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Search results for: iPhone

BANGLADESH-ROHINGYA/FIRE
RTXAUEPJ
March 26, 2021
Noor Banu, 32, talks to a relative over the phone as she tries to trace her eleven-year-old son Mohammed...
Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
The Wider Image: 'Can't take this pain': Rohingya mother searches for son after refugee camp blaze
Noor Banu, 32, talks to a relative over the phone as she tries to trace her eleven-year-old son Mohammed Karim, who went missing after a fire broke out earlier this week and destroyed thousands of shelters at the Balukhali refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, March 25, 2021. "I can't take this pain any more," Banu said. "I believe Karim is dead, and I may not even be able to identify his body." REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain SEARCH "BALUKHALI FAMILY" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
FRANCE-APPLE/ANTITRUST
RTXAIQIX
March 17, 2021
Isabelle de Silva, Head of France's competition authority, attends a news conference after French antitrust...
Paris, France
French antitrust watchdog issues decision on Apple
Isabelle de Silva, Head of France's competition authority, attends a news conference after French antitrust authority published a decision on iPhone maker Apple, in Paris, France, March 17, 2021. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
FRANCE-APPLE/ANTITRUST
RTXAIQIW
March 17, 2021
Isabelle de Silva, Head of France's competition authority, talks during a news conference after French...
Paris, France
French antitrust watchdog issues decision on Apple
Isabelle de Silva, Head of France's competition authority, talks during a news conference after French antitrust authority published a decision on iPhone maker Apple, in Paris, France, March 17, 2021. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
FRANCE-APPLE/ANTITRUST
RTXAIQIU
March 17, 2021
Isabelle de Silva, Head of France's competition authority, talks during a news conference after French...
Paris, France
French antitrust watchdog issues decision on Apple
Isabelle de Silva, Head of France's competition authority, talks during a news conference after French antitrust authority published a decision on iPhone maker Apple, in Paris, France, March 17, 2021. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
FRANCE-APPLE/ANTITRUST
RTXAIQIT
March 17, 2021
Isabelle de Silva, Head of France's competition authority, talks during a news conference after French...
Paris, France
French antitrust watchdog issues decision on Apple
Isabelle de Silva, Head of France's competition authority, talks during a news conference after French antitrust authority published a decision on iPhone maker Apple, in Paris, France, March 17, 2021. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SOCCER-FANS
RTXABUDV
March 11, 2021
A heath questionnaire, to gain access to a football match between Manchester City and Newcastle-under-Lyme,...
Newcastle-Under-Lyme, United Kingdom
The Wider Image: A year without fans lays bare soccer's true soul
A heath questionnaire, to gain access to a football match between Manchester City and Newcastle-under-Lyme, is completed on an iPhone, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Staffordshire, Britain, January 16, 2021. REUTERS/Carl Recine SEARCH "RECINE FANS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
WOMENS-DAY/BRAZIL
RTXA3XLT
March 05, 2021
Educator Pamela Carvalho, 28, who coordinates art and cultural projects for Redes da Mare, a civil society...
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Educator Pamela Carvalho, who coordinates art and cultural projects for Redes da Mare, a civil society...
Educator Pamela Carvalho, 28, who coordinates art and cultural projects for Redes da Mare, a civil society organization, speaks with her mother on her cell phone at her house in the Mare favelas complex in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil December 30, 2020. "I am the most beautiful dream of my ancestors. Both of my grandmothers were domestic workers, my mother worked as a maid also, I belong to a family of poor black women. I am the daughter of a domestic worker who is a teacher, who has a master's degree, who coordinates a civil society organization." Carvalho says. Picture taken December 30, 2020. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/PHONEBOOTH
RTXA2LAA
March 05, 2021
Sachiko Okawa, 76, who lost her husband, Toichiro, in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, calls...
OTSUCHI TOWN, Japan
The Wider Image: Japan's tsunami survivors call lost loves on the phone of the wind
Sachiko Okawa, 76, who lost her husband, Toichiro, in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, calls her late husband inside Kaze-no-Denwa (the phone of the wind), a phone booth set up for people to call their deceased loved ones, at Bell Gardia Kujira-yama, ahead of the 10th anniversary of the disaster, in Otsuchi town, Iwate Prefecture, northern Japan, February 27, 2021. Sachiko who was married to Toichiro for 44 years asks him what he has been doing with his days since he was swept away by the tsunami a decade ago "I'm lonely," she says. "Bye for now, I'll be back soon." Okawa says she sometimes feels like she can hear Toichiro on the other end of the line. "It makes me feel a little better." REUTERS/Issei Kato SEARCH "KATO PHONEBOOTH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/PHONEBOOTH
RTXA2LA9
March 05, 2021
Sachiko Okawa, 76, who lost her husband in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, calls her late...
