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Search results for: Worker%27s-health

HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/LEAR
RTS39QSJ
May 31, 2020
An employee of U.S. auto part maker Lear Corp., wearing a protective face mask, talks to a health worker...
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
U.S. auto part maker Lear Corp. plant safety measures to resume operations during COVID-19, in Ciudad...
An employee of U.S. auto part maker Lear Corp., wearing a protective face mask, talks to a health worker at a tent as part of the new security measures at the plant, before resuming operations during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 27, 2020. Picture taken May 27, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/LEAR
RTS39QSI
May 31, 2020
An employee of U.S. auto part maker Lear Corp., wearing a protective face mask, is checked by a health...
Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
U.S. auto part maker Lear Corp. plant safety measures to resume operations during COVID-19, in Ciudad...
An employee of U.S. auto part maker Lear Corp., wearing a protective face mask, is checked by a health worker at a tent as part of the new security measures at the plant, before resuming operations during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, May 27, 2020. Picture taken May 27, 2020. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/CANADA-GULL BAY
RTX7G9CY
April 28, 2020
A M.A.S.H tent is prepared where provincial health workers will perform coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
GULL BAY, Canada
Provincial health workers perform coronavirus disease tests in Gull Bay
A M.A.S.H tent is prepared where provincial health workers will perform coronavirus disease (COVID-19) tests on residents of the remote First Nations community of Gull Bay, Ontario, Canada April 27, 2020. Picture taken April 27, 2020. REUTERS/David Jackson
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MEDICS
RTX7D4R0
April 15, 2020
Meghan Sheehan, 27, a nurse practitioner who is caring for COVID-19 patients at an emergency department,...
UNITED STATES
Wider Image: A day fighting the coronavirus: US hospital staff share hardest moments on shift
Meghan Sheehan, 27, a nurse practitioner who is caring for COVID-19 patients at an emergency department, poses for a photograph after a 12-hour shift, outside the hospital where she works, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, Maryland, U.S., April 6, 2020. "I think the hardest moment has been the fear that lives within all of us. There is a lot of unknown right now. We fear what's going to happen tomorrow, how the emergency department will look next week when we come in. We have fears about our own colleagues, whether they will fall ill. We also fear that we could be asymptomatic carriers and bring this virus home to our families and our loved ones. There has been a lot of fear over our supplies and whether we'll run out. And then obviously there is the fear that we will see patients and not be able to do everything we normally can to help save patients' lives," Sheehan said. REUTERS/Rosem Morton SEARCH "MARYLAND COVID-19 HEALTH WORKERS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-SUPPLIES
RTS37G5P
March 27, 2020
Health workers in protective gear peer from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
Health workers in protective gear peer from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly - RC2ESF9VPJJ5
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37FKM
March 27, 2020
Health care workers stand outside a tent erected to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens, New York
Health care workers stand outside a tent erected to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37F6D
March 27, 2020
Scott LoBaido, 55, from Staten Island posts a large "Thank You" note dedicated to the health workers...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens, New York
Scott LoBaido, 55, from Staten Island posts a large "Thank You" note dedicated to the health workers of the nearby Elmhurst Hospital Center who are treating and testing people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Queens, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37F6C
March 27, 2020
Scott LoBaido, 55, from Staten Island posts a large "Thank You" note dedicated to the health workers...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens, New York
Scott LoBaido, 55, from Staten Island posts a large "Thank You" note dedicated to the health workers of the nearby Elmhurst Hospital Center who are treating and testing people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Queens, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37F69
March 27, 2020
Scott LoBaido, 55, from Staten Island posts a large "Thank You" note dedicated to the health workers...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens, New York
Scott LoBaido, 55, from Staten Island posts a large "Thank You" note dedicated to the health workers of the nearby Elmhurst Hospital Center who are treating and testing people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Queens, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37ESM
March 27, 2020
E.M.T.'s load a patient into an ambulance as health workers continued to test people for coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
E.M.T.'s load a patient into an ambulance as health workers continued to test people for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37ESD
March 27, 2020
Health workers in protective gear peer from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
Health workers in protective gear peer from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37ESC
March 27, 2020
A health worker in protective gear pauses near a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
A health worker in protective gear pauses near a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37ESB
March 27, 2020
A health worker in protective gear peers from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
A health worker in protective gear peers from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37ESA
March 27, 2020
Health workers in protective gear peer from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
Health workers in protective gear peer from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37ES6
March 27, 2020
Health workers in protective gear peer at people lining up to enter a tent which was constructed to test...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
Health workers in protective gear peer at people lining up to enter a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37ES4
March 27, 2020
A health worker in protective gear emerges from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
A health worker in protective gear emerges from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37ES3
March 27, 2020
A health worker in protective gear emerges from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
A health worker in protective gear emerges from a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-NEW YORK
RTS37ES2
March 27, 2020
A health worker in protective gear stands near a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing at the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York
A health worker in protective gear stands near a tent which was constructed to test people for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York City, U.S., March 27, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
BRITAIN-ELECTION/CORBYN
RTX7APDU
November 27, 2019
An NHS (National Health Service) worker poses for a picture with documents distributed at the Labour...
