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Search results for: Wooden-leg

BELGIUM-SHRIMP/
RTX6DPC2
August 02, 2018
Shrimps are seen in a basket after shrimp fishing during low tide at the coastal town of Oostduinkerke,...
Oostduinkerke, Belgium
Shrimps are seen in a basket after shrimp fishing during low tide at the coastal town of Oostduinkerke...
Shrimps are seen in a basket after shrimp fishing during low tide at the coastal town of Oostduinkerke, Belgium August 2, 2018. REUTERS/Yves Herman
NORTHKOREA-CHINA/BORDER-DEFECTORS
RTX5N7E6
April 12, 2018
Wooden crutches made by Ji Sung-ho are seen in Seoul, South Korea, August 13, 2017. Sung-ho is from Hoeryong,...
Seoul, South Korea
The Wider Image: Escape from North Korea
Wooden crutches made by Ji Sung-ho are seen in Seoul, South Korea, August 13, 2017. Sung-ho is from Hoeryong, near the border with China. He left North Korea in 2006 with a pair of wooden crutches. "I lived as a child beggar in North Korea. I was stealing coals from a train when I fell off and lost my leg and my hand. I had to bring the crutches with me. If I didn't have them, I wouldn't have made it here. The state doesn't help you in North Korea, and people who need crutches make their own. Mine are therefore not factory-made, so they're not perfect and break easily. I had several pairs of crutches but they all broke, and this was the last pair. I used these crutches for 10 years, until I was 25, when I arrived in South Korea. I would steal coal from moving trains and fall off, destroying my crutches. Or I would get beaten up by the police and they'd take and then break my crutches. When they broke, I would make new ones. When I had new ones, I could go back outside. When I first arrived in South Korea I thought about throwing them out. South Korea's intelligence agency gave me a prosthetic leg. My friends said I should throw the crutches out and not think about North Korea. They said I should show Kim Jong Il I was living a new life in South Korea and throw out everything I had from the North. Some asked if I got upset when I saw my crutches. But I couldn't just throw them out. To make my crutches, my friends had given me some wood that they had bought, and someone I knew in North Korea who had carpentry skills had made them. It was my father who added the final touches. There is a lot of love from my North Korean friends and family in these crutches. So I didn't throw them out. The South Korean government gave me some new crutches because the wood from my North Korean ones is hard and painful. But I still keep them, so as not to forget those memories." REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji SEARCH "DEFECTORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
NORTHKOREA-CHINA/BORDER-DEFECTORS
RTX5N7DI
April 12, 2018
Ji Sung-ho, 35, poses for a photograph in Seoul, South Korea, August 13, 2017. Sung-ho is from Hoeryong,...
Seoul, South Korea
The Wider Image: Escape from North Korea
Ji Sung-ho, 35, poses for a photograph in Seoul, South Korea, August 13, 2017. Sung-ho is from Hoeryong, near the border with China. He left North Korea in 2006 with a pair of wooden crutches. "I lived as a child beggar in North Korea. I was stealing coals from a train when I fell off and lost my leg and my hand. I had to bring the crutches with me. If I didn't have them, I wouldn't have made it here. The state doesn't help you in North Korea, and people who need crutches make their own. Mine are therefore not factory-made, so they're not perfect and break easily. I had several pairs of crutches but they all broke, and this was the last pair. I used these crutches for 10 years, until I was 25, when I arrived in South Korea. I would steal coal from moving trains and fall off, destroying my crutches. Or I would get beaten up by the police and they'd take and then break my crutches. When they broke, I would make new ones. When I had new ones, I could go back outside. When I first arrived in South Korea I thought about throwing them out. South Korea's intelligence agency gave me a prosthetic leg. My friends said I should throw the crutches out and not think about North Korea. They said I should show Kim Jong Il I was living a new life in South Korea and throw out everything I had from the North. Some asked if I got upset when I saw my crutches. But I couldn't just throw them out. To make my crutches, my friends had given me some wood that they had bought, and someone I knew in North Korea who had carpentry skills had made them. It was my father who added the final touches. There is a lot of love from my North Korean friends and family in these crutches. So I didn't throw them out. The South Korean government gave me some new crutches because the wood from my North Korean ones is hard and painful. But I still keep them, so as not to forget those memories." REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji SEARCH "DEFECTORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
NORTHKOREA-CHINA/BORDER-DEFECTORS
RTX5N7D8
April 12, 2018
A combination picture shows Ji Sung-ho, 35, (top) and his wooden crutches, in Seoul, South Korea, August...
