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Search results for: Worried

Spotlight
Spotlight
Pandemic fears and online deals thin Black Friday crowds
21 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/HOSPITALS
RTX8BL0K
November 24, 2020
Jade Carabajal-Richter worries about a lack of beds for patients with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
LAKIN, UNITED STATES
Hospitals in red states saturated with patients
Jade Carabajal-Richter worries about a lack of beds for patients with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as case numbers surge at a hospital in Lakin, Kansas, U.S., November 19, 2020. Picture taken November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/HOSPITALS
RTX8BL0J
November 24, 2020
Jade Carabajal-Richter worries about a lack of beds for patients with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
LAKIN, UNITED STATES
Hospitals in red states saturated with patients
Jade Carabajal-Richter worries about a lack of beds for patients with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as case numbers surge at a hospital in Lakin, Kansas, U.S., November 19, 2020. Picture taken November 19, 2020. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUU
November 23, 2020
Patricia McCloskey and her husband Mark McCloskey draw their firearms on protestors as they enter their...
St.Louis, UNITED STATES
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
Patricia McCloskey and her husband Mark McCloskey draw their firearms on protestors as they enter their neighbourhood during a protest against St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson, in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S. June 28, 2020. Reuters photogrpaher Lawrence Bryant: "That Sunday evening, several hundred Black and white protesters walked through an open gate into the community where the couple – Mark McCloskey and his wife Patricia McCloskey – lived. They were met by Mark McCloskey holding what looked like an automatic rifle and shouting 'get out!' several times at the crowd. I was not overly worried, even when he appeared to cock his weapon. But then Patricia McCloskey appeared from the front of the house holding a handgun. She had her finger on the trigger and looked nervous and I became a little bit more worried, as there were kids out there and she was sporadically pointing the gun at random people. I was just trying to make frames, stay safe, dodge the barrel of the gun and stay out of sight and out of line. I'm a big, Black man and I always have to pay attention to that anyway. I'm pleased with the pictures I took of the scene. I may have liked a longer lens to be able to zoom in on the couple, but the fact that I had only one camera meant I captured not just the McCloskeys, but also the protesters around them. A lot of the photos out there focus on the couple holding the guns, but to me that's not telling the whole story. I wanted to show there were people protesting peacefully and the couple came to engage them." REUTERS/Lawrence Bryant/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUL
November 23, 2020
Nancy Allen and Brian Allen stand outside their home as high winds push smoke and ash from the Currowan...
Nowra, Australia
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
Nancy Allen and Brian Allen stand outside their home as high winds push smoke and ash from the Currowan Fire towards Nowra, New South Wales, Australia, January 4, 2020. Reuters photographer Tracey Nearmy: "Covering Australia's sparsely populated regions is difficult. And when the bushfires started this summer, getting there was tricky. After a day of travelling, I found myself in smoky red haze face-to-face with Nancy Allen in Nowra, New South Wales. Nancy and her husband Brian, dressed in a singlet and shorts, were trying to defend their home with a garden hose. The fire bearing down on their town was so intense, it was creating its own pyrocumulonimbus storm, and the police had evacuated the area hours earlier. Yet, Nancy and Brian stayed in the swirling smoke and ash, anxiously wetting down the front of their house. Mistaking me for an emergency crew, Nancy rushed over to ask me what they should do. Given that the suburb had already been evacuated, I told them to follow the advice to go to the closest evacuation centre. Their home was close to dense bushland, so it was worrying to see them still on their property an hour later. Nancy's expression in this photograph summed up the shock and disbelief many Australians felt at the ferocity and enormity of these fires." REUTERS/Tracey Nearmy/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/GERMANY-PROTEST
RTX87V9E
November 07, 2020
A woman holds a sign as demonstrators rally against the government's restrictions following the coronavirus...
Leipzig, Germany
A rally against the government's restrictions, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A woman holds a sign as demonstrators rally against the government's restrictions following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Leipzig, Germany, November 7, 2020. The sign reads "I had COVID-19 and I am worried about you". REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach
JAPAN-TATTOOS/
RTX859CK
October 26, 2020
Part-time worker Tenji Okasaka, 24, pets his cat as he poses for a photograph at his house in Niiza,...