London, United Kingdom
Jeremy Corbyn speaks during a general election campaign event in London
An NHS (National Health Service) worker poses for a picture with documents distributed at the Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn's general election campaign event in London, Britain November 27, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX2602K
February 08, 2016
Gleyse Kelly da Silva bathes her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife,...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Gleyse Kelly da Silva bathes her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife, Brazil, January 30, 2016. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26028
February 08, 2016
Genesis Kladm holds Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife, Brazil, January 30,...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Genesis Kladm holds Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife, Brazil, January 30, 2016. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26026
February 08, 2016
Gleyse Kelly da Silva embraces her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil,...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Gleyse Kelly da Silva embraces her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26023
February 08, 2016
Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife,...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife, Brazil, January 30, 2016. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX26021
February 08, 2016
Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife,...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife, Brazil, January 30, 2016. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX2601X
February 08, 2016
Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, near at their house in...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, near at their house in Recife, Brazil, January 30, 2016. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX2601V
February 08, 2016
Maria do Rosario holds her granddaughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife,...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Maria do Rosario holds her granddaughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife, Brazil, January 30, 2016. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX2601U
February 08, 2016
Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife,...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife, Brazil, January 30, 2016. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX2601L
February 08, 2016
Gleyse Kelly da Silva looks at her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife,...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Gleyse Kelly da Silva looks at her daughter Maria Giovanna, who has microcephaly, at their house in Recife, Brazil, January 30, 2016. Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES
HEALTH-ZIKA/BRAZIL
RTX2601H
February 08, 2016
Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound...
Recife, Brazil
A Picture and its Story: After Zika - a mother's story
Reuters Photographer Ueslei Marcelino: "Gleyse Kelly da Silva was seven months pregnant when an ultrasound showed her baby's head had stopped growing. Maria Giovanna, now three months, has microcephaly, a deformation characterised by abnormally small heads that can also include brain damage. The condition is suspected to be linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, which the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency. My colleagues and I spent a day with Silva and her family at their home in Recife, eastern Brazil, which is at the centre of a crisis overwhelming local authorities. Silva, a 27-year-old toll-booth worker, became ill in April with a fever, back pain, itching and a rash. 'When I saw her the first time I cried,' Silva said. 'I saw my perfect daughter and thanked God. It was a feeling of love, happiness.' Such an assignment is delicate; you have to be respectful. I felt a responsibility to share their story and highlight the problem. Doctors took blood samples, as well as liquid from the baby's spine, for tests. Silva and Maria Giovanna's father, Felipe Marques, are still awaiting the results. Silva hopes her daughter will not suffer any severe consequences and that she will grow up to walk, talk and play with other children. 'I cannot believe it when the doctors say she will not walk,' Silva said. 'I need to believe that everything will be all right.'" REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino SEARCH "GLEYSE KELLY" FOR ALL IMAGES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-ZIKA/PUERTO RICO
RTX24BTO
January 28, 2016
A worker uses a forklift to store abandoned tyres, to remove potential breeding spots for mosquitoes...
San Juan, Puerto Rico
A worker uses a forklift to store abandoned tyres to remove potential breeding spots for mosquitoes transmitting...
