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RTR4LQC9
Conservation Fire Camp - 16 Jan 2015
A ballot measure passed last month to ease prison crowding means California is facing the prospect of a severely depleted wildfire protection force.

The state relies on its prison inmate population to make up most of the force but does not take on violent criminals, sex offenders and arsonists. Misdemeanor offenders, with shorter sentences, have long been ineligible because training them is not considered worth the investment.
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEDK
December 17, 2014
Prison inmate Angel Ramirez, 21, reads a book while lying on his bed at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmate Ramirez reads a book while lying on his bed at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa...
Prison inmate Angel Ramirez, 21, reads a book while lying on his bed at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEBW
December 17, 2014
Prison inmates wearing firefighting boots line up for breakfast at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmates wearing firefighting boots line up for breakfast at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35...
Prison inmates wearing firefighting boots line up for breakfast at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEMM
December 17, 2014
A correctional officer eats lunch in front of a mural painted by a prison inmate at Oak Glen Conservation...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
A correctional officer eats lunch in front of a mural painted by a prison inmate at Oak Glen Conservation...
A correctional officer eats lunch in front of a mural painted by a prison inmate at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEC5
December 17, 2014
A prison inmate eats breakfast at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmate eats breakfast at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa
A prison inmate eats breakfast at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY FOOD)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEM7
December 17, 2014
Prison inmates play chess at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014....
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmates play chess at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa
Prison inmates play chess at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IETG
December 17, 2014
A prison inmate cuts out a heart to line a wooden jewelry box he made at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmate cuts out a heart to line a wooden jewelry box he made at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp...
A prison inmate cuts out a heart to line a wooden jewelry box he made at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IERU
December 17, 2014
A prison inmate works out at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014....
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmate works out at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa
A prison inmate works out at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. There are no free weights in typical U.S. prisons. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IES1
December 17, 2014
Prison inmates Gilbert Serrato, 33, (L) and Joshua Mojarro, 28, wait to be assigned to work projects...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmates Serrato and Mojarro wait to be assigned to work projects at Oak Glen Conservation Fire...
Prison inmates Gilbert Serrato, 33, (L) and Joshua Mojarro, 28, wait to be assigned to work projects at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEUV
December 17, 2014
Correctional officer Tim Bruzzesi checks prison inmates' lunch boxes as they walk out of Oak Glen Conservation...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Correctional officer Bruzzesi checks prison inmates' lunch boxes as they walk out of Oak Glen Conservation...
Correctional officer Tim Bruzzesi checks prison inmates' lunch boxes as they walk out of Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 to go to work projects in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEUN
December 17, 2014
Prison inmate Kevin Black, 54, who is in the last 90 days of an eleven-year sentence, clears the path...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmate Black, who is in the last 90 days of an eleven-year sentence, clears the path to lay water...
Prison inmate Kevin Black, 54, who is in the last 90 days of an eleven-year sentence, clears the path to lay water pipes outside Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Black is among thousands of convicted felons who form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEJR
December 17, 2014
Prison inmate Kevin Black, 54, who is in the last 90 days of an eleven-year sentence, looks on as he...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmate Black, who is in the last 90 days of an eleven-year sentence, looks on as he lays water...
Prison inmate Kevin Black, 54, who is in the last 90 days of an eleven-year sentence, looks on as he lays water pipe outside Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Black is among thousands of convicted felons who form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEUI
December 17, 2014
Prison inmates lay water pipe on a work project outside Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa,...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmates lay water pipe on a work project outside Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa...
Prison inmates lay water pipe on a work project outside Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IELF
December 17, 2014
Prison inmates lay water pipe on a work project outside Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa,...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Prison inmates lay water pipe on a work project outside Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa...
Prison inmates lay water pipe on a work project outside Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA
RTR4IEEX
December 17, 2014
A sign indicating fires that prison inmates have been paid for is seen on a window at Oak Glen Conservation...
YUCAIPA, UNITED STATES
Sign indicating fires that prison inmates have been paid for is seen on a window at Oak Glen Conservation...
A sign indicating fires that prison inmates have been paid for is seen on a window at Oak Glen Conservation Fire Camp #35 in Yucaipa, California November 6, 2014. Thousands of convicted felons form the backbone of California's wildfire protection force under a unique and little-known prison labor program. But California may soon find it harder to recruit new inmate firefighters after a ballot measure was passed last month to ease prison crowding by reducing felony sentences to misdemeanor jail terms for most non-violent, low-level offenses, including many drug crimes. That measure will likely diminish the very segment of the inmate population that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, draws upon to fill its wildland firefighting crews. Picture taken November 6. To match Feature USA-FIREFIGHTERS/CALIFORNIA REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
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