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Search results for: Western-Union-(Money-transfers)

LEBANON-CRISIS/POUND
RTX7FGM0
April 24, 2020
A man takes Lebanese pound banknotes at the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT in Beirut,...
Beirut, Lebanon
A man takes Lebanese pound banknotes at the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT in Beirut...
A man takes Lebanese pound banknotes at the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT in Beirut, Lebanon April 24, 2020. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
LEBANON-CRISIS/POUND-BERRI
RTX7F9U3
April 23, 2020
Crowds are formed outside the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT after customers were informed...
Beirut, Lebanon
Crowds are formed outside the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT after customers were informed...
Crowds are formed outside the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT after customers were informed it was the last day to retrieve transfers in dollars, in Beirut, Lebanon April 23, 2020. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
LEBANON-CRISIS/POUND-BERRI
RTX7F9TI
April 23, 2020
People wearing face masks are seen at the entrance of money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT...
Beirut, Lebanon
People wearing face masks are seen at the entrance of money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT...
People wearing face masks are seen at the entrance of money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT after customers were informed it was the last day to retrieve transfers in dollars, in Beirut, Lebanon April 23, 2020. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
LEBANON-CRISIS/POUND-BERRI
RTX7F9T0
April 23, 2020
Crowds form outside the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT after customers were informed...
Beirut, Lebanon
Crowds form outside the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT after customers were informed...
Crowds form outside the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT after customers were informed it was the last day to retrieve transfers in dollars, in Beirut, Lebanon April 23, 2020. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
LEBANON-CRISIS/POUND-BERRI
RTX7F9ST
April 23, 2020
A Lebanese police officer walks near crowds formed outside the money transfer offices of Western Union...
Beirut, Lebanon
A Lebanese police officer walks near crowds formed outside the money transfer offices of Western Union...
A Lebanese police officer walks near crowds formed outside the money transfer offices of Western Union and OMT after customers were informed it was the last day to retrieve transfers in dollars, in Beirut, Lebanon April 23, 2020. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
GLOBAL-BANKS/
RTX3ENS0
September 04, 2017
The logo of a Western Union money transfer point is seen in Marseille, France, September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Jean-Paul...
Marseille, France
The logo of a Western Union money transfer point is seen in Marseille
The logo of a Western Union money transfer point is seen in Marseille, France, September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
AFRICA-OBAMA/
RTX1LIBI
July 23, 2015
A security guard walks past a montage of old U.S. dollar bills outside a currency exchange bureau ahead...
Nairobi, Kenya
A security guard walks past a montage of old U.S. dollar bills outside a currency exchange bureau ahead...
A security guard walks past a montage of old U.S. dollar bills outside a currency exchange bureau ahead of a scheduled State visit by the U.S. President Barack Obama in Kenya's capital Nairobi July 23, 2015. Obama will land in Kenya on Friday with a mission to strengthen U.S. security and economic ties, but his personal connection to his father's birthplace will dominate a trip that Kenyans view as a native son returning home. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya
BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA
RTR3W4KD
June 27, 2014
Shakir Hussein sits behind the counter window of his money transfer business, Mustaqbal Express, in Minneapolis...
Minneapolis, UNITED STATES
Hussein sits behind the counter window of his money transfer business, Mustaqbal Express, in Minneapolis...
Shakir Hussein sits behind the counter window of his money transfer business, Mustaqbal Express, in Minneapolis June 23, 2014. About 40 percent of all Somali families rely on remittances from another country, and the estimated annual total of $1.3 billion is more than all foreign aid and investment in Somalia combined, according to a study published last year by human aid organizations Adeso, Oxfam and the Inter-American Dialogue. Commercial banking disappeared in Somalia in the early 1990s, and Western money transfer companies such as Western Union Co and MoneyGram International Inc do not serve most parts of Somalia. This leaves the significantly cheaper and more informal money service businesses, or MSBs, to serve as intermediaries between the foreign banks that make the wire transfers and the intended recipients of the money. As these transmitters attracted attention from U.S. regulatory agencies that fear money launderers or militant groups would exploit them, banks around the world have been rapidly closing their accounts. Picture taken June 23, 2014. To match Feature BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA REUTERS/Eric Miller (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA
RTR3W4KB
June 27, 2014
Mohammed Ahamed (R) waits as Shakir Hussein, owner of money transfer business Mustaqbal Express in Minneapolis,...
Minneapolis, UNITED STATES
Ahamed waits as Hussein, owner of money transfer business Mustaqbal Express in Minneapolis, wires money...