NIIZA, Japan
The Wider Image: Breaking taboos: Japan's tattoo fans bare their ink
Part-time worker Tenji Okasaka, 24, pets his cat as he poses for a photograph at his house in Niiza, Saitama Prefecture, Japan, September 25, 2020. "Some people probably look at me funny, but I don't pay attention to it anymore. Yes, there are times when people think I'm part of a gang, but I don't worry about it that much. I'll keep on going until I don't have any skin uncoloured", said Okasaka. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON TATTOOS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S
October 15, 2020
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R
October 15, 2020
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E
October 15, 2020
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C
October 15, 2020
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
GERMANY-PROTESTS/EXTINCTION-REBELLION
RTX80AZI
October 06, 2020
An Extinction Rebellion activist sits on the ground as he takes part in a protest in front of Haus der...
Berlin, Germany
Extinction Rebellion protest in Berlin
An Extinction Rebellion activist sits on the ground as he takes part in a protest in front of Haus der Wirtschaft (house of economy) in Berlin, Germany October 6, 2020. The sign reads "I am here because I worry about the future". REUTERS/Christian Mang
GERMANY-PROTESTS/EXTINCTION-REBELLION
RTX80AY0
October 06, 2020
Extinction Rebellion activists block a road as they take part in a protest in front of Haus der Wirtschaft...
Berlin, Germany
Extinction Rebellion protest in Berlin
Extinction Rebellion activists block a road as they take part in a protest in front of Haus der Wirtschaft (house of economy) in Berlin, Germany October 6, 2020. The sign reads "I am here because I worry about the future". REUTERS/Christian Mang
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/PALESTINIANS-FISHFARM
RTX80ADT
October 06, 2020
A drone image shows Palestinian farmer Murad Abu Aram riding on a surfboard at his fish farm in a man-made...
Hebron, Palestinian Territories
Fish farmer worries about fate of produce after COVID-19
A drone image shows Palestinian farmer Murad Abu Aram riding on a surfboard at his fish farm in a man-made pond in Hebron, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank October 1, 2020. Picture taken October 1, 2020. REUTERS/Yosri Al-Jamal
CLIMATE-CHANGE/USA-NAVAJO
RTX804A4
October 05, 2020
Leonard Sloan, 64, lifts a visor off of his wife Maybelle Sloan, 59, who are both from Navajo Nation,...
Gap, UNITED STATES
The Wider Image: Climate change is drying the lifeblood of Navajo ranchers as their lands become desert...
Leonard Sloan, 64, lifts a visor off of his wife Maybelle Sloan, 59, who are both from Navajo Nation, at their sheep camp in the Bodaway Chapter in the Navajo Nation in Gap, Arizona, U.S. September 17, 2020. "I go out everyday to take care of my sheep. There's coyotes out there and sometimes people steal them so I got to be there. Sometimes I have to go to do something like go to town to do my laundry and then I can't go out but then the very next day I go out super early because I'm worried about them," said Maybelle. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY SEARCH "NAVAJO KEITH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
USA-ELECTION/LATINO-WISCONSIN
RTX7ZGAX
October 02, 2020
Steven Calderon relaxes outside his home which he shares with four other siblings in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,...
Milwaukee, UNITED STATES
Steven Calderon relaxes outside his home which he shares with four other siblings in Milwaukee
Steven Calderon relaxes outside his home which he shares with four other siblings in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., September 20, 2020. Originally from Puerto Rico, he's called Milwaukee home for over eight years and says he doesn't involve himself with politics. "There are other things to worry about then the circus." He said. Picture taken September 20, 2020. REUTERS/Sebastian Hidalgo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z842
October 01, 2020
Sanjib Chatterjee, 34, who works in a call centre, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Chitra...
Kolkata, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Sanjib Chatterjee, 34, who works in a call centre, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Chitra Chatterjee, 62, a housewife, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as he poses for a photograph, in Kolkata, India, September 25, 2020. "The last memory was when she was diagnosed with COVID-19," said Chatterjee. "We came to know about it after we received a call from the health department saying that she needed to visit the hospital," she added. "I hugged her and told her don't worry and we will be back soon." REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Wider Image
Wider Image
Energy security and economic fears drive China's return to coal
27 PICTURES
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE-LESBOS
RTX7XCPL
September 23, 2020
A child holds a piece of bread in her hand outside the new temporary camp for migrants and refugees,...
LESBOS, Greece
New temporary camp for migrants and refugees on the island of Lesbos
A child holds a piece of bread in her hand outside the new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, September 23, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE-LESBOS
RTX7X52M
September 22, 2020
A man is seen through a barbed wire at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island...
LESBOS, Greece
Man is seen through a barbed wire at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees on the island of...