OTSUCHI TOWN, Japan
The Wider Image: Japan's tsunami survivors call lost loves on the phone of the wind
Sachiko Okawa, 76, who lost her husband in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, calls her late husband with her two grandsons Reo and Daina inside Kaze-no-Denwa (the phone of the wind), a phone booth set up for people to call their deceased loved ones, at Bell Gardia Kujira-yama, ahead of the 10th anniversary of the disaster, in Otsuchi town, Iwate Prefecture, northern Japan, February 27, 2021. "Grandpa, it's been 10 years already and I'm going to be in middle school soon," says Daina. "There's this new virus that's killing lots of people and that's why we're wearing masks. But we're all doing well." Photograph taken with remote camera. REUTERS/Issei Kato SEARCH "KATO PHONEBOOTH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/PHONEBOOTH
RTXA2LA8
March 05, 2021
A notebook with messages written by visitors lies inside Kaze-no-Denwa (the phone of the wind), a phone...
OTSUCHI TOWN, Japan
The Wider Image: Japan's tsunami survivors call lost loves on the phone of the wind
A notebook with messages written by visitors lies inside Kaze-no-Denwa (the phone of the wind), a phone booth up for people to call their deceased loved ones, at Bell Gardia Kujira-yama, ahead of the 10th anniversary of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster, in Otsuchi town, Iwate Prefecture, northern Japan, February 28, 2021. The note reads: "I came to (Itaru) Sasaki's garden for the first time 15 years ago. You may not remember it. I brought a small child. I heard a lot about the concept of this garden and the roses at the time. I was really looking forward to seeing what happened to this garden from that time. I couldn't come after the disaster, but I suddenly thought about it today and came here again with the 20-year-old son. I will come again when the flowers and vegetation in the garden are overgrown!" REUTERS/Issei Kato SEARCH "KATO PHONEBOOTH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/PHONEBOOTH
RTXA2LA6
March 05, 2021
Sachiko Okawa, 76, who lost her husband, Toichiro, in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, holds...
OTSUCHI TOWN, Japan
The Wider Image: Japan's tsunami survivors call lost loves on the phone of the wind
Sachiko Okawa, 76, who lost her husband, Toichiro, in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, holds a photograph of her late husband Toichiro, as she visits Kaze-no-Denwa (the phone of the wind), a phone booth set up for people to call their deceased loved ones, at Bell Gardia Kujira-yama, ahead of the 10th anniversary of the disaster, in Otsuchi town, Iwate Prefecture, northern Japan February 27, 2021. Sachiko who was married to Toichiro for 44 years asks him what he has been doing with his days since he was swept away by the tsunami a decade ago. "I'm lonely," she says. "Bye for now, I'll be back soon." Okawa says she sometimes feels like she can hear Toichiro on the other end of the line. "It makes me feel a little better." REUTERS/Issei Kato SEARCH "KATO PHONEBOOTH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/PHONEBOOTH
RTXA2L7O
March 05, 2021
Kazuyoshi Sasaki, 67, who lost his wife, Miwako, in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, reacts...
OTSUCHI TOWN, Japan
The Wider Image: Japan's tsunami survivors call lost loves on the phone of the wind
Kazuyoshi Sasaki, 67, who lost his wife, Miwako, in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, reacts as he calls his late wife inside Kazo-no-Denwa (the phone of the wind), a phone booth set up for people to call their deceased loved ones, ahead of the 10th anniversary of the disaster, at Bell Gardia Kujira-yama in Otsuchi town, Iwate Prefecture, northern Japan, February 27, 2021. Inside, Sasaki dials his wife's cellphone number. He explains how he searched for her for days. "It all happened in an instant, I can't forget it even now," he says, weeping. "I sent you a message telling you where I was, but you didn't check it. When I came back to the house and looked up at the sky, there were thousands of stars, it was like looking at a jewel box," he added. "I cried and cried and knew then that so many people must have died." REUTERS/Issei Kato SEARCH "KATO PHONEBOOTH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGE OF THE DAY.
JAPAN-TSUNAMI/PHONEBOOTH
RTXA2L7Q
March 05, 2021
Kazuyoshi Sasaki, 67, who lost his wife, Miwako, in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster,...
