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Search results for: Vein

VENEZUELA-MALNUTRITION/
RTS2VF0B
December 18, 2019
Gregoria Hernandez feeds pasta and rice for lunch to her daughter Sonia, who was hospitalised a couple...
Barquisimeto, Venezuela
The Wider Image: Malnutrition curses the children of Venezuela
Gregoria Hernandez feeds pasta and rice for lunch to her daughter Sonia, who was hospitalised a couple of months ago for malnutrition, at their house in Barquisimeto, Venezuela, November 28, 2019. When Sonia's vital signs began slipping, Hernandez boarded an ambulance where medics struggled to find a vein in Sonia's emaciated body to intravenously hydrate her. "I thought she was going to die in that ambulance," said Hernandez. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins SEARCH "VENEZUELA MALNUTRITION" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
SPAIN-CULTURE/BULLS
RTS2LYEG
July 12, 2019
Javier San Miguel, 56, who has been running with the bulls for 27 years, poses on the street at the San...
Pamplona, Spain
Javier San Miguel, 56, poses on the street at the San Fermin festival in Pamplona
Javier San Miguel, 56, who has been running with the bulls for 27 years, poses on the street at the San Fermin festival in Pamplona, Spain, July 12, 2019. "Running with the bulls is an unforgettable experience. I'm getting older and it's becoming harder because they are more crowded now and the animals are faster and better prepared. I know one day I'll have to give it up, but I still feel it in my veins," San Miguel says. REUTERS/Jon Nazca
USA-COAL/BLACKLUNG
RTX674F3
June 01, 2018
Binders and boxes store the large database of black lung cases and histories gathered by Dr. Brandon...
PIKEVILLE, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Coal lobby fights black-lung tax as disease rates surge
Binders and boxes store the large database of black lung cases and histories gathered by Dr. Brandon Crum at United Medical Group in Pikeville, Kentucky, U.S., May 22, 2018. Dr. Crum, a fourth generation coal miner whose family members still mine coal, is the radiologist who first noticed the massive number of x-rays of complicated black lung in the region and his black lung disease database tracks variables such as which vein miners worked, and the type of job they did. REUTERS/Brian Snyder SEARCH "BLACK LUNG" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
INDIA-PAKISTAN/
RTS14SG4
May 02, 2017
People carry a coffin containing the body of Paramjit Singh, an Indian army soldier who the Indian army...
VEIN POIN, India
People carry a coffin containing the body of Paramjit Singh, an Indian army soldier who the Indian army...
People carry a coffin containing the body of Paramjit Singh, an Indian army soldier who the Indian army says was killed by Pakistani soldiers while patrolling the de facto border in the disputed Kashmir region on Monday, before his cremation in the village of Vein Poin on the outskirts of Amritsar, India May 2, 2017. REUTERS/Munish Sharma
INDIA-PAKISTAN/
RTS14SG3
May 02, 2017
Relatives console the wife (C) of Paramjit Singh, an Indian army soldier who the Indian army says was...
VEIN POIN, India
Relatives console the wife of Paramjit Singh as her husband's body is taken away for cremation in the...
Relatives console the wife (C) of Paramjit Singh, an Indian army soldier who the Indian army says was killed by Pakistani soldiers while patrolling the de facto border in the disputed Kashmir region on Monday, as her husband's body is taken away for cremation in the village of Vein Poin on the outskirts of Amritsar, India May 2, 2017. REUTERS/Munish Sharma
INDIA-PAKISTAN/
RTS14SEI
May 02, 2017
A relative touches the coffin of Paramjit Singh, an Indian army soldier who the Indian army says was...
VEIN POIN, India
A relative touches the coffin of Paramjit Singh, an Indian army soldier who the Indian army says was...
A relative touches the coffin of Paramjit Singh, an Indian army soldier who the Indian army says was killed by Pakistani soldiers while patrolling the de facto border in the disputed Kashmir region on Monday, in the village of Vein Poin on the outskirts of Amritsar, India May 2, 2017. REUTERS/Munish Sharma
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/SCIOLI
RTR4XBGP
April 14, 2015
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner shakes hands with Buenos Aires' province Governor...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Argentina's President de Kirchner shakes hands with Buenos Aires' province Governor Scioli as Economy...