A man is seen through a barbed wire at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, September 22, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE-LESBOS
RTX7X4ZV
September 22, 2020
A general view of a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees on the island of Lesbos, Greece, September...
LESBOS, Greece
General view of a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees on the island of Lesbos
A general view of a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees on the island of Lesbos, Greece, September 22, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE-LESBOS
RTX7WXGL
September 21, 2020
A woman looks over the barbed wire of a chain-linked fence at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees,...
LESBOS, Greece
Woman looks over a fence at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees on Lesbos island
A woman looks over the barbed wire of a chain-linked fence at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, September 21, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE-LESBOS
RTX7WQ2M
September 20, 2020
An Afghan child plays next to the barbed wire outside the new temporary camp for migrants and refugees,...
LESBOS, Greece
An Afghan child plays next to the barbed wire outside the new temporary camp for migrants and refugees,...
An Afghan child plays next to the barbed wire outside the new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, September 20, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE-LESBOS
RTX7WPZA
September 20, 2020
The hand of man is seen behind a barbed wire at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the...
LESBOS, Greece
The hand of man is seen behind a barbed wire at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the...
The hand of man is seen behind a barbed wire at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, September 20, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE-LESBOS
RTX7WKDZ
September 19, 2020
A man is seen from behind at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos,...
LESBOS, Greece
New temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos
A man is seen from behind at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, September 19, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
EUROPE-MIGRANTS/GREECE-LESBOS
RTX7WKAE
September 19, 2020
A woman is seen from behind as she stands in front of a barbed wire at a new temporary camp for migrants...
LESBOS, Greece
New temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos
A woman is seen from behind as she stands in front of a barbed wire at a new temporary camp for migrants and refugees, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, September 19, 2020. REUTERS/Yara Nardi
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-INTERNATIONAL-STUDENTS
RTX7QWBB
August 21, 2020
With Australia already sliding into its worst recession in almost a century, education leaders expect...
Sydney, Australia
The Wider Image: Chinese students in Australia head home as coronavirus upends study
With Australia already sliding into its worst recession in almost a century, education leaders expect the disappearance of international students to cost billions of dollars. Data on how many international students have left the country this year is not yet available, but anecdotal evidence on departures and data on new enrolments paints a worrying picture. New enrolments of international students, who generally make up about 20% of all university students in Australia, grew by an average of 10% over the past two years. But growth in the first six months of this year was negligible as Australia closed its borders in March to all foreigners because of the pandemic. The slowdown in foreign student enrolments mean Australian universities are facing a revenue hit of between A$3.1 billion and A$4.8 billion ($2.2-$3.5 billion) this year alone, Catriona Jackson, Chief Executive of Universities Australia, told Reuters. New enrolments from China fell 8% in the first half of the year, compared with a gain of 4% across 2019, according to government data. REUTERS/Loren Elliott SEARCH "INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AUSTRALIA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Wider Image
Wider Image
Chinese students in Australia head home as coronavirus upends study
34 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA-INTERNATIONAL-STUDENTS
RTX7QSQ3
August 20, 2020
With Australia already sliding into its worst recession in almost a century, education leaders expect...
Sydney, Australia
The Wider Image: Chinese students in Australia head home as coronavirus upends study
With Australia already sliding into its worst recession in almost a century, education leaders expect the disappearance of international students to cost billions of dollars. Data on how many international students have left the country this year is not yet available, but anecdotal evidence on departures and data on new enrolments paints a worrying picture. New enrolments of international students, who generally make up about 20% of all university students in Australia, grew by an average of 10% over the past two years. But growth in the first six months of this year was negligible as Australia closed its borders in March to all foreigners because of the pandemic. The slowdown in foreign student enrolments mean Australian universities are facing a revenue hit of between A$3.1 billion and A$4.8 billion ($2.2-$3.5 billion) this year alone, Catriona Jackson, Chief Executive of Universities Australia, told Reuters. New enrolments from China fell 8% in the first half of the year, compared with a gain of 4% across 2019, according to government data. REUTERS/Loren Elliott SEARCH "INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AUSTRALIA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-FAMILY
RTX7QPVN
August 20, 2020
Adel Faraj Oghlo, 31, who was injured in an explosion on the Beirut port, makes his way to a hospital...