OTSUCHI TOWN, Japan
The Wider Image: Japan's tsunami survivors call lost loves on the phone of the wind
Kazuyoshi Sasaki, 67, who lost his wife, Miwako, in the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster, reacts as he steps out of Kazo-no-Denwa (The phone of the Wind), a phone booth set up for people to call their deceased loved ones, after calling his late wife, ahead of the 10th anniversary of when the disaster happened, at Bell Gardia Kujira-yama in Otsuchi town, Iwate Prefecture, northern Japan, February 27, 2021. "It all happened in an instant, I can't forget it even now," Sasaki said when he explained how he searched for her for days after the devastating earthquake and tsunami a decade ago, visiting evacuation centres and makeshift morgues, returning at night to the rubble of their home. "I sent you a message telling you where I was, but you didn't check it," he added. "When I came back to the house and looked up at the sky, there were thousands of stars, it was like looking at a jewel box," he said. "I cried and cried and knew then that so many people must have died." REUTERS/Issei Kato SEARCH "KATO PHONEBOOTH" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
MYANMAR-PROTESTS/
RTX9LROV
February 21, 2021
A slogan is written on a street as a protest after the coup in Yangon, Myanmar February 21, 2021. Picture...
Yangon, Myanmar
A slogan is written on a street as a protest after the coup in Yangon
A slogan is written on a street as a protest after the coup in Yangon, Myanmar February 21, 2021. Picture taken with iPhone panoramic mode. REUTERS/Stringer
BUMBLE-IPO/
RTX95YCC
February 11, 2021
The Bumble Inc. (BMBL) app is shown on an Apple iPhone in this photo illustration as the dating app operator...
Encinitas, UNITED STATES
The Bumble Inc. (BMBL) app is shown on an Apple iPhone in this photo illustration
The Bumble Inc. (BMBL) app is shown on an Apple iPhone in this photo illustration as the dating app operator made its debut IPO on the Nasdaq stock exchange February 11, 2021. REUTERS/Mike Blake/Illustration
BUMBLE-IPO/
RTX95Y9W
February 11, 2021
The Bumble Inc. (BMBL) app is shown on an Apple iPhone in this photo illustration as the dating app operator...
Encinitas, UNITED STATES
The Bumble Inc. (BMBL) app is shown on an Apple iPhone in this photo illustration
The Bumble Inc. (BMBL) app is shown on an Apple iPhone in this photo illustration as the dating app operator made its debut IPO on the Nasdaq stock exchange February 11, 2021. REUTERS/Mike Blake/Illustration
BUMBLE-IPO/
RTX95Y9V
February 11, 2021
The Bumble Inc. (BMBL) app is shown on an Apple iPhone in this photo illustration as the dating app operator...
Encinitas, UNITED STATES
The Bumble Inc. (BMBL) app is shown on an Apple iPhone in this photo illustration
The Bumble Inc. (BMBL) app is shown on an Apple iPhone in this photo illustration as the dating app operator made its debut IPO on the Nasdaq stock exchange February 11, 2021. REUTERS/Mike Blake/Illustration
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VACCINE-DELIVERY
RTX8OT1L
January 25, 2021
Ramishi, 13, whose mother Reena Jani, is a health worker scheduled to receive the vaccine developed by...
KORAPUT, India
The Wider Image: The 1,700km journey to deliver coronavirus vaccine to India's rural health workers
Ramishi, 13, whose mother Reena Jani, is a health worker scheduled to receive the vaccine developed by Oxford/AstraZeneca, tries to find signal on her phone so she can ring her mother the day before Jani is vaccinated, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in Pendajam village in Koraput, India, January 15, 2021. Jani became an accredited social health activist (ASHA) community health worker, a lynchpin of India's rural healthcare system, around seven years ago. She helps to monitor pregnant women in her village of 500 people, and helps with malaria tests and doles out basic medication for fever and diarrhoea. The main breadwinner for her family of five, Jani draws a monthly salary of 3,000 rupees ($41), helping put her two daughters and one son through school. When she first learned she was to be vaccinated, Jani said she wasn't worried. Then she heard a rumour. "Someone told me that people are fainting, they are developing fever and some are dying after taking the injection," she said. "That is why I was frightened." REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui SEARCH "SIDDIQUI OXFORD/ASTRAZENECA" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
USA-BIDEN/YELLEN
RTX8NGDY
January 19, 2021
An iPhone is held up to film the timer in the Senate Finance Committee hearing for Janet Yellen, of California,...