A worker uses a forklift to store abandoned tyres, to remove potential breeding spots for mosquitoes transmitting Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases, at a temporary collection center in San Juan January 27, 2016. Puerto Rico is to release a report on Zika cases on the island this week which will show that around 18 cases are confirmed, the U.S. territory's health secretary Ana Rius told reporters on Tuesday. REUTERS/Alvin Baez TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-ZIKA/PUERTO RICO
RTX24BT1
January 28, 2016
A worker stores abandoned tyres, to remove potential breeding spots for mosquitoes transmitting Zika...
San Juan, Puerto Rico
A worker stores abandoned tyres, to remove potential breeding spots for mosquitoes transmitting Zika...
A worker stores abandoned tyres, to remove potential breeding spots for mosquitoes transmitting Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases, at a temporary collection center in San Juan January 27, 2016. Puerto Rico is to release a report on Zika cases on the island this week which will show that around 18 cases are confirmed, the U.S. territory's health secretary Ana Rius told reporters on Tuesday. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
HEALTH-ZIKA/PUERTO RICO
RTX24BSX
January 28, 2016
A worker uses a forklift to store abandoned tyres, to remove potential breeding spots for mosquitoes...
San Juan, Puerto Rico
A worker uses a forklift to store abandoned tyres, to remove potential breeding spots for mosquitoes...
A worker uses a forklift to store abandoned tyres, to remove potential breeding spots for mosquitoes transmitting Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases, at a temporary collection center in San Juan January 27, 2016. Puerto Rico is to release a report on Zika cases on the island this week which will show that around 18 cases are confirmed, the U.S. territory's health secretary Ana Rius told reporters on Tuesday. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
HEALTH-ZIKA/PUERTO RICO
RTX24BSW
January 28, 2016
A health worker prepares insecticide before fumigating in a neighborhood in San Juan, January 27, 2016....
San Juan, Puerto Rico
A health worker prepares insecticide before fumigating in a neighborhood in San Juan
A health worker prepares insecticide before fumigating in a neighborhood in San Juan, January 27, 2016. Puerto Rico is to release a report on Zika cases on the island this week which will show that around 18 cases are confirmed, the U.S. territory's health secretary Ana Rius told reporters on Tuesday. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
AFGHANISTAN-DRUGS/
RTX21M9H
January 09, 2016
Health workers help to undress people at a newly-opened treatment centre at Camp Phoenix, after a police...
Kabul, Afghanistan
Health workers help to undress people at a newly-opened treatment centre at Camp Phoenix, after a police...
Health workers help to undress people at a newly-opened treatment centre at Camp Phoenix, after a police round up of suspected drug addicts in Kabul, Afghanistan December 27, 2015. Afghan officials have opened a new drug treatment centre in an abandoned NATO military base in Kabul, in the latest attempt to stamp out the country's massive problem of drug abuse. Camp Phoenix, a former training camp on the edges of Kabul set up by the U.S. army in 2003, will take in around 1,000 homeless drug addicts who will receive food, medical attention and treatment, said Public Health Minister Ferozuddin Feroz. Picture taken December 27, 2015. REUTERS/Ahmad Masood
CENTRALAFRICA-HEALTH/
RTX1VLLF
November 24, 2015
A doctor with the Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) (Doctors Without Borders) charity examines one of Marceline...
Bambari, Central African Republic
An MSF doctor examines one of Marceline Wanou’s two sons as they recover from malnutrition in hospital...
A doctor with the Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) (Doctors Without Borders) charity examines one of Marceline Wanou’s two sons as they recover from malnutrition in hospital in Bambari, Central African Republic, November 10, 2015. A fter gunmen burned down her village in scrubland of Central African Republic's Ouaka region, Marceline Wanou fled into the forest with her two young sons, hoping to return in a few days. Nine months later Wanou has yet to go back, spending six months struggling to survive in the forest until a team of aid workers in July discovered her and 350 other members of her community, badly malnourished with many barely able to walk. Clashes between mainly Christian anti-balaka militias and mainly Muslim Seleka factions risk derailing internationally-backed presidential and parliamentary elections now due on Dec. 27 after being postponed in October due to violence. To match story CENTRALAFRICA-HEALTH/ Picture taken November 10, 2015. REUTERS/Tom Esslemont
IRELAND-ADOPTION
RTR3FSU4
February 27, 2014
Catherine Droogan holds her birth and baptismal certificate in the kitchen of her house in the Northern...
