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Technology 

RTR4TDYI 
Bionic People - 04 Jun 2015 
Technological innovations that combine man with machine. 
SPAIN-TECHNOLOGY/
RTR4T898 
March 13, 2015 
Nigel Ackland uses his myoelectric hand as he makes a speech during the Singularity University Summit... 
Seville, Spain 
Nigel Ackland uses his myoelectric hand as he makes a speech during the Singularity University Summit... 
Nigel Ackland uses his myoelectric hand as he makes a speech during the Singularity University Summit in the Andalusian capital of Seville March 13, 2015. Ackland was a precious metals smelter before being involved in a severe workplace injury that led to the amputation of his arm. Recently, he has been fitted with a myoelectric prosthetic hand. REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) 
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J08W 
March 28, 2014 
Allan Kozlowski (L), assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Kozlowski and Voigt adjust a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit before therapy session with Samuels... 
Allan Kozlowski (L), assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, and Alexandra Voigt, a clinical research coordinator and therapist, adjust a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit before a therapy session with 22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him, at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York March 26, 2014. ReWalk, made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Kozlowski, whose patients are working with the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS) 
USA-HEALTH/
RTR4YP5E 
June 03, 2015 
Terrence Karpowicz shows off his prototype bionic leg at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago in Chicago,... 
Chicago, UNITED STATES 
Terrence Karpowicz shows off his prototype bionic leg at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago in Chicago... 
Terrence Karpowicz shows off his prototype bionic leg at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, United States, June 3, 2015. REUTERS/Jim Young
USA/
RTR3M9OA 
April 22, 2014 
Vietnam veteran Fred Downs gives a thumbs up during a demonstration of modular prosthetic arm technology... 
Washington, UNITED STATES 
Vietnam veteran Downs gives a thumbs up during a demonstration of modular prosthetic arm technology developed... 
Vietnam veteran Fred Downs gives a thumbs up during a demonstration of modular prosthetic arm technology developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) at the Pentagon in Washington April 22, 2014.
REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS HEALTH) 
HEALTH-HEART/PUMP
RTXTCDZ 
October 12, 2010 
Dan Roth poses for a portrait displaying his surgery scar and holding the batteries for his Heartmate... 
Norwood, UNITED STATES 
To match Special Report HEALTH-HEART/PUMP 
Dan Roth poses for a portrait displaying his surgery scar and holding the batteries for his Heartmate II Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) at his home in Norwood, Massachusetts September 23, 2010. The device, implanted inside the patient's chest and powered by external, rechargeable batteries connected by a cable coming out of the patient's side, pumps blood through the circulatory system on a continuous basis, taking over most of the heart's work. Picture taken September 23. To match Special Report HEALTH-HEART/PUMP REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCI TECH) 
JAPAN/
RTR3RSJQ 
June 02, 2014 
An employee of ActiveLink Co. established under the intrapreneurship of Panasonic Corp, demonstrates... 
Tokyo, Japan 
An ActiveLink Co. employee demonstrates the ARM01 in Tokyo 
An employee of ActiveLink Co. established under the intrapreneurship of Panasonic Corp, demonstrates ARM01, called 'Raku Vest', jointly developed with Kubota Corp., in Tokyo June 2, 2014. The ARM01is a robotic exoskeleton developed to help farmers and construction workers. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY BUSINESS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
JAPAN/
RTR3RSI4 
June 02, 2014 
An employee of ActiveLink Co., established under the intrapreneurship of Panasonic Corp, demonstrates... 
Tokyo, Japan 
An ActiveLink employee demonstrates the company's PLL-4 in Tokyo 
An employee of ActiveLink Co., established under the intrapreneurship of Panasonic Corp, demonstrates the company's PowerLoader light PLL-4, the Ninja, in Tokyo June 2, 2014. The PowerLoader is a robotic exoskeleton that is developed to help farmers and construction workers. The Ninja weighs only 15 kg (33 lbs) and it has other variants, including one built to lift objects that weigh up to 220 kg (485 lbs). The system functions by measuring the direction, rotation and force of pressure that a user applies, translating that into the movement of the machine. REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY) 
SPAIN-TECHNOLOGY/
RTR4T87S 
March 13, 2015 
Nigel Ackland gestures with his myoelectric hand as he makes a speech during the Singularity University... 