Beirut, Lebanon
The Wider Image: Stranded and injured, Lebanese family reels from blast
Adel Faraj Oghlo, 31, who was injured in an explosion on the Beirut port, makes his way to a hospital appointment by taxi, in Beirut, Lebanon, August 13, 2020. Oghlo worries that doctors may have to amputate his leg, held together by metal screws and said his father had gone through something similar during an earlier crisis that devastated Lebanon - the 1975-1990 civil war. "I grew up with my father having his leg amputated and his arm wounded. And it was the same, he had metal braces and all." REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "FAMILY HOME LEBANON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-FAMILY
RTX7QPVJ
August 20, 2020
Adel Faraj Oghlo, 38, who was injured in an explosion on the Beirut port, speaks to Dr. Joseph Salloum...
Beirut, Lebanon
The Wider Image: Stranded and injured, Lebanese family reels from blast
Adel Faraj Oghlo, 38, who was injured in an explosion on the Beirut port, speaks to Dr. Joseph Salloum during a hospital appointment in Beirut, Lebanon, August 15, 2020. When the blast sent a mushroom cloud over Beirut, Adel lay on a road pleading for help in the chaos. One person used a belt as tourniquet. Another, a waiter, wrapped an apron around his crushed leg. Oghlo worries that doctors may have to amputate his leg, held together by metal screws. "Medication doesn't have an effect anymore, so now I am trying to get used to the pain, get to know it, and for it to know me," he said. "Sometimes I just sit and stroke it... and cry, cry from pain. Sometimes I ask it for a five minute break." REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "FAMILY HOME LEBANON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-FAMILY
RTX7QPVI
August 20, 2020
Rita Faraj Oghlo, 31, comforts her husband Adel Faraj Oghlo, 38, who was injured in an explosion on the...
Beirut, Lebanon
The Wider Image: Stranded and injured, Lebanese family reels from blast
Rita Faraj Oghlo, 31, comforts her husband Adel Faraj Oghlo, 38, who was injured in an explosion on the Beirut port, as he attends a hospital appointment in Beirut, Lebanon, August 13, 2020. When the blast sent a mushroom cloud over Beirut, Adel lay on a road pleading for help in the chaos. One person used a belt as tourniquet. Another, a waiter, wrapped an apron around his crushed leg. Oghlo worries that doctors may have to amputate his leg, held together by metal screws. "My husband will need a long time to rehabilitate because of his leg so we don't know what to do, we don't know what will happen," said Rita. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "FAMILY HOME LEBANON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-FAMILY
RTX7QPUP
August 20, 2020
Beirut's catastrophic port explosion has demolished Rita Faraj Oghlo's house, left her family stranded...
Beirut, Lebanon
The Wider Image: Stranded and injured, Lebanese family reels from blast
Beirut's catastrophic port explosion has demolished Rita Faraj Oghlo's house, left her family stranded and may cost her husband Adel his leg. Like many Lebanese, they have endured multi-layered suffering since the Aug. 4 blast, which killed 179 people, injured 6,000 and triggered protests against an elite blamed for political turmoil and economic collapse. Homes and businesses were razed in the country's commercial heart, uprooting nearly a quarter of a million people. Many of them are now crammed into relatives' tiny apartments, unable to imagine how they will ever be able to afford their own. "It's very difficult for us right now," said Rita, who, along with her injured husband Adel and their children Christy, 2 and Saymen, 8, has moved in with her mother, stepfather and sister. The cost of the operation Adel needs looms large. When the blast sent a mushroom cloud over Beirut, he lay on a road pleading for help in the chaos. One person used a belt as tourniquet. Another, a waiter, wrapped an apron around his crushed leg. "A lot of people saw me and they were in shock, looked and just left," he said. He was already struggling to find work during the economic meltdown. He sits in agony, and worries that doctors may have to amputate his leg, held together by metal screws. REUTERS/Hannah McKay SEARCH "FAMILY HOME LEBANON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Matching Text: LEBANON-SECURITY/BLAST-FAMILY
Coronavirus
Coronavirus
Respiratory therapist struggles to catch her own breath after COVID-19
35 PICTURES
Wider Image
Wider Image
Fears at Nile's convergence in Sudan that new dam will sap river’s strength
29 PICTURES
NILE-CONVERGENCE/
RTS3IP7U
July 09, 2020
At an open-air, riverbank factory where the Blue Nile and White Nile meet in Sudan, Mohamed Ahmed al...