Seoul, South Korea
The Wider Image: Escape from North Korea
A combination picture shows Ji Sung-ho, 35, (top) and his wooden crutches, in Seoul, South Korea, August 13, 2017. Sung-ho is from Hoeryong, near the border with China. He left North Korea in 2006 with a pair of wooden crutches. "I lived as a child beggar in North Korea. I was stealing coals from a train when I fell off and lost my leg and my hand. I had to bring the crutches with me. If I didn't have them, I wouldn't have made it here. The state doesn't help you in North Korea, and people who need crutches make their own. Mine are therefore not factory-made, so they're not perfect and break easily. I had several pairs of crutches but they all broke, and this was the last pair. I used these crutches for 10 years, until I was 25, when I arrived in South Korea. I would steal coal from moving trains and fall off, destroying my crutches. Or I would get beaten up by the police and they'd take and then break my crutches. When they broke, I would make new ones. When I had new ones, I could go back outside. When I first arrived in South Korea I thought about throwing them out. South Korea's intelligence agency gave me a prosthetic leg. My friends said I should throw the crutches out and not think about North Korea. They said I should show Kim Jong Il I was living a new life in South Korea and throw out everything I had from the North. Some asked if I got upset when I saw my crutches. But I couldn't just throw them out. To make my crutches, my friends had given me some wood that they had bought, and someone I knew in North Korea who had carpentry skills had made them. It was my father who added the final touches. There is a lot of love from my North Korean friends and family in these crutches. So I didn't throw them out. The South Korean government gave me some new crutches because the wood from my North Korean ones is hard and painful. But I still keep them, so as not to forget those memories." REUTERS/Kim Hong-ji SEARCH "DEFECTORS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR
HUNGARY-ELECTION/
RTX5JWSG
April 08, 2018
Hungarian women, wearing traditional costumes, fill their ballot papers at a polling station during Hungarian...
VERESEGYHAZ, Hungary
Hungarian women, wearing traditional costumes, fill their ballot papers at a polling station during Hungarian...
Hungarian women, wearing traditional costumes, fill their ballot papers at a polling station during Hungarian parliamentary elections in Veresegyhaz, Hungary April 8, 2018. REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HUNGARY-ELECTION/
RTX5JRO8
April 08, 2018
A woman stands in polling booth during Hungarian parliamentary elections at a polling station in Budapest,...
Budapest, Hungary
A woman stands in polling booth during Hungarian parliamentary elections at a polling station in Budapest...
A woman stands in polling booth during Hungarian parliamentary elections at a polling station in Budapest, Hungary April 8, 2018. REUTERS/Bernadett Szabo
NORTHKOREA-DEFECTOR/CRUTCHES
RTX4ML43
February 01, 2018
Ji Seong-ho, 35, a North Korean defector who appeared at President Trump's State of the Union address...
Washington, UNITED STATES
A Picture and its Story: Me and my crutches - a North Korean defector's story
Ji Seong-ho, 35, a North Korean defector who appeared at President Trump's State of the Union address this week, is from Hoeryong, near the border with China. He told Reuters last year about the wooden crutches that he left North Korea with in 2006. This is an edited translation of his story: "I lived as a child beggar in North Korea. I was stealing coal from a train when I fell off and lost my leg and my hand. I had to bring the crutches with me. If I didn't have them, I wouldn't have made it here. The state doesn't help you in North Korea, and people who need crutches make their own. Mine are therefore not factory-made so they're not perfect and break easily. I had several pairs of crutches but they all broke, and this was the last pair. I used these crutches for 10 years, until I was 25, when I arrived in South Korea. I would steal coals from moving trains and fall off, destroying my crutches. Or I would get beaten up by the police and they'd take and then break my crutches. When they broke, I would make new ones. When I had new ones, I could go back outside. When I first arrived in South Korea I thought about throwing them out. South Korea's intelligence agency gave me a prosthetic leg. My friends said I should throw the crutches out and not think about North Korea. They said I should show Kim Jong Il I was living a new life in South Korea and throw out everything I had from the North. Some asked if I got upset when I saw my crutches. But I couldn't just throw them out. To make my crutches, my friends had given me some wood that they had bought, and someone I knew in North Korea who had carpentry skills had made them. It was my father who added the final touches. There is a lot of love from my North Korean friends and family in these crutches. So I didn't throw them out. The South Korean government gave me some new crutches because the wood from my North Korean ones is hard and painful. But I still keep them, so as not to forget those memories." REUTERS/Jonathan
UKRAINE-ODDLY/
RTX3A9TM
July 06, 2017
The legs of wooden model Kid are pictured in the flat of its maker, Dmitry Balandin in Zaporizhzhya,...
