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Search results for: Yichang-(City)

CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715P
August 22, 2012
A view from the Three Gorges dam over the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The...
Yichang, China
A view from the Three Gorges dam over the Yangtze River in Yichang
A view from the Three Gorges dam over the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715O
August 22, 2012
A fisherman walks with his catch on the banks of the Yangtze River, near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang,...
Yichang, China
A fisherman walks with his catch on the banks of the Yangtze River, near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang...
A fisherman walks with his catch on the banks of the Yangtze River, near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 8, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715D
August 22, 2012
A man stands on the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems...
Yichang, China
A man stands on the Three Gorges dam in Yichang
A man stands on the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR3715C
August 22, 2012
A man stands next to the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental...
Yichang, China
A man stands next to the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province
A man stands next to the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTR37158
August 22, 2012
A man fishes at the Yangtze River near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012....
Yichang, China
A man fishes at the Yangtze River near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang
A man fishes at the Yangtze River near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. The environmental problems associated with the Three Gorges dam illustrate China's energy dilemma: To move away from its reliance on coal-fired power plants, Beijing says it has to develop cleaner forms of power. Hydropower is the most cost-effective way China can meet its energy needs, but its problems are still unfolding. China built the dam to tame flooding on the Yangtze, improve shipping and produce pollutant-free power. The dam has a total capacity of 22.5 GW, equivalent to burning 50 million tonnes of coal, according to the Three Gorges' Project State Assessment Report. The dam cost China more than $50 billion and displaced 1.4 million people while another 100,000 people may be moved from Hubei and the southwestern municipality of Chongqing in the next three to five years due to geological risks an official said in April. The number of geological disasters has risen 70 percent since the reservoir reached its maximum height of 175 metres, he said. Picture taken on August 9, 2012. To match story CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ENERGY)
CHINA/
RTR36IVG
August 09, 2012
A local resident holds a fish as he fishes at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9,...
Yichang, China
A local resident holds a fish as he fishes at the Yangtze River in Yichang
A local resident holds a fish as he fishes at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6 percent of the globe's fresh water resources, and the Yangtze, China's biggest river, is the artery that feeds much of its farming and industrial heartlands. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTR36IV4
August 09, 2012
A local resident fishes at the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China...
Yichang, China
A local resident fishes at the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang
A local resident fishes at the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6 percent of the globe's fresh water resources, and the Yangtze, China's biggest river, is the artery that feeds much of its farming and industrial heartlands. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTR36IUU
August 09, 2012
A local resident fishes on the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China...
Yichang, China
A local resident fishes on the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang
A local resident fishes on the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6 percent of the globe's fresh water resources, and the Yangtze, China's biggest river, is the artery that feeds much of its farming and industrial heartlands. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT)
CHINA/
RTR36IUH
August 09, 2012
A couple chat at the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just...
Yichang, China
A couple chat at the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang
A couple chat at the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6 percent of the globe's fresh water resources, and the Yangtze, China's biggest river, is the artery that feeds much of its farming and industrial heartlands. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTR36IUA
August 09, 2012
People watch as a local resident fishes at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012....
Yichang, China
People watch as a local resident fishes at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province
People watch as a local resident fishes at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6 percent of the globe's fresh water resources, and the Yangtze, China's biggest river, is the artery that feeds much of its farming and industrial heartlands. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/
RTR36ITP
August 09, 2012
A local resident fishes at the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China...
Yichang, China
A local resident fishes at the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang
A local resident fishes at the bank of the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6 percent of the globe's fresh water resources, and the Yangtze, China's biggest river, is the artery that feeds much of its farming and industrial heartlands. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA
RTR36ISW
August 09, 2012
A local resident sits as a man holds a fish next to the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August...
Yichang, China
A local resident sits as a man holds a fish next to the Yangtze River in Yichang
A local resident sits as a man holds a fish next to the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6 percent of the globe's fresh water resources, and the Yangtze, China's biggest river, is the artery that feeds much of its farming and industrial heartlands. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA
RTR36ISB
August 09, 2012
Local residents fish at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6...
Yichang, China
Local residents fish at the Yangtze River in Yichang
Local residents fish at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6 percent of the globe's fresh water resources, and the Yangtze, China's biggest river, is the artery that feeds much of its farming and industrial heartlands. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA/LIM