Omagh, United Kingdom
Droogan holds her birth and baptismal certificate in her house in Omagh
Catherine Droogan holds her birth and baptismal certificate in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh February 27, 2014. Adopted at four weeks from a convent in eastern Ireland, Droogan doesn't know who her parents were or where she was born. She is not even certain who actually named her Catherine. Lying on her kitchen table in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh is a one-page document that the state has given her about her parents, containing what's known as "non-identifying information". It took her a year to get from Ireland's health service and tells her that her father was a blue-eyed factory worker in his early 20s, and her mother was a catering assistant who liked to read and dance. There are no names or addresses. To match Insight IRELAND-ADOPTION/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
IRELAND-ADOPTION
RTR3FSTZ
February 27, 2014
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph while holding her adoption papers in the kitchen of her house...
Omagh, United Kingdom
Droogan poses for a photo while holding her adoption papers in her house in Omagh
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph while holding her adoption papers in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh February 27, 2014. Adopted at four weeks from a convent in eastern Ireland, Droogan doesn't know who her parents were or where she was born. She is not even certain who actually named her Catherine. Lying on her kitchen table in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh is a one-page document that the state has given her about her parents, containing what's known as "non-identifying information". It took her a year to get from Ireland's health service and tells her that her father was a blue-eyed factory worker in his early 20s, and her mother was a catering assistant who liked to read and dance. There are no names or addresses. To match Insight IRELAND-ADOPTION/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
IRELAND-ADOPTION
RTR3FS85
February 27, 2014
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of...
Omagh, United Kingdom
Droogan poses for a photo in her house in Omagh
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh February 27, 2014. Adopted at four weeks from a convent in eastern Ireland, Droogan doesn't know who her parents were or where she was born. She is not even certain who actually named her Catherine. Lying on her kitchen table in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh is a one-page document that the state has given her about her parents, containing what's known as "non-identifying information". It took her a year to get from Ireland's health service and tells her that her father was a blue-eyed factory worker in his early 20s, and her mother was a catering assistant who liked to read and dance. There are no names or addresses. To match Insight IRELAND-ADOPTION/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
IRELAND-ADOPTION
RTR3FS81
February 27, 2014
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph while holding her adoption papers in the kitchen of her house...
Omagh, United Kingdom
Droogan poses for a photo while holding her adoption papers in her house in Omagh
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph while holding her adoption papers in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh February 27, 2014. Adopted at four weeks from a convent in eastern Ireland, Droogan doesn't know who her parents were or where she was born. She is not even certain who actually named her Catherine. Lying on her kitchen table in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh is a one-page document that the state has given her about her parents, containing what's known as "non-identifying information". It took her a year to get from Ireland's health service and tells her that her father was a blue-eyed factory worker in his early 20s, and her mother was a catering assistant who liked to read and dance. There are no names or addresses. To match Insight IRELAND-ADOPTION/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
IRELAND-ADOPTION
RTR3FS7Z
February 27, 2014
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of...
Omagh, United Kingdom
Droogan poses for a photo in her house in Omagh
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh February 27, 2014. Adopted at four weeks from a convent in eastern Ireland, Droogan doesn't know who her parents were or where she was born. She is not even certain who actually named her Catherine. Lying on her kitchen table in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh is a one-page document that the state has given her about her parents, containing what's known as "non-identifying information". It took her a year to get from Ireland's health service and tells her that her father was a blue-eyed factory worker in his early 20s, and her mother was a catering assistant who liked to read and dance. There are no names or addresses. To match Insight IRELAND-ADOPTION/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
IRELAND-ADOPTION
RTR3FS7V
February 27, 2014
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of...
Omagh, United Kingdom
Droogan poses for a photo in her house in Omagh
Catherine Droogan poses for a photograph in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh February 27, 2014. Adopted at four weeks from a convent in eastern Ireland, Droogan doesn't know who her parents were or where she was born. She is not even certain who actually named her Catherine. Lying on her kitchen table in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh is a one-page document that the state has given her about her parents, containing what's known as "non-identifying information". It took her a year to get from Ireland's health service and tells her that her father was a blue-eyed factory worker in his early 20s, and her mother was a catering assistant who liked to read and dance. There are no names or addresses. To match Insight IRELAND-ADOPTION/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
IRELAND-ADOPTION
RTR3FS7O
February 27, 2014
Catherine Droogan looks at her birth certificate and adoption papers as she poses for a photograph in...