Seville, Spain 
Nigel Ackland gestures with his myoelectric hand as he makes a speech during the Singularity University... 
Nigel Ackland gestures with his myoelectric hand as he makes a speech during the Singularity University Summit in the Andalusian capital of Seville March 13, 2015. Ackland was a precious metals smelter before being involved in a severe workplace injury that led to the amputation of his arm. Recently, he has been fitted with a myoelectric prosthetic hand. REUTERS/Marcelo del Pozo (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) 
USA-JAPAN/
RTX1AIN6 
April 27, 2015 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr (L) demonstrates an early version of a bionic... 
Cambridge, UNITED STATES 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Herr demonstrates an early version of a bionic limb developed... 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Hugh Herr (L) demonstrates an early version of a bionic limb developed by his biomechatronics lab for Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 27, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
USA-BUSINESS/
RTR4KAY2 
January 06, 2015 
A man shakes hands with a robotic prosthetic hand in the Intel booth at the International Consumer Electronics... 
Las Vegas, UNITED STATES 
A man shakes hands with a robotic prosthetic hand in the Intel booth at the International Consumer Electronics... 
A man shakes hands with a robotic prosthetic hand in the Intel booth at the International Consumer Electronics show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada January 6, 2015. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) 
USA/
RTR39ZM5 
November 04, 2012 
Zac Vawter, a 31-year-old software engineer from Seattle, Washington, climbs to the 103rd story Willis... 
Chicago, UNITED STATES 
Vawter climbs to 103rd story of the Willis Tower using the world's first neural-controlled Bionic leg... 
Zac Vawter, a 31-year-old software engineer from Seattle, Washington, climbs to the 103rd story Willis Tower using the world's first neural-controlled Bionic leg in Chicago, November 4, 2012. According to the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, their Center for Bionic Medicine has worked to develop technology that allows amputees like Vawter to better control prosthetics with their own thoughts. REUTERS/John Gress (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY) 
USA-BOSTON/MARATHON-HOSPITALS
RTR3LNZX 
April 17, 2014 
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins... 
Cambridge, UNITED STATES 
Professor Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins... 
Professor Hugh Herr, who heads the Biomechatronics research group at the MIT Media Lab, stands amid mannequins displaying various bionic limbs his lab has developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts April 4, 2014. The homemade bombs that ripped through the crowd at the finish line of last year's Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring 264, showcased the city's medical talent but also taught valuable lessons in responding to a mass disaster. As victims slowly adjust to life without limbs, a ballroom dance instructor's story inspired the Massachusetts Institute of Technology biophysicist who is a double amputee to return her to the dance floor with a specially designed bionic leg. Picture taken April 4, 2014. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT ATHLETICS SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) 
ARGENTINA-PROSTHETIC/
RTR4J44U 
December 23, 2014 
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, puts on a prosthetic arm at the... 
Santa Fe, Argentina 
Stella Azambullo, who lost her arm in an accident, puts on her prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology... 
Stella Azambullo, who lost her left arm seven years ago in an accident, puts on a prosthetic arm at the Bioparx Health Technology company in Santa Fe, north of Buenos Aires December 18, 2014. The laboratory in the Argentine farm province of Santa Fe has developed what it calls the first prosthetic arm in Latin America to use sensors to respond to nerve impulses at a price that could radically expand the use of such devices. The bionic skeleton of the prosthetic has a flexible claw-like hand consisting of a thumb, index and middle finger. It is covered with a lifelike glove that can sport rings, bracelets, nail polish, anything to lend a normal look while allowing wearers to perform such tasks as writing and washing dishes. Picture taken December 18, 2014. REUTERS/Enrique Marcarian (ARGENTINA - Tags: BUSINESS HEALTH SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) 
USA-REWALK/
RTR3J0H1 
March 28, 2014 
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed... 
New York, UNITED STATES 
Samuels pauses to pose for portrait while walking with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during... 
