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MOTOR-RALLY-DAKAR/
RTX8KVCC
January 07, 2021
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 People...
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Dakar Rally
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 People take photographs with their cell phones as vehicles pass during stage 5 REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
MOTOR-RALLY-DAKAR/
RTX8KV6P
January 07, 2021
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 A...
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Dakar Rally
Rallying - Dakar Rally - Stage 5 - Riyadh to Al Qaisumah - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - January 7, 2021 A person takes a photograph with their cell phone as South Racing's Mathias Behringer and Co-Driver Stefan Henken pass during stage 5 REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
BRAZIL-RACE/SWEEPER
RTXE20N0
December 09, 2020
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also...
BELFORD ROXO, Brazil
The Wider Image: Scholar by day, street-sweeper by night, one Black man navigates Rio's racial divide...
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also works as a street-sweeper, uses his cellphone to take part in an online class for his university, as he holds his dog Mel at his home in Belford Roxo, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, December 9, 2020. Brazil's educational inequalities have only grown during the pandemic, as remote classes force students to rely on resources at home, widening a gap between the haves and the have-nots. "For my course, which demands a lot of reading, I need a better computer than the one I got. But some people aren't even given a computer," Luther said, noting the array of challenges for disadvantaged students forced to study from home. "Not all phones are good enough for working, and not everyone has a phone ... or enough internet data to download their readings." REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "BLM OLIVARES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
BRAZIL-RACE/SWEEPER
RTXE20MY
December 09, 2020
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also...
BELFORD ROXO, Brazil
The Wider Image: Scholar by day, street-sweeper by night, one Black man navigates Rio's racial divide...
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also works as a street-sweeper, kisses his wife Erica Maria da Silva, 32, as she leaves for work, at their home in Belford Roxo near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, December 9, 2020. Brazil's educational inequalities have only grown during the pandemic, as remote classes force students to rely on resources at home, widening a gap between the haves and the have-nots. "For my course, which demands a lot of reading, I need a better computer than the one I got. But some people aren't even given a computer," Luther said, noting the array of challenges for disadvantaged students forced to study from home. "Not all phones are good enough for working, and not everyone has a phone ... or enough internet data to download their readings." REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "BLM OLIVARES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BRAZIL-RACE/SWEEPER
RTXE20MU
December 09, 2020
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also...
BELFORD ROXO, Brazil
The Wider Image: Scholar by day, street-sweeper by night, one Black man navigates Rio's racial divide...
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also works as a street-sweeper, uses his cellphone to take part in an online class for his university, as he has lunch with his stepdaughter Mirella da Silva, 8, at their home in Belford Roxo, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, December 9, 2020. Brazil's educational inequalities have only grown during the pandemic, as remote classes force students to rely on resources at home, widening a gap between the haves and the have-nots. "For my course, which demands a lot of reading, I need a better computer than the one I got. But some people aren't even given a computer," Luther said, noting the array of challenges for disadvantaged students forced to study from home. "Not all phones are good enough for working, and not everyone has a phone ... or enough internet data to download their readings." REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "BLM OLIVARES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BRAZIL-RACE/SWEEPER
RTXE20JI
December 09, 2020
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also...
BELFORD ROXO, Brazil
The Wider Image: Scholar by day, street-sweeper by night, one Black man navigates Rio's racial divide...
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also works as a street-sweeper, uses his cellphone to take part in an online class for university, as his wife Erica Maria da Silva, 32, does his hair, at their home in Belford Roxo, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, December 9, 2020. Brazil's educational inequalities have only grown during the pandemic, as remote classes force students to rely on resources at home, widening a gap between the haves and the have-nots. "For my course, which demands a lot of reading, I need a better computer than the one I got. But some people aren't even given a computer," Luther said, noting the array of challenges for disadvantaged students forced to study from home. "Not all phones are good enough for working, and not everyone has a phone ... or enough internet data to download their readings." REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "BLM OLIVARES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BRAZIL-RACE/SWEEPER
RTXE20JF
December 09, 2020
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also...
BELFORD ROXO, Brazil
The Wider Image: Scholar by day, street-sweeper by night, one Black man navigates Rio's racial divide...