Omagh, United Kingdom
Droogan poses for a photo in her house in Omagh
Catherine Droogan looks at her birth certificate and adoption papers as she poses for a photograph in the kitchen of her house in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh February 27, 2014. Adopted at four weeks from a convent in eastern Ireland, Droogan doesn't know who her parents were or where she was born. She is not even certain who actually named her Catherine. Lying on her kitchen table in the Northern Ireland town of Omagh is a one-page document that the state has given her about her parents, containing what's known as "non-identifying information". It took her a year to get from Ireland's health service and tells her that her father was a blue-eyed factory worker in his early 20s, and her mother was a catering assistant who liked to read and dance. There are no names or addresses. To match Insight IRELAND-ADOPTION/ REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton (NORTHERN IRELAND - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY)
CANADA-FIRE/
RTX17XE5
January 27, 2014
Emergency workers remove debris on the site of Residence du Havre in L'Isle Verte, Quebec, January 27,...
L'ISLE VERTE, Canada
Emergency workers remove debris on the site of Residence du Havre in L'Isle Verte
Emergency workers remove debris on the site of Residence du Havre in L'Isle Verte, Quebec, January 27, 2014. Quebec might speed up introduction of tougher laws on installing sprinklers at seniors' residences after a fire last week that is believed to have killed 32 people, the Canadian province's health minister said on Monday. REUTERS/Mathieu Belanger (CANADA - Tags: DISASTER)
CANADA-FIRE/
RTX17XD9
January 27, 2014
An emergency worker removes a tarp from the remains of the Residence du Havre in L'Isle Verte, Quebec,...
L'ISLE VERTE, Canada
An emergency worker removes a tarp from the Residence du Havre in L'Isle Verte
An emergency worker removes a tarp from the remains of the Residence du Havre in L'Isle Verte, Quebec, January 27, 2014. Quebec might speed up introduction of tougher laws on installing sprinklers at seniors' residences after a fire last week that is believed to have killed 32 people, the Canadian province's health minister said on Monday. REUTERS/Mathieu Belanger (CANADA - Tags: DISASTER)
FRANCE-REFORMS/
RTX17WV3
January 27, 2014
French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault (R), French Social Affairs and Health minister Marisol Touraine...
Paris, France
French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault and ministers meet with with MEDEF head Pierre Gattaz during...
French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault (R), French Social Affairs and Health minister Marisol Touraine (2ndR), and French minister for State Reform, Decentralisation and Public Administration Marylise Lebranchu (3rdR) meet with Pierre Gattaz (L), President of French employers' association MEDEF at the Hotel Matignon in Paris January 27, 2014, to discuss the"Responsibility Pact" which aims to offer companies lower taxes in exchange for hiring more workers as part of moves to spur growth in the eurozone's second economy. REUTERS/Bertrand Guay/Pool (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
FRANCE-REFORM/
RTX17WRU
January 27, 2014
French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault (2ndR), French Social Affairs and Health Minister Marisol Touraine...
Paris, France
French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault and ministers meeting with French FO labour union head Mailly...
French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault (2ndR), French Social Affairs and Health Minister Marisol Touraine (3rdR), French Labour, Employment and Social Dialogue Minister Michel Sapin (R) and French minister for State Reform, Decentralisation and Public Administration Marylise Lebranchu (4thR) meet with French Force Ouvriere (FO) labour union's general secretary Jean-Claude Mailly (L) at the Hotel Matignon in Paris January 27, 2014, to discuss the form of the so-called "Responsibility Pact" which aims to offer companies lower taxes in exchange for hiring more workers as part of moves to spur growth in the eurozone's second economy. REUTERS/Bertrand Guay/Pool (FRANCE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
SPAIN-BUDGET/
RTR3FFVX
September 30, 2013
A worker (R) shovels sand into a wheelbarrow as tourists walk in a street in downtown Ronda, near Malaga...