Mohammed Ahamed (R) waits as Shakir Hussein, owner of money transfer business Mustaqbal Express in Minneapolis, wires money to his ex-wife in Somalia, June 23, 2014. About 40 percent of all Somali families rely on remittances from another country, and the estimated annual total of $1.3 billion is more than all foreign aid and investment in Somalia combined, according to a study published last year by human aid organizations Adeso, Oxfam and the Inter-American Dialogue. Commercial banking disappeared in Somalia in the early 1990s, and Western money transfer companies such as Western Union Co and MoneyGram International Inc do not serve most parts of Somalia. This leaves the significantly cheaper and more informal money service businesses, or MSBs, to serve as intermediaries between the foreign banks that make the wire transfers and the intended recipients of the money. As these transmitters attracted attention from U.S. regulatory agencies that fear money launderers or militant groups would exploit them, banks around the world have been rapidly closing their accounts. Picture taken June 23, 2014. To match Feature BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA REUTERS/Eric Miller (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA
RTR3W4JQ
June 27, 2014
Shakir Hussein (L), owner of money transfer business Mustaqbal Express, wires money for Mohammed Ahamed...
Minneapolis, UNITED STATES
Hussein, owner of money transfer business Mustaqbal Express, wires money for Ahamed in Minneapolis
Shakir Hussein (L), owner of money transfer business Mustaqbal Express, wires money for Mohammed Ahamed (at counter) for Ahamed's ex-wife in Somalia, in Minneapolis June 23, 2014. About 40 percent of all Somali families rely on remittances from another country, and the estimated annual total of $1.3 billion is more than all foreign aid and investment in Somalia combined, according to a study published last year by human aid organizations Adeso, Oxfam and the Inter-American Dialogue. Commercial banking disappeared in Somalia in the early 1990s, and Western money transfer companies such as Western Union Co and MoneyGram International Inc do not serve most parts of Somalia. This leaves the significantly cheaper and more informal money service businesses, or MSBs, to serve as intermediaries between the foreign banks that make the wire transfers and the intended recipients of the money. As these transmitters attracted attention from U.S. regulatory agencies that fear money launderers or militant groups would exploit them, banks around the world have been rapidly closing their accounts. Picture taken June 23, 2014. To match Feature BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA REUTERS/Eric Miller (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA
RTR3W4JG
June 27, 2014
Shakir Hussein (L), owner of money transfer business Mustaqbal Express, wires money for Mohammed Ahamed...
Minneapolis, UNITED STATES
Hussein, owner of money transfer business Mustaqbal Express, wires money for Ahamed, in Minneapolis
Shakir Hussein (L), owner of money transfer business Mustaqbal Express, wires money for Mohammed Ahamed (at counter) for Ahamed's former wife in Somalia, in Minneapolis June 23, 2014. About 40 percent of all Somali families rely on remittances from another country, and the estimated annual total of $1.3 billion is more than all foreign aid and investment in Somalia combined, according to a study published last year by human aid organizations Adeso, Oxfam and the Inter-American Dialogue. Commercial banking disappeared in Somalia in the early 1990s, and Western money transfer companies such as Western Union Co and MoneyGram International Inc do not serve most parts of Somalia. This leaves the significantly cheaper and more informal money service businesses, or MSBs, to serve as intermediaries between the foreign banks that make the wire transfers and the intended recipients of the money. As these transmitters attracted attention from U.S. regulatory agencies that fear money launderers or militant groups would exploit them, banks around the world have been rapidly closing their accounts. Picture taken June 23, 2014. To match Feature BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA REUTERS/Eric Miller (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA
RTR3W4FO
June 27, 2014
Shakir Hussein stands at the counter of his money transfer business Mustaqbal Express in Minneapolis...
Minneapolis, UNITED STATES
Hussein stands at the counter of his money transfer business Mustaqbal Express in Minneapolis
Shakir Hussein stands at the counter of his money transfer business Mustaqbal Express in Minneapolis June 23, 2014. About 40 percent of all Somali families rely on remittances from another country, and the estimated annual total of $1.3 billion is more than all foreign aid and investment in Somalia combined, according to a study published last year by human aid organizations Adeso, Oxfam and the Inter-American Dialogue. Commercial banking disappeared in Somalia in the early 1990s, and Western money transfer companies such as Western Union Co and MoneyGram International Inc do not serve most parts of Somalia. This leaves the significantly cheaper and more informal money service businesses, or MSBs, to serve as intermediaries between the foreign banks that make the wire transfers and the intended recipients of the money. As these transmitters attracted attention from U.S. regulatory agencies that fear money launderers or militant groups would exploit them, banks around the world have been rapidly closing their accounts. Picture taken June 23, 2014. To match Feature BANKS-REMITTANCES/SOMALIA REUTERS/Eric Miller (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
WESTERNUNION-RESULTS/
RTX124UB
July 30, 2013
A Western Union branch is seen in New York July 30, 2013. Western Union Co, the world's largest money-transfer...