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also works as a street-sweeper, holds his cell phone as he takes part in an online class for his university, at his home in Belford Roxo, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, December 9, 2020. Brazil's educational inequalities have only grown during the pandemic, as remote classes force students to rely on resources at home, widening a gap between the haves and the have-nots. "For my course, which demands a lot of reading, I need a better computer than the one I got. But some people aren't even given a computer," Luther said, noting the array of challenges for disadvantaged students forced to study from home. "Not all phones are good enough for working, and not everyone has a phone ... or enough internet data to download their readings." REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "BLM OLIVARES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
BRAZIL-RACE/SWEEPER
RTXE20JH
December 09, 2020
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also...
BELFORD ROXO, Brazil
The Wider Image: Scholar by day, street-sweeper by night, one Black man navigates Rio's racial divide...
Felipe Luther, 37, a scholarship student at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio (PUC-Rio) who also works as a street-sweeper, uses his cellphone to take part in an online class for his university, as he washes the dishes at his home in Belford Roxo, near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, December 9, 2020. Brazil's educational inequalities have only grown during the pandemic, as remote classes force students to rely on resources at home, widening a gap between the haves and the have-nots. "For my course, which demands a lot of reading, I need a better computer than the one I got. But some people aren't even given a computer," Luther said, noting the array of challenges for disadvantaged students forced to study from home. "Not all phones are good enough for working, and not everyone has a phone ... or enough internet data to download their readings." REUTERS/Pilar Olivares SEARCH "BLM OLIVARES" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
GLOBAL-POY/STORIES-2020
RTX8BCUR
November 23, 2020
A woman cries as a horse-drawn carriage carrying the casket containing the body of George Floyd, whose...
PEARLAND, UNITED STATES
Pictures of the Year: A Picture and its Story
A woman cries as a horse-drawn carriage carrying the casket containing the body of George Floyd, whose death in Minneapolis police custody has sparked nationwide protests against racial inequality, passes by in Pearland, Texas, U.S., June 9, 2020. Reuters photographer Carlos Barria: "The death of George Floyd triggered a massive wave of nationwide protests demanding justice and police accountability. But it was different this time, covering protests during a global pandemic. Each time we went out on the streets, we had to work hard to assess and minimize the risk. It was very difficult to photograph people's expressions as they wore masks, but as the horse-drawn carriage bearing Floyd's casket passed on its way to the cemetery, I heard someone screaming. When I turned, I saw a woman without a face mask on, crying as she held up her phone. I took a few pictures, but only later realized that the carriage was reflected in her phone, capturing all the elements to tell the story within a single frame." REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File photo SEARCH "POY STORIES 2020" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
BAHRAIN-POLITICS/GOVERNMENT
RTX88TRX
November 11, 2020
A woman checks her smart phone in front of Bahraini flags flying at half-mast following the death of...
Muharraq, Bahrain
A woman checks her smart phone in front of Bahraini flags flying at half-mast following the death of...
A woman checks her smart phone in front of Bahraini flags flying at half-mast following the death of Bahrain's Prime Minister, Sheikh Khalifa bin Salman al-Khalifa, in Seef Mall in Muharraq, Bahrain November 11, 2020. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-ELECTION/MIDDLEEAST
RTX883DI
November 08, 2020
A man poses for a photograph with his mobile phone showing a headline reporting on U.S. Vice President-elect...
Manama, Bahrain
A man poses for a photograph with his mobile phone showing a headline reporting on U.S. Vice President-elect...
A man poses for a photograph with his mobile phone showing a headline reporting on U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris at a shop in Manama, Bahrain, November 8, 2020. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
USA-ELECTION/MIDDLEEAST
RTX8838G
November 08, 2020
A man holds his phone and looks at his news headlines reporting on Joe Biden's U.S. presidential election...
Manama, Bahrain
A man holds his phone and looks at his news headlines reporting on Joe Biden's U.S. presidential election...
A man holds his phone and looks at his news headlines reporting on Joe Biden's U.S. presidential election victory at a shop in Manama, Bahrain, November 8, 2020. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
JAPAN-TATTOOS/
RTX859C1
October 26, 2020
Tattoo model Yuki, 30, checks her mobile phone as she smokes a cigarette on her break while performing...
