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RTR3EVV9 
The Whale Shark Feeders - 12 Mar 2013 
Photographer David Loh dived with whale sharks and documented the feeding process of the world's biggest fish in Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu. Tan-awan used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline by fishermen who handfeed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. 
PHILIPPINES-WHALESHARKS/
RTR3EVGV 
March 12, 2013 
A sign advertising whale shark watching is pictured as a tricycle passes by in the village of Tan-awan,... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A sign advertising whale shark watching is pictured as a tricycle passes by in the village of Tan-awan... 
A sign advertising whale shark watching is pictured as a tricycle passes by in the village of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu February 27, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural.Picture taken February 27, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
Fishermen pull their boat on the beach in Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu,... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
Fishermen pull their boat on the beach in Tan-awan 
Fishermen pull their boat on the beach in Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, February 27, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 27, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
Fishermen gather to share daily earnings from the whale shark watching in Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
Fishermen gather to share daily earnings from the whale shark watching in Tan-awan 
Fishermen gather to share daily earnings from the whale shark watching in Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
Packets of "uyap", small shrimp, which are used by fishermen to feed whale sharks, are loaded onto a... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
Packets of "uyap", small shrimp, which are used by fishermen to feed whale sharks, are loaded onto a... 
Packets of "uyap", small shrimp, which are used by fishermen to feed whale sharks, are loaded onto a feeder boat on the beach in Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, February 28, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
Fisherman Roy Lagahid, 16, pushes away a juvenile whale shark looking for food as he sits on a paddleboat... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
Fisherman Lagahid pushes away a juvenile whale shark looking for food as he sits on a paddleboat off... 
Fisherman Roy Lagahid, 16, pushes away a juvenile whale shark looking for food as he sits on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu February 28, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural.
Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A juvenile whale shark approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A juvenile whale shark approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan 
A juvenile whale shark approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu February 28, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A juvenile whale shark eats "uyap", small shrimps, fed to it by a fisherman on a paddleboat off the beach... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A juvenile whale shark eats "uyap", small shrimps, fed to it by a fisherman on a paddleboat off the beach... 
A juvenile whale shark eats "uyap", small shrimps, fed to it by a fisherman on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, in Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu February 28, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A juvenile whale shark approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, in Oslob, in the... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A juvenile whale shark approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan 
A juvenile whale shark approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, in Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu February 28, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A whale shark approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A whale shark approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan 
A whale shark approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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March 12, 2013 
A whale shark feeds next to a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A whale shark feeds next to a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan 
A whale shark feeds next to a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A whale shark feeds next to a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A whale shark feeds next to a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan 
A whale shark feeds next to a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A whale shark approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A whale shark approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan 
A whale shark approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A whale shark hits a snorkeler with its tail after he swam too close to it off the beach of Tan-awan,... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A whale shark hits a snorkeler with its tail after he swam too close to it off the beach of Tan-awan 
A whale shark hits a snorkeler with its tail after he swam too close to it off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, February 28, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A snorkeler swims next to a juvenile whale shark off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A snorkeler swims next to a juvenile whale shark off the beach of Tan-awan 
A snorkeler swims next to a juvenile whale shark off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu February 28, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
Whale sharks looking for food approach paddleboats off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
Whale sharks looking for food approach paddleboats off the beach of Tan-awan 
Whale sharks looking for food approach paddleboats off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A scuba diver swims near a whale shark as it approaches a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob,... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A scuba diver swims near a whale shark as it approaches a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan 
A scuba diver swims near a whale shark as it approaches a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, March 1 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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March 12, 2013 
Snorkelers swim next to a juvenile whale shark as it approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach... 
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Snorkelers swim next to a juvenile whale shark as it approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach... 
Snorkelers swim next to a juvenile whale shark as it approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu February 28, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
Snorkelers swim next to a juvenile whale shark as it approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
Snorkelers swim next to a juvenile whale shark as it approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach... 
Snorkelers swim next to a juvenile whale shark as it approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu February 28, 2013. TTan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A snorkeler swims next to a juvenile whale shark as it approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach... 
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A snorkeler swims next to a juvenile whale shark as it approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach... 
A snorkeler swims next to a juvenile whale shark as it approaches a feeder on a paddleboat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu February 28, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken February 28, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A whale shark swims looking for food off the coast of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A whale shark swims looking for food off the coast of Tan-awan 
A whale shark swims looking for food off the coast of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
Snorkelers swim next to a whale shark as it approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob,... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
Snorkelers swim next to a whale shark as it approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan 
Snorkelers swim next to a whale shark as it approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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March 12, 2013 
A snorkeler swims next to a whale shark as it is fed from a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob,... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A snorkeler swims next to a whale shark as it is fed from a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan 
A snorkeler swims next to a whale shark as it is fed from a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
A scuba diver swims next to a whale shark as it is fed from a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan,... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
A scuba diver swims next to a whale shark as it is fed from a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan 
A scuba diver swims next to a whale shark as it is fed from a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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March 12, 2013 
Fisherman Jersen Soriano pushes his paddleboat at dawn to search for and feed whale sharks off the beach... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
Fisherman Soriano pushes his paddleboat at dawn to search for and feed whale sharks off the beach of... 
Fisherman Jersen Soriano pushes his paddleboat at dawn to search for and feed whale sharks off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: SOCIETY ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

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PHILIPPINES-WHALESHARKS/
RTR3EVHO 
March 12, 2013 
Fishermen wearing Tan-awan Oslob Sea Warden Fishermen's Association (TOSWFA) t-shirts pray before the... 
OSLOB, Philippines 
Fishermen wearing TOSWFA t-shirts pray before the start of their working day in Tan-awan 
Fishermen wearing Tan-awan Oslob Sea Warden Fishermen's Association (TOSWFA) t-shirts pray before the start of their working day in Tan-awan, Oslob in the Philippines island of Cebu, March 1, 2013. Tan-awan, in the southern Philippines island of Cebu, used to be a sleepy village that never saw tourists unless they were lost or in transit. Yet now they flock there by the hundreds - to swim with whale sharks, the world's largest fish. Whale sharks are lured to the Tan-awan coastline of the Oslob district by fishermen who hand feed them small shrimp, drawing divers and snorkelers to see the highly sought-after animals, known as gentle giants of the sea. But the practice has sparked fierce debate on the internet and among biologists, who decry it as unnatural. Picture taken March 1, 2013. REUTERS/David Loh (PHILIPPINES - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY RELIGION)

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