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Search results for: Walkers-(Food-Business)

USA-ELECTION/WALKER
RTX1F6S9
June 05, 2015
Workers are seen cooling off bottles of liquid at Kent Precision Foods in Superior, Wisconsin, United...
Superior, UNITED STATES
Workers are seen cooling off bottles of liquid at Kent Precision Foods in Superior, Wisconsin
Workers are seen cooling off bottles of liquid at Kent Precision Foods in Superior, Wisconsin, United States, May 28, 2015. Shortly after taking office in 2011, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker traveled to this hardscrabble port city to unveil a new sign that announced his plan to slash taxes and lure companies from nearby Minnesota. "Open for business," it said. Picture taken May 28, 2015. To match USA-ELECTION/WALKER REUTERS/Jim Young?
CLIMATECHANGE-AUSTRALIA/WINE
RTR3YEPJ
July 13, 2014
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast...
Hobart, Australia
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast...
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast of Tasmania, checks rows of vines during his daily inspection June 4, 2014. Australia's wine-growing industry is responding to the rigors of climate change. A study by the U.S. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that up to 73 percent of Australian land currently used for viticulture could become unsuitable by 2050. As the country's traditional wine growing regions, including the Barossa, the Hunter Valley and Margaret River grow ever hotter and drier, winemakers are rushing to the cool climate of the tiny island state of Tasmania. While the national wine industry has shrunk 1.9 percent annually from 2009 to 2014, the Tasmanian state industry is growing at a rate of close to 10 percent per annum, according to the Tasmanian Climate Change Office. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT FOOD SOCIETY)
CLIMATECHANGE-AUSTRALIA/WINE
RTR3YEPI
July 13, 2014
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast...
Hobart, Australia
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast...
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast of Tasmania, checks rows of vines during his daily inspection June 4, 2014. Australia's wine-growing industry is responding to the rigors of climate change. A study by the U.S. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that up to 73 percent of Australian land currently used for viticulture could become unsuitable by 2050. As the country's traditional wine growing regions, including the Barossa, the Hunter Valley and Margaret River grow ever hotter and drier, winemakers are rushing to the cool climate of the tiny island state of Tasmania. While the national wine industry has shrunk 1.9 percent annually from 2009 to 2014, the Tasmanian state industry is growing at a rate of close to 10 percent per annum, according to the Tasmanian Climate Change Office. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT FOOD SOCIETY)
CLIMATECHANGE-AUSTRALIA/WINE
RTR3YEPF
July 13, 2014
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast...
Hobart, Australia
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast...
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast of Tasmania, checks rows of vines during his daily inspection June 4, 2014. Australia's wine-growing industry is responding to the rigors of climate change. A study by the U.S. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that up to 73 percent of Australian land currently used for viticulture could become unsuitable by 2050. As the country's traditional wine growing regions, including the Barossa, the Hunter Valley and Margaret River grow ever hotter and drier, winemakers are rushing to the cool climate of the tiny island state of Tasmania. While the national wine industry has shrunk 1.9 percent annually from 2009 to 2014, the Tasmanian state industry is growing at a rate of close to 10 percent per annum, according to the Tasmanian Climate Change Office. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT FOOD SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CLIMATECHANGE-AUSTRALIA/WINE
RTR3YEP8
July 13, 2014
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast...
Hobart, Australia
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast...
Cameron Walker, site manager at Yalumba's Jansz estate in the Tamar Valley, located in the northeast of Tasmania, checks rows of vines during his daily inspection June 4, 2014. Australia's wine-growing industry is responding to the rigors of climate change. A study by the U.S. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that up to 73 percent of Australian land currently used for viticulture could become unsuitable by 2050. As the country's traditional wine growing regions, including the Barossa, the Hunter Valley and Margaret River grow ever hotter and drier, winemakers are rushing to the cool climate of the tiny island state of Tasmania. While the national wine industry has shrunk 1.9 percent annually from 2009 to 2014, the Tasmanian state industry is growing at a rate of close to 10 percent per annum, according to the Tasmanian Climate Change Office. Picture taken June 4, 2014. REUTERS/David Gray (AUSTRALIA - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT FOOD SOCIETY)
APEC/
RTR2TT31
November 10, 2011
Onyekachi Amadi balances on a slackline as a U.S. Air Force forklift drives along Waikiki Beach to put...
Honolulu, UNITED STATES
A woman balances on a slackline as a U.S. Air Force forklift drives along Waikiki Beach to put up concrete...
Onyekachi Amadi balances on a slackline as a U.S. Air Force forklift drives along Waikiki Beach to put up concrete barriers before the annual APEC Summit in Honolulu, Hawaii, November 9, 2011. Honolulu will host the annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit where leaders of major nations bordering the Pacific will meet from Wednesday to Sunday in Hawaii to work towards building a regional free trade area and an environmental initiative to help spur world economic growth. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJFM
May 17, 2011
Bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky move along on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky move along on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJFI
May 17, 2011
A worker looks at a bottle of Johnnie Walker whisky at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks at a bottle of Johnnie Walker whisky at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJF9
May 17, 2011
Bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky move along on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
Bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky move along on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJF6
May 17, 2011
A workman looks at boxes of Johnnie Walker whisky packed and ready for shipment in a warehouse at the...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A workman looks at boxes of Johnnie Walker whisky packed and ready for shipment in a warehouse at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJF5
May 17, 2011
A worker looks at bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks at bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland March 24, 2011. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. Picture taken March 24, 2011. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJDC
May 17, 2011
A glass of Johnnie Walker whisky is poured at a bar in a nightclub in Shanghai February 25, 2010. From...
Shanghai, China
To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A glass of Johnnie Walker whisky is poured at a bar in a nightclub in Shanghai February 25, 2010. From crowded Shanghai bars to the beaches of the southern Chinese island of Hainan, Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples. Whisky exports to China were up 24 percent in 2010. Whisky now accounts for 40 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold in China, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth close to 100 million pounds in 2010, from a mere 1 million pounds in 2000. Picture taken February 25, 2010. To match Feature FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/Aly Song (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
RTR2MJ7Q
May 17, 2011
A worker looks at bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall...
Glasgow, United Kingdom
To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA
A worker looks at bottles of Johnnie Walker whisky on the production line at the Diageo owned Shieldhall bottling plant in Glasgow, Scotland, in this March 24, 2011 file photo. Shieldhall is the world's largest Scotch whisky bottling plant producing around 24 million cases of whisky per year. Scotch whisky is muscling in at the expense of local tipples in China, where whisky exports were up 24 percent in 2010. It now accounts for 45 percent of all foreign-produced spirits sold there, about the same share as cognac. Though still small, the Chinese whisky market was worth over 300 million pounds in 2010, from just a few million pounds in 2000. To keep up with demand, Scotland's whisky industry has poured 600 million pounds into expanding and building new distilleries over the last three years. Long-forgotten still houses have been re-opened. Expansion is underway at a handful of big industrial grain whisky plants, bottling halls and cooperages, and also at some of the smaller 102 malt whisky distilleries scattered across the highlands and islands of Scotland. To match Reuters Life! FOOD-WHISKY/CHINA REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS FOOD DRINK SOCIETY)
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