Khartoum, Sudan
The Wider Image: Fears at Nile's convergence in Sudan that new dam will sap river's strength
At an open-air, riverbank factory where the Blue Nile and White Nile meet in Sudan, Mohamed Ahmed al Ameen and his colleagues mould thousands of bricks every day from mud deposited by summer floods. "I consider the Nile something I have not parted with since I was born," Ameen said, as workers around him shaped bricks with blistered hands and laid them out to dry in the sun. "I eat from it, I farm with it. And I extract these bricks from it." But the labourers on Tuti Island in Sudan's capital Khartoum fear a giant dam Ethiopia is building close to the border between the two countries could endanger their livelihood. They worry the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam upstream could weaken the Blue Nile's force, putting at risk an industry that locals say provided bricks for some of Khartoum's first modern public buildings around a century ago. Pottery makers, farmers and fishermen around the Nile's convergence share similar concerns, though other residents displaced by flooding last summer see benefit in a dam that will regulate the powerful river's waters. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra. SEARCH "BENSEMRA NILE" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: NILE-CONVERGENCE/ TEMPLATE OUT
POLAND-ELECTION/LGBT
RTS3FCMY
June 23, 2020
Marzenna Latawiec poses with her gay son Pawel Bednarek in Warsaw, Poland, June 19, 2020. Parents of...
Warsaw, Poland
Marzenna Latawiec, poses with her gay son Pawel Bednarek in Warsaw
Marzenna Latawiec poses with her gay son Pawel Bednarek in Warsaw, Poland, June 19, 2020. Parents of gay/transgender children worry for their future as they watch the presidential election campaign turn to LGBT issues. Picture taken June 19, 2020. REUTERS/Aleksandra Szmigiel
POLAND-ELECTION/LGBT
RTS3FCMV
June 23, 2020
Elzbieta Mieszczanska-Blaszczyk, her husband Marek Blaszczyk and lesbian daughter Aleksandra sit in a...
Warsaw, Poland
Elzbieta Mieszczanska-Blaszczyk, her husband Marek Blaszczyk and lesbian daughter Aleksandra Blaszczyk...
Elzbieta Mieszczanska-Blaszczyk, her husband Marek Blaszczyk and lesbian daughter Aleksandra sit in a garden in Warsaw, Poland, June 21, 2020. Parents of gay/transgender children worry for their future as they watch the presidential election campaign turn to LGBT issues. Picture taken June 21, 2020. REUTERS/Aleksandra Szmigiel
POLAND-ELECTION/LGBT
RTS3FCKT
June 23, 2020
Elzbieta Mieszczanska-Blaszczyk, her husband Marek Blaszczyk and lesbian daughter Aleksandra pose for...
Warsaw, Poland
Elzbieta Mieszczanska-Blaszczyk, her husband Marek Blaszczyk and lesbian daughter Aleksandra Blaszczyk...
Elzbieta Mieszczanska-Blaszczyk, her husband Marek Blaszczyk and lesbian daughter Aleksandra pose for a photograph in a garden in Warsaw, Poland, June 21, 2020. Parents of gay/transgender children worry for their future as they watch the presidential election campaign turn to LGBT issues. Picture taken June 21, 2020. REUTERS/Aleksandra Szmigiel
POLAND-ELECTION/LGBT
RTS3FCKS
June 23, 2020
Aleksandra Blaszczyk poses for a photograph in a garden in Warsaw, Poland, June 21, 2020. Parents of...
Warsaw, Poland
Aleksandra Blaszczyk poses for a photograph in a garden in Warsaw
Aleksandra Blaszczyk poses for a photograph in a garden in Warsaw, Poland, June 21, 2020. Parents of gay/transgender children worry for their future as they watch the presidential election campaign turn to LGBT issues. Picture taken June 21, 2020. REUTERS/Aleksandra Szmigiel
POLAND-ELECTION/LGBT
RTS3FCKR
June 23, 2020
Pawel Bednarek poses for a photograph in Warsaw, Poland, June 19, 2020. Parents of gay/transgender children...
Warsaw, Poland
Pawel Bednarek poses for a photograph in Warsaw
Pawel Bednarek poses for a photograph in Warsaw, Poland, June 19, 2020. Parents of gay/transgender children worry for their future as they watch the presidential election campaign turn to LGBT issues. Picture taken June 19, 2020. REUTERS/Aleksandra Szmigiel
POLAND-ELECTION/LGBT
RTS3FCKQ
June 23, 2020
Marzenna Latawiec poses with her gay son Pawel Bednarek in Warsaw, Poland, June 19, 2020. Parents of...