RTR36IR7
August 09, 2012
A local resident catches a fish at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China...
Yichang, China
A local resident catches a fish at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province
A local resident catches a fish at the Yangtze River in Yichang, Hubei province August 9, 2012. China has just 6 percent of the globe's fresh water resources, and the Yangtze, China's biggest river, is the artery that feeds much of its farming and industrial heartlands. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (CHINA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTXB70
November 14, 2007
Concrete pylons stick out of the water at the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city in Hubei...
Yichang, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/
Concrete pylons stick out of the water at the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city in Hubei Province, central China November 6, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 6, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTXB6Z
November 14, 2007
Tourists take photographs in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city in Hubei...
Yichang, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/
Tourists take photographs in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city in Hubei Province, central China November 6, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 6, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA-THREEGORGES/
RTXB29
November 14, 2007
A worker carries rocks on his back in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city...
Yichang, China
To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/
A worker carries rocks on his back in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city in Hubei Province, central China November 6, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 6, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA) Also see GF2DXIABLKAA
CHINA/
RTX1XW
November 07, 2007
Tourists take a photograph and read a pamphlet in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of...
WANZHOU, China
Tourists take a photograph and read a pamphlet in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of...
Tourists take a photograph and read a pamphlet in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city in Hubei Province, central China November 6, 2007. Many villages living on the slopes of tributaries to China?s Three Gorges dam, the world?s largest dam, have had to deal with the project?s environmental impact on their daily lives. Picture taken November 6, 2007. REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA)
CHINA
RTR1XF2D
November 06, 2007
A worker carries rocks on his back in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city...
Beijing, China
A worker carries rocks on his back in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city...
A worker carries rocks on his back in front of the Three Gorges Dam located northwest of Yichang city in Hubei Province, central China November 6, 2007. The slopes of Chenjialing Village have shuddered and groaned lately, cracking and warping homes and fields, and making residents fear the banks of China's swelling Three Gorges Dam may hold deadly perils. Picture taken November 6, 2007. To match feature CHINA-THREEGORGES/ REUTERS/David Gray (CHINA) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
CHINA
RTXOLFA
May 17, 2006
Workers remove scaffolding at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's...
Yichang, China
Workers remove scaffolding at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China'.....
Workers remove scaffolding at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
CHINA
RTXOLF9
May 17, 2006
A worker (Bottom) enters the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
A worker (Bottom) enters the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hub.....
A worker (Bottom) enters the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
CHINA
RTXOLF8
May 17, 2006
Workers (Top R) are seen on the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
Workers (Top R) are seen on the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's .....
Workers (Top R) are seen on the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
CHINA
RTXOLF7
May 17, 2006
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province...
Yichang, China
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei p.....
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
CHINA
RTXOLF6
May 17, 2006
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province...
Yichang, China
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei p.....
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
CHINA
RTXOLF5
May 17, 2006
Workers walk in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
Workers walk in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hub.....
Workers walk in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
CHINA
RTXOLF4
May 17, 2006
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central...
Yichang, China
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in centr.....
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
CHINA
RTXOLF3
May 17, 2006
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central...
Yichang, China
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in centr.....
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DGJY
May 17, 2006
A security guard stands on watch beside an electric pylon near the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river...
Yichang, China
A security guard stands on watch beside an electric pylon near the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river...
A security guard stands on watch beside an electric pylon near the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DGJW
May 17, 2006
Water is released from the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
Water is released from the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
Water is released from the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DGJV
May 17, 2006
A worker walks in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
A worker walks in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A worker walks in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DGJR
May 17, 2006
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province...
Yichang, China
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG7W
May 17, 2006
Workers (Top R) are seen on the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
Workers are seen on the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
Workers (Top R) are seen on the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG7V
May 17, 2006
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province...
Yichang, China
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG7U
May 17, 2006
Workers walk in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
