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Religion

RTR1LUUV
Hindus Celebrate Thaipusam Festival - 01 Feb 2007
Hindus Celebrate Thaipusam Festival - 01 Feb 2007
MALAYSIA/
RTR1LTMS
January 31, 2007
A young Hindu devotee takes a shower before starting his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple during...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Young Hindu devotee takes shower before starting pilgrimage to sacred Batu Caves temple during Thaipusam...
A young Hindu devotee takes a shower before starting his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple during Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur on January 31, 2007. Thousands of Hindus, who comprise over eight percent of the 26 million Malaysia's population, participate in the annual Hindu thanksgiving festival, in which devotees subject themselves to painful rituals in a demonstration of faith and penance, held in honour of Lord Subramaniam. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
THAIPUSAM/MALAYSIA
RTR1LUSW
February 01, 2007
A Hindu devotee carries a "kavadi" during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur Febuary 1, 2007. Thaipusam,...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
A Hindu devotee carries a "kavadi" during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur
A Hindu devotee carries a "kavadi" during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur Febuary 1, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. REUTERS/Zainal Abd Halim (MALAYSIA)
MALAYSIA-HINDUS/
RTR1LUP4
February 01, 2007
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar places a burning candle in a banana-leaf boat on a river before starting his...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar places a burning candle in a banana-leaf boat on a river before starting his...
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar places a burning candle in a banana-leaf boat on a river before starting his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur January 31, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. Picture taken on January 31. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
MALAYSIA HINDUS/
RTR1LUQ4
February 01, 2007
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar takes the final step before reaching the 272-step Batu Caves temple on his...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar takes final step as he reaches 272-step Batu Caves temple on his pilgrimage...
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar takes the final step before reaching the 272-step Batu Caves temple on his pilgrimage during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur January 31, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. Picture taken on January 31. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
MALAYSIA-HINDUS/
RTR1LUPI
February 01, 2007
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar, with his tongue pierced with a metal skewer, takes a rest as he carries a...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar takes a rest as he carries a "kavadi" on his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu...
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar, with his tongue pierced with a metal skewer, takes a rest as he carries a "kavadi" or "burden" in Tamil, on his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur January 31, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. Picture taken on January 31. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
SINGAPORE/
RTR1LUR7
February 01, 2007
A metal rod is pierced through the mouth of a Hindu devotee before a procession as part of Thaipusam...
Singapore, Singapore
A metal rod is pierced through the mouth of a Hindu devotee before a procession as part of Thaipusam...
A metal rod is pierced through the mouth of a Hindu devotee before a procession as part of Thaipusam festival in Singapore February 1, 2007. Hindus in Singapore mark the festival on Thursday with various rituals of penance and thanksgiving, including shaving their hair and piercing various parts of their bodies. REUTERS/Tim Chong (SINGAPORE)
MALAYSIA HINDUS/
RTR1LUPS
February 01, 2007
A Hindu priest pierces a metal skewer into Uthaya Kumar's (L) tongue as he carries a "kavadi", a kind...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
A Hindu priest pierces a metal skewer into Uthaya Kumar's tongue as he carries a "kavadi" before his...
A Hindu priest pierces a metal skewer into Uthaya Kumar's (L) tongue as he carries a "kavadi", a kind of portable wooden altar, before his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur January 31, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. Picture taken on January 31. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
MALAYSIA-HINDUS/
RTR1LUQK
February 01, 2007
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar (L) prepares offerings before ending his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar prepares offerings before ending pilgrimage to Batu Caves temple during Thaipusam...
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar (L) prepares offerings before ending his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur January 31, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. Picture taken on January 31. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
MALAYSIA-HINDUS/
RTR1LUPX
February 01, 2007
Accompanied by his parents, Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar, with his tongue pierced with a metal skewer and...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar, with tongue pierced with metal skewer and carrying "kavadi", arrives at Batu...
Accompanied by his parents, Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar, with his tongue pierced with a metal skewer and carrying a "kavadi", a kind of portable wooden altar, arrives at the sacred Batu Caves temple during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur January 31, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. Picture taken on January 31. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
THAIPUSAM/MALAYSIA
RTR1LUSZ
February 01, 2007
A Hindu devotee gets his tongue pierced with a metal skewer during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
A Hindu devotee gets his tongue pierced with a metal skewer during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur...
A Hindu devotee gets his tongue pierced with a metal skewer during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur Febuary 1, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. REUTERS/Zainal Abd Halim (MALAYSIA)
SINGAPORE/
RTR1LUR5
February 01, 2007
A Chinese Hindu devotee touches another Chinese Hindu devotee's feet as a sign of respect as he wears...
Singapore, Singapore
A Hindu Chinese devotee touches another devotee's feet as a sign of respect as he wears nail-studded...
A Chinese Hindu devotee touches another Chinese Hindu devotee's feet as a sign of respect as he wears nail-studded sandals during a procession as part of Thaipusam festival in Singapore February 1, 2007. Hindus in Singapore mark the festival on Thursday with various rituals of penance and thanksgiving, including shaving their hair and piercing various parts of their bodies. REUTERS/Tim Chong (SINGAPORE)
MALAYSIA-HINDUS/
RTR1LUQL
February 01, 2007
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar recites a prayer before starting his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar recites a prayer before starting his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple...
Hindu devotee Uthaya Kumar recites a prayer before starting his pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur January 31, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. Picture taken on January 31. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
SINGAPORE/
RTR1LURA
February 01, 2007
Metal hooks are attached to a Hindu devotee before a procession as part of Thaipusam festival in Singapore...
Singapore, Singapore
Metal hooks are attached to a Hindu devotee before a procession as part of Thaipusam festival in Singapore...
Metal hooks are attached to a Hindu devotee before a procession as part of Thaipusam festival in Singapore February 1, 2007. Hindus in Singapore mark the festival on Thursday with various rituals of penance and thanksgiving, including shaving their hair and piercing various parts of their bodies. REUTERS/Tim Chong (SINGAPORE)
MALAYSIA/
RTR1LTMX
January 31, 2007
With milkpots on their head, a Hindu family recite a prayer before starting their pilgrimage to the sacred...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Hindu family recite prayer before starting pilgrimage to sacred Batu Caves temple during Thaipusam in...
With milkpots on their head, a Hindu family recite a prayer before starting their pilgrimage to the sacred Batu Caves temple during Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur on January 31, 2007. Thousands of Hindus, who comprise over eight percent of the 26 million Malaysia's population, participate in the annual Hindu thanksgiving festival, in which devotees subject themselves to painful rituals in a demonstration of faith and penance, held in honour of Lord Subramaniam. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
THAIPUSAM/MALAYSIA
RTR1LUTA
February 01, 2007
A Hindu devotee with his cheeks pierced with a metal skewer pulls a "kavadi" during the Thaipusam festival...
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
A Hindu devotee with his cheeks pierced with a metal skewer pulls a "kavadi" during the Thaipusam festival...
A Hindu devotee with his cheeks pierced with a metal skewer pulls a "kavadi" during the Thaipusam festival in Kuala Lumpur Febuary 1, 2007. Thaipusam, named for the Tamil month of Thai, is celebrated in the 10th month of the Hindu calendar, and marks the triumph of good over evil. While still observed in parts of south India, the festival finds fervent adherents among the ethnic Indian minority in mostly-Muslim Malaysia, which numbers about eight percent of a population of roughly 26 million. REUTERS/Zainal Abd Halim (MALAYSIA)
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