Zaporizhzhya, Ukraine
The legs of wooden model Kid are pictured in the flat of its maker Balandin in Zaporizhzhya
The legs of wooden model Kid are pictured in the flat of its maker, Dmitry Balandin in Zaporizhzhya, Ukraine July 5, 2017. It took Balandin, who works as a crane operator, eighteen months to build 3 models from 1750 parts. Balandin says he does not use blueprints and designs the parts as he works on them. He says he would love to build metal models but that is impossible to do so in his small apartment. He plays with models as a child would play with a doll or Lego toy and he hopes to have them displayed at exhibitions and galleries. Picture taken July 5, 2017. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
RUSSIA-CULTURE/
RTS10F29
February 26, 2017
A man climbs up a wooden pole to get a prize during celebration of Maslenitsa, or Pancake Week, a pagan...
RUMYANTSEVO, Russia
A man climbs up a wooden pole to get a prize during celebration of Maslenitsa, or Pancake Week, a pagan...
A man climbs up a wooden pole to get a prize during celebration of Maslenitsa, or Pancake Week, a pagan holiday marking the end of winter, near Rumyantsevo, Moscow region, Russia, February 26, 2017. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
OLYMPICS-RIO/CONDOMS
RTX2JP9Z
July 04, 2016
Antonia Marcelino, 51, carries a handmade wooden leg, a symbol of grace, during an annual celebration...
Xapuri, Brazil
2016 Rio Olympics: Forests, faith and Olympic condoms
Antonia Marcelino, 51, carries a handmade wooden leg, a symbol of grace, during an annual celebration in Chico Mendes Extraction Reserve in Xapuri, Acre state, Brazil, June 24, 2016. The leg is an offering to Sao Joao do Guarani (St. John the Guarani), who devotees believe is a saint of the forest and can grant blessings and miracles. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes SEARCH "CONDOMS OLYMPICS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z0I
November 08, 2015
Crew members of a wooden raft of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition Norwegian Hakon Wium Lie (L) and Chilean Esteban...
Callao, Peru
Crew members of a wooden raft of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition Norwegian Hakon Wium Lie and Chilean Esteban...
Crew members of a wooden raft of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition Norwegian Hakon Wium Lie (L) and Chilean Esteban Contreras prepare the cabin before its departure from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z0H
November 08, 2015
A crew member of a wooden raft of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition prepares the cabin before its departure from...
Callao, Peru
A crew member of a wooden raft of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition prepares the cabin before its departure from...
A crew member of a wooden raft of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition prepares the cabin before its departure from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z0E
November 08, 2015
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November...
Callao, Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z0D
November 08, 2015
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru,...
Callao, Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z0B
November 08, 2015
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November...
Callao, Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z07
November 08, 2015
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November...
Callao, Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z05
November 08, 2015
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru,...
Callao, Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z04
November 08, 2015
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November...
Callao, Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z02
November 08, 2015
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru,...
Callao, Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z01
November 08, 2015
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November...
Callao, Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5Z00
November 08, 2015
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November...
Callao, Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
Two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5YZZ
November 08, 2015
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru,...
Callao, Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
PERU-EXPEDITION/KON-TIKI
RTS5YZQ
November 08, 2015
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru,...
Callao, Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru
One of two wooden rafts of the Kon-Tiki2 expedition depart from Peru's Callao Naval Shipyard in Peru, November 7, 2015. A team of explorers departed on Saturday by raft from Peru on an 8,000 kilometre (5,000 mile) journey destined for Easter Island and Valparaiso, Chile. They expect the mammoth journey to take approximately four months to complete with the first leg from Lima to Easter Island to take about six weeks. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo
MEXICO-FARMS/WIDERIMAGE
RTX1D45R
May 15, 2015
The legs of fruit pickers Genaro Perfecto, 38, and his wife Cecilia Feliciano, 37, are seen as they pose...