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner shakes hands with Buenos Aires' province Governor Daniel Scioli (C) as Economy Minister Axel Kicillof watches during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires September 30, 2014. Scioli, the front-running candidate for the ruling party ticket in Argentina's presidential election, has a new buzz word: "gradualismo", or "gradual change". It is hardly a slogan to set the campaign trail ablaze ahead of the October 25, 2015 election. Instead it illustrates the tightrope act he needs to pull off as he tries to win the support of outgoing leftist President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner's loyalists while tapping a rich vein of undecided voters demanding change. Picture taken September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/SCIOLI
RTR4XBF7
April 14, 2015
Daniel Scioli (R), governor of the Argentine province of Buenos Aires stands by Argentine President Fernandez...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Scioli governor of the Argentine province of Buenos Aires stands by Argentine President Fernandez in...
Daniel Scioli (R), governor of the Argentine province of Buenos Aires stands by Argentine President Fernandez de Kirchner at the Casa Rosada Government House in Buenos Aires, February 11, 2015. Scioli, the front-running candidate for the ruling party ticket in Argentina's presidential election, has a new buzz word: "gradualismo", or "gradual change". It is hardly a slogan to set the campaign trail ablaze ahead of the October 25, 2015 election. Instead it illustrates the tightrope act he needs to pull off as he tries to win the support of outgoing leftist President Fernandez's loyalists while tapping a rich vein of undecided voters demanding change. Picture taken February 11, 2015. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian
ARGENTINA-ELECTION/SCIOLI
RTR4XBEY
April 14, 2015
Buenos Aires' province governor Daniel Scioli gestures during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential...
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Buenos Aires' province governor Scioli gestures during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace...
Buenos Aires' province governor Daniel Scioli gestures during a ceremony at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires September 30, 2014. Scioli, the front-running candidate for the ruling party ticket in Argentina's presidential election, has a new buzz word: "gradualismo", or "gradual change". It is hardly a slogan to set the campaign trail ablaze ahead of the October 25, 2015 election. Instead it illustrates the tightrope act he needs to pull off as he tries to win the support of outgoing leftist President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner's loyalists while tapping a rich vein of undecided voters demanding change. Picture taken September 30, 2014.
REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS
RTR49NL9
October 10, 2014
Fans watch as Ferencvaros plays against Szombathely in their Hungarian first division soccer match, at...
Budapest, Hungary
Fans watch as Ferencvaros plays against Szombathely in their Hungarian first division soccer match, at...
Fans watch as Ferencvaros plays against Szombathely in their Hungarian first division soccer match, at Ferencvaros' brand new stadium, where a palm vein identification entry system has been launched, in Budapest, September 28, 2014. A Hungarian invention, the scanner identifies a fan based on five million palm vein data points. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. Still, the scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 28, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT SOCCER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS
RTR49NL6
October 10, 2014
A fan of Ferencvaros shouts slogans as they play against Szombathely in a Hungarian first division soccer...
Budapest, Hungary
Fan of Ferencvaros shouts slogans as they play against Szombathely in a Hungarian first division soccer...
A fan of Ferencvaros shouts slogans as they play against Szombathely in a Hungarian first division soccer match, at their brand new stadium, where a palm vein identification entry system has been launched, in Budapest, September 28, 2014. A Hungarian invention, the scanner identifies a fan based on five million palm vein data points. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. Still, the scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 28, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT SOCCER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS
RTR49NKU
October 10, 2014
Fans watch as Ferencvaros (in stripes) plays against Szombathely in their Hungarian first division soccer...
Budapest, Hungary
Fans watch as Ferencvaros plays against Szombathely in their Hungarian first division soccer match, at...