Tokyo, Japan
The Wider Image: Breaking taboos: Japan's tattoo fans bare their ink
Tattoo model Yuki, 30, checks her mobile phone as she smokes a cigarette on her break while performing on set for French pop group Supernaive's music video in Tokyo, Japan, February 18, 2020. "I thought tattoos were really nice and wanted to put them all over my body. I can't even count how many times I've been to the parlor", said Yuki. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon SEARCH "KYUNG-HOON TATTOOS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTX854PO
October 26, 2020
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in the city...
Sydney, Australia
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in Sydney...
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in the city centre as the state of New South Wales continues to report low case numbers of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Sydney, Australia, October 26, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTX854PM
October 26, 2020
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in the city...
Sydney, Australia
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in Sydney...
A customer wearing a protective mask looks at an iPhone 12 Pro display inside an Apple Store in the city centre as the state of New South Wales continues to report low case numbers of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Sydney, Australia, October 26, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/AUSTRALIA
RTX854PC
October 26, 2020
A shopper looks at an iPhone 12 display while waiting in line to enter an Apple Store in the city centre...
Sydney, Australia
A shopper looks at an iPhone 12 display while waiting in line to enter an Apple Store in Sydney
A shopper looks at an iPhone 12 display while waiting in line to enter an Apple Store in the city centre as the state of New South Wales continues to report low case numbers of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Sydney, Australia, October 26, 2020. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JNF
October 23, 2020
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 in Brooklyn, New York...
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JNE
October 23, 2020
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale at an Apple Store in Brooklyn,...
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues, at an Apple Store in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JND
October 23, 2020
A customers speaks to an employee outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customers speaks to an employee outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 in Brooklyn,...
A customers speaks to an employee outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JNC
October 23, 2020
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 in Brooklyn, New York...
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JNB
October 23, 2020
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale at an Apple Store in Brooklyn,...
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues, at an Apple Store in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JN6
October 23, 2020
A customer has his temperature taken while in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customer has his temperature taken while in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone...
A customer has his temperature taken while in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JN5
October 23, 2020
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease...
New York, UNITED STATES
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale at an Apple Store in Brooklyn,...
A customer exits after picking up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 that went on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues, at an Apple Store in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JN2
October 23, 2020
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus...
New York, UNITED STATES
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 in Brooklyn, New York...
Customers wait in line outside an Apple Store to pick up Apple's new 5G iPhone 12, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/USA
RTX84JN3
October 23, 2020
The Apple logo is seen at an Apple Store, as Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 went on sale in Brooklyn, New York,...
New York, UNITED STATES
The Apple logo is seen at an Apple Store, as Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 went on sale in Brooklyn, New York...
The Apple logo is seen at an Apple Store, as Apple's new 5G iPhone 12 went on sale in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84C3H
October 23, 2020
Apple's 5G iPhone 12 and iPhone 11 are seen at an Apple Store, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Shanghai, China
Apple's 5G iPhone 12 and iPhone 11 are seen at an Apple Store, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Apple's 5G iPhone 12 and iPhone 11 are seen at an Apple Store, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84C33
October 23, 2020
A staff member holds a thermometer as people wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go...
Shanghai, China
A staff member holds a thermometer as people wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go...
A staff member holds a thermometer as people wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BIW
October 23, 2020
Apple employees wearing face masks applaud at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale,...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
Apple employees wearing face masks applaud at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BIC
October 23, 2020
A man reacts while entering at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
A man reacts while entering at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BI1
October 23, 2020
A man wears a face mask while waiting at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
A man wears a face mask while waiting at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BHR
October 23, 2020
People wearing face masks wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
People wearing face masks wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BHN
October 23, 2020
People line up as they wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
People line up as they wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
APPLE-IPHONE/CHINA
RTX84BHF
October 23, 2020
People line up as they wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus...
Shanghai, China
The outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Shanghai
People line up as they wait at an Apple Store before Apple's 5G new iPhone 12 go on sale, as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Shanghai China October 23, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song
ISRAEL-GULF/BAHRAIN
RTX836WF
October 18, 2020
Israeli foreign ministry spokesman Lior Haiat holds a mobile phone as he speaks at Bahrain International...