New York, UNITED STATES
A Western Union branch is seen in New York
A Western Union branch is seen in New York July 30, 2013. Western Union Co, the world's largest money-transfer company, reported a 27 percent decline in quarterly profit July 30, 2013 after cutting prices and spending more on its online business to compete with more nimble rivals.
REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
WESTERNUNION-RESULTS/
RTX124TE
July 30, 2013
A Western Union branch is seen in New York July 30, 2013. Western Union Co, the world's largest money-transfer...
New York, UNITED STATES
A Western Union branch is seen in New York
A Western Union branch is seen in New York July 30, 2013. Western Union Co, the world's largest money-transfer company, reported a 27 percent decline in quarterly profit July 30, 2013 after cutting prices and spending more on its online business to compete with more nimble rivals.
REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
WESTERNUNION-RESULTS/
RTX124TD
July 30, 2013
A person walks out of a Western Union branch in New York July 30, 2013. Western Union Co, the world's...
New York, UNITED STATES
A person walks out of a Western Union branch in New York
A person walks out of a Western Union branch in New York July 30, 2013. Western Union Co, the world's largest money-transfer company, reported a 27 percent decline in quarterly profit July 30, 2013 after cutting prices and spending more on its online business to compete with more nimble rivals.
REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS)
IRELAND-TAX/
RTX11LPE
July 13, 2013
A man walks past the Richview Office Park which houses Western Union offices in Dublin July 8, 2013....
Dublin, Ireland
A man walks past the Richview Office Park which houses Western Union offices in Dublin
A man walks past the Richview Office Park which houses Western Union offices in Dublin July 8, 2013. Occupying a single floor of a three-storey building in a suburban Dublin office park, Western Union's offices are notably modest for the international headquarters of the world's largest money transfer firm. Photograph taken July 8, 2013. To match Insight IRELAND-TAX/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (IRELAND - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
IRELAND-TAX/
RTX11LPD
July 13, 2013
A man walks past the Richview Office Park which houses Western Union offices in Dublin July 8, 2013....
Dublin, Ireland
A man walks past the Richview Office Park which houses Western Union offices in Dublin
A man walks past the Richview Office Park which houses Western Union offices in Dublin July 8, 2013. Occupying a single floor of a three-storey building in a suburban Dublin office park, Western Union's offices are notably modest for the international headquarters of the world's largest money transfer firm. Photograph taken July 8, 2013. To match Insight IRELAND-TAX/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (IRELAND - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
JAMAICA/
RTR2ZZ8O
March 27, 2012
A worker climbs a flag pole to attach a sponsors flag at Jamaica's national stadium during preparations...
Kingston, Jamaica
Worker climbs pole to attach flag at Jamaica's national stadium during preparations for Inter-Secondary...
A worker climbs a flag pole to attach a sponsors flag at Jamaica's national stadium during preparations for the upcoming Jamaica's Inter-Secondary Schools Boys and Girls Athletics Championships at Kingston March 27, 2012. The Boys and Girls Athletics Championships, also known as Champs, is one of the oldest athletic championships in the world, with a history of 100 years. About 30,000 people gather to support their schools annually during Champs. Sporting events such as Champs have produced Jamaican athletes such as Asafa Powell and current Olympic gold medallist Usain Bolt, who is the fastest man in the world. REUTERS/Gilbert Bellamy (JAMAICA - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS)
FINANCIAL/USA-REMITTANCES
RTXDDIY
March 29, 2009
A Western Union sign is seen in New York March 28, 2009. Picture taken March 28, 2009. REUTERS/Eric...
New York, UNITED STATES
A Western Union sign is seen in New York
A Western Union sign is seen in New York March 28, 2009. Picture taken March 28, 2009. REUTERS/Eric Thayer (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SOCIETY)
FINANCIAL/USA-REMITTANCES
RTXDDIH
March 29, 2009
People walk outside a Western Union branch in New York March 28, 2009. The burden of supporting family...
New York, UNITED STATES
People walk outside a Western Union branch in New York
People walk outside a Western Union branch in New York March 28, 2009. The burden of supporting family members abroad is weighing more heavily on immigrants in the United States, and many are having to cut costs to keep up remittances. But remittances are dropping despite the sacrifices. Picture taken March 28, 2009. REUTERS/Eric Thayer (UNITED STATES BUSINESS SOCIETY)
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