Fans watch as Ferencvaros (in stripes) plays against Szombathely in their Hungarian first division soccer match, at Ferencvaros' brand new stadium where a palm vein identification entry system has been launched, in Budapest, September 28, 2014. A Hungarian invention, the scanner identifies a fan based on five million palm vein data points. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. Still, the scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 29=8, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT SOCCER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
HUNGARY-VEINSCANNER
RTR49NJI
October 10, 2014
Fans watch as Ferencvaros plays against Szombathely in their Hungarian first division soccer match, at...
Budapest, Hungary
Fans watch as Ferencvaros plays against Szombathely in their Hungarian first division soccer match, at...
Fans watch as Ferencvaros plays against Szombathely in their Hungarian first division soccer match, at Ferencvaros' brand new stadium where a palm vein identification entry system has been launched, in Budapest, September 28, 2014. A Hungarian invention, the scanner identifies a fan based on five million palm vein data points. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. Still, the scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 29=8, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT SOCCER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS
RTR49NIR
October 10, 2014
A fan of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros plays a drum during a demonstration at the club's brand new...
Budapest, Hungary
Fan of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros plays a drum during a demonstration at the club's brand new...
A fan of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros plays a drum during a demonstration at the club's brand new stadium against a new entry system based on palm vein scanners in Budapest, September 21, 2014. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. The scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 21, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT CIVIL UNREST SOCCER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS
RTR49NIA
October 10, 2014
Fans of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros demonstrate at the club's brand new stadium against a new entry...
Budapest, Hungary
Fans of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros demonstrate at the club's brand new stadium against a new entry...
Fans of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros demonstrate at the club's brand new stadium against a new entry system based on palm vein scanners in Budapest, September 21, 2014. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. The scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 21, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT CIVIL UNREST SOCCER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS
RTR49NHY
October 10, 2014
A fan of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros prepares to enter the stadium for a home match using the new...
Budapest, Hungary
Fan of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros prepares to enter the stadium for a home match using the new...
A fan of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros prepares to enter the stadium for a home match using the new palm vein identification system in Budapest, September 14, 2014. A Hungarian invention, the scanner identifies a fan based on five million palm vein data points. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. Still, the scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 14, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS
RTR49NGT
October 10, 2014
A Ferencvaros soccer fan has his palm registered in the biometric identification system used for entry...
Budapest, Hungary
Ferencvaros soccer fan has his palm registered in the biometric identification system used for entry...
A Ferencvaros soccer fan has his palm registered in the biometric identification system used for entry into the team's home stadium, in Budapest, September 28, 2014. A Hungarian invention, the scanner identifies a fan based on five million palm vein data points. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. Still, the scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 28, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT SOCCER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS
RTR49NG7
October 10, 2014
Security guards stand at one of the main gates of the brand new stadium of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros,...
Budapest, Hungary
Security guards stand at one of the main gates of the brand new stadium of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros,...
Security guards stand at one of the main gates of the brand new stadium of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros, where a palm vein identification entry system has been launched, in Budapest, September 14, 2014. A Hungarian invention, the scanner identifies a fan based on five million palm vein data points. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. Still, the scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 14, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT SOCCER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS
RTR49NF8
October 10, 2014
Fans of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros demonstrate at the club's brand new stadium against a new entry...
Budapest, Hungary
Fans of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros demonstrate at the club's brand new stadium against a new entry...
Fans of Hungarian soccer club Ferencvaros demonstrate at the club's brand new stadium against a new entry system based on palm vein scanners in Budapest, September 21, 2014. The developers say this is the fastest existing system for the safe identification of big crowds at sports and other events. The scanner was the last straw for the hard core of Fradi fans who had been upset anyway by the introduction of club cards, a rise in ticket prices and ever stricter regulations of the behaviour of soccer fans in and around the stadium. Picture taken September 21, 2014. To match Feature SOCCER-HUNGARY/BIOMETRICS REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo (HUNGARY - Tags: SPORT CIVIL UNREST SOCCER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
CHINA/
RTR3G5A2
March 07, 2014
A student presses down on the wrist vein of her fellow student, which halts the blood flow into the hand,...