SAN QUINTIN, Mexico
Wider Image: Fruits Of Wrath
The legs of fruit pickers Genaro Perfecto, 38, and his wife Cecilia Feliciano, 37, are seen as they pose for a photo with their children in the courtyard of their house in San Quintin in Baja California state, Mexico April 1, 2015. Fruit pickers in the Baja California peninsula of Mexico, railing against a life of grinding poverty, have blocked roads, staged marches and held meetings with lawmakers since March as frustration over working conditions boiled over. One labourer in San Quintin, south of the border town of Tijuana, sleeps with his family on the bare earth in a tiny wooden shack on scrubland. He said after picking between 110 kg and 200kg of strawberries a day he earns from $56 to $79 a week. Strawberries fetched $5.19 a kilo on average in the United States in 2013. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

PICTURE 17 OF 27 FOR WIDER IMAGE STORY "FRUITS OF WRATH"
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CHINA-DAILYLIFE/
RTR4VBIO
March 29, 2015
A man rests on wooden boards at a freight station in Wanding, Yunnan province, March 28, 2015. Picture...
WANDING, China
A man rests on wooden boards at a freight station in Wanding
A man rests on wooden boards at a freight station in Wanding, Yunnan province, March 28, 2015. Picture taken March 28, 2015. REUTERS/Wong Campion
CZECH-CULTURE/
RTR4QJ5H
February 21, 2015
A participant competes on vintage skis during a traditional historical ski race in the northern Bohemian...
SMRZOVKA, Czech Republic
A participant competes on vintage skis during a traditional historical ski race in Smrzovka
A participant competes on vintage skis during a traditional historical ski race in the northern Bohemian town of Smrzovka February 21, 2015. REUTERS/David W Cerny (CZECH REPUBLIC - Tags: SOCIETY SPORT SKIING)
KENYA-CONFLICT/
RTR47M13
September 25, 2014
A Turkana man sleeps on the western shore of Lake Turkana close to Todonyang near the Kenya-Ethiopia...
Todonyang, Kenya
A Turkana man sleeps on the western shore of Lake Turkana close to Todonyang near the Kenya-Ethiopia...
A Turkana man sleeps on the western shore of Lake Turkana close to Todonyang near the Kenya-Ethiopia border in northern Kenya on September 25, 2014. The Turkana have historically clashed over ethnic differences and precious resources such as fishing, pasture and fresh water with other tribes bordering their territory such as the Dassanach from southern Ethiopia. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic (KENYA - Tags: SOCIETY CIVIL UNREST TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
SRILANKA-RELIGION/
RTR40ZPH
August 02, 2014
A devotee hangs a wooden pole with hooks attached to his back and legs during the annual Chariot festival...
Colombo, Sri Lanka
A devotee hangs a wooden pole with hooks attached to his back and legs during the annual Chariot festival...
A devotee hangs a wooden pole with hooks attached to his back and legs during the annual Chariot festival of the Sri Mayurapathy Paththirakaali temple in Colombo August 2, 2014. The chariot procession starts at the temple and is brought through streets as Hindu devotees follow behind, performing acts of penance or thanksgiving such as piercing hooks through their skin, in order to fulfill their vows to the Hindu gods. REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte (SRI LANKA - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY)
SOCCER-CHAMPIONS/
RTR3NALZ
April 30, 2014
A Chelsea stadium worker changes the wooden fixture board to their next match following tonights Champion's...
London, United Kingdom
Chelsea stadium worker changes wooden fixture board to next match following tonights Champion's League...
A Chelsea stadium worker changes the wooden fixture board to their next match following tonights Champion's League semi-final second leg soccer match against Atletico Madrid at Stamford Bridge in London April 30, 2014. REUTERS/Toby Melville (BRITAIN - Tags: SPORT SOCCER)
GERMANY/
RTR3E43K
February 22, 2013
Participants compete in the 'Nostalgic Ski Race' in the western town of Neuastenberg February 17, 2013....
NEUASTENBERG, Germany
Participants compete in the 'Nostalgic Ski Race' in the western town of Neuastenberg
Participants compete in the 'Nostalgic Ski Race' in the western town of Neuastenberg February 17, 2013. The 'Nostalgic Ski Race' is held every two years with about 40 participants and is organized by the ski club of Neuastenberg, a town which was founded in 1713. The conditions for the participation in the race are vintage skis and dresses. Picture taken February 17, 2013. REUTERS/Ina Fassbender (GERMANY - Tags: SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT SPORT)
COSTA-RICA/
RTR3DO1Q
February 12, 2013
A worker tries on a prosthetic leg for Jimena Ruiz, 6, at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose...
