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Animals

RTR2UEDU
Monkey Bounty Hunters in India - 24 Nov 2011
Monkey Bounty Hunters in India - 24 Nov 2011
INDIA/
RTR2UEA4
November 24, 2011
A veterinarian places a monkey on the table for sterilization inside an operation theatre at a monkey...
Shimla, India
A veterinarian places a monkey on the table for sterilization inside an operation theatre at a monkey...
A veterinarian places a monkey on the table for sterilization inside an operation theatre at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBG
November 24, 2011
Monkey trappers Raghunath, 28, (R) and Alok, 25, carry monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest...
Shimla, India
Monkey trappers Raghunath and Alok carry monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Monkey trappers Raghunath, 28, (R) and Alok, 25, carry monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBE
November 24, 2011
A monkey looks at the trapped monkeys caught by trappers in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November...
Shimla, India
A monkey looks at the trapped monkeys caught by trappers in Shimla
A monkey looks at the trapped monkeys caught by trappers in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBD
November 24, 2011
An attendant (L) and trapper Alok, 25, carry caught monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest...
Shimla, India
An attendant and trapper Alok carry caught monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
An attendant (L) and trapper Alok, 25, carry caught monkeys to the monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBA
November 24, 2011
Monkey trappers Raghunath, 28, (2nd R) carries a cage as Alok (R), 25, stands next to a cage with trapped...
Shimla, India
Monkey trappers Raghunath carries a cage as Alok stands next to a cage with trapped monkeys in Shimla...
Monkey trappers Raghunath, 28, (2nd R) carries a cage as Alok (R), 25, stands next to a cage with trapped monkeys in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB2
November 24, 2011
Caught monkeys are pictured in their cages inside a van at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
Caught monkeys are pictured in their cages inside a van at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Caught monkeys are pictured in their cages inside a van at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB0
November 24, 2011
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEA8
November 24, 2011
An injured monkey reacts from a cage inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
An injured monkey reacts from a cage inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
An injured monkey reacts from a cage inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH) FOR BEST QUALITY IMAGE: ALSO SEE GM1E7C40Y3N01
INDIA/
RTR2UEAZ
November 24, 2011
A monkey eats a leftover apple from a garbage box in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November...
Shimla, India
A monkey eats a leftover apple from a garbage box in Shimla
A monkey eats a leftover apple from a garbage box in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBC
November 24, 2011
A Langur monkey runs across a road in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The...
Shimla, India
A Langur monkey runs across a road in Shimla
A Langur monkey runs across a road in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH TRANSPORT)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB4
November 24, 2011
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
A monkey looks out from a cage before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 16, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 16, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAS
November 24, 2011
Monkeys lie before their sterilization process to start at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
Monkeys lie before their sterilization process to start at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Monkeys lie before their sterilization process to start at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEBI
November 24, 2011
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB8
November 24, 2011
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAR
November 24, 2011
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAM
November 24, 2011
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
An attendant carries a monkey after its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAF
November 24, 2011
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey through laparoscopy inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and...
Shimla, India
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey through laparoscopy inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and...
A veterinarian sterilizes a monkey through laparoscopy inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAD
November 24, 2011
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAH
November 24, 2011
Attendants examine a monkey before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
Attendants examine a monkey before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Attendants examine a monkey before its sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAB
November 24, 2011
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
Shimla, India
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department...
An attendant tends to an injured monkey inside a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 13, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 13, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEB5
November 24, 2011
An attendant examines monkeys before their sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and...
Shimla, India
An attendant examines monkeys before their sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and...
An attendant examines monkeys before their sterilization at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
INDIA/
RTR2UEAO
November 24, 2011
An attendant examines the teeth of an injured monkey at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
Shimla, India
An attendant examines the teeth of an injured monkey at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife...
An attendant examines the teeth of an injured monkey at a monkey rescue centre run by forest and wildlife department Tutikandi in the northern Indian hill town of Shimla November 14, 2011. The Himachal Pradesh state government is offering a reward of 500 Indian Rupees ($9.50) for every monkey caught by a member of the public in an effort to control their numbers. Monkeys are increasingly seen as a nuisance in places like the capital Shimla, where they harass people and other animals on the roads and rifle through garbage bins looking for food. Monkeys caught are taken to one of four sterilization centres, where they are neutered before being released back into the same area they were trapped in. There were at least 317,000 monkeys in Himachal Pradesh according to the most recent survey of the primates, which was conducted in 2004-05. Picture taken November 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mukesh Gupta (INDIA - Tags: ANIMALS SOCIETY HEALTH)
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