Muharraq, Bahrain
Israeli foreign ministry spokesman Lior Haiat holds a mobile phone as he speaks at Bahrain International...
Israeli foreign ministry spokesman Lior Haiat holds a mobile phone as he speaks at Bahrain International Airport, ahead of the arrival of an Israeli delegation accompanied by the U.S. treasury secretary, in Muharraq, Bahrain, October 18, 2020. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S
October 15, 2020
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R
October 15, 2020
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E
October 15, 2020
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C
October 15, 2020
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/ITALY-GRANDAD
RTX80IVI
October 07, 2020
Ines Prandini records a video on a mobile phone, to be shown to her husband, Gino Verani, who is in care...
SAN FIORANO, Italy
The Wider Image: Losing my grandfather to dementia during the pandemic
Ines Prandini records a video on a mobile phone, to be shown to her husband, Gino Verani, who is in care facility, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in San Fiorano, Italy, September 3, 2020. Toniolo, Prandini and Verani's grandson, said that the facility where Verani was taken, allowed family members to make video calls with a helper at the care home who would hold up an iPad. However, in Verani's room, the internet did not work, so his family had to resort to video messages. Toniolo said that the emotion and the certainty that his grandfather would not be able to understand, made this operation of making the video messages, disappointing. REUTERS/Marzio Toniolo SEARCH "TONIOLO GRANDFATHER" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z843
October 01, 2020
Khushboo, 26, a student, shows a picture on her phone of her father Shakeel Ahmad Baba, a government...
Srinagar, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Khushboo, 26, a student, shows a picture on her phone of her father Shakeel Ahmad Baba, a government employee, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as she poses for a photograph, in Srinagar, September 24, 2020. "Our lives changed drastically after my father passed away, he was a loving father, a decision maker. He died because of improper healthcare facilities in the hospital. He would have survived had there been a proper oxygen supply in the hospital. A day before his death I spoke to him on the phone and he told me to pray for him and the next day he passed away. His death left a great void in our entire family," said Khushboo. REUTERS/Sanna Irshad Mattoo SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z842
October 01, 2020
Sanjib Chatterjee, 34, who works in a call centre, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Chitra...
Kolkata, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Sanjib Chatterjee, 34, who works in a call centre, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Chitra Chatterjee, 62, a housewife, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as he poses for a photograph, in Kolkata, India, September 25, 2020. "The last memory was when she was diagnosed with COVID-19," said Chatterjee. "We came to know about it after we received a call from the health department saying that she needed to visit the hospital," she added. "I hugged her and told her don't worry and we will be back soon." REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z841
October 01, 2020
Fardeen Khan, 19, a student, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Noor Jahan, a housewife, who...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Fardeen Khan, 19, a student, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Noor Jahan, a housewife, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), for a photograph, in New Delhi, India, September 27, 2020. "Since my mother died, my life has changed. There is no cure or vaccine for the disease and I wish there was one and my mother would have survived. I miss my mom a lot, as everyday she used to ask me where I was going, when will I be back home, the moment I used to step out of our house. I want people to follow precautions like social distancing etc until there is a cure for the disease," Khan said. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z83T
October 01, 2020
Niranjan Poddar, 50, a businessman, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Kausalya Devi Poddar,...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Niranjan Poddar, 50, a businessman, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Kausalya Devi Poddar, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as he poses for a photograph, in New Delhi, India, September 27, 2020. "I feel like I have lost that shade, that shadow that was guarding me and I don't know with whom I will share all my problems. It's a big change in my life and I have made some resolutions after her death and I hope she blesses me and I am able to keep them," said Poddar. REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z83R
October 01, 2020
Tilak Raj, 38, a software engineer, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Krishna Devi, a housewife,...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Tilak Raj, 38, a software engineer, shows a picture on his phone of his mother Krishna Devi, a housewife, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), for a photograph, in New Delhi, India, September 26, 2020. Raj said when his mother was hospitalised, there was no oxygen in the ambulance. When they arrived at the hospital, the cylinder that was provided was empty in five minutes. "If we had a better health system, my mother would have survived," he said. "My mother died in front of my eyes and I helplessly covered her eyes with a bed-sheet," Raj added. ""Take care of yourself my son" were the last words from my mother and I will never forget those words." REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z83Q
October 01, 2020
Mohammad Hayat, 55, a government employee, shows a picture on his phone of his father Haji Ghulam Mohammad...