Zhengzhou, China
A student presses down on the wrist vein of her fellow student as she practises hand massage during a...
A student presses down on the wrist vein of her fellow student, which halts the blood flow into the hand, as she practises hand massage during a training course at Huaxia Liangtse Massage Training Centre, in Zhengzhou, Henan province February 18, 2014. Huaxia Liangtse was established 17 years ago in Jinan, capital of China's Shandong province. It now has over 300 branches in China and has also opened outlets abroad. A training centre for the company in Henan has trained well over a thousand foot massage students and the number is growing year by year. Picture taken February 18, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY HEALTH BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 03 OF 24 FOR PACKAGE 'TRAINEE MASSEUSE - MAKING IT IN CHINA'
TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'HUAXIA LIANGTSE'
CES/
RTX176ZT
January 09, 2014
A woman registers her palm on a PulseWallet, a point-of-purchase device, during the 2014 International...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
A woman registers her palm on a PulseWallet, a point-of-purchase device, during the 2014 International...
A woman registers her palm on a PulseWallet, a point-of-purchase device, during the 2014 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 8, 2014. The system measures vein patterns in the palm. After confirming a person's identity, the purchase can be paid with a "digital wallet" linked to a credit card, debit card, a bank account or even paid in bit coins. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
AUSTRALIA/
RTX161J4
December 02, 2013
A general view of dried-up rivers in the Pilbara region of Western Australia December 2, 2013. Western...
PORT HEADLAND, Australia
A general view of dried-up rivers in the Pilbara region of Western Australia
A general view of dried-up rivers in the Pilbara region of Western Australia December 2, 2013. Western Australia's Pilbara region, which is the size of Spain, has the world's largest known deposits of iron ore and supplies nearly 45 percent of global trade in the mineral. Picture taken December 2. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
USA/
RTX15511
November 08, 2013
Screenwriter Barbara Stepansky, winner of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Nicholl Fellowships...
Beverly Hills, UNITED STATES
Barbara Stepansky, winner of Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting...
Screenwriter Barbara Stepansky, winner of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting for her screenplay titled "Sugar in My Veins", poses during ceremonies in Beverly Hills November 7, 2013. The Nicholl Fellowships is an international screenwriting competition established to identify and encourage talented new screenwriters. REUTERS/Fred Prouser (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT)
CHINA-CHRISTIES/
RTX140E8
September 26, 2013
A Christie's moderator facilitates the sale of a piece of art titled "Clothes Veins Study Series" by...
Shanghai, China
A Christie's moderator facilitates the sale of a piece of art titled "Clothes Veins Study Series" by...
A Christie's moderator facilitates the sale of a piece of art titled "Clothes Veins Study Series" by Sui Jianguo during a Christie's auction in Shanghai September 26, 2013. Christie's holds its first sale in China to test the appetite of mainland collectors for artworks from the West. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CES/
RTR3C9CP
January 09, 2013
A PulseWallet system is demonstrated during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January...
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES
A PulseWallet system is demonstrated during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas
A PulseWallet system is demonstrated during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas January 9, 2013. The device identifies registered users by unique finger vein patterns. The user's account is registered to a bank account or credit card to make purchases. The system is not currently in operation in stores. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
USA-CLINTON/
RTR3C26I
January 02, 2013
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leaves New York Presbyterian Hospital with husband, Bill (top...
New York, UNITED STATES
U.S. Secretary of State Clinton leaves New York Presbyterian Hospital with husband, Bill and daughter,...
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leaves New York Presbyterian Hospital with husband, Bill (top R), and daughter, Chelsea (R), in New York, January 2, 2013. The secretary of state, who has not been seen in public since Dec. 7, briefly left New York-Presbyterian hospital on Wednesday, only to return about 15 minutes later, the New York Daily News reported. The State Department declined to comment on where Clinton may have gone or the status of her hospital stay. She was admitted for treatment of a blood clot in a vein behind her right ear. REUTERS/Joshua Lott (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
USA-CLINTON-HEALTH/
RTR3C1C3
January 01, 2013
Members of the Secret Service stand outside the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health Center at the...