RONDA, Spain
A worker shovels sand into a wheelbarrow as tourists walk in a street in downtown Ronda
A worker (R) shovels sand into a wheelbarrow as tourists walk in a street in downtown Ronda, near Malaga September 30, 2013. Spain's government presented its most pain-free budget in years on September 27 as a nascent economic recovery and lower borrowing costs put fiscal targets within reach without unpopular cuts to health and education spending. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS EMPLOYMENT)
SPAIN-BUDGET/
RTR3FFVM
September 30, 2013
A worker (L) removes a screw of a "For Sale" sign from a window of a confectionery shop that has been...
RONDA, Spain
A worker removes a screw of a "For Sale" sign from a window of a confectionery shop that has been closed...
A worker (L) removes a screw of a "For Sale" sign from a window of a confectionery shop that has been closed for several years, at La Bola street in downtown Ronda, near Malaga September 30, 2013. Spain's government presented its most pain-free budget in years on September 27 as a nascent economic recovery and lower borrowing costs put fiscal targets within reach without unpopular cuts to health and education spending. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (SPAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS EMPLOYMENT)
SPAIN-BUDGET/
RTR3FFVL
September 30, 2013
A worker (L) cleans a facade to place a banner for the opening of a new greengrocers shop at La Bola...
RONDA, Spain
A worker cleans a facade to place a banner for the opening of a new greengrocers shop at La Bola street...
A worker (L) cleans a facade to place a banner for the opening of a new greengrocers shop at La Bola street in downtown Ronda, near Malaga September 30, 2013. Spain's government presented its most pain-free budget in years on September 27 as a nascent economic recovery and lower borrowing costs put fiscal targets within reach without unpopular cuts to health and education spending. REUTERS/Jon Nazca (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS)
GREECE-ECONOMY/
RTX13IK5
September 12, 2013
Workers in the state medical sector shout slogans during an anti-austerity rally outside the Health ministry...
Athens, Greece
Workers in the state medical sector shout slogans during an anti-austerity rally outside the Health ministry...
Workers in the state medical sector shout slogans during an anti-austerity rally outside the Health ministry in Athens September 12, 2103. Greece's jobless rate hit a record high of 27.9 percent in June, data showed on Thursday, as the labour market continued to buckle in a deep recession with austerity policies linked to the country's bailout. REUTERS/Yorgos Karahalis (GREECE - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
GREECE-ECONOMY/
RTX13IJZ
September 12, 2013
Workers in the state medical sector shout slogans during an anti-austerity rally outside the Health ministry...
Athens, Greece
Workers in the state medical sector shout slogans during an anti-austerity rally outside the Health ministry...
Workers in the state medical sector shout slogans during an anti-austerity rally outside the Health ministry in Athens September 12, 2103. Greece's jobless rate hit a record high of 27.9 percent in June, data showed on Thursday, as the labour market continued to buckle in a deep recession with austerity policies linked to the country's bailout. REUTERS/Yorgos Karahalis (GREECE - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
BANGLADESH-BUILDING/INSPECTIONS
RTX12359
July 28, 2013
Fazal Uddin, 80, lies on a bed as he suffers from asthma, in Haragach, Rangpur district, Bangladesh July...
HARAGACH, Bangladesh
Fazal Uddin, 80, lies on a bed as he suffers from asthma, in Haragach, Rangpur district
Fazal Uddin, 80, lies on a bed as he suffers from asthma, in Haragach, Rangpur district, Bangladesh July 11, 2013. According to Uddin's family, he became sick as he used to work in a 'bidi' (cigarrette) factory for 8-10 years. According to a 2012 study by US-based NGO, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, over 45,000 people in Bangladesh are employed in manufacturing inexpensive cigarettes known as bidis and this number includes “many women and children working in household based establishments where they make low wages and live in poverty.” A 2011 research paper about bidi workers in Bangladesh, published in the journal Tobacco Control, says that working conditions can involve poor ventilation and exposure to tobacco dust, which can cause a range of health problems including respiratory and skin diseases. International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. Picture taken July 11, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Biraj (BANGLADESH - Tags: BUSINESS INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 27 OF 35 FOR PACKAGE 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS IN BANGLADESH'. TO FIND ALL IMAGES SEARCH 'INDUSTRY'S VICTIMS BIRAJ'
USA-HEALTHCARE/EMPLOYERS
RTX11B1B
July 03, 2013
A Tea Party member reaches for a pamphlet titled "The Impact of Obamacare", at a "Food for Free Minds...