Washington, UNITED STATES
Yellen participates remotely in a Senate Finance Committee hearing in Washington
An iPhone is held up to film the timer in the Senate Finance Committee hearing for Janet Yellen, of California, President-elect Joe Biden’s nominee for Treasury Secretary in Washington, U.S., January 19, 2021. Anna Moneymaker/Pool via REUTERS
MOTOR-RALLY-DAKAR/
RTX8L3V7
January 08, 2021
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 6 - Al Qaisumah to Ha'il - Al Qaisumah, Saudi Arabia - January 8, 2021...
AL QAISUMAH, Saudi Arabia
Dakar Rally
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 6 - Al Qaisumah to Ha'il - Al Qaisumah, Saudi Arabia - January 8, 2021 Orlen Team's Kamil Wisniewski in action during stage 6 as boys take photographs on their cell phones REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
MOTOR-RALLY-DAKAR/
RTX8L3T0
January 08, 2021
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 6 - Al Qaisumah to Ha'il - Al Qaisumah, Saudi Arabia - January 8, 2021...
AL QAISUMAH, Saudi Arabia
Dakar Rally
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 6 - Al Qaisumah to Ha'il - Al Qaisumah, Saudi Arabia - January 8, 2021 Neil Hawker's Neil Hawker in action during stage 6 as boys take photographs on their cell phones REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
MOTOR-RALLY-DAKAR/
RTX8L3SI
January 08, 2021
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 6 - Al Qaisumah to Ha'il - Al Qaisumah, Saudi Arabia - January 8, 2021...
AL QAISUMAH, Saudi Arabia
Dakar Rally
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 6 - Al Qaisumah to Ha'il - Al Qaisumah, Saudi Arabia - January 8, 2021 FN Speed - Rieju Team's Oriol Mena in action during stage 6 as boys take photographs on their cell phones REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
MOTOR-RALLY-DAKAR/
RTX8KVRV
January 07, 2021
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 Saudi...
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Dakar Rally
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 Saudi Arabia's Prince and Head of Saudi Motorsport Federation, Khalid bin Sultan Al Faisal takes a photograph with his cell phone during stage 5 REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
MOTOR-RALLY-DAKAR/
RTX8KVCC
January 07, 2021
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 People...
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Dakar Rally
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 People take photographs with their cell phones as vehicles pass during stage 5 REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
MOTOR-RALLY-DAKAR/
RTX8KV6P
January 07, 2021
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 A...
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Dakar Rally
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 A person takes a photograph with their cell phone as South Racing's Mathias Behringer and Co-Driver Stefan Henken pass during stage 5 REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUR
November 23, 2020
A woman cries as a horse-drawn carriage carrying the casket containing the body of George Floyd, whose...
PEARLAND, UNITED STATES
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
A woman cries as a horse-drawn carriage carrying the casket containing the body of George Floyd, whose death in Minneapolis police custody has sparked nationwide protests against racial inequality, passes by in Pearland, Texas, U.S., June 9, 2020. Reuters photographer Carlos Barria: "The death of George Floyd triggered a massive wave of nationwide protests demanding justice and police accountability. But it was different this time, covering protests during a global pandemic. Each time we went out on the streets, we had to work hard to assess and minimize the risk. It was very difficult to photograph people's expressions as they wore masks, but as the horse-drawn carriage bearing Floyd's casket passed on its way to the cemetery, I heard someone screaming. When I turned, I saw a woman without a face mask on, crying as she held up her phone. I took a few pictures, but only later realized that the carriage was reflected in her phone, capturing all the elements to tell the story within a single frame." REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BAHRAIN-POLITICS/GOVERNMENT
RTX88TRX
November 11, 2020
A woman checks her smart phone in front of Bahraini flags flying at half-mast following the death of...
Muharraq, Bahrain
A woman checks her smart phone in front of Bahraini flags flying at half-mast following the death of...
A woman checks her smart phone in front of Bahraini flags flying at half-mast following the death of Bahrain's Prime Minister, Sheikh Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa, in Seef Mall in Muharraq, Bahrain November 11, 2020. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-ELECTION/MIDDLEEAST
RTX883DI
November 08, 2020
A man poses for a photograph with his mobile phone showing a headline reporting on U.S. Vice President-elect...
Manama, Bahrain
A man poses for a photograph with his mobile phone showing a headline reporting on U.S. Vice President-elect...
A man poses for a photograph with his mobile phone showing a headline reporting on U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris at a shop in Manama, Bahrain, November 8, 2020. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-ELECTION/MIDDLEEAST
RTX8838G
November 08, 2020
A man holds his phone and looks at his news headlines reporting on Joe Biden's U.S. presidential election...