San Jose, Costa Rica
A worker tries on a prosthetic leg for a patient at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose
A worker tries on a prosthetic leg for Jimena Ruiz, 6, at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTA-RICA/
RTR3DO1K
February 12, 2013
Jimena Ruiz, 6, leans against a chair while waiting for a new prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced...
San Jose, Costa Rica
A girl leans against a chair while waiting for a new prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics...
Jimena Ruiz, 6, leans against a chair while waiting for a new prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTA-RICA/
RTR3DO1J
February 12, 2013
Jimena Ruiz, 6, waits for a new prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February...
San Jose, Costa Rica
A girl waits for a new prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose
Jimena Ruiz, 6, waits for a new prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTA-RICA/
RTR3DO1H
February 12, 2013
A worker makes a prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013....
San Jose, Costa Rica
A worker makes a prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose
A worker makes a prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTA-RICA/
RTR3DO1G
February 12, 2013
Workers make a prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Workers make a prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose
Workers make a prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR3DO1F
February 12, 2013
Jimena Ruiz, 6, looks at her old leg prosthesis, while waiting for a new one at the Center of Advanced...
San Jose, Costa Rica
A girl looks at her old leg prosthesis while waiting for a new one at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics...
Jimena Ruiz, 6, looks at her old leg prosthesis, while waiting for a new one at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTA-RICA/
RTR3DO1E
February 12, 2013
Used prosthetic legs are seen at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Used prosthetic legs are seen at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose
Used prosthetic legs are seen at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR3DO1C
February 12, 2013
A worker adjusts part of a leg prosthesis fitted in a plastic mould at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics...
San Jose, Costa Rica
A worker adjusts part of a leg prosthesis fitted in a plastic mould at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics...
A worker adjusts part of a leg prosthesis fitted in a plastic mould at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR3DO17
February 12, 2013
A worker cuts part of a mould for making a plastic prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics...
San Jose, Costa Rica
A worker cuts part of a mould for making a plastic prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics...
A worker cuts part of a mould for making a plastic prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTA-RICA/
RTR3DO14
February 12, 2013
Orthotist and prosthetist Dino Cozzarelli checks a patient's prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Orthotist and prosthetist Dino Cozzarelli checks a patient's prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced...
Orthotist and prosthetist Dino Cozzarelli checks a patient's prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR3DO13
February 12, 2013
Alberto Acosta boards an ambulance after receiving a prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Alberto Acosta boards an ambulance after receiving a prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics...
Alberto Acosta boards an ambulance after receiving a prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTA-RICA/
RTR3DO12
February 12, 2013
Alberto Acosta tests his new prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Alberto Acosta tests his new prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose
Alberto Acosta tests his new prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Dino Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian orthotist and prosthetist living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones. REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY)
COSTARICA/
RTR3E0KW
February 11, 2013
Orthotist and prosthetist Dino Cozzarelli checks a patient's prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced...
San Jose, Costa Rica
Orthotist and prosthetist Cozzarelli checks a patient's prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics...
Orthotist and prosthetist Dino Cozzarelli checks a patient's prosthetic leg at the Center of Advanced Prosthetics in San Jose February 11, 2013. Cozzarelli, an Ecuadorian living in Costa Rica, is attempting to introduce affordable prosthetic limbs for patients by purchasing prosthesis used previously in the U.S. and Europe and modifying them to fit their new wearers. For instance, a new bionic knee costs an average of $20,000 while a used one purchased and fitted with new sockets would cost patients only a quarter of its price. According to Cozzarelli, modifying plastic prosthesis is a better option for patients using free wooden prosthesis funded by the state's social security system, which are heavier and of lower quality than plastic ones.REUTERS/Juan Carlos Ulate (COSTA RICA - Tags: HEALTH SOCIETY) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
MALI-CRISIS/CRIME
RTR39JU0
October 25, 2012
Construction worker Ibrahim Diarra moves a plank of wood at a villa work site in the Bako-Djicoroni district...
Bamako, Mali
Construction worker Ibrahim Diarra moves a plank of wood in a villa work site in the Bako-Djicoroni district...