Littleton, UNITED STATES
File photo of an Obamacare pamphlet at a Tea Party rally in Littleton
A Tea Party member reaches for a pamphlet titled "The Impact of Obamacare", at a "Food for Free Minds Tea Party Rally" in Littleton, New Hampshire in this October 27, 2012 file photo. The Obama administration said on July 2, 2013 it would not require employers to provide health insurance for their workers until 2015, delaying a key provision of President Barack Obama's healthcare reform law by a year, to beyond the next election. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi//Files (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
MANDELA/
RTX112TD
June 27, 2013
Workers build a wall in a garden at former South African President Nelson Mandela's house in Qunu, June...
Qunu, South Africa
Workers build a wall in a garden at former South African President Mandela's house in Qunu
Workers build a wall in a garden at former South African President Nelson Mandela's house in Qunu, June 27, 2013. South Africans prepared on Thursday to say farewell to ailing anti-apartheid leader Mandela after his condition deteriorated further in hospital, forcing President Jacob Zuma to cancel a trip to neighbouring Mozambique. REUTERS/Rogan Ward (SOUTH AFRICA - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH)
EU-YOUTH/NURSES
RTX11191
June 26, 2013
(L-R) Spanish nurses Sara Vallejo, 22, Maria Grifo, 23, Pilar Baldayo, 23, Marta Martinez, 24, Maria...
The Hague, Netherlands
A group of Spanish nurses pose for a portrait in an apartment in the nursing home in The Hague
(L-R) Spanish nurses Sara Vallejo, 22, Maria Grifo, 23, Pilar Baldayo, 23, Marta Martinez, 24, Maria Jose Marin, 23, Alberto Soto, 24, Maria Teresa Marin, 23, Vanesa Diaz, 22, Estefania Torrico, 27, Angelica Munoz, 29 and Angie Luque, 25, pose for a portrait in an apartment in the Deo Gratias nursing home in The Hague, June 8, 2013. After months of studying Dutch, a group of young Spanish nurses moved to the Netherlands to take up work, fleeing a dismal job market at home. Spain's population dropped last year for the first time on record as young professionals and immigrants who moved here during a construction boom head for greener pastures. Spain's jobless rate is 27 percent, and more than half of young workers are unemployed. For Spanish nurses, the Netherlands' nursing deficit is a boon. Soto's t-shirt reads: "Spain is bloody wonderful". Picture taken June 8, 2013. REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo (NETHERLANDS - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 32 OF 32 FOR PACKAGE 'IN SEARCH OF WORK IN EUROPE'. SEARCH 'MARIA MARIN' FOR ALL IMAGES
EU-YOUTH/NURSES
RTX11190
June 26, 2013
Spanish nurses Maria Jose Marin (C), 23, holds up a towel as she stands next to her twin sister Maria...
The Hague, Netherlands
Spanish nurses Maria Jose Marin holds up a towel as she stands next to her twin sister Maria Teresa in...
Spanish nurses Maria Jose Marin (C), 23, holds up a towel as she stands next to her twin sister Maria Teresa (R) in a supermarket in The Hague, June 7, 2013. After months of studying Dutch, a group of young Spanish nurses moved to the Netherlands to take up work, fleeing a dismal job market at home. Spain's population dropped last year for the first time on record as young professionals and immigrants who moved here during a construction boom head for greener pastures. Spain's jobless rate is 27 percent, and more than half of young workers are unemployed. For Spanish nurses, the Netherlands' nursing deficit is a boon. Picture taken June 7, 2013. REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo (NETHERLANDS - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 31 OF 32 FOR PACKAGE 'IN SEARCH OF WORK IN EUROPE'. SEARCH 'MARIA MARIN' FOR ALL IMAGES
EU-YOUTH/NURSES
RTX1118Y
June 26, 2013
Spanish nurse Maria Teresa Marin (L), 23, rides a bicycle with her twin sister Maria Jose on the back,...
The Hague, Netherlands
Spanish nurse Maria Teresa Marin rides a bicycle with her twin sister Maria Jose on the back in The Hague...
