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Coronavirus

RTX82FAJ
Unsuited to new era? Fate of formal fashion hangs by a thread
Most people in "white-collar" jobs are working from home, with a newfound love of sweatpants, a trend that some experts expect to outlive the pandemic. And few, if any, weddings or parties are taking place.

This seismic shift in behaviour is having profound repercussions across the supply chain for suits and formal wear, upending a sartorial sector spanning every continent.
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F5G
October 15, 2020
General manager Ettore Piacenza poses for a photograph at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
General manager Ettore Piacenza poses for a photograph at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F5F
October 15, 2020
General manager Ettore Piacenza poses for a photograph at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
General manager Ettore Piacenza poses for a photograph at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F5E
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F5D
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F3W
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F3X
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F3V
October 15, 2020
Fratelli Piacenza wool mill is seen in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
Fratelli Piacenza wool mill is seen in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F3U
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F3K
October 15, 2020
Fratelli Piacenza wool mill is seen in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
Fratelli Piacenza wool mill is seen in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F3D
October 15, 2020
Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill is seen in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020....
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in Northern Italy
Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill is seen in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F2Y
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F2S
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F2D
October 15, 2020
Spools of assorted coloured thread are seen at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
Spools of assorted coloured thread are seen at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F24
October 15, 2020
A yarn spool is seen close to a weaving machine at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
A yarn spool is seen close to a weaving machine at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F25
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F0R
October 15, 2020
Managing Director Silvio Botto Poala poses for a photograph at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
Managing Director Silvio Botto Poala poses for a photograph at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F0I
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F0K
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F0J
October 15, 2020
Managing Director Silvio Botto Poala poses for a photograph at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
Managing Director Silvio Botto Poala poses for a photograph at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82F0L
October 15, 2020
Managing Director Silvio Botto Poala poses for a photograph at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
Managing Director Silvio Botto Poala poses for a photograph at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82EX9
October 15, 2020
Spools of assorted coloured thread are seen at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
Spools of assorted coloured thread are seen at Botto Giuseppe & Figli wool mill in Valdilana, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82EWW
October 15, 2020
General manager Ettore Piacenza poses for a photograph at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
General manager Ettore Piacenza poses for a photograph at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9B
October 15, 2020
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Embroidered cloth is seen on a work bench in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E9A
October 15, 2020
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Cravats and bow ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E99
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E98
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury looks at silk ties displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E97
October 15, 2020
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
London, United Kingdom
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)...
Cloth samples are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E96
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E95
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E94
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury works in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E92
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E91
October 15, 2020
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Silk ties are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E90
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Z
October 15, 2020
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
London, United Kingdom
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row,...
Head Shirt Cutter Tom Bradbury holds a bespoke tailcoat in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Y
October 15, 2020
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
London, United Kingdom
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease...
Bunches of swatches are seen in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8X
October 15, 2020
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
London, United Kingdom
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus...
Handkerchiefs are displayed for sale in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8W
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8V
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8U
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8T
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8S
October 15, 2020
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Finished outfits are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8R
October 15, 2020
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A finished outfit is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8Q
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano checks his look in a mirror at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8P
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8O
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8N
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City,...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano shows off some fabric at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8M
October 15, 2020
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
London, United Kingdom
General view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,...
A general view of Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8L
October 15, 2020
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
London, United Kingdom
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on...
Dege & Skinner Managing Director William Skinner poses for a portrait in the Dege & Skinner tailors on Savile Row, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in London, Britain October 7, 2020. William Skinner is a fifth-generation tailor and the third to run the Savile Row shop Dege & Skinner. Established in 1865, Dege & Skinner is one of only two family-owned Savile Row firms. Its clients include businessmen, generals and royals including Prince Harry, who chose the brand for his wedding uniform. Business has been “quite challenging,” but since reopening in June, the shop has seen “quite a lot” of new customers. “It’s been on their bucket list for a long time,” Skinner said about some of his new customers, who think: “if I get COVID, then I might never do this, so let’s do it now’.” “There’s a whole raft of attitudes out there … feedback we’ve had from some of our clients is ‘we’ve had nothing to spend our money on over the last 3-6 months, so I’m going to buy a new suit’.” Nevertheless, orders for the past six months are about one-quarter of what they would normally be. The company usually makes about 500-600 suits a year, starting at £5,500 each. Picture taken October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8K
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8E
October 15, 2020
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
Ties are pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8F
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8D
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8C
October 15, 2020
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New...
