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Search results for: Voice-over-internet

MYANMAR-ROHINGYA/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4R6C0
February 25, 2015
Rahana cries as she talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands...
Sittwe, Myanmar
Rahana cries as she talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, near Sittwe
Rahana cries as she talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar January 29, 2015. Rahana, a 32-year-old Rohingya, has already sent $1,100 to the trafficker who is holding her 12-year-old son ransom at a camp along the Thailand-Malaysia border. The trafficker wants another $300 before he will release the boy. "Let me speak to my son," Rahana tells the trafficker. A few seconds pass, then a small voice says, "Mum?" Rahana's eyes fill with tears. "I will send the money," she assures her son. "Then they will let you go." Operators of the huts charge customers 10 cents a minute to talk to relatives who have left Rakhine State by boat to seek work overseas. In a camp for displaced Rohingya Muslims, residents frequent bamboo "internet huts" where they can communicate with relatives who left the country, escaping the violence that led to 200 deaths and left over 140,000 homeless in 2012. Some arrive safely, while others are held hostage for ransom by human traffickers at jungle camps in Thailand or Malaysia. REUTERS/Minzayar (MYANMAR - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 14 OF 25 FOR WIDER IMAGE PACKAGE 'ROHINGYA SCREEN LIGHT PORTRAITS'

TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'ROHINGYA MINZAYAR'
MYANMAR-ROHINGYA/WIDERIMAGE
RTR4R6BY
February 25, 2015
Robizar cries as she talks to her son from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands...
Sittwe, Myanmar
Robizar cries as she talks to her son from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands...
Robizar cries as she talks to her son from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 13, 2015. Robizar's 18-year-old son left Myanmar by boat 10 months ago and now lives with his father in Malaysia. Robizar, a 32-year-old Rohingya, misses him badly. "Son, I can't tell you how it feels to hear your voice," she says. Operators of the huts charge customers 10 cents a minute to talk to relatives who have left Rakhine State by boat to seek work overseas. In a camp for displaced Rohingya Muslims, residents frequent bamboo "internet huts" where they can communicate with relatives who left the country, escaping the violence that led to 200 deaths and left over 140,000 homeless in 2012. Some arrive safely, while others are held hostage for ransom by human traffickers at jungle camps in Thailand or Malaysia. REUTERS/Minzayar (MYANMAR - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 08 OF 25 FOR WIDER IMAGE PACKAGE 'ROHINGYA SCREEN LIGHT PORTRAITS'

TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'SCREEN LIGHT MINZAYAR'
RUSSIA-INTERNET/
RTR44UX6
September 04, 2014
Internet ombudsman Dmitry Marinichev attends a news conference in Moscow July 16, 2014. With an estimated...
Moscow, Russia
Internet ombudsman Dmitry Marinichev attends a news conference in Moscow
Internet ombudsman Dmitry Marinichev attends a news conference in Moscow July 16, 2014. With an estimated 75 million people online in Russia, up from just 2 million when Vladimir Putin came to power in 1999, the reach of the Internet dwarfs that of the clandestine texts shared, at high risk, among intellectuals during the Cold War. Where elderly Communist librarians once stood guard over copy machines, activists say a slew of regulations this year aim to police the web at one step removed, enabling authorities to target leading dissenting voices, lean on social networks and telecoms companies and encourage self-censorship. Picture taken July 16, 2014. To match Insight RUSSIA-INTERNET/ REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin (RUSSIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS BUSINESS)
RUSSIA-INTERNET/
RTR44UX3
September 04, 2014
Internet ombudsman Dmitry Marinichev attends a news conference in Moscow July 16, 2014. With an estimated...
Moscow, Russia
Internet ombudsman Dmitry Marinichev attends a news conference in Moscow
Internet ombudsman Dmitry Marinichev attends a news conference in Moscow July 16, 2014. With an estimated 75 million people online in Russia, up from just 2 million when Vladimir Putin came to power in 1999, the reach of the Internet dwarfs that of the clandestine texts shared, at high risk, among intellectuals during the Cold War. Where elderly Communist librarians once stood guard over copy machines, activists say a slew of regulations this year aim to police the web at one step removed, enabling authorities to target leading dissenting voices, lean on social networks and telecoms companies and encourage self-censorship. Picture taken July 16, 2014. To match Insight RUSSIA-INTERNET/ REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin (RUSSIA - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY POLITICS BUSINESS)
EMIRATES/VOIP
RTR2TSC6
November 09, 2011
Men stand outside an Internet shop at Deira November 7, 2011. In the gritty streets of Deira, the old...