Construction worker Ibrahim Diarra moves a plank of wood at a villa work site in the Bako-Djicoroni district of Bamako September 19, 2012. Picture taken September 19, 2012. To match Special Report MALI-CRISIS/CRIME REUTERS/Joe Penney (MALI - Tags: BUSINESS CONSTRUCTION CRIME LAW TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
MYANMAR-TRANSPORTATION/
RTR3900X
October 10, 2012
A man with a wooden leg cleans rubbish from the tracks of a circular train in Yangon's suburbs September...
Yangon, Myanmar
A man with a wooden leg cleans rubbish from the tracks of a circular train in Yangon's suburbs
A man with a wooden leg cleans rubbish from the tracks of a circular train in Yangon's suburbs September 17, 2012. Around Yangon, with its growing and increasingly demanding population of almost five million, a circular train operates, moving passengers through its suburbs. On a three hour long ride, a train made of rusted vehicles marked with different classes but little visible difference between them, takes passengers around the city stopping briefly at numerous small stations. As Myanmar opens up, the most immediate physical changes are on its streets, as new cars begin plying roads long dominated by rattletrap buses and rusting taxis. Barely changed since the British colonial era in the early 20th century, some of the decades-old buses and trains are starting to be retired. Picture taken September 17, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: TRANSPORT SOCIETY)

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NEPAL/
RTR36V87
August 15, 2012
Drumpal Choudhary, 11, a street performer ties his legs with a wooden pole as he gets ready to perform...
Kathmandu, Nepal
Drumpal, 11, a street performer ties his legs with a wooden pole as he gets ready to perform a trick...
Drumpal Choudhary, 11, a street performer ties his legs with a wooden pole as he gets ready to perform a trick at a street in Kathmandu August 15, 2012. Drumpal, his brother, Gchan and sister, Shivani, came to Kathmandu from India 5 years ago. They earn their living by performing tricks on the streets of Kathmandu. According to Drumpal, they earn around $10 a day by performing tricks, which is not enough to feed their 10-member family living together in a small hut without a proper toilet or any basic needs. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar (NEPAL - Tags: SOCIETY POVERTY IMMIGRATION)
BRITAIN
RTR30ESN
April 06, 2012
Felicity Hanson (C) reacts to the cold water as she and fellow pilgrims Margaret Williams (L) and Nadia...
Berwick, United Kingdom
Felicity Hanson reacts to the cold water as she and fellow pilgrims Margaret Williams and Nadia Coppola...
Felicity Hanson (C) reacts to the cold water as she and fellow pilgrims Margaret Williams (L) and Nadia Coppola walk across a tidal causeway while carrying a wooden cross during the final leg of the Northern Cross pilgrimage to Holy Island in Northumbria, England April 6, 2012. For more than thirty years Christians have taken part in the pilgrimage to Holy Island, walking through Northumberland and the Scottish Borders, during Holy Week. REUTERS/David Moir (BRITAIN - Tags: RELIGION) SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY)
BRAZIL/
RTR2SJRG
October 12, 2011
A pilgrim rests next to a wooden cross as he arrives at the Basilica of Our Lady of Aparecida, Brazil's...
Aparecida, Brazil
Pilgrim rests next to a wooden cross as he arrives at the Basilica of Our Lady of Aparecida in the city...
A pilgrim rests next to a wooden cross as he arrives at the Basilica of Our Lady of Aparecida, Brazil's national saint, in the city of Aparecida, 165 km (103 miles) east of Sao Paulo October 11, 2011. The Basilica is Latin America's most popular shrine and one of the world's largest cathedrals. The shrine dates back to 1717, when three fishermen having a run of bad luck cast their nets in the Paraiba River and dragged up a headless statue of the Virgin Mary, venerated as Our Lady of Aparecida and named Brazil's national saint in 1930. Every year millions of Brazilian and foreign pilgrims visit the shrine and about 100,000 people usually attend services in Aparecida commemorating her every October 12. REUTERS/Nacho Doce (BRAZIL - Tags: RELIGION)
SPAIN/
RTR2OLWE
July 08, 2011
A runner hangs from a wooden door as Cebada Gago fighting bulls and steers run by during the second running...
Pamplona, Spain
A runner hangs from a wooden door as Cebada Gago fighting bulls and steers run by during the second running...