22-year-old Errol Samuels from Queens, New York, who lost the use of his legs in 2012 after a roof collapsed onto him at an off-campus house party near where he was attending college in upstate New York, pauses to pose for a portrait while walking with a ReWalk electric powered exoskeletal suit during a therapy session at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City March 26, 2014. Made by the Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies, ReWalk is a computer controlled device that powers the hips and knees to help those with lower limb disabilities and paralysis to walk upright using crutches. Allan Kozlowski, assistant professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai hospital, where patients like Samuels are enrolled in his clinical trials of the ReWalk and another exoskeleton, the Ekso (Ekso Bionics) hopes machines like these will soon offer victims of paralysis new hope for a dramatically improved quality of life and mobility. The ReWalk is currently only approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in rehabilitation facilities like at Mount Sinai, as they weigh whether to approve the device for home use as it already is in Europe. Picture taken March 26, 2014. REUTERS/Mike Segar (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY HEALTH BUSINESS) 
USA/
RTR39ZLQ 
November 04, 2012 
Zac Vawter, a 31-year-old software engineer from Seattle, Washington, prepares to climb to the 103rd... 
Chicago, UNITED STATES 
Vawter prepares to climb to 103rd story of Willis Tower using the world's first neural-controlled Bionic... 
Zac Vawter, a 31-year-old software engineer from Seattle, Washington, prepares to climb to the 103rd story of the Willis Tower using the world's first neural-controlled Bionic leg in Chicago, November 4, 2012. According to the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, their Center for Bionic Medicine has worked to develop technology that allows amputees like Vawter to better control prosthetics with their own thoughts. REUTERS/John Gress (UNITED STATES - Tags: HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY) 
SPAIN/
RTR2R1F2 
September 08, 2011 
British cyborg musician and performer Neil Harbisson poses in Palma de Mallorca on the Spanish Balearic... 
Palma De Mallorca, Spain 
British cyborg musician and performer Harbisson poses in Palma de Mallorca on the Balearic island of... 
British cyborg musician and performer Neil Harbisson poses in Palma de Mallorca on the Spanish Balearic island of Mallorca September 9, 2011. Harbisson, who was born with achromatopsia, a condition that only allows him to see in black and white, became in 2004 the first person in the world to be fitted with an eyeborg. The eyeborg works with a head mounted camera that picks up the colours in front of it and converts them in into sound waves. By memorysing the frequencies related to each colour, Harbisson can perceive up to 36 colors. REUTERS/Enrique Calvo (SPAIN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY) 
FINLAND/
RTXD5II 
March 24, 2009 
Finnish computer engineer Jerry Jalava displays a USB drive which he had installed in his prosthetic... 
RIIHIMAKI, Finland 
Computer engineer displays a USB drive installed in his prosthetic finger in Riihimaki 
Finnish computer engineer Jerry Jalava displays a USB drive which he had installed in his prosthetic finger in Riihimaki in this picture taken March 23, 2009. Jalava lost half one of the ring finger on his left hand in a motorcycle accident last May and fitted a small memory stick under the nail of the prosthetic device. Picture taken March 23, 2009. REUTERS/Attila Cser (FINLAND ODDLY SCI TECH IMAGE OF THE DAY TOP PICTURE) 
EYEBORG/
RTXCDG3 
March 05, 2009 
Canada's filmmaker Rob Spence, who lost his right eye when he was a child, shows a prototype of a prosthetic... 
Brussels, Belgium 
Canada's filmmaker Spence shows a prosthetic eye-camera during a conference in Brussels 
Canada's filmmaker Rob Spence, who lost his right eye when he was a child, shows a prototype of a prosthetic eye which will be transformed into a video camera, during a conference in Brussels March 5, 2009. Spence, director and producer in Toronto, said he would use the eye-cam the same way he uses a video camera to carry out the so-called "EyeBorg Project". In using his eye as a wireless video camera, Spence wants to make a documentary about how video and humanity intersect especially with regards to surveillance. REUTERS/Yves Herman (BELGIUM) 
RTRGOFF 
August 26, 1998 
Campbell Aird tests out the Worlds first bionic arm which he has been fitted with at the Princess Margaret... 
United Kingdom 
WORLDS FIRST BIONIC ARM LAUNCHED IN EDINBURGH. 
Campbell Aird tests out the Worlds first bionic arm which he has been fitted with at the Princess Margaret Rose Hospital in Edinburgh August 26. Aird had his right arm amputated 16 years ago when he was diagnosed with a fast spreading muscle cancer.

JJM/CLH/ 
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