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
To match Feature EMIRATES/VOIP
Men stand outside an Internet shop at Deira November 7, 2011. In the gritty streets of Deira, the old commercial heart of Dubai, lurks a threat to some of the region's biggest telecommunications firms. It is here on the northern bank of Dubai creek, among the grocery stores and barbers, the discount tailors and food stalls, where low-wage workers come after a day?s toil to phone their family and friends overseas. These shops dodge government inspectors to offer unlicensed Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services -- free Internet-to-Internet calls and cheap Internet-to-phone calls. The UAE's regulator says only licensed companies can provide VoIP. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature EMIRATES/VOIP REUTERS/Nikhil Monteiro (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS)
EMIRATES/VOIP
RTR2TSC5
November 09, 2011
Customers sit inside an Internet shop at Deira November 7, 2011. In the gritty streets of Deira, the...
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
To match Feature EMIRATES/VOIP
Customers sit inside an Internet shop at Deira November 7, 2011. In the gritty streets of Deira, the old commercial heart of Dubai, lurks a threat to some of the region's biggest telecommunications firms. It is here on the northern bank of Dubai creek, among the grocery stores and barbers, the discount tailors and food stalls, where low-wage workers come after a day?s toil to phone their family and friends overseas. These shops dodge government inspectors to offer unlicensed Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services -- free Internet-to-Internet calls and cheap Internet-to-phone calls. The UAE's regulator says only licensed companies can provide VoIP. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature EMIRATES/VOIP REUTERS/Nikhil Monteiro (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS)
EMIRATES/VOIP
RTR2TSBQ
November 09, 2011
A customer makes Internet phone calls at an Internet shop at Deira November 7, 2011. In the gritty streets...
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
To match Feature EMIRATES/VOIP
A customer makes Internet phone calls at an Internet shop at Deira November 7, 2011. In the gritty streets of Deira, the old commercial heart of Dubai, lurks a threat to some of the region's biggest telecommunications firms. It is here on the northern bank of Dubai creek, among the grocery stores and barbers, the discount tailors and food stalls, where low-wage workers come after a day?s toil to phone their family and friends overseas. These shops dodge government inspectors to offer unlicensed Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services -- free Internet-to-Internet calls and cheap Internet-to-phone calls. The UAE's regulator says only licensed companies can provide VoIP. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature EMIRATES/VOIP REUTERS/Nikhil Monteiro (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS)
EMIRATES/VOIP
RTR2TSBM
November 09, 2011
Customers make Internet phone calls at an Internet shop at Deira November 7, 2011. In the gritty streets...
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
To match Feature EMIRATES/VOIP
Customers make Internet phone calls at an Internet shop at Deira November 7, 2011. In the gritty streets of Deira, the old commercial heart of Dubai, lurks a threat to some of the region's biggest telecommunications firms. It is here on the northern bank of Dubai creek, among the grocery stores and barbers, the discount tailors and food stalls, where low-wage workers come after a day?s toil to phone their family and friends overseas. These shops dodge government inspectors to offer unlicensed Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services -- free Internet-to-Internet calls and cheap Internet-to-phone calls. The UAE's regulator says only licensed companies can provide VoIP. Picture taken November 7, 2011. To match Feature EMIRATES/VOIP REUTERS/Nikhil Monteiro (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS)
USA/
RTR2TEN3
October 30, 2011
Computer scientist Stephen Casner speaks at the grand opening of the Kleinrock Internet Heritage Site...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Computer scientist Stephen Casner speaks at the grand opening of the Kleinrock Internet Heritage Site...
Computer scientist Stephen Casner speaks at the grand opening of the Kleinrock Internet Heritage Site and Archive in 3420 Boelter Hall, the birthplace of the Internet, at UCLA in Los Angeles, California October 29, 2011. The first message to pass over the ARPANET was sent from 3420 Boelter Hall on October 29, 1969 led by UCLA professor of computer science Leonard Kleinrock and his team. Casner and fellow researcher Danny Cohen, working at the University of Southern California, designed and implemented protocols and software for some of the earliest experiments with packet voice using the ARPANET. The ARPANET evolved into the Internet we use today. REUTERS/Fred Prouser (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
USA/
RTR2TEMS
October 30, 2011
British computer scientist Peter Kirstein (L) speaks with fellow computer scientists Stephen Casner (R)...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Computer scientist Kirstein speaks with fellow computer scientists Casner and Cohen at the Kleinrock...
British computer scientist Peter Kirstein (L) speaks with fellow computer scientists Stephen Casner (R) and Israeli-born Danny Cohen at the grand opening of the Kleinrock Internet Heritage Site and Archive in 3420 Boelter Hall at UCLA in Los Angeles, California October 29, 2011. Kirstein was a leader in the international development of the Internet who in 1973, established one of the first two international nodes of the ARPANET. Casner and fellow researcher Cohen, working at the University of Southern California, designed and implemented protocols and software for some of the earliest experiments with packet voice using the ARPANET. The first message to pass over ARPANET was sent from 3420 Boelter Hall on October 29, 1969 led by UCLA professor Kleinrock and his team. The ARPANET evolved into the Internet we use today. REUTERS/Fred Prouser (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
USA/
RTR2TEKO
October 30, 2011
Israeli-born computer scientist Danny Cohen attends the grand opening of the Kleinrock Internet Heritage...