New York, UNITED STATES
Members of the Secret Service stand outside the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health Center at the...
Members of the Secret Service stand outside the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health Center at the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remains hospitalized in New York, January 1, 2013. Clinton suffered a blood clot in a vein between her brain and skull behind her right ear but is expected to make a full recovery, her doctors said on Monday in a statement released by the State Department. REUTERS/Joshua Lott (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
USA-CLINTON-HEALTH
RTR3C1C1
January 01, 2013
A member of the Secret Service stands at the entrance of the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health...
New York, UNITED STATES
A member of the Secret Service stands at the entrance of the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health...
A member of the Secret Service stands at the entrance of the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health Center at the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remains hospitalized in New York, January 1, 2013. Clinton suffered a blood clot in a vein between her brain and skull behind her right ear but is expected to make a full recovery, her doctors said on Monday in a statement released by the State Department. REUTERS/Joshua Lott (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
USA-CLINTON-HEALTH/
RTR3C1BY
January 01, 2013
Members of the Secret Service stand outside the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health Center at the...
New York, UNITED STATES
Members of the Secret Service stand outside the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health Center at the...
Members of the Secret Service stand outside the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health Center at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remains hospitalized in New York, January 1, 2013. Clinton suffered a blood clot in a vein between her brain and skull behind her right ear but is expected to make a full recovery, her doctors said on Monday in a statement released by the State Department. REUTERS/Joshua Lott (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
USA-CLINTON-HEALTH/
RTR3C1BW
January 01, 2013
A member of the Secret Service and a security guard stand at the entrance of the Vivian And Seymour Milstein...
New York, UNITED STATES
A member of the Secret Service and a security guard stand at the entrance of the Vivian And Seymour Milstein...
A member of the Secret Service and a security guard stand at the entrance of the Vivian And Seymour Milstein Family Health Center at the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remains hospitalized in New York, January 1, 2013. Clinton suffered a blood clot in a vein between her brain and skull behind her right ear but is expected to make a full recovery, her doctors said on Monday in a statement released by the State Department. REUTERS/Joshua Lott (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
USA-CLINTON-HEALTH/
RTR3C1BV
January 01, 2013
A member of the hospital staff walks in front of the Milstein Hospital Building at the New York-Presbyterian...
New York, UNITED STATES
A member of the hospital staff walks in front of the Milstein Hospital Building at the New York-Presbyterian...
A member of the hospital staff walks in front of the Milstein Hospital Building at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remains hospitalized in New York, January 1, 2013. Clinton suffered a blood clot in a vein between her brain and skull behind her right ear but is expected to make a full recovery, her doctors said on Monday in a statement released by the State Department. REUTERS/Joshua Lott (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
USA-CLINTON-HEALTH/
RTR3C1BT
January 01, 2013
Pedestrians walk outside Milstein Hospital Building at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S....
New York, UNITED STATES
Pedestrians walk outside Milstein Hospital Building at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S....
Pedestrians walk outside Milstein Hospital Building at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remains hospitalized in New York, January 1, 2013. Clinton suffered a blood clot in a vein between her brain and skull behind her right ear but is expected to make a full recovery, her doctors said on Monday in a statement released by the State Department. REUTERS/Joshua Lott (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS)
USA-CLINTON-HEALTH/
RTR3C1BR
January 01, 2013
Pedestrians walk outside Milstein Hospital Building at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S....
New York, UNITED STATES
Pedestrians walk outside Milstein Hospital Building at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S....
Pedestrians walk outside Milstein Hospital Building at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital where U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remains hospitalized in New York, January 1, 2013. Clinton suffered a blood clot in a vein between her brain and skull behind her right ear but is expected to make a full recovery, her doctors said on Monday in a statement released by the State Department. REUTERS/Joshua Lott (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH POLITICS)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ1J
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) puts in the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Greiner puts in new glass eye of patient in his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) puts in the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ1I
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (seen in mirror) looks at the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Greiner looks at new glass eye of patient in his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (seen in mirror) looks at the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Sechser, 72, got his first glass eye in 1960. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ1H
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ1G
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ1F
December 13, 2012
A tray of example glass eyes are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner...
