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Search results for: Yakuza

JAPAN-TATTOOS/
RTX859CJ
October 26, 2020
Tattoos have been linked to criminals for as long as 400 years, most recently to yakuza gang members,...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: Breaking taboos: Japan's tattoo fans bare their ink
Tattoos have been linked to criminals for as long as 400 years, most recently to yakuza gang members, whose full-body ink-work stops short of hands and neck, allowing concealment under regular clothes. The popularity of Western rock music, though, with musicians increasingly sporting tattoos, has eaten away at this bias. A court decision last year that tattoos were for decoration, and were not medical procedures, helped clarify their murky legal status and may signal a shift in attitude - perhaps leading the industry to regulate itself, giving it a more mainstream image. Referring to them as tattoos rather than "irezumi" - literally meaning "inserting ink" - as is becoming more common, may also help give them a stylish, fashionable veneer. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON TATTOOS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
JAPAN/
RTX150EY
November 05, 2013
A man walks past a branch of Mizuho Financial Group's Mizuho Bank in Tokyo November 5, 2013. Japan's...
Tokyo, Japan
Man walks past a branch of Mizuho Financial Group's Mizuho Bank in Tokyo
A man walks past a branch of Mizuho Financial Group's Mizuho Bank in Tokyo November 5, 2013. Japan's Financial Services Agency began a probe on Tuesday into whether all three of the country's big banks Mitsubishi UFJ (MUFG), Mizuho and Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc, conducted transactions with Japanese gangsters, known as the yakuza. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS LOGO)
JAPAN/
RTX150EV
November 05, 2013
People walk past Mizuho Financial Group's Mizuho Bank headquarters in Tokyo November 5, 2013. Japan's...
Tokyo, Japan
People walk past Mizuho Financial Group's Mizuho Bank headquarters in Tokyo
People walk past Mizuho Financial Group's Mizuho Bank headquarters in Tokyo November 5, 2013. Japan's Financial Services Agency began a probe on Tuesday into whether all three of the country's big banks Mitsubishi UFJ (MUFG), Mizuho and Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc, conducted transactions with Japanese gangsters, known as the yakuza. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS LOGO)
JAPAN/
RTX150ER
November 05, 2013
People walk past Mizuho Financial Group's Mizuho Bank headquarters in Tokyo November 5, 2013. Japan's...
Tokyo, Japan
People walk past Mizuho Financial Group's Mizuho Bank headquarters in Tokyo
People walk past Mizuho Financial Group's Mizuho Bank headquarters in Tokyo November 5, 2013. Japan's Financial Services Agency began a probe on Tuesday into whether all three of the country's big banks Mitsubishi UFJ (MUFG), Mizuho and Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc, conducted transactions with Japanese gangsters, known as the yakuza. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS)
JAPAN/
RTX150EL
November 05, 2013
A man walks past a sign of Japan's Financial Services Agency (FSA) at its headquarters in Tokyo November...
Tokyo, Japan
A man walks past a sign of Japan's Financial Services Agency (FSA) at its headquarters in Tokyo
A man walks past a sign of Japan's Financial Services Agency (FSA) at its headquarters in Tokyo November 5, 2013. Japan's FSA financial regulator began a probe on Tuesday into whether all three of the country's big banks Mitsubishi UFJ (MUFG), Mizuho and Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc, conducted transactions with Japanese gangsters, known as the yakuza. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS)
JAPAN/
RTX150EH
November 05, 2013
A man stands under a sign of Japan's Financial Services Agency (FSA) at its headquarters in Tokyo November...
Tokyo, Japan
A man stands under a sign of Japan's Financial Services Agency (FSA) at its headquarters in Tokyo
A man stands under a sign of Japan's Financial Services Agency (FSA) at its headquarters in Tokyo November 5, 2013. Japan's financial regulator began a probe on Tuesday into whether all three of the country's big banks Mitsubishi UFJ (MUFG), Mizuho and Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc, conducted transactions with Japanese gangsters, known as the yakuza. REUTERS/Toru Hanai (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS)
News
News
Funeral of Tokyo Stabbing Victim - 12 Jun 2008
59 PICTURES
KOREA-CASTRATION/
RTR1W94Y
January 25, 2008
Singer Na Hoon-a speaks at a news conference in Seoul January 25, 2008. Na spoke on Friday to deny rumours...
Seoul, South Korea
Singer Na Hoon-a speaks at a news conference in Seoul
Singer Na Hoon-a speaks at a news conference in Seoul January 25, 2008. Na spoke on Friday to deny rumours he had been castrated by a Japanese gangster yakuza boss who was angry that the 60-year-old singer had a fling with one of his favourite South Korean actresses. REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (SOUTH KOREA)