Los Angeles, UNITED STATES
Danny Cohen attends the grand opening of the Kleinrock Internet Heritage Site and Archive at UCLA
Israeli-born computer scientist Danny Cohen attends the grand opening of the Kleinrock Internet Heritage Site and Archive in 3420 Boelter Hall, birthplace of the Internet, at UCLA in Los Angeles, California October 29, 2011. Cohen and fellow researcher Stephen Casner at the University of Southern California designed and implemented protocols and software for some of the earliest experiments with packet voice using the ARPANET. The first message to pass over ARPANET was sent from 3420 Boelter Hall on October 29, 1969 led by computer science professor at UCLA Leonard Kleinrock and his team. The ARPANET evolved into the Internet we use today. REUTERS/Fred Prouser (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS TELECOMS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
SECURITY-BINLADEN/TAPE
RTR1TPLC
September 11, 2007
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is seen speaking in this video grab provided to Reuters on September...
United Kingdom
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is seen speaking in this video grab
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is seen speaking in this video grab provided to Reuters on September 11, 2007. Bin Laden eulogizes a September 11 hijacker as a rare and magnificent man in a tape released on Tuesday to mark the sixth anniversary of the attacks on the United States. The Al Qaeda leader's voice can be heard over a still image presenting the last testament of Waleed al-Shehri, and praising his role in the attacks. The 47-minute video did not appear to include any moving images of bin Laden, but it did include English subtitles. REUTERS/Internet
SECURITY-BINLADEN/TAPE
RTR1TPLB
September 11, 2007
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is seen speaking in this video grab provided to Reuters on September...
United Kingdom
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is seen speaking in this video grab
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is seen speaking in this video grab provided to Reuters on September 11, 2007. Bin Laden eulogizes a September 11 hijacker as a rare and magnificent man in a tape released on Tuesday to mark the sixth anniversary of the attacks on the United States. The Al Qaeda leader's voice can be heard over a still image presenting the last testament of Waleed al-Shehri, and praising his role in the attacks. The 47-minute video did not appear to include any moving images of bin Laden, but it did include English subtitles. REUTERS/Internet
SECURITY-BINLADEN/TAPE
RTR1TPL8
September 11, 2007
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is seen speaking in this video grab provided to Reuters on September...
United Kingdom
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is seen speaking in this video grab
Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden is seen speaking in this video grab provided to Reuters on September 11, 2007. Bin Laden eulogizes a September 11 hijacker as a rare and magnificent man in a tape released on Tuesday to mark the sixth anniversary of the attacks on the United States. The Al Qaeda leader's voice can be heard over a still image presenting the last testament of Waleed al-Shehri, and praising his role in the attacks. The 47-minute video did not appear to include any moving images of bin Laden, but it did include English subtitles. REUTERS/Internet
SINGAPORE/
RTR1RHGC
July 05, 2007
A worker collects analogue telephones, which were replaced by Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phones,...
Singapore, Singapore
Worker collects analog phones at an office in Singapore
A worker collects analogue telephones, which were replaced by Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phones, at an office in Singapore July 5, 2007. VOIP technology cuts up a phone conversation into digital bits and sends them as Internet Protocol packets over the Internet or over a dedicated part of a telecoms operator's network with guaranteed service levels. REUTERS/Kimitsu Yogachi (SINGAPORE)
CANADA TELECOM SUMMIT
RTR15JPI
May 30, 2005
Steve Koles (L), General Manager, Netscape and Enhanced Services, AOL Canada, Joe Parent, (C),Vice-President,...
Toronto, Canada
Telecom industry panel listens to question at Canadian Telecom Summit.
Steve Koles (L), General Manager, Netscape and Enhanced Services, AOL Canada, Joe Parent, (C),Vice-President, Marketing and Business Development, Vonage Canada and Matt Stein, Primus Canada Vice-President of New Technology and Services, listen to a question while participating in a panel discussion on Voice-Over-Internet Protocol (VoIP) at the Canadian Telecom Summit in Toronto, May 30, 2005. Industry leaders in telecommunications will speak on advancements in technology services and policy at the three day summit. REUTERS/Mike Cassese MC
CANADA TELECOM SUMMIT
RTRCWTI
May 30, 2005
Matt Stein, Primus Canada Vice-President of New Technology and Services, delivers his remarks prior to...
Toronto, Canada
Primus Canada VP Matt Stein speaks at Canadian Telecom Summit.
