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Search results for: WILCZEK-Frank

USA-SCIENCE/IGNOBELS
RTS1NL0
September 18, 2015
(L-R) Nobel Laureates Dudley Herschbach, Eric Maskin, Carol Greider, Jack Szostak, and Frank Wilczek...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Nobel Laureates Dudley Herschbach, Eric Maskin, Carol Greider, Jack Szostak, and Frank Wilczek stand...
(L-R) Nobel Laureates Dudley Herschbach, Eric Maskin, Carol Greider, Jack Szostak, and Frank Wilczek stand on the stage at the conclusion of the 25th First Annual Ig Nobel Prizes awards ceremony at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts September 17, 2015. The annual prizes, meant to entertain and encourage global research and innovation, are awarded by the Annals of Improbable Research as a whimsical counterpart to the Nobel Prizes. REUTERS/Gretchen Ertl
NOBEL
RTRHY3R
December 10, 2004
US Frank Wilczek receives the joint 2004 Nobel Prize for Physics from Swedish King Carl Gustaf in Stockholm....
Stockholm
US Frank Wilczek receives the joint 2004 Nobel Prize for Physics from Swedish King Carl Gustaf in ......
US Frank Wilczek receives the joint 2004 Nobel Prize for Physics from Swedish King Carl Gustaf in Stockholm. U.S. Frank Wilczek (L) receives the joint 2004 Nobel Prize for Physics from Swedish King Carl Gustaf in front of a bust of the award's founder Swedish industrialist and inventor of dynamite, Alfred Nobel, at the Concert Hall in Stockholm December 10, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel Prize for physics for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
NOBEL
RTR15CRD
December 07, 2004
U.S. Frank Wilczek, joint 2004 Nobel Prize Laureate for Physics is listening during a news conference...
Stockholm
US Wilczek joint 2004 Nobel Prize Laureate for Physics islistening during a news conference in Stockholm....
U.S. Frank Wilczek, joint 2004 Nobel Prize Laureate for Physics is listening during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm December 7, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay WR/DL
NOBEL
RTRHN2Z
December 07, 2004
U.S. David J. Gross (L) and Frank Wilczek, joint 2004 Nobel Prize Laureates for Physics address the media...
Stockholm
US Gross and Wilczek 2004 joint Nobel Prize Laureates for Physics address the media in Stockholm.
U.S. David J. Gross (L) and Frank Wilczek, joint 2004 Nobel Prize Laureates for Physics address the media in a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm December 7, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. Gross, Wilczek and David Politzer (not in picture) had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay WR/SM
NOBEL
RTRHMXO
December 07, 2004
2004 Nobel Prize Laureates for Chemistry, Physics and Economy pose for a group picture in front of a...
Stockholm
2004 Nobel Prize Laureates for Chemistry, Physics and Economy pose for a group picture in front of a...
2004 Nobel Prize Laureates for Chemistry, Physics and Economy pose for a group picture in front of a bust of Alfred Nobel in Stockholm. 2004 Nobel Prize Laureates pose in front of a bust of Alfred Nobel, the donor of the prestigious award at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm December 7, 2004. Standing Laureates are L-R Israeli Aaron Ciechanover (Chemistry), U.S Edward C. Prescott (Economics), U.S. David J. Gross (Physics), U.S. David Politzer (Physics) and U.S. Frank Wilczek (Physics). Seated Laureates are L-R Norwegian Finn E. Kydland (Economics), U.S. Irwin Rose (Chemistry) and Israeli Avram Hershko (Chemistry). REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay
BUSH NOBEL
RTRH6B2
December 01, 2004
U.S. President George W. Bush meets with 2004 U.S. Nobel Prize winners in the Oval Office of the White...
Washington, UNITED STATES
President Bush meets with Nobel Prize winners at the White House.
U.S. President George W. Bush meets with 2004 U.S. Nobel Prize winners in the Oval Office of the White House December 1, 2004. From left, are winners Linda Buck, physiology/medicine; Finn Kydland, economics; Edward Prescott, economics; President Bush, Frank Wilczek, physics; David Gross, physics and Richard Axel, physiology/medicine. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque KL/
WILCZEK
RTXMYHH
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics, Frank Wilczek, explains the discovery that led to his...
Cambridge, USA
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics, Frank Wilczek, explains the discovery that led to .....
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics, Frank Wilczek, explains the discovery that led to his prize, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 5, 2004. Wilczek teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. [David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks -- the basic building blocks of nature -- was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together.]
WILCZEK
RTXMYHG
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek smiles at his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts,...
Cambridge, USA
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek smiles at his home in Cambridge, Mass.....
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek smiles at his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 5, 2004. Wilczek teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. [David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks -- the basic building blocks of nature -- was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together.]
NOBEL PHYSICS
RTR15BL4
October 05, 2004
David J. Gross, of the University of California, Santa Barbara, California, talks to the media at a press...