Srinagar, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Mohammad Hayat, 55, a government employee, shows a picture on his phone of his father Haji Ghulam Mohammad Rather, an employee at a Muslim trust board, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as he poses for a photograph, in Srinagar, September 25, 2020. "I have had a bitter experience of this ongoing pandemic because the government is not prepared even after months of lockdown. We shifted our father from one hospital to another as there were a shortage of ventilators. Lockdown periods gave authorities enough time to get ready for the pandemic but people, especially clerics of mosques and other religion heads, should come out to spread awareness about the pandemic. My father used to help people regardless of religion, caste. Our family is incomplete with him and all I can do is to pray for his soul," said Hayat. REUTERS/Sanna Irshad Mattoo SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z83O
October 01, 2020
Mohd Irfan, a businessman, shows a picture on his phone of his father Mohd Mobin, 59, who was also a...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Mohd Irfan, a businessman, shows a picture on his phone of his father Mohd Mobin, 59, who was also a businessman and who died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as he poses for a photograph in New Delhi, India, September 22, 2020. "My whole world has collapsed. He was everything for us. He was like a roof to me and to my family. He protected us. I don't have any words to describe the loss. This pandemic has hit us hard. Life will not be the same again. I miss his presence," said Irfan. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z83N
October 01, 2020
Rahul Adhav, 26, a pharmacist, shows a picture on his phone of his father Bhaginath Jagannath Adhav,...
Mumbai, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Rahul Adhav, 26, a pharmacist, shows a picture on his phone of his father Bhaginath Jagannath Adhav, a police officer, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as he poses for a photograph, in Mumbai, India, September 28, 2020. "Life has become lonely since my father passed away, no one can take his place in the family. My dad did his best while on duty urging the general public to maintain social distancing etc. I request people to maintain social distancing and co-operate with the police. The police are doing their best to serve you. I also request that the government provide financial support to families of police who died while serving the people in the pandemic," said Adhav. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z83L
October 01, 2020
Biplab Kumar Chatterjee, 65, a laboratory technician, shows a picture on his phone of his mother-in-law...
Kolkata, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Biplab Kumar Chatterjee, 65, a laboratory technician, shows a picture on his phone of his mother-in-law Krishna Ghosh, 85, a housewife, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as he poses for a photograph, in Kolkata, India, September 27, 2020. "My mother-in-law's loss is painful. I was also a Covid positive. I recovered but my mother-in-law died. She was in a private hospital for three days; we had tried our best but could not save her because of her age and she had many other health problems," Chatterjee said. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z83J
October 01, 2020
Rekha Khandait, 38, a housewife, shows a picture on her phone of her husband Jayant Khandait, 58, a police...
Mumbai, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Rekha Khandait, 38, a housewife, shows a picture on her phone of her husband Jayant Khandait, 58, a police head constable, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as she poses for a photograph, in Mumbai, India, September 27, 2020. "I know my husband has passed away but I can still feel his presence. I can't believe that six months have passed. I still haven't told our son about his father's death," said Khandait. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/INDIA-VICTIMS
RTX7Z83G
October 01, 2020
Abida Begum, 55, a housewife, shows a picture on her phone of her son-in-law Luqman Ahmed, a factory...
New Delhi, India
The Wider Image: Indians share the stories of loved ones they lost to the pandemic
Abida Begum, 55, a housewife, shows a picture on her phone of her son-in-law Luqman Ahmed, a factory worker, who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), as she poses for a photograph, in New Delhi, India, September 26, 2020. "My son-in law was a good husband, a good father. He is gone too early. A lack of medical facilities killed him. He would have survived had there been proper medical care in hospitals. I appeal the government to ensure that they have good medical facilities in hospitals for the poor like us, so that people survive this pandemic," Begum said. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi SEARCH "COVID DEATHS" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
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