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Environment

RTR2SLH6
Collecting Guano in Peru - 13 Oct 2011
Collecting Guano in Peru - 13 Oct 2011
PERU/
RTR2SL56
October 12, 2011
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other...
Paracas, Peru
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS AGRICULTURE TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
PERU/
RTR2SLCX
October 13, 2011
Workers collect bird dung on a field in Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas,...
Paracas, Peru
Workers collect bird dung on Ballestas island
Workers collect bird dung on a field in Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS POLITICS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR2SL5P
October 12, 2011
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other...
Paracas, Peru
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE ANIMALS SOCIETY) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE: ALSO SEE GF2E95H1KNW01.
PERU/
RTR2SLG2
October 13, 2011
A worker throws bird dung to be processed on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas,...
Paracas, Peru
A worker throws bird dung to be processed on Ballestas island
A worker throws bird dung to be processed on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS POLITICS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR2SL4Y
October 12, 2011
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas,...
Paracas, Peru
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
PERU/
RTR2SL41
October 12, 2011
Workers scrap stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas,...
Paracas, Peru
Workers scrap stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island
Workers scrap stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
PERU/
RTR2SL5M
October 12, 2011
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other...
Paracas, Peru
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island
Workers collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR2SL64
October 12, 2011
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other...
Paracas, Peru
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island
Workers process bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT)
PERU/
RTR2SLCL
October 13, 2011
A worker collects bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, like the...
Paracas, Peru
A worker collects bird dung on Ballestas island
A worker collects bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS POLITICS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR2SL5B
October 12, 2011
A worker throws an empty bag while processing guano on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8,...
Paracas, Peru
A worker throws an empty bag while processing guano on the Ballestas island
A worker throws an empty bag while processing guano on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 8, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 8, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS AGRICULTURE)
PERU/
RTR2SL59
October 12, 2011
A worker passes a bag full of guano to another fellow worker to be processed on the Ballestas island,...
Paracas, Peru
A worker passes a bag full of guano to another fellow worker to be processed on the Ballestas island
A worker passes a bag full of guano to another fellow worker to be processed on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENT)
PERU/
RTR2SL5K
October 12, 2011
A worker collects bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 12, 2011. Ballestas, as other...
Paracas, Peru
A worker collects bird dung on the Ballestas island
A worker collects bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 12, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT AGRICULTURE SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR2SLCU
October 13, 2011
Workers run as they carry bags of bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas,...
Paracas, Peru
Workers run as they carry bags of bird dung on Ballestas island
Workers run as they carry bags of bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS POLITICS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR2SL5V
October 12, 2011
A worker pushes a wheelbarrow to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 11,...
Paracas, Peru
A worker pushes a wheelbarrow to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island
A worker pushes a wheelbarrow to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 11, 2011. Ballestas, as other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Nowadays Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 11, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: ANIMALS AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR2SLCN
October 13, 2011
A worker (C) walks in front of Guanay Cormorant birds on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9,...
Paracas, Peru
A worker walks in front of Guanay Cormorant birds on Ballestas island
A worker (C) walks in front of Guanay Cormorant birds on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS SOCIETY AGRICULTURE)
PERU/
RTR2SL4X
October 12, 2011
A worker scrapes stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011....
Paracas, Peru
A worker scrapes stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island
A worker scrapes stones to collect bird dung on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 10, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
PERU/
RTR2SL4U
October 12, 2011
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung early morning on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October...
Paracas, Peru
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung early morning on the Ballestas island
Workers scrape stones to collect bird dung early morning on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 10, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT)
PERU/
RTR2SL3P
October 12, 2011
Thousands of Guanay Cormorant birds fly over and nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October...
Paracas, Peru
Thousands of Guanay Cormorant birds fly over and nest on the Ballestas island
Thousands of Guanay Cormorant birds fly over and nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 10, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
PERU/
RTR2SL3Y
October 12, 2011
Boobies nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands...
Paracas, Peru
Boobies nest on the Ballestas island
Boobies nest on the Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 9, 2011. Ballestas, as with other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, are home of nearly 4 million migratory birds as guanays, boobies and pelicans which excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource, being exported to United States, England and France. Now, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers with an annual production of 20 thousand tons, destined to boost organic agriculture, according to Agrorural, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: POLITICS ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
PERU/
RTR2SLES
October 13, 2011
A worker walks among bags full of bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011. Ballestas,...
Paracas, Peru
A worker walks among bags of bird dung on Ballestas island
A worker walks among bags full of bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 10, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 10, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares(PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS POLITICS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR2SLEV
October 13, 2011
A worker takes a rest while processing bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima October 9, 2011....
Paracas, Peru
A worker rests while processing bird dung on Ballestas island
A worker takes a rest while processing bird dung on Ballestas island, south of Lima October 9, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 9, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS POLITICS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
PERU/
RTR2SLF5
October 13, 2011
A worker takes a rest from bird dung processing on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 11, 2011....
Paracas, Peru
A worker takes a rest from bird dung processing on Ballestas island
A worker takes a rest from bird dung processing on Ballestas island, south of Lima, October 11, 2011. Ballestas, like the other 21 islands along the Peruvian coast, is home to nearly 4 million migratory birds such as guanays, boobies and pelicans whose excrement make up the world's finest natural fertilizer. The bird dung, also known as guano, reached its greatest economic importance in the 19th century as a coveted resource being exported to the United States, England and France. With a current annual production of 20 thousand tons, Peru hopes to benefit mostly small farmers by boosting organic agriculture, the Rural Agrarian Productive Development Program (Agrorural) reported. Picture taken October 11, 2011. REUTERS/Pilar Olivares (PERU - Tags: AGRICULTURE ANIMALS POLITICS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY)
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