Manama, Bahrain
A man holds his phone and looks at his news headlines reporting on Joe Biden's U.S. presidential election...
A man holds his phone and looks at his news headlines reporting on Joe Biden's U.S. presidential election victory at a shop in Manama, Bahrain, November 8, 2020. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
JAPAN-TATTOOS/
RTX859C1
October 26, 2020
Tattoo model Yuki, 30, checks her mobile phone as she smokes a cigarette on her break while performing...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: Breaking taboos: Japan's tattoo fans bare their ink
Tattoo model Yuki, 30, checks her mobile phone as she smokes a cigarette on her break while performing on set for French pop group Supernaive's music video in Tokyo, Japan, February 18, 2020. "I thought tattoos were really nice and wanted to put them all over my body. I can't even count how many times I've been to the parlor", said Yuki. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON TATTOOS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTX854PO
October 26, 2020
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in the city...
Sydney, Australia
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in Sydney...
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in the city centre as the state of New South Wales continues to report low case numbers of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Sydney, Australia, October 26, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTX854PM
October 26, 2020
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in the city...
Sydney, Australia
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in Sydney...
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in the city centre as the state of New South Wales continues to report low case numbers of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Sydney, Australia, October 26, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTX854PC
October 26, 2020
A shopper looks at an iPhone 12 display while waiting in line to enter an Apple Store in the city centre...
Sydney, Australia
A shopper looks at an iPhone 12 display while waiting in line to enter an Apple Store in Sydney
A shopper looks at an iPhone 12 display while waiting in line to enter an Apple Store in the city centre as the state of New South Wales continues to report low case numbers of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Sydney, Australia, October 26, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JNF
October 23, 2020
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 in Brooklyn, New York...
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JNE
October 23, 2020
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale at an Apple Store in Brooklyn,...
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues, at an Apple Store in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JND
October 23, 2020
A customers speaks to an employee outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customers speaks to an employee outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 in Brooklyn,...
A customers speaks to an employee outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JNC
October 23, 2020
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 in Brooklyn, New York...
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JNB
October 23, 2020
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale at an Apple Store in Brooklyn,...
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues, at an Apple Store in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JN6
October 23, 2020
A customer has his temperature taken while in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customer has his temperature taken while in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone...
A customer has his temperature taken while in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JN5
October 23, 2020
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale at an Apple Store in Brooklyn,...
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues, at an Apple Store in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JN2
October 23, 2020
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 in Brooklyn, New York...
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JN3
October 23, 2020
The Apple logo is seen at an Apple Store, as Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 went on sale in Brooklyn, New York,...
New York, UNITED STATES
The Apple logo is seen at an Apple Store, as Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 went on sale in Brooklyn, New York...
The Apple logo is seen at an Apple Store, as Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 went on sale in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84C3H
October 23, 2020
Apple's 5G iPhone 12 and iPhone 11 are seen at an Apple Store, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Shanghai, China
Apple's 5G iPhone 12 and iPhone 11 are seen at an Apple Store, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Apple's 5G iPhone 12 and iPhone 11 are seen at an Apple Store, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84C33
October 23, 2020
A staff member holds a thermometer as people wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go...
Shanghai, China
A staff member holds a thermometer as people wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go...
A staff member holds a thermometer as people wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BIW
October 23, 2020
Apple employees wearing face masks applaud at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale,...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
Apple employees wearing face masks applaud at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BIC
October 23, 2020
A man reacts while entering at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
A man reacts while entering at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BI1
October 23, 2020
A man wears a face mask while waiting at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
A man wears a face mask while waiting at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BHR
October 23, 2020
People wearing face masks wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
People wearing face masks wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BHN
October 23, 2020
People line up as they wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
People line up as they wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BHF
October 23, 2020
People line up as they wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
People line up as they wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
ISRAEL-GULF/BAHRAIN
RTX836WF
October 18, 2020
Israeli foreign ministry spokesman Lior Haiat holds a mobile phone as he speaks at Bahrain International...
Muharraq, Bahrain
Israeli foreign ministry spokesman Lior Haiat holds a mobile phone as he speaks at Bahrain International...
Israeli foreign ministry spokesman Lior Haiat holds a mobile phone as he speaks at Bahrain International Airport, ahead of the arrival of an Israeli delegation accompanied by the U.S. treasury secretary, in Muharraq, Bahrain, October 18, 2020. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S
October 15, 2020
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R
October 15, 2020
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
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