Workers walk in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
Workers walk in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG7T
May 17, 2006
Workers remove scaffolding at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's...
Yichang, China
Workers remove scaffolding at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
Workers remove scaffolding at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG7S
May 17, 2006
A worker (Bottom) enters the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
A worker enters the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A worker (Bottom) enters the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG7H
May 17, 2006
A worker (Top) is seen on the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
A worker is seen on the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A worker (Top) is seen on the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG6O
May 17, 2006
A family walks in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
A family walks in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A family walks in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG6N
May 17, 2006
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province...
Yichang, China
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG6M
May 17, 2006
A worker walks in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei...
Yichang, China
A worker walks in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A worker walks in front of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG6K
May 17, 2006
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province...
Yichang, China
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A general view shows the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG6J
May 17, 2006
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central...
Yichang, China
A Chinese worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA THREE GORGES DAM
RTR1DG6I
May 17, 2006
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central...
Yichang, China
A Chinese worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river
A worker paints a giant flood scale at the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Yichang in central China's Hubei province May 17, 2006 as the construction on the dam is set to finish next week. With the last of the concrete being poured nearly a decade after China stemmed the flow of the Yangtze River to begin work, environmentalists say it should provide a cautionary tale to an energy-hungry government pushing similar hydropower dam projects.
REUTERS/Reinhard Krause
CHINA
RTXLGUX
September 04, 2002
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its...
Yichang, China
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during it.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its construction in Yichang, Hubei province, September 1, 2002. More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates as high as $75 billion or more. Picture taken September 1, 2002.
CHINA
RTXLGUP
September 04, 2002
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its...
Yichang, China
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during it.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its construction in Yichang, Hubei province, September 1, 2002. More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates as high as $75 billion or more. Picture taken September 1, 2002.
CHINA
RTXLGUO
September 04, 2002
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its...
Yichang, China
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during it.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its construction in Yichang, Hubei province, September 1, 2002. More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates as high as $75 billion or more. Picture taken September 1, 2002.
CHINA
RTXLHMH
September 02, 2002
- PHOTO TAKEN 31AUG02 - A general view of the main dam of the Three Gorges project under construction...
Yichang, China
- PHOTO TAKEN 31AUG02 - A general view of the main dam of the Three Gorges project under constructio.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 31AUG02 - A general view of the main dam of the Three Gorges project under construction in Yichang, Hubei province, on August 31, 2002. More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates of $75 billion or more. Picture taken August 31, 2002.
CHINA
RTXLHMG
September 02, 2002
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at a main dam of the Three Gorges project under construction...
Yichang, China
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at a main dam of the Three Gorges project under const.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A Chinese worker looks at a main dam of the Three Gorges project under construction in Yichang, Hubei province, on September 1, 2002. More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates of $75 billion or more. Picture taken September 1, 2002.
CHINA
RTXLHMF
September 02, 2002
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A passerby looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its construction...
Yichang, China
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A passerby looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its cons.....
- PHOTO TAKEN 01SEP02 - A passerby looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its construction in Yichang, Hubei province, on September 1, 2002. More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River are displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates of $75 billion or more. Picture taken September 1, 2002.
CHINA
RTXLHM8
September 02, 2002
- PHOTO TAKEN 31AUG02 - A general view of a main dam of the Three Gorges project under construction in...
Yichang, China
- PHOTO TAKEN 31AUG02 - A general view of a main dam of the Three Gorges project under construction .....
- PHOTO TAKEN 31AUG02 - A general view of a main dam of the Three Gorges project under construction in Yichang, Hubei province, August 31, 2002. More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates of $75 billion or more. Picture taken August 31, 2002.
CHINA
RTR1545H
September 01, 2002
A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project
during its construction in Yichang,...
Yichang, China - Peoples Republic of
A CHINESE WORKER LOOKS AT THE MAIN DAM OF THE THREE GORGES PROJECT
DURING ITS CONSTRUCTION IN YICHANG....
A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project
during its construction in Yichang, Hubei province, September 1, 2002.
More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the
Yangtze River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control
the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three
Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single
construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates as
high as $75 billion or more. Picture taken September 1, 2002.
REUTERS/Guang Niu