Santa Barbara
Physics Nobel co-winner David Gross.
David J. Gross, of the University of California, Santa Barbara, California, talks to the media at a press conference, October 5, 2004. Gross, David Politzer and Frank Wilczek won the 2004 Nobel physics prize October 5, 2004 for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. REUTERS/Phil Klein PK/SV
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTR15BKC
October 05, 2004
Dr. Jerome Friedman, winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize for Physics, congratulates colleague Frank Wilczek...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Corecipient of Nobel Physics Prize congratulated by past Nobel winner.
Dr. Jerome Friedman, winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize for Physics, congratulates colleague Frank Wilczek (R), co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 5, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. Dr. Friedman's discoveries lead the way for David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek to show how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTR15BK4
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek waits to be introduced at a press conference...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Co recipient of Nobel Physics Prize waits to be introduced at press conference.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek waits to be introduced at a press conference at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 5, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS/HB
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTR15BK0
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics, Frank Wilczek, explains the discovery that led to his...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Co recipient of Nobel Physics Prize explains the discovery that lead to the prize.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics, Frank Wilczek, explains the discovery that led to his prize, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 5, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS/HB
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTR15BJX
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek sits with a foot up on his desk in his...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Corecipient of Nobel Physics Prize sits with a foot up on his desk.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek sits with a foot up on his desk in his office at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 5, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTR15BJN
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek explains the formula that resulted in...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Corecipient of Nobel Physics Prize explains formula that resulted in the prize.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek explains the formula that resulted in his prize, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 5, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTR15BJD
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek smiles while answering a question from...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Corecipient of Nobel Physics Prize smiles while answering a question from a reporter.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek smiles while answering a question from a reporter at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 5, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS
NOBEL PHYSICS
RTRCLFM
October 05, 2004
David J. Gross, stands in his office at the University of California, Santa Barbara, California October...
Santa Barbara
David J. Gross, stand in his office at the University of California, Santa Barbara, California.
David J. Gross, stands in his office at the University of California, Santa Barbara, California October 5, 2004. Gross, David Politzer and Frank Wilczek won the 2004 Nobel physics prize October 5 for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. REUTERS/Phil Klein PK/JDP
NOBEL PHYSICS
RTRCLB9
October 05, 2004
David J. Gross, of the University of California, Santa Barbara, California, sits in his office after...
Santa Barbara
Physics Nobel co-winner David Gross sits in his office in Santa Barbara.
David J. Gross, of the University of California, Santa Barbara, California, sits in his office after a press conference, in Santa Barbara, October 5, 2004. Gross, David Politzer and Frank Wilczek won the 2004 Nobel physics prize October 5 for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. REUTERS/Phil Klein PK/SV
NOBEL PHYSICS
RTRCLAL
October 05, 2004
David J. Gross, of the University of California, Santa Barbara, California, talks to the media at a press...
Santa Barbara
Physics Nobel co-winner David Gross addresses media in Santa Barbara.
David J. Gross, of the University of California, Santa Barbara, California, talks to the media at a press conference, October 5, 2004. Gross, David Politzer and Frank Wilczek won the 2004 Nobel physics prize October 5, 2004 for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. REUTERS/Phil Klein PK/SV
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTRCK77
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek smiles at his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts,...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Co recipient of Nobel Physics prize smiles at his home.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek smiles at his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 5, 2004. Wilczek teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS/HB
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTRCK6L
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek receives a congratulatory phone call at...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Co recipient of Nobel Physics prize receives congratulatory phone call.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek receives a congratulatory phone call at his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 5, 2004. Wilczek teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS/HB
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTRCK61
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek receives a congratulatory phone call at...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Co recipient of Nobel Physics prize receives congratulatory phone call.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek receives a congratulatory phone call at his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 5, 2004. Wilczek teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS/HB
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTRCK5R
October 05, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek leaves home for his office at Massachusetts...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Winner of 2004 Nobel Physics Prize Wilczek leaves his home.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek leaves home for his office at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts, October 5, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek had shown how the attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature - was strong when they were far apart and weak when they were close together. REUTERS/Brian Snyder BS/HB
NOBEL SCIENCE
RTR15BJR
October 04, 2004
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek answers a question from a reporter at...
Cambridge, UNITED STATES
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek answers a question in Cambridge.
Co-recipient of the 2004 Noble Prize for Physics Frank Wilczek answers a question from a reporter at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts October 5, 2004. Three American scientists won the 2004 Nobel physics prize on Tuesday for showing how tiny quark particles interact, helping to explain everything from how a coin spins to how the universe was built. The formulas and graphs on the blackboard show what David Gross, David Politzer and Wilczek discovered about attraction between quarks - the basic building blocks of nature. REUTERS/Brian Snyder Pictures of the Month October 2004 Pictures of the Year 2004 BS
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