A runner hangs from a wooden door as Cebada Gago fighting bulls and steers run by during the second running of the bulls of the San Fermin festival in Pamplona July 8, 2011. Four people were treated in hospital and a 24-year-old Australian man was gored in the leg in a run that lasted three minutes and ten seconds, according to local news sources. REUTERS/Joseba Etxaburu (SPAIN - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)
SPAIN/
RTR2OLWD
July 08, 2011
A runner (L) hangs from a wooden door as a Cebada Gago fighting bull runs by during the second running...
Pamplona, Spain
A runner hangs from a wooden door as a Cebada Gago fighting bull runs by during the second running of...
A runner (L) hangs from a wooden door as a Cebada Gago fighting bull runs by during the second running of the bulls of the San Fermin festival in Pamplona July 8, 2011. Four people were treated in hospital and a 24-year-old Australian man was gored in the leg in a run that lasted three minutes and ten seconds, according to local news sources. REUTERS/Joseba Etxaburu (SPAIN - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY)
USA/
RTR2KETD
March 26, 2011
Members of the audience pedal the "Sustainable Sound" system, an eco friendly power generator, during...
Somerville, UNITED STATES
Members of the audience pedal the "Sustainable Sound" system, an eco friendly power generator, during...
Members of the audience pedal the "Sustainable Sound" system, an eco friendly power generator, during a performance by "Melodeego" at Johnny D's in Somerville, Massachusetts March 25, 2011. Created by Sean Stevens from scrap materials such as old bicycle parts and plywood, the system produces electricity to power audio and lighting devices for concerts by pedalling on it. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY ODDLY SCI TECH ENERGY)
CLIMATE DEFORESTATION/INDONESIA
RTXVCH4
December 03, 2010
An illegal logger cuts down a tree to be turned into planks for construction in a forest south of Sampit,...
Sampit, Indonesia
To match Special Report CLIMATE DEFORESTATION/INDONESIA
An illegal logger cuts down a tree to be turned into planks for construction in a forest south of Sampit, in Indonesia's Central Kalimantan province November 14, 2010. Rainforests cover 60 percent of Indonesia, and yet the country is one of the world's leading emitters of the greenhouse gas blamed for global warming. The reason is that Indonesia also has one of the planet's fastest rates of deforestation. Picture taken November 14, 2010. To match Special Report CLIMATE DEFORESTATION/INDONESIA REUTERS/Yusuf Ahmad (INDONESIA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT)
PAKISTAN/
RTR2ELLJ
May 31, 2010
A barefoot labourer works to overhaul a wooden cargo ship in Karachi's Fish Harbor May 31, 2010. The...
Karachi, Pakistan
A barefoot labourer works to overhaul a wooden cargo ship in Karachi's Fish Harbor
A barefoot labourer works to overhaul a wooden cargo ship in Karachi's Fish Harbor May 31, 2010. The process of overhauling a boat takes about a week, in which the boat is brought to dry land and its wooden panels and paint serviced by a team of 20 carpenters and labourers, before it is set back to sea. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro (PAKISTAN - Tags: EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS SOCIETY)
CHINA-BRUCELEE/
RTR2C1RC
March 25, 2010
A gardener walks near the legs of a twelve-metre high bronze statue of Bruce Lee under scaffolding at...
XIACUN, China
To match Reuters Life! CHINA-BRUCELEE/
A gardener walks near the legs of a twelve-metre high bronze statue of Bruce Lee under scaffolding at a "Bruce Lee Paradise" park in the township of Xiacun in China's southern Guangdong province March 18, 2010. In the sleepy town of Xiacun, elders doze and children play along "little dragon" alley, which winds its way to the ancestral home of kung fu star Bruce Lee. The small, grey-brick courtyard house contains old photos of Lee on the walls, an altar, a musty bedroom and a wooden dummy used for martial arts training, but visitors are few and far between, and other efforts by the town's council to commemorate their most famous son are also off the tourist radar. Picture taken March 18, 2010. To match Reuters Life! CHINA-BRUCELEE/. REUTERS/Bobby Yip (CHINA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT) SOCIETY SPORT)
CHINA-BRUCELEE/
RTR2C1R1
March 25, 2010
The legs of a twelve-metre high bronze statue of Bruce Lee are seen under scaffolding at a "Bruce Lee...
XIACUN, China
To match Reuters Life! CHINA-BRUCELEE/.