Arts
Arts
Gangster Daughter Sheds Light on Underworld in Japan - 3 Sep 2007
7 PICTURES
JAPAN-GANGSTERS
RTR1TDPA
September 03, 2007
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" speaks during an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007....
Tokyo, Japan
To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" speaks during an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo, 39, the author of "Yakuza Moon", a best-selling memoir just out in English, says that police efforts to eradicate the gansters have merely made them harder to track. To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS. Picture taken on August 28, 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (JAPAN)
JAPAN-GANGSTERS
RTR1TDP9
September 03, 2007
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" speaks during an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007....
Tokyo, Japan
To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" speaks during an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo, 39, the author of "Yakuza Moon", a best-selling memoir just out in English, says that police efforts to eradicate the gansters have merely made them harder to track. To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS. Picture taken on August 28, 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (JAPAN)
JAPAN-GANGSTERS
RTR1TDP8
September 03, 2007
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo,...
Tokyo, Japan
To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo, 39, the author of "Yakuza Moon", a best-selling memoir just out in English, says that police efforts to eradicate the gansters have merely made them harder to track. To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS. Picture taken on August 28, 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (JAPAN)
JAPAN-GANGSTERS
RTR1TDP7
September 03, 2007
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo,...
Tokyo, Japan
To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo, 39, the author of "Yakuza Moon", a best-selling memoir just out in English, says that police efforts to eradicate the gansters have merely made them harder to track. To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS. Picture taken on August 28, 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (JAPAN)
JAPAN-GANGSTERS
RTR1TDP6
September 03, 2007
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo,...
Tokyo, Japan
To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo, 39, the author of "Yakuza Moon", a best-selling memoir just out in English, says that police efforts to eradicate the gansters have merely made them harder to track. To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS. Picture taken on August 28, 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (JAPAN)
JAPAN-GANGSTERS
RTR1TDOV
September 03, 2007
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo,...
Tokyo, Japan
To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo, 39, the author of "Yakuza Moon", a best-selling memoir just out in English, says that police efforts to eradicate the gansters have merely made them harder to track. To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS. Picture taken on August 28, 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (JAPAN)
JAPAN-GANGSTERS
RTR1TDOQ
September 03, 2007
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo,...
Tokyo, Japan
To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS
Shoko Tendo author of "Yakuza Moon" poses after an interview with Reuters in Tokyo August 28, 2007. Tendo, 39, the author of "Yakuza Moon", a best-selling memoir just out in English, says that police efforts to eradicate the gansters have merely made them harder to track. To match feature: JAPAN-GANGSTERS. Picture taken on August 28, 2007. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (JAPAN)
KOREA JAPAN
RTRQZ4M
September 07, 1999
South Korean Kwon Hee-ro, known in Japan as Kim Hui-ro, 71, waves after arriving in Pusan September 7....
Seoul, Korea - Republic of
SOUTH KOREAN KWON HEE-RO WAVES IN PUSAN SOUTH KOREA.
South Korean Kwon Hee-ro, known in Japan as Kim Hui-ro, 71, waves after arriving in Pusan September 7. Kwon, the recently released longest-serving prisoner in Japan, carries the remains of his deceased mother in a box on his chest. Kwon was released on Tuesday from a prison in Tokyo after serving a sentence for killing two Yakuzas 31 years ago in Japan to protest against Japanese racial discrimination.

YUN/PB
KOREA JAPAN
RTRQZ30
September 07, 1999
South Korean police commandos are on alert against possible Japanese Yakuzas attacks on Kim Hee-ro who...
Seoul, Korea - Republic of
SOUTH KOREAN POLICE COMMANDOS ON ALERT IN PUSAN.
South Korean police commandos are on alert against possible Japanese Yakuzas attacks on Kim Hee-ro who is arriving at Pusan airport September 7. Kim Hee-ro, the longest serving prisoner in Japan, who 31 years ago killed two Yakuzas to protest against Japanese racial discrimination, was released on Tuesday from a prison in Tokyo.

YUN/TAN
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