ASW/PB
CHINA
RTR9T01
September 01, 2002
A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project
during its construction in Yichang,...
Yichang, China - Peoples Republic of
A CHINESE WORKER LOOKS AT THE MAIN DAM OF THE THREE GORGES PROJECT
DURING ITS CONSTRUCTION IN YICHANG....
A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project
during its construction in Yichang, Hubei province, September 1, 2002.
More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the
Yangtze River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control
the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three
Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single
construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates as
high as $75 billion or more. Picture taken September 1, 2002.
REUTERS/Guang Niu

ASW/PB
CHINA
RTR9SZT
September 01, 2002
A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project
during its construction in Yichang,...
Yichang, China - Peoples Republic of
A CHINESE WORKER LOOKS AT THE MAIN DAM OF THE THREE GORGES PROJECT
DURING ITS CONSTRUCTION IN YICHANG....
A Chinese worker looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project
during its construction in Yichang, Hubei province, September 1, 2002.
More than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the
Yangtze River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control
the country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three
Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single
construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates as
high as $75 billion or more. Picture taken September 1, 2002.
REUTERS/Guang Niu

ASW/PB
CHINA
RTR9PJN
September 01, 2002
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE FOURTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A Chinese worker looks at a main dam...
Yichang, China - Peoples Republic of
A CHINESE WORKER LOOKS AT THE MAIN DAM OF THE THREE GORGES PROJECT IN
YICHANG.
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE FOURTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A Chinese worker looks at a main dam of the Three Gorges project under
construction in Yichang, Hubei province, on September 1, 2002. More
than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze
River are being displaced by the project, which aims to control the
country's mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three
Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost more than any other single
construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates of
$75 billion or more. Picture taken September 1, 2002. REUTERS/Guang
Niu
CHINA
RTR9PIY
September 01, 2002
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE FIRST IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A passerby looks at the main dam of...
Yichang, China - Peoples Republic of
A PASSERBY LOOKS AT THE MAIN DAM OF THE THREE GORGES PROJECT IN
YICHANG.
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE FIRST IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A passerby looks at the main dam of the Three Gorges project during its
construction in Yichang, Hubei province, on September 1, 2002. More
than 1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze
River are displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's
mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam
project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction
project in China's history, with unofficial estimates of $75 billion or
more. Picture taken September 1, 2002. REUTERS/Guang Niu
CHINA
RTR9PLM
August 31, 2002
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE NINTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A general view of a main dam of the...
Yichang, China - Peoples Republic of
A TOURIST LOOKS AT A MAIN DAM OF THE THREE GORGES PROJECT IN YICHANG.
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE NINTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A general view of a main dam of the Three Gorges project under
construction in Yichang, Hubei province, August 31, 2002. More than
1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River
are being displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's
mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam
project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction
project in China's history, with unofficial estimates of $75 billion or
more. Picture taken August 31, 2002. REUTERS/Guang Niu
CHINA
RTR9PLA
August 31, 2002
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE EIGHTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A general view of the main dam of...
Yichang, China - Peoples Republic of
THE MAIN DAM OF THE THREE GORGES PROJECT IN YICHANG.
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE EIGHTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A general view of the main dam of the Three Gorges project under
construction in Yichang, Hubei province, on August 31, 2002. More than
1.13 million residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River
are being displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's
mighty Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam
project is thought to have cost more than any other single construction
project in China's history, with unofficial estimates of $75 billion or
more. Picture taken August 31, 2002. REUTERS/Guang Niu
CHINA
RTXLHAU
August 30, 2002
-PHOTO TAKEN 29AUG02- Construction cranes line the main dam of the Three Gorges Dam Project on the Yangtze...
Yichang, China
-PHOTO TAKEN 29AUG02- Construction cranes line the main dam of the Three Gorges Dam Project on the Y.....
-PHOTO TAKEN 29AUG02- Construction cranes line the main dam of the Three Gorges Dam Project on the Yangtze River in Yichang, China's Hubei province, August 29, 2002. [The project, which aims to control the country's mighty Yangtze River and tame annual floods, is thought to have cost more than any other single construction project in China's history, with unofficial estimates as high as $75 billion or more.] Picture taken August 29, 2002.
CHINA
RTR9PKZ
August 30, 2002
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE SEVENTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

Chinese families, displaced by the...
Yichang, China - Peoples Republic of
CHINESE FAMILIES DISPLACED BY THE THREE GORGES DAM PROJECT LEAVE
YICHANG.
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE SEVENTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

Chinese families, displaced by the Three Gorges Dam project, are crammed in
a special train leaving Yichang in Hubei province enroute to new homes in
Guangdong province, August 30, 2002. More than 1.13 million residents in the
Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River are being displaced by the
project, which aims to control the country's mighty Yangtze River and
generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam project is thought to have cost
more than any other single construction project in China's history, with
unofficial estimates of $75 billion or more. Picture taken August 30, 2002.
NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/Guang Niu
CHINA
RTR9PKB
August 30, 2002
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE SIXTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A girl and her family, displaced by...
Yichang, China - Peoples Republic of
GIRL DISPLACED BY THE THREE GORGES CHINESE DAM PROJECT LEAVES YICHANG.
ATTENTION EDITORS-THIS IS THE SIXTH IN A SERIES OF NINE IMAGES

A girl and her family, displaced by the Three Gorges Dam project, sits
in a special train leaving Yichang in Hubei province enroute to a new
home in Guangdong province, August 30, 2002. More than 1.13 million
residents in the Three Gorges area along the Yangtze River are being
displaced by the project, which aims to control the country's mighty
Yangtze River and generate electricity. The Three Gorges Dam project is
thought to have cost more than any other single construction project in
China's history, with unofficial estimates of $75 billion or more.
Picture taken August 30, 2002. REUTERS/Guang Niu
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