New York, UNITED STATES
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier
A label is pictured in Domenico "Mimmo" Spano's atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E8B
October 15, 2020
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8,...
Biella, Italy
The wool mill crisis during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in northern Italy
An employee works at Fratelli Piacenza wool mill in Pollone, near Biella, northern Italy, October 8, 2020. Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E89
October 15, 2020
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
New York, UNITED STATES
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his...
Domenico "Mimmo" Spano speaks with a scrap book of memories in his lap as he poses for a photo at his atelier in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., October 8, 2020. Spano, a Manhattan-based Italian tailor who goes by the nickname of "Mimmo" and makes suits starting from $5,400, said he was making three to five suits a month now compared to 10 or 15 in good times. But he was not too worried and said he had managed to keep in touch with his customers during lockdown, by phoning them and setting up appointments. He said people still liked to buy clothes from him to shake off the virus gloom, and some of his customers had gained or lost weight during the pandemic, and it was cheaper for them to buy a new suit rather than alter an old one. "What I make over here, no-one needs. This is something somebody buys because they like it, you know? Nobody needs a $5,000 - $6,000 suit. They want to have it. They don't need it. You know what I mean? And I tell the truth when people are saying 'Mimmo, I don't know what I need.' The first thing I say is, 'You don't need anything. What would you like?'" Picture taken October 8, 2020. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E88
October 15, 2020
Wool and sheep producer Micheal Field looks at his merino sheep on the property "Benangaroo" in Jugiong,...
Jugiong, Australia
Wool and sheep producer Micheal Field looks at his merino sheep on the property "Benangaroo" in Jugiong...
Wool and sheep producer Micheal Field looks at his merino sheep on the property "Benangaroo" in Jugiong, New South Wales, Australia October 7, 2020. Picture taken on October 7, 2020. REUTERS/Jill Gralow
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E87
October 15, 2020
Australian sheep and wool producer Dave Young and his working dog Bill are seen on his property "Ferndale"...
BOOKHAM, Australia
Australian sheep and wool producer Dave Young and his working dog are seen on his property in Bookham...
Australian sheep and wool producer Dave Young and his working dog Bill are seen on his property "Ferndale" in Bookham, Yass, New South Wales, Australia October 6, 2020. Picture taken October 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jill Gralow
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E86
October 15, 2020
Merino sheep belonging to Australian sheep and wool producer Dave Young are seen on his property "Ferndale"...
BOOKHAM, Australia
Dave Young's merino sheep are seen on his property "Ferndale" in Bookham
Merino sheep belonging to Australian sheep and wool producer Dave Young are seen on his property "Ferndale" in Bookham, Yass, New South Wales, Australia October 6, 2020. Picture taken with a drone. Picture taken on October 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jill Gralow
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E7Z
October 15, 2020
Merino sheep belonging to Australian sheep and wool producer Dave Young are seen on his property "Ferndale"...
BOOKHAM, Australia
Dave Young's merino sheep are seen on his property "Ferndale" in Bookham
Merino sheep belonging to Australian sheep and wool producer Dave Young are seen on his property "Ferndale" in Bookham, Yass, New South Wales, Australia October 6, 2020. Picture taken with a drone. Picture taken on October 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jill Gralow
HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/SUITS
RTX82E7W
October 15, 2020
Merino sheep belonging to Australian sheep and wool producer Dave Young are seen on his property "Ferndale"...
BOOKHAM, Australia
Merino sheep belonging to Dave Young are seen on his property in Bookham
Merino sheep belonging to Australian sheep and wool producer Dave Young are seen on his property "Ferndale" in Bookham, Yass, New South Wales, Australia October 6, 2020. Picture taken October 6, 2020. REUTERS/Jill Gralow
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