Warsaw, Poland
Marzenna Latawiec poses with her gay son Pawel Bednarek in Warsaw
Marzenna Latawiec poses with her gay son Pawel Bednarek in Warsaw, Poland, June 19, 2020. Parents of gay/transgender children worry for their future as they watch the presidential election campaign turn to LGBT issues. Picture taken June 19, 2020. REUTERS/Aleksandra Szmigiel
Wider Image
Wider Image
'Hospitals are too risky': home birth in Mexico City
24 PICTURES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/HONDURAS-PRISON
RTX7IWX9
May 14, 2020
La Esperanza is a low-security prison tucked into the pine and oak-lined mountains of central Honduras....
La Esperanza, Honduras
The Wider Image: Cut off by coronavirus: Hondurans in packed prison suffer mental toll
La Esperanza is a low-security prison tucked into the pine and oak-lined mountains of central Honduras. Its name, in Spanish, means hope. Behind the bars, the ultimate law is that which reigns in Central America, a mantra sprayed onto walls in gang-controlled neighborhoods: ver, oir, y callar. See, hear, and shut up. A whiteboard at the entrance keeps a daily tally. The top line never changes: "Prison Capacity: 70 inmates." But the rows below of the actual number of prisoners tick up and down. Today's count: 454. The roots of the problems at La Esperanza plague prisons throughout Latin America, said director Jose Lopez Cerrato: harsh sentences for small crimes, lack of proper police investigation, and many detainees held without charge, often for years. The only reprieve is visiting days, when children, grandparents and wives breathe life into the courtyard, taking over the kitchen, playing ball, and praying with the inmates at religious services. But as the coronavirus took hold in Honduras, authorities banned visits. And with prohibitively expensive rates for calls from the prison's three working phones, inmates are now all but cut off from the outside world. In addition to the health risks posed by overcrowding, staff worry about the pandemic's mental toll. Honduras has had over 2,000 reported coronavirus cases and 120 deaths, although most public health experts say those numbers are a likely underestimate. REUTERS/Adrees Latif SEARCH "HONDURAS PRISON" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY. Matching text: HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/HONDURAS-PRISON
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MEATPACKING C
RTX7IFUL
May 11, 2020
The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the U.S. meat supply chain, leading to worries the country will...
A meaty problem eps C
The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the U.S. meat supply chain, leading to worries the country will lack adequate meat supplies.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/USA-MEATPACKING
RTX7IENK
May 11, 2020
The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the U.S. meat supply chain, leading to worries the country will...
Interactive Content
A meaty problem media-interactive
The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the U.S. meat supply chain, leading to worries the country will lack adequate meat supplies.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/MIDEAST-REFUGEES
RTX7I7KU
May 10, 2020
A Syrian refugee girl wears oversized shoes, as Lebanon extends a lockdown to combat the spread of the...
Bekaa, Lebanon
A Syrian refugee girl wears oversized shoes, as Lebanon extends a lockdown to combat the spread of the...
A Syrian refugee girl wears oversized shoes, as Lebanon extends a lockdown to combat the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at a Syrian refugee camp in the Bekaa valley, Lebanon May 7, 2020. Picture taken May 7, 2020. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/REFUGEE-HOSPITAL
RTX7GUUS
May 02, 2020
A migrant man hold his son's hand as they leave a migrant encampment, where more than 2,000 people live...
Matamoros, Mexico
A migrant man hold his son's hand as they leave a migrant encampment during the outbreak of COVID-19...
A migrant man hold his son's hand as they leave a migrant encampment, where more than 2,000 people live in while seeking asylum in the U.S., during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Matamoros, Mexico May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/REFUGEE-HOSPITAL
RTX7GUSS
May 02, 2020
A Salvadoran transgender woman washes her feet at a migrant encampment, where more than 2,000 people...
Matamoros, Mexico
A Salvadoran transgender woman washes her feet at a migrant encampment during the outbreak of COVID-19...
A Salvadoran transgender woman washes her feet at a migrant encampment, where more than 2,000 people live in while seeking asylum in the U.S., during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Matamoros, Mexico May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-BUSINESS
RTX7F7A8
April 23, 2020
Emiliano Di Carlo packs an order after Ezio Di Carlo opened up his restaurant for 3 days a week to carry...
Rome, Italy
The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues in Rome
Emiliano Di Carlo packs an order after Ezio Di Carlo opened up his restaurant for 3 days a week to carry out home deliveries but the money he earns is just about keeping his head above water. He worries about the easing up of lockdown and the struggle to make enough money to cover his costs with strict social distancing restrictions, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Rome, Italy, April 23, 2020. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane
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