescu gestures during an interview with Reuters in Bucharest
Romania's Finance Minister Ioana Petrescu gestures during an interview with Reuters in Bucharest April 7, 2014. Romania will scrap the tax on profits that companies reinvest in the country and cut some other levies to help create jobs and secure economic growth of around 3 percent this year, the finance minister said on Monday. The government will also reduce firms' social security payments by 5 percentage points, slash value-added tax on certain foods and, once it can afford to, introduce a lower income tax rate for low earners, Petrescu told Reuters in an interview. REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZR2
December 01, 2013
A man walks his dog with a message which reads, "Higher VAT, fewer purchases, increased recession" as...
Paris, France
People attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" to attack the next increase in the value...
A man walks his dog with a message which reads, "Higher VAT, fewer purchases, increased recession" as several thousand people attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" in particular attacking the next increase in the value added tax (VAT) in Paris December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZQS
December 01, 2013
Jean-Luc Melenchon (2ndR), the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), and politician Clementine...
Paris, France
Jean-Luc Melenchon, the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), attends a protest demonstration...
Jean-Luc Melenchon (2ndR), the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), and politician Clementine Autain (3rdL) attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" in particular attacking the next increase in the value added tax (VAT) in Paris December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZQQ
December 01, 2013
A man holds a sign which reads, "For a Tax Revoluation" as several thousand people attend a protest demonstration...
Paris, France
People attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" to attack the next increase in the value...
A man holds a sign which reads, "For a Tax Revoluation" as several thousand people attend a protest demonstration attacking the next increase in the value added tax (VAT) in Paris December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Gonazalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZPR
December 01, 2013
A man holds a sign which reads, "Tax Revoluation" as several thousand people attend a protest demonstration...
Paris, France
People attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" to attack the next increase in the value...
A man holds a sign which reads, "Tax Revoluation" as several thousand people attend a protest demonstration attacking the next increase in the value added tax (VAT) in Paris December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZPM
December 01, 2013
A man holds a sign which reads, "tax capital" as several thousand people attend a protest demonstration...
Paris, France
People attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" to attack the next increase in the value...
A man holds a sign which reads, "tax capital" as several thousand people attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" in particular attacking the next increase in the value added tax (VAT) in Paris December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZPD
December 01, 2013
Several thousand people attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" in particular attacking...
Paris, France
Several thousand people attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" in particular attacking...
Several thousand people attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" in particular attacking the next increase in the value added tax (VAT) in Paris December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZP6
December 01, 2013
Jean-Luc Melenchon (C), the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), and politician Clementine...
Paris, France
Jean-Luc Melenchon, the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), attends a protest demonstration...
Jean-Luc Melenchon (C), the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), and politician Clementine Autain (L) attend a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" in particular attacking the next increase in the value added tax (VAT) in Paris December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZP5
December 01, 2013
Jean-Luc Melenchon, the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), attends a protest demonstration...
Paris, France
Jean-Luc Melenchon, the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), attends a protest demonstration...
Jean-Luc Melenchon, the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), attends a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" in particular attacking the next increase in the value added tax (VAT) in Paris December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZP4
December 01, 2013
Jean-Luc Melenchon (C), the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), attends a protest demonstration...
Paris, France
Jean-Luc Melenchon, the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), attends a protest demonstration...
Jean-Luc Melenchon (C), the leader of the French far-left Parti de Gauche (PG), attends a protest demonstration for a "tax revolution" in particular attacking the next increase in the value added tax (VAT) in Paris December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZOW
December 01, 2013
People demonstrate against a government's bill to increase the Valued-Added Tax (VAT) for equestrian...
Nice, France
People demonstrate against a government's bill to increase the Valued-Added Tax (VAT) for equestrian...
People demonstrate against a government's bill to increase the Valued-Added Tax (VAT) for equestrian centers from 7 to 20 per cent, on the Promenade Des Anglais in Nice December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ANIMALS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZOR
December 01, 2013
People demonstrate against a government's bill to increase the Valued-Added Tax (VAT) for equestrian...
Nice, France
People demonstrate against a government's bill to increase the Valued-Added Tax (VAT) for equestrian...
People demonstrate against a government's bill to increase the Valued-Added Tax (VAT) for equestrian centers from 7 to 20 per cent, on the Promenade Des Anglais in Nice December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ANIMALS)
FRANCE/
RTX15ZOO
December 01, 2013
People demonstrate against a government's bill to increase the Valued-Added Tax (VAT) for equestrian...
Nice, France
People demonstrate against a government's bill to increase the Valued-Added Tax (VAT) for equestrian...
People demonstrate against a government's bill to increase the Valued-Added Tax (VAT) for equestrian centers from 7 to 20 per cent, on the Promenade Des Anglais in Nice December 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS ANIMALS)
Sort by
Display
Items per page
Page
of 9