The legs of a twelve-metre high bronze statue of Bruce Lee are seen under scaffolding at a "Bruce Lee Paradise" park in the township of Xiacun in China's southern Guangdong province March 18, 2010. In the sleepy town of Xiacun, elders doze and children play along "little dragon" alley, which winds its way to the ancestral home of kung fu star Bruce Lee. The small, grey-brick courtyard house contains old photos of Lee on the walls, an altar, a musty bedroom and a wooden dummy used for martial arts training, but visitors are few and far between, and other efforts by the town's council to commemorate their most famous son are also off the tourist radar. Picture taken March 18, 2010. To match Reuters Life! CHINA-BRUCELEE/. REUTERS/Bobby Yip (CHINA - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT) SOCIETY SPORT)
CHINA/
RTR26T15
August 17, 2009
Women dance together on a Sunday morning at the Paramount, a ballroom in the centre of Shanghai, August...
Shanghai, China
Women dance together on a Sunday morning at the Paramount, a ballroom in the centre of Shanghai
Women dance together on a Sunday morning at the Paramount, a ballroom in the centre of Shanghai, August 16, 2009. The Paramount originally opened in 1933 and was frequented by Shanghai's elite during the 30's. After the communists came to power in 1949 and the upper classes fell from grace, the hall was closed. The Paramount reopened in 2001 after massive renovations and now operates as a place with a taste of old Shanghai where locals, some in their 80's, come to dance in evenings and in the day. REUTERS/Nir Elias
CHINA-TIBET/MONK
RTXC3HW
February 26, 2009
The feet of monk Hua Chi are seen close to the footprints made by him by praying at the same spot for...
TONGREN, China
The feet of monk Hua Chi are seen close to the footprints made by him at a monastery near Tongren
The feet of monk Hua Chi are seen close to the footprints made by him by praying at the same spot for decades, at a monastery near Tongren, Qinghai province February 25, 2009. Hua Chi, who believes he is around 70 years old, has prayed at the same spot so many times that perfect footprints remain on the wooden doorstep. The monk and doctor of traditional medicine has been coming to the small temple in the monastery town of Tongren in China's western Qinghai province for nearly twenty years to perform a strict personal ritual. Every day, before sunrise, Hua arrives at the temple steps, placing his feet onto his footprints as he bends down to kowtow a few thousand times before walking around the temple. Picture taken February 25, 2009. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause (CHINA)
CHINA-TIBET/MONK
RTXC3HN
February 26, 2009
The footprints made by monk Hua Chi who kowtowed at the same spot for decades, are seen at a monastery...
TONGREN, China
The footprints made by monk Hua Chi who kowtowed at the same spot for decades, are seen at a monastery...
The footprints made by monk Hua Chi who kowtowed at the same spot for decades, are seen at a monastery near Tongren, Qinghai province February 25, 2009. Hua Chi, who believes he is around 70 years old, has kowtowed at the same spot so many times that perfect footprints remain on the wooden doorstep. The monk and doctor of traditional medicine has been coming to the small temple in the monastery town of Tongren in China's western Qinghai province for nearly twenty years to perform a strict personal ritual. Every day, before sunrise, Hua arrives at the temple steps, placing his feet onto his footprints as he bends down to kowtow a few thousand times before walking around the temple. "During the first years I would kowtow 2,000 to 3,000 times a day. But I have grown older, so in recent years I have only done around 1,000 each day," he said, adding that to his dismay, in the cold winter-time he would sometimes only manage around 500 kowtows. Picture taken February 25, 2009. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause (CHINA)
CHINA/
RTXB8SI
February 05, 2009
Footprints carved in wood, which locals believe were made by a worshipper who prayed at the same spot...
TONGREN, China
Footprints carved in wood, which locals believe were made by a worshipper who prayed at the same spot...
Footprints carved in wood, which locals believe were made by a worshipper who prayed at the same spot for decades, are seen at a monastery near Tongren, Qinghai province February 5, 2009. Local Tibetan monks and pilgrims gather to celebrate Monlam, or Great Prayer Festival, one of the most important festivals in Tibetan Buddhism. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause (CHINA)
CANADA/
RTXAKA2
November 13, 2008
A man sits in the Galleria Italia at the newly renovated Art Gallery of Ontario designed by architect...
Toronto, Canada
A man sits in the Galleria Italia at the newly renovated Art Gallery of Ontario designed by architect...
A man sits in the Galleria Italia at the newly renovated Art Gallery of Ontario designed by architect Frank Gehry in Toronto, November 13, 2008. REUTERS/Mark Blinch (CANADA)
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