Munich, Germany
A tray of example glass eyes are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner...
A tray of example glass eyes are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ1C
December 13, 2012
Patient Helmut Sechser looks in a mirror after being fitted with a new glass eye at a medical equipment...
Munich, Germany
Patient Helmut Sechser looks in a mirror after being fitted with a new glass eye at a medical equipment...
Patient Helmut Sechser looks in a mirror after being fitted with a new glass eye at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Shop owner and ocularist Gerhard Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Sechser, 72, got his first glass eye in 1960. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ1A
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ19
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ18
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his...
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ16
December 13, 2012
The old glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser sits in a small box at the medical equipment shop of ocularist...
Munich, Germany
Old glass eye of patient sits in a small box at medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in...
The old glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser sits in a small box at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. Ocularist Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ15
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) looks at the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Greiner looks at new glass eye of patient in his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner (L) looks at the new glass eye of patient Helmut Sechser in his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Sechser, 72, got his first glass eye in 1960. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ14
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ13
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his...
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ12
December 13, 2012
Patient Helmut Sechser looks in a mirror after being fitted with a new glass eye at a medical equipment...
Munich, Germany
Patient Helmut Sechser looks in a mirror after being fitted with a new glass eye at a medical equipment...
Patient Helmut Sechser looks in a mirror after being fitted with a new glass eye at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Shop owner and ocularist Gerhard Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Sechser, 72, got his first glass eye in 1960. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ11
December 13, 2012
Coloured glass rods and the equiptment of ocularist Gerhard Greiner to make glass eyes, lie on a work...
Munich, Germany
Coloured glass rods and equiptment of ocularist Greiner to make glass eyes lie on a work top at his medical...
Coloured glass rods and the equiptment of ocularist Gerhard Greiner to make glass eyes, lie on a work top at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ10
December 13, 2012
Rods of glass in different colours are pictured in a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012....
Munich, Germany
Rods of glass in different colours are pictured in a medical equipment shop in Munich
Rods of glass in different colours are pictured in a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Shop owner and ocularist Gerhard Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0Z
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0X
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0V
December 13, 2012
A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist...
Munich, Germany
A tray of glass eyes are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich...
A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises are pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0U
December 13, 2012
A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises is pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist...
Munich, Germany
A tray of glass eyes is pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich...
A tray of glass eyes with different coloured irises is pictured at the medical equipment shop of ocularist Gerhard Greiner in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0T
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his...
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner blows through molten glass to make a sphere as he produces a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0S
December 13, 2012
Patient Helmut Sechser puts in his old glass eye while he waits for a new one to be made at a medical...
Munich, Germany
Patient Sechser puts in his old glass eye while waiting for new one at a medical equipment shop in Munich...
Patient Helmut Sechser puts in his old glass eye while he waits for a new one to be made at a medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Shop owner and ocularist Gerhard Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Sechser, 72, got his first glass eye in 1960. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0R
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0P
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0O
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0N
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner selects a coloured glass rod as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner selects a coloured glass rod as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment...
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner selects a coloured glass rod as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
GERMANY/
RTR3BJ0M
December 13, 2012
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical...
Munich, Germany
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich
Ocularist Gerhard Greiner holds a glass tube over a bunsen burner as he makes a glass eye at his medical equipment shop in Munich December 11, 2012. Greiner produces individual hand glass-blown human eye prostheses for people who have lost an eye or eyes due to a trauma, illness or accident. Each glass eye takes about one hour to make, with constant reference to the patient for the right colour and for detailed drawing of the veins. A bespoke glass eye prostheses cost from 350 euros (US $457). A typical modern glass eye is a hollow half sphere that fits over the non-working eye, if it is still there. Otherwise it goes over a ball that has been surgically implanted into the eye socket and attached to the eye muscles. Picture taken on December 11. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANY - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
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