Matt Stein, Primus Canada Vice-President of New Technology and Services, delivers his remarks prior to taking part in a panel discussion on Voice-Over-Internet Protocol (VoIP) at the Canadian Telecom Summit in Toronto, May 30, 2005. Industry leaders in telecommunications will speak on advancements in technology services and policy at the three day summit. REUTERS/Mike Cassese MC
CANADA TELECOM SUMMIT
RTRCWT2
May 30, 2005
Matt Stein, Primus Canada Vice-President of New Technology and Services, is shown after taking part in...
Toronto, Canada
Primus Canada VP Matt Stein speaks at Canadian Telecom Summit.
Matt Stein, Primus Canada Vice-President of New Technology and Services, is shown after taking part in a panel discussion on Voice-Over-Internet Protocol (VoIP) at the Canadian Telecom Summit in Toronto, May 30, 2005. Industry leaders in telecommunications will speak on advancements in technology services and policy at the three day summit. REUTERS/Mike Cassese MC
WASHINGTON
RTRBS9O
May 19, 2005
Cheryl Wall looks on during a news conference with U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL) discussing 9-1-1 phone...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson holds a news conference on 9-1-1 phone call reforms.
Cheryl Wall looks on during a news conference with U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL) discussing 9-1-1 phone call reforms on Capitol Hill in Washington, May 19, 2005. Mrs. Wall, a Deltona, Florida mother, sparked the reforms after she could not get through to 9-1-1 dispatchers on her voice-over-internet protocol phone when her infant daughter stopped breathing. Mrs. Wall's daughter later died. REUTERS/Shaun Heasley sh/HK
WASHINGTON
RTRBS29
May 19, 2005
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (D-Fla) (R) gestures during a news conference discussing 911 emergency phone...
Washington, UNITED STATES
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson holds news conference on 911 phone call reforms.
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (D-Fla) (R) gestures during a news conference discussing 911 emergency phone call reforms on Capitol Hill, in Washington May 19, 2005. Sparking the reforms is Cheryl Wall (C), a Deltona, Florida mother who could not get through to 911 dispatchers on her voice-over-internet protocol phone when her infant daughter stopped breathing. Mrs. Wall's daughter later died as a result. REUTERS/Shaun Heasley sh
SON
RTXKYFV
December 18, 2001
Japanese Internet investor Softbank Corp President Masayoshi Son prompts reporters' questions at a news...
Tokyo, Japan
Japanese Internet investor Softbank Corp President Masayoshi Son prompts reporters' questions at a n.....
Japanese Internet investor Softbank Corp President Masayoshi Son prompts reporters' questions at a news conference announcing the launch in spring 2002 of a cut-rate Internet broadband telephone service, BB Phone, by Softbank and subsidiary Yahoo Japan Corp, in Tokyo December 18, 2001. [It's an unprecedented, new approach to the telephone business, probably the first in the world to offer complete telephone services over a broadband network, he said. Unlike other Voice over Internet protocol services, BB Phone works through a special telephone terminal adapter that allows users to connect a normal telephone and dial regular phone numbers, he said.]
TECH SOFTBANK PHONE
RTRQDTX
December 18, 2001
SOFTBANK PRESIDENT MASAYOSHI SON PROMPTS REPORTERS' QUESTIONS AT BROADBAND
TELEPHONE SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT...
Tokyo, Japan
SOFTBANK PRESIDENT MASAYOSHI SON PROMPTS REPORTERS' QUESTIONS AT
BROADBAND TELEPHONE SERVICE ...
SOFTBANK PRESIDENT MASAYOSHI SON PROMPTS REPORTERS' QUESTIONS AT BROADBAND
TELEPHONE SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT IN TOKYO.

Japanese Internet investor Softbank Corp President Masayoshi Son prompts
reporters' questions at a news conference announcing the launch in spring
2002 of a cut-rate Internet broadband telephone service, BB Phone, by
Softbank and subsidiary Yahoo Japan Corp, in Tokyo December 18, 2001. It's
an unprecedented, new approach to the telephone business, probably the first
in the world to offer complete telephone services over a broadband network,
he said. Unlike other Voice over Internet protocol services, BB Phone works
through a special telephone terminal adapter that allows users to connect a
normal telephone and dial regular phone numbers, he said. REUTERS/Eriko
Sugita
SASNETT
RTXK7SI
January 07, 2001
Bo Sasnett, a product development consultant, looks over the 3Com "Audrey" internet appliance during...
Las Vegas, USA
Bo Sasnett, a product development consultant, looks over the 3Com "Audrey" internet appliance during.....
Bo Sasnett, a product development consultant, looks over the 3Com "Audrey" internet appliance during the Consumer Electronics Show January 7, 2001 in Las Vegas. The websurfing device is unique in that it can sychronize information with hand held devices that run on the Palm operating system. The appliance also offers three ways to send email: typical typed email, as a hand written message or as a voice message. The product started shipping in November and runs $499 for "linen" color, $50 more for colored units.
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