Spanish nurse Maria Teresa Marin (L), 23, rides a bicycle with her twin sister Maria Jose on the back, in The Hague, June 7, 2013. After months of studying Dutch, a group of young Spanish nurses moved to the Netherlands to take up work, fleeing a dismal job market at home. Spain's population dropped last year for the first time on record as young professionals and immigrants who moved here during a construction boom head for greener pastures. Spain's jobless rate is 27 percent, and more than half of young workers are unemployed. For Spanish nurses, the Netherlands' nursing deficit is a boon. Picture taken June 7, 2013. REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo (NETHERLANDS - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 30 OF 32 FOR PACKAGE 'IN SEARCH OF WORK IN EUROPE'. SEARCH 'MARIA MARIN' FOR ALL IMAGES
EU-YOUTH/NURSES
RTX1118X
June 26, 2013
Spanish nurses Maria Jose Marin (R), 23, and her twin sister Maria Teresa prepare food for a woman in...
The Hague, Netherlands
Spanish nurses Maria Jose Marin and her twin sister Maria Teresa prepare food for a woman in the Deo...
Spanish nurses Maria Jose Marin (R), 23, and her twin sister Maria Teresa prepare food for a woman in the Deo Gratias nursing home in The Hague, June 7, 2013. After months of studying Dutch, a group of young Spanish nurses moved to the Netherlands to take up work, fleeing a dismal job market at home. Spain's population dropped last year for the first time on record as young professionals and immigrants who moved here during a construction boom head for greener pastures. Spain's jobless rate is 27 percent, and more than half of young workers are unemployed. For Spanish nurses, the Netherlands' nursing deficit is a boon. Picture taken June 7, 2013. REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo (NETHERLANDS - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 28 OF 32 FOR PACKAGE 'IN SEARCH OF WORK IN EUROPE'. SEARCH 'MARIA MARIN' FOR ALL IMAGES
EU-YOUTH/NURSES
RTX1118W
June 26, 2013
Spanish nurse Maria Jose Marin, 23, pushes a man in a wheelchair through the Deo Gratias nursing home...
The Hague, Netherlands
Spanish nurse Maria Jose Marin pushes a man in a wheelchair through the Deo Gratias nursing home in The...
Spanish nurse Maria Jose Marin, 23, pushes a man in a wheelchair through the Deo Gratias nursing home in The Hague, June 7, 2013. After months of studying Dutch, a group of young Spanish nurses moved to the Netherlands to take up work, fleeing a dismal job market at home. Spain's population dropped last year for the first time on record as young professionals and immigrants who moved here during a construction boom head for greener pastures. Spain's jobless rate is 27 percent, and more than half of young workers are unemployed. For Spanish nurses, the Netherlands' nursing deficit is a boon. Picture taken June 7, 2013. REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo (NETHERLANDS - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 29 OF 32 FOR PACKAGE 'IN SEARCH OF WORK IN EUROPE'. SEARCH 'MARIA MARIN' FOR ALL IMAGES
EU-YOUTH/NURSES
RTX1118T
June 26, 2013
Spanish nurses Maria Jose Marin (2nd R), 23, her twin sister Maria Teresa and nine other Spanish nurses...
The Hague, Netherlands
Spanish nurses Maria Jose Marin, her twin sister Maria Teresa and other Spanish nurses attend a welcoming...
Spanish nurses Maria Jose Marin (2nd R), 23, her twin sister Maria Teresa and nine other Spanish nurses attend a welcoming meeting with the management of the Deo Gratias nursing home in The Hague, June 6, 2013. After months of studying Dutch, a group of young Spanish nurses moved to the Netherlands to take up work, fleeing a dismal job market at home. Spain's population dropped last year for the first time on record as young professionals and immigrants who moved here during a construction boom head for greener pastures. Spain's jobless rate is 27 percent, and more than half of young workers are unemployed. For Spanish nurses, the Netherlands' nursing deficit is a boon. Picture taken June 6, 2013. REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo (NETHERLANDS - Tags: HEALTH BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT SOCIETY)

ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 26 OF 32 FOR PACKAGE 'IN SEARCH OF WORK IN EUROPE'. SEARCH 'MARIA MARIN' FOR ALL IMAGES
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